Bible Discussion: We Buried Him In The Garden Because It Was Too Dangerous To Go Out

We Buried Him In The Garden Because It Was Too Dangerous To Go Out
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Norwood Holden
2004-11-10 03:01:33 EST
'Scores of civilians' killed in Falluja


Tuesday 09 November 2004, 23:53 Makka Time, 20:53 GMT


Residents say scores of civilians have been killed





Muhammad Abbud said he watched his nine-year-old son bleed to death at
their Falluja home, unable to take him to hospital as fighting raged
in the streets and bombs rained down on the Iraqi city.


In the midst of a US onslaught and hemmed in by a round-the-clock
curfew, he said he had little choice but to bury his eldest son,
Ghaith, in the garden.

"My son got shrapnel in his stomach when our house was hit at dawn,
but we couldn't take him for treatment," said Abbud, a teacher. "We
buried him in the garden because it was too dangerous to go out. We
did not know how long the fighting would last."

Residents say scores of civilians have been killed or wounded in 24
hours of fighting since US-led forces pushed deep into the city on
Monday evening.

Doctors said people brought in at least 15 dead civilians at the main
clinic in Falluja on Monday. By Tuesday, there were no clinics open,
residents said, and no way to count casualties.

Medical supplies low

US and Iraqi forces seized control of the city's main hospital, across
the Euphrates river from Falluja proper, hours before the onslaught
began.


US forces have been steadily
moving deeper into the city

Overnight US bombardments hit a clinic inside the Sunni Muslim city,
killing doctors, nurses and patients, residents said. US military
authorities denied the reports.

Interim Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi said troops detained 38
fighters entrenched at Falluja hospital and accused doctors there of
exaggerating civilian casualties.

Sami al-Jumaili, a doctor at Falluja hospital, said the city was
running out of medical supplies.

"There is not a single surgeon in Falluja. We had one ambulance hit by
US fire and a doctor wounded. There are scores of injured civilians in
their homes who we can't move," he said by telephone from a house
where he had gone to help the wounded.

"A 13-year-old child just died in my hands."

ICRC voices concern

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said on Tuesday
that it was extremely worried about the fate of people wounded in the
battle for control of the Iraqi city of Falluja.



"The ICRC urges the belligerents to ensure that all those in need of
such care - whether friend or foe - be given access to medical
facilities and that medical personnel and vehicles can function
without hindrance at all times," a statement said.



The organisation said it was "deeply concerned about reports that the
injured cannot receive adequate medical care".



Families flee


Weekend air raids destroyed a clinic funded by an Islamic relief
organisation in the centre of Falluja and a nearby warehouse used to
store medical supplies, witnesses said.


Residents say there is no power
and food supplies are running low

Many families fled the city of 300,000 long before the offensive
began. An official from a Sunni Muslim group with links to some
fighters in Falluja said on Monday only about 60,000 people remained.

Residents say they have no power and are using kerosene lamps at
night. They say they keep to ground floors for safety. Food shops have
been closed for six days.

"My kids are hysterical with fear," said Farhan Salih. "They are
traumatised by the sound but there is nowhere to take them."

US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said on Monday he did not foresee
large numbers of civilian casualties in the assault, saying US forces
were disciplined and precise.

Those words were of little comfort to the Abbud family, sitting in a
house damaged by the bomb that killed their child.

"We just bandaged his stomach and gave him water, but he was losing a
lot of blood. He died this afternoon," said Abbud.



http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/813419D5-CC95-4505-9367-05140111C618.htm

Norwood Holden
2004-11-10 10:33:37 EST
'Scores of civilians' killed in Falluja


Tuesday 09 November 2004, 23:53 Makka Time, 20:53 GMT


Residents say scores of civilians have been killed





Muhammad Abbud said he watched his nine-year-old son bleed to death at
their Falluja home, unable to take him to hospital as fighting raged
in the streets and bombs rained down on the Iraqi city.


In the midst of a US onslaught and hemmed in by a round-the-clock
curfew, he said he had little choice but to bury his eldest son,
Ghaith, in the garden.

"My son got shrapnel in his stomach when our house was hit at dawn,
but we couldn't take him for treatment," said Abbud, a teacher. "We
buried him in the garden because it was too dangerous to go out. We
did not know how long the fighting would last."

Residents say scores of civilians have been killed or wounded in 24
hours of fighting since US-led forces pushed deep into the city on
Monday evening.

Doctors said people brought in at least 15 dead civilians at the main
clinic in Falluja on Monday. By Tuesday, there were no clinics open,
residents said, and no way to count casualties.

Medical supplies low

US and Iraqi forces seized control of the city's main hospital, across
the Euphrates river from Falluja proper, hours before the onslaught
began.


US forces have been steadily
moving deeper into the city

Overnight US bombardments hit a clinic inside the Sunni Muslim city,
killing doctors, nurses and patients, residents said. US military
authorities denied the reports.

Interim Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi said troops detained 38
fighters entrenched at Falluja hospital and accused doctors there of
exaggerating civilian casualties.

Sami al-Jumaili, a doctor at Falluja hospital, said the city was
running out of medical supplies.

"There is not a single surgeon in Falluja. We had one ambulance hit by
US fire and a doctor wounded. There are scores of injured civilians in
their homes who we can't move," he said by telephone from a house
where he had gone to help the wounded.

"A 13-year-old child just died in my hands."

ICRC voices concern

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said on Tuesday
that it was extremely worried about the fate of people wounded in the
battle for control of the Iraqi city of Falluja.



"The ICRC urges the belligerents to ensure that all those in need of
such care - whether friend or foe - be given access to medical
facilities and that medical personnel and vehicles can function
without hindrance at all times," a statement said.



The organisation said it was "deeply concerned about reports that the
injured cannot receive adequate medical care".



Families flee


Weekend air raids destroyed a clinic funded by an Islamic relief
organisation in the centre of Falluja and a nearby warehouse used to
store medical supplies, witnesses said.


Residents say there is no power
and food supplies are running low

Many families fled the city of 300,000 long before the offensive
began. An official from a Sunni Muslim group with links to some
fighters in Falluja said on Monday only about 60,000 people remained.

Residents say they have no power and are using kerosene lamps at
night. They say they keep to ground floors for safety. Food shops have
been closed for six days.

"My kids are hysterical with fear," said Farhan Salih. "They are
traumatised by the sound but there is nowhere to take them."

US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said on Monday he did not foresee
large numbers of civilian casualties in the assault, saying US forces
were disciplined and precise.

Those words were of little comfort to the Abbud family, sitting in a
house damaged by the bomb that killed their child.

"We just bandaged his stomach and gave him water, but he was losing a
lot of blood. He died this afternoon," said Abbud.



http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/813419D5-CC95-4505-9367-05140111C618.htm

Marta
2004-11-10 11:29:29 EST


Norwood Holden wrote:

> 'Scores of civilians' killed in Falluja
>
Norwood, this post of yours made me cry.

Also, I heard the 'Doctors without border'
are leaving or already had left Iraq...though, I do not know why?

>
> Tuesday 09 November 2004, 23:53 Makka Time, 20:53 GMT
>
>
> Residents say scores of civilians have been killed
>
>
>
>
>
> Muhammad Abbud said he watched his nine-year-old son bleed to death at
> their Falluja home, unable to take him to hospital as fighting raged
> in the streets and bombs rained down on the Iraqi city.
>
>
> In the midst of a US onslaught and hemmed in by a round-the-clock
> curfew, he said he had little choice but to bury his eldest son,
> Ghaith, in the garden.
>
> "My son got shrapnel in his stomach when our house was hit at dawn,
> but we couldn't take him for treatment," said Abbud, a teacher. "We
> buried him in the garden because it was too dangerous to go out. We
> did not know how long the fighting would last."
>
> Residents say scores of civilians have been killed or wounded in 24
> hours of fighting since US-led forces pushed deep into the city on
> Monday evening.
>
> Doctors said people brought in at least 15 dead civilians at the main
> clinic in Falluja on Monday. By Tuesday, there were no clinics open,
> residents said, and no way to count casualties.
>
> Medical supplies low
>
> US and Iraqi forces seized control of the city's main hospital, across
> the Euphrates river from Falluja proper, hours before the onslaught
> began.
>
>
> US forces have been steadily
> moving deeper into the city
>
> Overnight US bombardments hit a clinic inside the Sunni Muslim city,
> killing doctors, nurses and patients, residents said. US military
> authorities denied the reports.
>
> Interim Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi said troops detained 38
> fighters entrenched at Falluja hospital and accused doctors there of
> exaggerating civilian casualties.
>
> Sami al-Jumaili, a doctor at Falluja hospital, said the city was
> running out of medical supplies.
>
> "There is not a single surgeon in Falluja. We had one ambulance hit by
> US fire and a doctor wounded. There are scores of injured civilians in
> their homes who we can't move," he said by telephone from a house
> where he had gone to help the wounded.
>
> "A 13-year-old child just died in my hands."
>
> ICRC voices concern
>
> The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said on Tuesday
> that it was extremely worried about the fate of people wounded in the
> battle for control of the Iraqi city of Falluja.
>
>
>
> "The ICRC urges the belligerents to ensure that all those in need of
> such care - whether friend or foe - be given access to medical
> facilities and that medical personnel and vehicles can function
> without hindrance at all times," a statement said.
>
>
>
> The organisation said it was "deeply concerned about reports that the
> injured cannot receive adequate medical care".
>
>
>
> Families flee
>
>
> Weekend air raids destroyed a clinic funded by an Islamic relief
> organisation in the centre of Falluja and a nearby warehouse used to
> store medical supplies, witnesses said.
>
>
> Residents say there is no power
> and food supplies are running low
>
> Many families fled the city of 300,000 long before the offensive
> began. An official from a Sunni Muslim group with links to some
> fighters in Falluja said on Monday only about 60,000 people remained.
>
> Residents say they have no power and are using kerosene lamps at
> night. They say they keep to ground floors for safety. Food shops have
> been closed for six days.
>
> "My kids are hysterical with fear," said Farhan Salih. "They are
> traumatised by the sound but there is nowhere to take them."
>
> US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said on Monday he did not foresee
> large numbers of civilian casualties in the assault, saying US forces
> were disciplined and precise.
>
> Those words were of little comfort to the Abbud family, sitting in a
> house damaged by the bomb that killed their child.
>
> "We just bandaged his stomach and gave him water, but he was losing a
> lot of blood. He died this afternoon," said Abbud.
>
>
>
> http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/813419D5-CC95-4505-9367-05140111C618.htm


Holden
2004-11-10 11:42:10 EST
Marta wrote:



> Norwood Holden wrote:

> > 'Scores of civilians' killed in Falluja
> >
> Norwood, this post of yours made me cry.

> Also, I heard the 'Doctors without border'
> are leaving or already had left Iraq...though, I do not know why?



Because they've bombed all the hospitals and clinics Marta. Doctors,
nurses killed of course.

If this guy in the news story (which I am sure everyone saw on the US /
Brit TV not) had been able to get his son to the hospital it wouldn't have
helped.

The oil must flow. Wasn't there a Geneva Convention or something? In an
ideal world wouldn't a UN be sharing out resources like oil according to
need - or am I just an old commie? Are there any other commies left?

Its good you can still cry.


Marcus Collie
2004-11-10 11:57:47 EST

"Marta" <Marta@seasite.net> wrote in message
news:Jlrkd.177527$%k.33626@pd7tw2no...

>
> Also, I heard the 'Doctors without border'
> are leaving or already had left Iraq...though, I do not know why?
>

Simple really - it is too dangerous for them to stay. Their security cannot
be assured as the insurrgent guerrillas have already proven by taking
hostage aid worker(s).

Marcus



Holden
2004-11-10 12:05:29 EST
Marcus Collie wrote:


> "Marta" <Marta@seasite.net> wrote in message
> news:Jlrkd.177527$%k.33626@pd7tw2no...

> >
> > Also, I heard the 'Doctors without border'
> > are leaving or already had left Iraq...though, I do not know why?
> >

> Simple really - it is too dangerous for them to stay. Their security cannot
> be assured as the insurrgent guerrillas have already proven by taking
> hostage aid worker(s).



That would be a factor. Bombing the hospitals and killing doctors and
nurses could be another factor Marcus?






Marcus Collie
2004-11-10 15:06:55 EST

"Norwood Holden" <postmaster@norwoodholden.force9.co.uk> wrote in message
news:41924a59$0$4004$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net...
> Marcus Collie wrote:
>
>
>> "Marta" <Marta@seasite.net> wrote in message
>> news:Jlrkd.177527$%k.33626@pd7tw2no...
>
>> >
>> > Also, I heard the 'Doctors without border'
>> > are leaving or already had left Iraq...though, I do not know why?
>> >
>
>> Simple really - it is too dangerous for them to stay. Their security
>> cannot
>> be assured as the insurrgent guerrillas have already proven by taking
>> hostage aid worker(s).
>
>
>
> That would be a factor. Bombing the hospitals and killing doctors and
> nurses could be another factor Marcus?
>

Let us have a look at that one shall we?

How many Medicine Sans Frontieres Doctors and Nurses have been killed by
bombing of hospitals?

Answer - NONE.

Your point is therefore, at this time at least, invalid.

MC



Holden
2004-11-10 16:19:11 EST
Marcus Collie wrote:


> "Norwood Holden" <postmaster@norwoodholden.force9.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:41924a59$0$4004$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net...
> > Marcus Collie wrote:
> >
> >
> >> "Marta" <Marta@seasite.net> wrote in message
> >> news:Jlrkd.177527$%k.33626@pd7tw2no...
> >
> >> >
> >> > Also, I heard the 'Doctors without border'
> >> > are leaving or already had left Iraq...though, I do not know why?
> >> >
> >
> >> Simple really - it is too dangerous for them to stay. Their security
> >> cannot
> >> be assured as the insurrgent guerrillas have already proven by taking
> >> hostage aid worker(s).
> >
> >
> >
> > That would be a factor. Bombing the hospitals and killing doctors and
> > nurses could be another factor Marcus?
> >

> Let us have a look at that one shall we?

> How many Medicine Sans Frontieres Doctors and Nurses have been killed by
> bombing of hospitals?

> Answer - NONE.

> Your point is therefore, at this time at least, invalid.



Perhaps, and I am just guessing wildly here, the good Doctors from
Medicine Sans Frontieres would feel more secure working in hospitals and
clinics that have not been bombed along with their previous medical staff.
Nah, I'm sure you have a point. Somewhere!! LOL!!






Norwood Holden
2004-11-11 09:40:50 EST
The Red Cross and Red Crescent expressed concern over the fate of the
wounded, as the government said some of the tens of thousands who fled
were ill and living in cramped conditions.

Up to half the population of 300,000 may have stayed
behind.

In an effort to persuade fighters in the Sunni Muslim city to lay down
their arms, Allawi offered an amnesty to those who had "committed no
major crimes".

The assault on the city - where residents say wounded children are
dying from lack of medical help, food shops are closed and power has
been cut - has angered Muslim clerics.

And in a move that could potentially undermine the planned 27 January
elections, the Association of Muslim Scholars (AMS), urged a boycott.

"The clerics call on the ... people of Iraq to boycott the coming
elections that they want to hold on the remains of the dead and the
blood of the wounded from Iraqi cities like Falluja and others,"
Harith al-Dhari, its top official, said.

The AMS also reported that one of its members, Shaikh Abdul Wahab
al-Janabi, was killed in the Falluja attack.

Iraqi journalist Fadil al-Badrani said many civilians had died in the
bombing of the city and people had resorted to burying their dead in
gardens. Many houses have also been destroyed.

Norwood Holden
2004-11-11 10:36:30 EST
Yes, yes you are correct Marta.

In America the people are the most oppressed in the whole world. They
have NO Freedom of Speech and they have NO Freedom of thought.

This is FACT.

So, imagine their everyday burden, their everyday pain – not allowed
to think in certain ways, not allowed to speak apart from along
prescribed lines.

So much tension, they would go mad.

How can they get relief from the tension?

SIMPLE! They can demonstrate and shout the odds in a controlled way
prescribed by the government.

HOW? What can they be allowed to shout about?

ABORTION! They must oppose it. They are the dainty pro-lifers They are
united in a vent for their anger.

How perfect. The Satanic shepherd thus herds his sheep to a victory
for Satan.

And all the time the RELIGIOUS NUTS forget the most important
commandments:

To love God and therefore each other as they would love themselves,
which of course includes THOU SHALT NOT KILL!

Yet the oppressed psychopathic sheep KILL with their words and KILL
with their votes.

And they wonder why the future holds what it does for them.

WHAT THOU SOWETH ALSO DOTH THOU REAP.


Marta wrote:

> Norwood, very few people thinks for themselves..most listen to what is
> said and forms their opinions based on it or on what they read in the
> press without critical thinking.

> The governments know it and use it to its advantage.

> The political 'game' of fear, real or imagined almost always works!
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