Vegetarian Discussion: Cost Of Vegetarian Foods Vs. Meat-industry Foods

Cost Of Vegetarian Foods Vs. Meat-industry Foods
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M
2007-06-08 00:09:59 EST
I'm looking for the right place to post this, please redirect me if
incorrect...

I'm a meat-eater. Love the stuff. But I do find myself shocked by
videos I have seen and books I have read about how that meat makes its
way to my plate.

I have tried the vegetarian solutions, and am quite satisfied with the
results. There are some great, tasty, products out there that do not
require animal slaughter. Veggie steaks, burgers, etc... taste great!
So... fine, I would be happy to switch over except for one thing...

The vegetarian products cost triple the price! For $10.00 I can buy
enough meat-industry food to feed myself for a good while, but $10.00
of vegetarian food barely fills my stomach!

Why is there this disparity? The vegan movement will go nowhere so
long as it costs so much, in my opinion. It's almost like, "If you've
got the scratch, you can eat well and feel full and morally rewarded.
But if you don't have the scratch, have as many hotdogs as you would
like."

Any thoughts out there?

Thank you.


Pearl
2007-06-08 09:11:55 EST
On Jun 8, 5:09 am, M <matthewmpo...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I'm looking for the right place to post this, please redirect me if
> incorrect...
>
> I'm a meat-eater. Love the stuff. But I do find myself shocked by
> videos I have seen and books I have read about how that meat makes its
> way to my plate.
>
> I have tried the vegetarian solutions, and am quite satisfied with the
> results. There are some great, tasty, products out there that do not
> require animal slaughter. Veggie steaks, burgers, etc... taste great!
> So... fine, I would be happy to switch over except for one thing...
>
> The vegetarian products cost triple the price! For $10.00 I can buy
> enough meat-industry food to feed myself for a good while, but $10.00
> of vegetarian food barely fills my stomach!
>
> Why is there this disparity? The vegan movement will go nowhere so
> long as it costs so much, in my opinion. It's almost like, "If you've
> got the scratch, you can eat well and feel full and morally rewarded.
> But if you don't have the scratch, have as many hotdogs as you would
> like."
>
> Any thoughts out there?
>
> Thank you.

Hello M. My thoughts on what you posted above.

1. Meat is high in fat - even lean meat can be 5-6%.
The flavor is in the fat. Fat is a "primary reinforcer",
meaning that we like it from birth -- fat (and sugar)
represent calories (energy) and the type of fat found
in plant foods, like nuts, seeds, some fruits, legumes
and leafy greens is essential to good health - saturated
fat, found almost exclusively in animal-based 'foods'
is not; animal fat found to be associated with disease.

2. You are to be commended on your consideration,
your efforts to educate yourself on these issues and
your willingness and action based on that knowledge.

3. Seems the (monetary) price of convenience foods,
i.e pizza, lasagne, whether vegetarian or meat are
comparable. Veggie burgers, etc, are still highly
processed, whereas meat burgers and "hotdogs" are
mostly cheap fat and those minced bits n' pieces..
In addition to that, the meat industry is subsidized
to the hilt, unlike horticulture, emphasis on organic.
So, in reality, we are all paying for it, through taxes.
The real cost of meat should be reflected in the price.
Except, life it priceless. Inflicting pain and suffering
on fellow sentient beings not even in the equation..

I suggest you find a local farm that sells produce,
preferably organic, and buy direct, and/or grow some
foods yourself. You could even plant up window pots.
Rather than buying ready-made stuff, get more basic
ingredients and prepare far more wholesome food, and
in quantity, which we need, as well as eating fruits and
nuts. Raw salads are great. (At least grow lettuce. :)
This is a favorite site for recipes and wider horizons:
http://www.living-foods.com/recipes/ .

Enjoy, and to your good health and a kinder world,

'pearl'.


M
2007-06-08 20:30:36 EST
Thank you very much, I will try, what the heck... grow lettuce, eh?
You do understand that I've never successfully kept a house plant for
more than a month :-)

Thanks for the link also.

Matt


Ontheroad
2007-06-12 16:02:55 EST

"M" <matthewmpower@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1181275799.138147.100900@g4g2000hsf.googlegroups.com...
> I'm looking for the right place to post this, please redirect me if
> incorrect...
>
> I'm a meat-eater. Love the stuff. But I do find myself shocked by
> videos I have seen and books I have read about how that meat makes its
> way to my plate.


Ah, another that wishes to ignore the way veggies make it to your plate.
Animals die in every step of production of veggies. And, they die a far
more brutal, inhumane death than any slaughterhouse animal endues.
Tell us how being sliced, diced, shredded and dis-membered in machinery
is preferable to a bolt to the brain. tell us how having your guts
painfully turn
to mush over several days is preferable to a quick bolt to the brain.

Discover the great lie of veg*ns and learn to think for yourself, not
blindly
regurgitate the propaganda spewed by whacko web sites...



M
2007-06-12 22:54:39 EST
> Ah, another that wishes to ignore the way veggies make it to your plate.
> Animals die in every step of production of veggies. And, they die a far
> more brutal, inhumane death than any slaughterhouse animal endues.

> Discover the great lie of veg*ns and learn to think for yourself, not
> blindly regurgitate the propaganda spewed by whacko web sites...

Ok, fine, but care to back these statements up? That's the whole
reason I posted here... to get the info.



Ontheroad
2007-06-12 23:46:51 EST

"M" <matthewmpower@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1181703279.537658.274340@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>> Ah, another that wishes to ignore the way veggies make it to your plate.
>> Animals die in every step of production of veggies. And, they die a far
>> more brutal, inhumane death than any slaughterhouse animal endues.
>
>> Discover the great lie of veg*ns and learn to think for yourself, not
>> blindly regurgitate the propaganda spewed by whacko web sites...
>
> Ok, fine, but care to back these statements up? That's the whole
> reason I posted here... to get the info.
>
>===================
You've seriously never heard of farm machinery, pesticides, and
other poisons being used on animals? What hole have you been
keeping your head in?

Tell us how being sliced, diced, shredded or dis-membered in farm machinery
is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals endure. Tell
us how
having your guts turn to mush over several days is less brutal and inhumane
than
what slaughterhouse animals endure. Tell us how dying from starvation and
predation is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals
endure.
Google some old posts. You'll find that farm fields can have 100s to 1000s
of
animals per acre. that's per acre, not the whole field. Then, when the
numbers
are the highest, you take away all the easy food and cover leaving the ones
that
survived the machines and poisons to die of starvation and predation. And
no,
they cannot just all scurry off to the surrounding areas. Those will
already be at
their natural carry capacity.

Do even a modicum of research off of PeTA and animal rights whacko sites.
Why would you depend on what others tell you instead of doing your own
research? That is, unless you really just wanted to preach, not find out
real data.



Pearl
2007-06-13 06:42:29 EST
On Jun 13, 4:46 am, "ontheroad" <s...@stop.com> wrote:
> "M" <matthewmpo...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:1181703279.537658.274340@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...>> Ah, another that wishes to ignore the way veggies make it to your plate.
> >> Animals die in every step of production of veggies. And, they die a far
> >> more brutal, inhumane death than any slaughterhouse animal endues.
> >> Discover the great lie of veg*ns and learn to think for yourself, not
> >> blindly regurgitate the propaganda spewed by whacko web sites...
>
> > Ok, fine, but care to back these statements up? That's the whole
> > reason I posted here... to get the info.
>
> >===================
>
> You've seriously never heard of farm machinery, pesticides, and
> other poisons being used on animals? What hole have you been
> keeping your head in?

Say you from hole you keep yours in, petter, that prevents you from
acknowledging the holocaust of wildlife for the meat industry, killer.

> Tell us how being sliced, diced, shredded or dis-membered in farm machinery
> is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals endure.

It is common for animals to be sliced and dismembered still conscious
in
your blood-drenched hell, etter. It also happens to them while being
raised.

> Tell
> us how
> having your guts turn to mush over several days is less brutal and inhumane
> than
> what slaughterhouse animals endure. Tell us how dying from starvation and
> predation is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals
> endure.
> Google some old posts. You'll find that farm fields can have 100s to 1000s
> of
> animals per acre. that's per acre, not the whole field. Then, when the
> numbers
> are the highest, you take away all the easy food and cover leaving the ones
> that
> survived the machines and poisons to die of starvation and predation. And
> no,
> they cannot just all scurry off to the surrounding areas. Those will
> already be at
> their natural carry capacity.
>
> Do even a modicum of research off of PeTA and animal rights whacko sites.
> Why would you depend on what others tell you instead of doing your own
> research? That is, unless you really just wanted to preach, not find out
> real data.

You've been asked for verifiable evidence to back up your spew, etter.

Predictably, you've just repeated your rant. Show us your "real data"
with regards to collateral deaths due to shredding, dicing, slicing,
etc.

As for deaths due to pesticides, that is common-knowledge. Thank
you for your support for organic horticulture. ..Except, you ignore
it.



Pearl
2007-06-13 06:59:12 EST
On Jun 13, 4:46 am, "ontheroad" <s...@stop.com> wrote:

>, you take away all the easy food and cover

That definitely occurs with forage crops - hay and silage.
All those "parts of the plants that are inedible to humans".

'Historically, soil surface cover from crop residue has been
known to reduce rainfall energy responsible for soil erosion.
The primary benefits of crop residues are reduction of soil
erosion, improvement of soil properties, and reduction of
soil surface sealing effect. Crop residue is increasingly being
used as a major tool to reduce the loss of one of our most
valuable natural resources, topsoil. Conservation practices
encourage the use residue as a protective blanket from rainfall
and to enrich soil structure by increased organic matter content.
..'
http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=166033

'Livestock are directly or indirectly responsible for much of the
soil erosion in the United States, the ecologist determined. On
lands where feed grain is produced, soil loss averages 13 tons
per hectare per year. Pasture lands are eroding at a slower pace,
at an average of 6 tons per hectare per year. But erosion may
exceed 100 tons on severely overgrazed pastures, and 54
percent of U.S. pasture land is being overgrazed. '
http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/Aug97/livestock.hrs.html

'The grass on the other side.

The future's bright, the future's green with the growing popularity
of vegan organic farming

Food scares, health concerns, pesticide problems, environmental
worries and animal welfare issues have brought farming methods
into the spotlight. Most farmers are dependent on chemicals and
animal by-products - and even those specialising in organic farming
use animal manures and slaughterhouse by-products. This presents
a difficult dilemma for vegans who refuse animal-derived food yet
are still linked to the meat industry by their seemingly innocent
groceries. However, despite popular beliefs, animals aren't
necessary to agriculture.

The number of farmed animals in the world has quadrupled in the
last 50 years, and food production no longer nurtures the land.
Both animals and soil are pushed to their limits to satisfy the
West's demand for animal products and profits. At present modern
agriculture is far from sustainable and the meat industry directly
contributes to all the major environmental catastrophes:

*Rainforests are still being chopped down at an alarming rate either
for grazing or to grow crops to feed to animals.

*Crops (mostly grown for animal feed) are doused in pesticides and
fertilisers that leach into waterways and cause massive pollution.

*The increased number of animals means more manure, which
contributes to acid rain and river and lake pollution - rendering
drinking water unsafe.

*Soil is pushed beyond its fertility limits, is not replenished or
fallowed and becomes prone to erosion.

*Oceans are being destroyed by over-fishing, which is
devastating entire marine ecosystems, while coastal fish farms
are causing extensive pollution and wildlife decline.

*Growing feed for livestock requires intense use of synthetic
fertilisers and thus causes the release of nitrous oxide into the
atmosphere.

*Producing feed and heating buildings that house animals uses
fossil fuels, emitting CO2. And the decomposition of liquid
manure releases large amounts of methane as well as forming
nitrous oxide - all of which are contributing significantly to
global warming.

Millions of consumers in the West are dying from diseases such
as heart attacks, strokes, diabetes and cancer, caused by eating
animal products, while the world's poor are dying from diseases
of poverty. Children in the developing world starve next to fields
of fodder destined for export as animal feed, to support the rich,
meat-hungry cultures. Livestock farming is generally inefficient:
an area of land the size of five football pitches will grow enough
meat to feed two people; or maize to feed 10; or grain to feed 24;
or soya to feed 61. If everyone in the world ate the typical US
meat-centred diet (where 35% of calories come from animal
products), the world could support only 2.5 billion people. On a
vegetarian diet all 6 billion of us could be fed healthily. The world
can feed less than half its present population on a meat-based diet.

In order to feed the world it is imperative that vegan organic
farming becomes widespread.

But it's not all bad news!

Recent years has seen a growth in awareness and popularity of
vegan organic farming. Vegan-organics is any system of
cultivation that avoids artificial chemicals and sprays, GMOs,
livestock manures and animal remains from slaughterhouses or
fish processing etc. Fertility is maintained by vegetable composts,
green manures, crop rotation, mulches, and any other method
that is sustainable, ecologically viable and not dependent upon
animal exploitation. This ensures long-term fertility, and
wholesome food for our and future generations.

Organic growing involves treating the soil, the growing environment,
and the world environment as a resource to be husbanded for future
generations, rather than exploited in the short term. The maxim of
vegan organic growing is to feed the soil and the soil will feed the
plants.

Instead of scattering animal manures and slaughterhouse waste
products on the land the above time-honoured techniques can be
used to grow over 60 different vegetables in the UK climate.
Perennial crops including perennial vegetables like artichokes and
asparagus, perennial soft fruit like strawberries, raspberries and
currants and tree crops like apples, cherries and nuts can also be
grown successfully.

The vegan organic system finally rejects the long-standing reliance
on animal products. It offers a different quality of food that stands
a
part from the industrially produced, money-led foodstuffs available
now. Even small scale 'grow your own' farming can help promote
awareness of self-sufficiency and give something back to nature -
whether it's a multi-functional allotment, a small vegetable patch in
your back garden or just a window box containing a few herbs!
It's easier than you think!

A vision for the future

"If it was up to you there'd be no animals in the fields anymore!"
Vegans often hear this ignorant argument from meat-eaters who
like to see their food as well as eat it. True, farmed animals are
bred for people to eat and as the demand for meat falls, less
animals will be bred. But instead of being the end of the
countryside as we know it, like many imagine, in fact a huge toll
of suffering would be eliminated and wildlife allowed to recover
from the pressures of the animal industry.

The vast majority of farmed animals are kept in indoor units
where they never see the light of day. Those that are outside
are only kept alive for a fraction of their natural lifespans
before being slaughtered for meat - often in the most barbaric
manner imaginable.

Modern farmed animals have been bred and mutated over
generations to produce as much meat as possible, and have
become a far cry from their wild ancestors. For example birds
are often so obese they can barely walk and suffer from
crippling leg disorders. Dairy cows are bred to produce so
much milk that their udders can become painfully swollen and
infected. Sheep have been genetically manipulated to give birth
earlier in the year, and as a result each year 20 per cent of new
born lambs die within days of birth from sickness, exposure,
malnutrition and disease.

If people ate crops directly we would need far less land for
food production. In the UK, birds, butterflies and wild flowers
would even start to appear. And around the world the ancestors
of today's farm animals could begin to thrive, as they would
once again have space. For example:

*Wild turkeys live in North and Central America. They roost
in trees and roam in woodlands, eating vegetation and insects.
An adult bird can fly up to 50mph.

*Chickens are decended from the red jungle fowl (gallus gallus)
in Asia. Wild hens like to move around almost ceaselessly in
daylight hours. Also they lay only 20 eggs a year and need a
safe, private place for laying.

*It is believed cattle originally descended from the wild auroch,
of Eurasia and North Africa, a species that did not become
extinct until the 17th century. Banteng are a shy species of
wild South East Asian cattle found in hill forests.

*The European Wild Boar is the ancestor of the farmed pig.
They live in forested areas, eating a wide variety of plants
and occasionally small animals and insects. They lived wild
in Britain's woodlands until hunted to extinction in the 17th
century. They can still be found in countries such as Germany
and France.

*Most wild sheep and goats live in mountains but some inhabit
desert grasslands, tropical forests or Arctic tundra. Habitat loss,
hunting and resource competition from farmed animals have
resulted in most species being classed by the IUCN (World
Conservation Union) as threatened, endangered or critical.

Going veggie is a big step, going vegan is huge, and going vegan
organic is even larger than that. Although the option of completely
cruelty free food is available to very few of us at the moment, the
ethos of animal free farming is spreading. And, due to the number
of support groups setting up, anyone who wants to try it
themselves will not be alone.

Support Viva! and help us spread the vegan word. Click here to
join. http://www.viva.org.uk/supporter/membershipform.htm

Another organisation that helps is the Vegan Organic Network:
"Our commitment is to peace and justice for people, animals and
the environment in a sustainable balance. To achieve this we must
change our lifestyles and introduce a philosophy which will
continue to maintain our unique planet. VON attempts to come
to grips with politics and ethics in everyday living."

They provide practical advice on how to start growing your own
food, details of the issues surrounding vegan organic farming
and links to other useful groups. Have a look at their website.
www.veganorganic.net

For more information on the issues raised above see Viva!'s
Planet on a Plate
http://www.viva.org.uk/guides/planetonaplate.htm
and Feed the World guides.
http://www.viva.org.uk/guides/feedtheworld.htm
Also read The Silent Ark.
http://www.viva.org.uk/books/ark/intro.html

Viva! Vegetarians International Voice for Animals
8 York Court, Wilder Street, Bristol BS2 8QH, UK
T: 0117 944 1000 F: 0117 924 4646 E: info @ viva.org.uk
(close spaces to email)
http://www.viva.org.uk/campaigns/other/veganfarming.html


Ontheroad
2007-06-13 08:40:30 EST

"pearl" <lilweed@esatclear.ie> wrote in message
news:1181731349.298357.89650@g37g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> On Jun 13, 4:46 am, "ontheroad" <s...@stop.com> wrote:
>> "M" <matthewmpo...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>>
>> news:1181703279.537658.274340@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...>> Ah,
>> another that wishes to ignore the way veggies make it to your plate.
>> >> Animals die in every step of production of veggies. And, they die a
>> >> far
>> >> more brutal, inhumane death than any slaughterhouse animal endues.
>> >> Discover the great lie of veg*ns and learn to think for yourself, not
>> >> blindly regurgitate the propaganda spewed by whacko web sites...
>>
>> > Ok, fine, but care to back these statements up? That's the whole
>> > reason I posted here... to get the info.
>>
>> >===================
>>
>> You've seriously never heard of farm machinery, pesticides, and
>> other poisons being used on animals? What hole have you been
>> keeping your head in?
>
> Say you from hole you keep yours in, petter, that prevents you from
> acknowledging the holocaust of wildlife for the meat industry, killer.
=============
RPTFLMAO Unlike you, killer, I've never denied that animals die for my
diet and lifestyle.


>
>> Tell us how being sliced, diced, shredded or dis-membered in farm
>> machinery
>> is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals endure.
>
> It is common for animals to be sliced and dismembered still conscious
> in
> your blood-drenched hell, etter. It also happens to them while being
> raised.
>
>> Tell
>> us how
>> having your guts turn to mush over several days is less brutal and
>> inhumane
>> than
>> what slaughterhouse animals endure. Tell us how dying from starvation
>> and
>> predation is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals
>> endure.
>> Google some old posts. You'll find that farm fields can have 100s to
>> 1000s
>> of
>> animals per acre. that's per acre, not the whole field. Then, when the
>> numbers
>> are the highest, you take away all the easy food and cover leaving the
>> ones
>> that
>> survived the machines and poisons to die of starvation and predation.
>> And
>> no,
>> they cannot just all scurry off to the surrounding areas. Those will
>> already be at
>> their natural carry capacity.
>>
>> Do even a modicum of research off of PeTA and animal rights whacko sites.
>> Why would you depend on what others tell you instead of doing your own
>> research? That is, unless you really just wanted to preach, not find out
>> real data.
>
> You've been asked for verifiable evidence to back up your spew, etter.
===============
It's been posted many many times, hypocrite. Do try to read for
comprehension sometime, killer.

>
> Predictably, you've just repeated your rant. Show us your "real data"
> with regards to collateral deaths due to shredding, dicing, slicing,
> etc.
>
> As for deaths due to pesticides, that is common-knowledge. Thank
> you for your support for organic horticulture. ..Except, you ignore
> it.
====================
No, fool, it is you that ignores the truth. As I have shown many many
times, organic
does NOT mean chemical-free, nor cruelty-free, hypocrite. And, the
chemicals
used in organic crops can be, and are just as toxic, or even more toxic than
the
synthetic counterpart. Too bad you're too willfully ignorant to again read
for
comprehension, killer.

>
>



Pearl
2007-06-13 10:17:44 EST
ontheroad wrote:

> "pearl" <lilweed@esatclear.ie> wrote in message
> news:1181731349.298357.89650@g37g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> > On Jun 13, 4:46 am, "ontheroad" <s...@stop.com> wrote:
> >> "M" <matthewmpo...@gmail.com> wrote in message
> >>
> >> news:1181703279.537658.274340@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...>> Ah,
> >> another that wishes to ignore the way veggies make it to your plate.
> >> >> Animals die in every step of production of veggies. And, they die a
> >> >> far
> >> >> more brutal, inhumane death than any slaughterhouse animal endues.
> >> >> Discover the great lie of veg*ns and learn to think for yourself, not
> >> >> blindly regurgitate the propaganda spewed by whacko web sites...
> >>
> >> > Ok, fine, but care to back these statements up? That's the whole
> >> > reason I posted here... to get the info.
> >>
> >> >===================
> >>
> >> You've seriously never heard of farm machinery, pesticides, and
> >> other poisons being used on animals? What hole have you been
> >> keeping your head in?
> >
> > Say you from hole you keep yours in, petter, that prevents you from
> > acknowledging the holocaust of wildlife for the meat industry, killer.
> =============
> RPTFLMAO Unlike you, killer, I've never denied that animals die for my
> diet and lifestyle.

I have addressed every issue that has been raised, but
you've repeatedly snipped and ignored evidence of the
meat industry's terrible impact on wildlife and habitat.

> >> Tell us how being sliced, diced, shredded or dis-membered in farm
> >> machinery
> >> is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals endure.
> >
> > It is common for animals to be sliced and dismembered still conscious
> > in your blood-drenched hell, etter. It also happens to them while being
> > raised.

Why do you ignore this, etter? Acknowledge these harms.
Acknowledge the suffering of *billions* of animals for meat.

> >> Tell
> >> us how
> >> having your guts turn to mush over several days is less brutal and
> >> inhumane
> >> than
> >> what slaughterhouse animals endure. Tell us how dying from starvation
> >> and
> >> predation is less brutal and inhumane than what slaughterhouse animals
> >> endure.
> >> Google some old posts. You'll find that farm fields can have 100s to
> >> 1000s
> >> of
> >> animals per acre. that's per acre, not the whole field. Then, when the
> >> numbers
> >> are the highest, you take away all the easy food and cover leaving the
> >> ones
> >> that
> >> survived the machines and poisons to die of starvation and predation.
> >> And
> >> no,
> >> they cannot just all scurry off to the surrounding areas. Those will
> >> already be at
> >> their natural carry capacity.
> >>
> >> Do even a modicum of research off of PeTA and animal rights whacko sites.
> >> Why would you depend on what others tell you instead of doing your own
> >> research? That is, unless you really just wanted to preach, not find out
> >> real data.
> >
> > You've been asked for verifiable evidence to back up your spew, etter.
> ===============
> It's been posted many many times, hypocrite. Do try to read for
> comprehension sometime, killer.

What's been posted? About pesticides? Animals in fields?

> > Predictably, you've just repeated your rant. Show us your "real data"
> > with regards to collateral deaths due to shredding, dicing, slicing,
> > etc.

Well? Let's see you support your whacko propaganda, rick.

> > As for deaths due to pesticides, that is common-knowledge. Thank
> > you for your support for organic horticulture. ..Except, you ignore
> > it.
> ====================
> No, fool, it is you that ignores the truth. As I have shown many many
> times, organic
> does NOT mean chemical-free, nor cruelty-free, hypocrite. And, the
> chemicals
> used in organic crops can be, and are just as toxic, or even more toxic than
> the
> synthetic counterpart.

'Pesticide residues

Over 400 pesticides are permitted for use in the UK. The incidence and
levels of pesticide residues on foods are monitored annually. 28.6% of
all foods tested in 1999 were found to contain pesticide residues, and
48% of all fruit and vegetables tested (MAFF 2000). The levels found
are typically very low. Just 1.6% of all foods and 3% of fruit and
vegetables exceeded the MRL - maximum residue limit - in 1999.

Seven pesticides are permitted for restricted use in organic farming.
Organic produce is usually found to contain no pesticide residues.
When
residues are present, they are typically of significantly lower
incidence and
levels than those found in non-organic produce (MAFF 1999, Sch�pbach
1986, Reinhardt & Wolf 1986), and result mostly from environmental
pollution from non-organic agriculture (Woese et al. 1997, Bitaud
2000).

'Rigorous safety assessments' are made of all pesticides and it is
asserted
that these incidences and levels do not represent a threat to food
safety
(FSA 2001). However no such 'rigorous safety assessment' has or can
be made of the infinite number of mixtures of compounds consumers are
typically exposed to. Individual samples contained up to seven
different
pesticides in 1999. Synergies resulting in greatly increased toxicity
of
pesticides and other agricultural compounds have been observed (Boyd
et al. 1990, Porter et al. 1993, Porter et al. 1999, Thiruchelvam et
al. 2000).

Dietary exposure to pesticide residues has been linked to
gastrointestinal
and neurological complaints (Ratner et al. 1983), breast milk
contamination
(Aubert 1975) and some sperm quality parameters (Juhler et al. 1999,
Abell et al. 1994, Jensen et al. 1996). The British Medical
Association
urges a precautionary approach "because the data on risk to human
health
from exposure to pesticides are incomplete" (BMA 1992).
..'
http://www.organic.aber.ac.uk/library/Assessing%20organic%20food%20quality.pdf

'The independent research quoted in this report found substantially
greater levels of both abundance and diversity of species on the
organic farms, as outlined below:
- Plants: Five times as many wild plants in arable fields, 57% more
species, and several rare and declining wild arable species found
only on organic farms.
- Birds: 25% more birds at the field edge, 44% more in-field in
autumn/winter; 2.2 times as many breeding skylarks and higher
skylark breeding rates.
- Invertebrates: 1.6 times as many of the arthropods that comprise
bird food; three times as many non-pest butterflies in the crop areas;
one to five times as many spider numbers and one to two times as
many spider species.
- Crop pests: Significant decrease in aphid numbers; no change in
numbers of pest butterflies.
- Distribution of the biodiversity benefits: Though the field
boundaries
had the highest levels of wildlife, the highest increases were found
in the cropped areas of the fields.
- Quality of the habitats: Both the field boundary and crop habitats
were more favourable on the organic farms. The field boundaries
had more trees, larger hedges and no spray drift.
..'
http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/pn48/pn48p15b.htm

> Too bad you're too willfully ignorant to again read
> for comprehension, killer.

~ Etter's Ode ~

Confined within a closed mind
Apparitions roam vicious in intent
Making me believe, holding me captive
Lys are my truths
MY ignorance is taught
I don't know the truth
I'm not allowed
Confined within this narrow mind

My world is dark and cold
It's always black as night
The only light that I see is that which trickles
throuhg the fog of black Cloud

I sit on a tree stump and look out into the mist
Watching it crate shapes of abominable horrors that
Only appear in the darkest reaches of my mind
Dead trees surround me
Their branches reach for the sky and at me
As if seeking salvation from there mere existence ..

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