Vegetarian Discussion: Poisoned: 400 Of Britain's Lakes

Poisoned: 400 Of Britain's Lakes
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'Mike'
2007-02-11 13:48:01 EST
"pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote in message
news:eqno7c$bdr$1@reader01.news.esat.net...
> Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes

snip all the doom ..............

'It's being so miserable that keeps some people happy'!!

:-))

Mike


--
..........................................................
Royal Naval Electrical Branch Association
www.rnshipmates.co.uk
www.nsrafa.com



Pearl
2007-02-11 13:50:34 EST
Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes

Many of our most famous waters, from the lochs to the Broads, are
being badly polluted. Environment Editor Geoffrey Lean reports

Published: 11 February 2007

Nearly 400 of Britain's most wildlife-rich lakes are being stifled by
pollution, an official study has found. They include most of the
country's best-known and best-loved expanses of water.

>From the Lake District to the Norfolk Broads, from Scotland's
Loch Lomond to Surrey's Frensham Great Pond, from wild
Malham Tarn to suburban Virginia Water, they are being
devastated, mainly by sewage and farming. Some, such as the
haunting Semerwater in the Yorkshire Dales, are so badly affected
that they are virtually dead.

The study, headed by the Environment Agency, covered the 1,047
"most ecologically valuable" of Britain's 14,000 lakes, those either
protected as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), or home to
Britain's most endangered species.

It found that 379 of them are so "degraded" that they are in urgent
need of "rehabilitation". It is now joining with other official bodies
to mount a rescue programme of "lake habitat action plans".

"We all take lakes for granted," said Geoff Phillips, an Environment
Agency ecologist who led the study. "Nonetheless, many of them are
severely stressed as a result of human-induced pressures, to an extent
inevitable on a densely populated island."

Historically lakes have received less attention in clean-up campaigns
than rivers, but they are much more vulnerable because their more
stagnant waters allow pollution to collect and do more damage.

Mostly they are being fed to death by sewage and - especially -
wastes and fertilisers from agriculture. These cause weeds and algae
to flourish, soaking up oxygen from the water and suffocating other
life. And, partly as a result, they are often plagued by alien, invasive
species.

Bassenthwaite Lake, in the north of the Lake District, exemplifies
many of the problems. It is theoretically one of the most protected
water bodies in the country - being designated under the EU Habitats
Directive as an SSSI and as part of the Lake District National Park -
and is Britain's main stronghold of a very rare fish, the slim,
blue-green vendace. But it is still struggling to survive, despite efforts
to rescue it.

For decades, it was overfed by effluent from a local sewage works;
this has now been cleaned up, but phosphorous from the past
pollution still lurks in its sediments. And it is still being contaminated
by septic tanks used by houses around its shores.

More pollution comes from the droppings of the sheep that graze its
catchment. And allowing too many sheep on to the fells make things
worse; overgrazing erodes the soil, bringing it -and the wastes - down
into the lake.

Trees are now being planted to help to stabilise the soil, but the waters
produce blooms of blue-green algae, which can be toxic. And they
encourage an invasive species - the Australian swamp stonecrop,
originally introduced to Britain from Tasmania nearly 100 years ago -
which smothers other organisms.

Windermere, to the south, is struggling against another set of perils.
It, too, is polluted by sewage, augmented by a staggering six million
visitors a year. It also receives run-off from cattle farming. Last year,
its blue-green algal blooms were so bad that notices had to be put
up warning people, and their dogs, not to go into the water.

It, too, has a rare fish - the cold-water Arctic char - but as pollution
deprives the depths of the lake of oxygen in summer it is forced to
swim nearer the surface in waters too warm for it to tolerate.
Meanwhile, roach, an invasive species in this lake, flourish in the
balmier temperatures brought by global warming.

The bonny banks of Loch Lomond similarly wash pollution into the
lake from agriculture, and from fertilised golf courses - and it, too,
is polluted by sewage.

Right across the country, the growth of algae is so bad that it has
completely killed off underwater vegetation in many areas, which
in turn destroys invertebrate life and leads to changes in fish
populations. Some, such as Rollesby Broad and Cockshoot Broad,
are being restored, but still suffer from past pollution. Others, such
as Wroxham Broad, remain in deep trouble.

Surrey's Frensham Great Pond, tucked away in the Home Counties
but with an ecology closer to lakes in the northern uplands, receives
too many substances from earth disturbed by road building and
other developments in its catchment area. By contrast, Malham Tarn,
high in the Yorkshire Dales, has been damaged by nature lovers. A
septic tank in a field studies centre on its shores polluted it for years;
it has also been invaded by Canadian pondweed, probably brought
on an angler's rod or a hiker's boots.

Perhaps the saddest story of all is at Semerwater in Wensleydale -
which, by legend, covers a once-thriving city, cursed after turning
away a poor man seeking food. It, said Dr Stewart Clarke, an
ecologist at Natural England, has "suffered massive enrichment"
from the dung of the cattle raised around it. As a result, he said,
"virtually no submerged plants are left in Semerwater any more".

Norfolk Broads

Polluted by sewage. Phosphorous from sewage works remains
in sediment

Frensham Great Pond, Surrey

Threatened by polluted soil disturbed by road building

Malham Tarn, Yorkshire Dales

Plagued by Canadian pondweed, probably introduced by anglers
or hikers

Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria

Soil contaminated by sheep droppings has washed into the lake

http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2258886.ece



Jim Webster
2007-02-11 14:01:50 EST

"pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote in message
news:eqno7c$bdr$1@reader01.news.esat.net...
> Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes
>

Old story, well known

In broads, too much arable agriculture, too much ploughing
In Lakes, local authorities got away with tipping untreated sewage in lakes
(as did boat owners) but they are finally being reigned in,
Also too many septic tanks in the area round about, but they blame farms
because the planning authority don't want to take the blame for giving all
those planning permissions for caravan sites etc




Pearl
2007-02-11 14:34:44 EST
"Jim Webster" <jim@websterpagebank.freeswerve.co.uk> wrote in message news:5397h2F1rf9sjU1@mid.individual.net...
>
> "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote in message
> news:eqno7c$bdr$1@reader01.news.esat.net...
> > Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes
> >
>
> Old story, well known
>
> In broads, too much arable agriculture, too much ploughing
> In Lakes, local authorities got away with tipping untreated sewage in lakes
> (as did boat owners) but they are finally being reigned in,
> Also too many septic tanks in the area round about, but they blame farms
> because the planning authority don't want to take the blame for giving all
> those planning permissions for caravan sites etc

'Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes

Many of our most famous waters, from the lochs to the Broads, are
being badly polluted. Environment Editor Geoffrey Lean reports

Published: 11 February 2007

Nearly 400 of Britain's most wildlife-rich lakes are being stifled by
pollution, an official study has found. They include most of the
country's best-known and best-loved expanses of water.

>From the Lake District to the Norfolk Broads, from Scotland's
Loch Lomond to Surrey's Frensham Great Pond, from wild
Malham Tarn to suburban Virginia Water, they are being
devastated, mainly by sewage and farming. Some, such as the
haunting Semerwater in the Yorkshire Dales, are so badly affected
that they are virtually dead.

The study, headed by the Environment Agency, covered the 1,047
"most ecologically valuable" of Britain's 14,000 lakes, those either
protected as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), or home to
Britain's most endangered species.

It found that 379 of them are so "degraded" that they are in urgent
need of "rehabilitation". It is now joining with other official bodies
to mount a rescue programme of "lake habitat action plans".

"We all take lakes for granted," said Geoff Phillips, an Environment
Agency ecologist who led the study. "Nonetheless, many of them are
severely stressed as a result of human-induced pressures, to an extent
inevitable on a densely populated island."

Historically lakes have received less attention in clean-up campaigns
than rivers, but they are much more vulnerable because their more
stagnant waters allow pollution to collect and do more damage.

Mostly they are being fed to death by sewage and - especially -
wastes and fertilisers from agriculture. These cause weeds and algae
to flourish, soaking up oxygen from the water and suffocating other
life. And, partly as a result, they are often plagued by alien, invasive
species.

Bassenthwaite Lake, in the north of the Lake District, exemplifies
many of the problems. It is theoretically one of the most protected
water bodies in the country - being designated under the EU Habitats
Directive as an SSSI and as part of the Lake District National Park -
and is Britain's main stronghold of a very rare fish, the slim,
blue-green vendace. But it is still struggling to survive, despite efforts
to rescue it.

For decades, it was overfed by effluent from a local sewage works;
this has now been cleaned up, but phosphorous from the past
pollution still lurks in its sediments. And it is still being contaminated
by septic tanks used by houses around its shores.

More pollution comes from the droppings of the sheep that graze its
catchment. And allowing too many sheep on to the fells make things
worse; overgrazing erodes the soil, bringing it -and the wastes - down
into the lake.

Trees are now being planted to help to stabilise the soil, but the waters
produce blooms of blue-green algae, which can be toxic. And they
encourage an invasive species - the Australian swamp stonecrop,
originally introduced to Britain from Tasmania nearly 100 years ago -
which smothers other organisms.

Windermere, to the south, is struggling against another set of perils.
It, too, is polluted by sewage, augmented by a staggering six million
visitors a year. It also receives run-off from cattle farming. Last year,
its blue-green algal blooms were so bad that notices had to be put
up warning people, and their dogs, not to go into the water.

It, too, has a rare fish - the cold-water Arctic char - but as pollution
deprives the depths of the lake of oxygen in summer it is forced to
swim nearer the surface in waters too warm for it to tolerate.
Meanwhile, roach, an invasive species in this lake, flourish in the
balmier temperatures brought by global warming.

The bonny banks of Loch Lomond similarly wash pollution into the
lake from agriculture, and from fertilised golf courses - and it, too,
is polluted by sewage.

Right across the country, the growth of algae is so bad that it has
completely killed off underwater vegetation in many areas, which
in turn destroys invertebrate life and leads to changes in fish
populations. Some, such as Rollesby Broad and Cockshoot Broad,
are being restored, but still suffer from past pollution. Others, such
as Wroxham Broad, remain in deep trouble.

Surrey's Frensham Great Pond, tucked away in the Home Counties
but with an ecology closer to lakes in the northern uplands, receives
too many substances from earth disturbed by road building and
other developments in its catchment area. By contrast, Malham Tarn,
high in the Yorkshire Dales, has been damaged by nature lovers. A
septic tank in a field studies centre on its shores polluted it for years;
it has also been invaded by Canadian pondweed, probably brought
on an angler's rod or a hiker's boots.

Perhaps the saddest story of all is at Semerwater in Wensleydale -
which, by legend, covers a once-thriving city, cursed after turning
away a poor man seeking food. It, said Dr Stewart Clarke, an
ecologist at Natural England, has "suffered massive enrichment"
from the dung of the cattle raised around it. As a result, he said,
"virtually no submerged plants are left in Semerwater any more".

Norfolk Broads

Polluted by sewage. Phosphorous from sewage works remains
in sediment

Frensham Great Pond, Surrey

Threatened by polluted soil disturbed by road building

Malham Tarn, Yorkshire Dales

Plagued by Canadian pondweed, probably introduced by anglers
or hikers

Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria

Soil contaminated by sheep droppings has washed into the lake

http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2258886.ece





Pete ‹•¿•›
2007-02-11 17:13:01 EST
On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 19:01:50 -0000, "Jim Webster"
<*m@websterpagebank.freeswerve.co.uk> wrote:

>On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 18:50:34 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:
>
>>Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes
>>
>>Many of our most famous waters, from the lochs to the Broads, are
>>being badly polluted. Environment Editor Geoffrey Lean reports
>>
>>Published: 11 February 2007
>>
>>Nearly 400 of Britain's most wildlife-rich lakes are being stifled by
>>pollution, an official study has found. They include most of the
>>country's best-known and best-loved expanses of water.
>>
>>From the Lake District to the Norfolk Broads, from Scotland's
>>Loch Lomond to Surrey's Frensham Great Pond, from wild
>>Malham Tarn to suburban Virginia Water, they are being
>>devastated, mainly by sewage and farming. Some, such as the
>>haunting Semerwater in the Yorkshire Dales, are so badly affected
>>that they are virtually dead.
>>
>>The study, headed by the Environment Agency, covered the 1,047
>>"most ecologically valuable" of Britain's 14,000 lakes, those either
>>protected as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), or home to
>>Britain's most endangered species.
>>
>>It found that 379 of them are so "degraded" that they are in urgent
>>need of "rehabilitation". It is now joining with other official bodies
>>to mount a rescue programme of "lake habitat action plans".
>>
>>"We all take lakes for granted," said Geoff Phillips, an Environment
>>Agency ecologist who led the study. "Nonetheless, many of them are
>>severely stressed as a result of human-induced pressures, to an extent
>>inevitable on a densely populated island."
>>
>>Historically lakes have received less attention in clean-up campaigns
>>than rivers, but they are much more vulnerable because their more
>>stagnant waters allow pollution to collect and do more damage.
>>
>>Mostly they are being fed to death by sewage and - especially -
>>wastes and fertilisers from agriculture. These cause weeds and algae
>>to flourish, soaking up oxygen from the water and suffocating other
>>life. And, partly as a result, they are often plagued by alien, invasive
>>species.
>>
>>Bassenthwaite Lake, in the north of the Lake District, exemplifies
>>many of the problems. It is theoretically one of the most protected
>>water bodies in the country - being designated under the EU Habitats
>>Directive as an SSSI and as part of the Lake District National Park -
>>and is Britain's main stronghold of a very rare fish, the slim,
>>blue-green vendace. But it is still struggling to survive, despite efforts
>>to rescue it.
>>
>>For decades, it was overfed by effluent from a local sewage works;
>>this has now been cleaned up, but phosphorous from the past
>>pollution still lurks in its sediments. And it is still being contaminated
>>by septic tanks used by houses around its shores.
>>
>>More pollution comes from the droppings of the sheep that graze its
>>catchment. And allowing too many sheep on to the fells make things
>>worse; overgrazing erodes the soil, bringing it -and the wastes - down
>>into the lake.
>>
>>Trees are now being planted to help to stabilise the soil, but the waters
>>produce blooms of blue-green algae, which can be toxic. And they
>>encourage an invasive species - the Australian swamp stonecrop,
>>originally introduced to Britain from Tasmania nearly 100 years ago -
>>which smothers other organisms.
>>
>>Windermere, to the south, is struggling against another set of perils.
>>It, too, is polluted by sewage, augmented by a staggering six million
>>visitors a year. It also receives run-off from cattle farming. Last year,
>>its blue-green algal blooms were so bad that notices had to be put
>>up warning people, and their dogs, not to go into the water.
>>
>>It, too, has a rare fish - the cold-water Arctic char - but as pollution
>>deprives the depths of the lake of oxygen in summer it is forced to
>>swim nearer the surface in waters too warm for it to tolerate.
>>Meanwhile, roach, an invasive species in this lake, flourish in the
>>balmier temperatures brought by global warming.
>>
>>The bonny banks of Loch Lomond similarly wash pollution into the
>>lake from agriculture, and from fertilised golf courses - and it, too,
>>is polluted by sewage.
>>
>>Right across the country, the growth of algae is so bad that it has
>>completely killed off underwater vegetation in many areas, which
>>in turn destroys invertebrate life and leads to changes in fish
>>populations. Some, such as Rollesby Broad and Cockshoot Broad,
>>are being restored, but still suffer from past pollution. Others, such
>>as Wroxham Broad, remain in deep trouble.
>>
>>Surrey's Frensham Great Pond, tucked away in the Home Counties
>>but with an ecology closer to lakes in the northern uplands, receives
>>too many substances from earth disturbed by road building and
>>other developments in its catchment area. By contrast, Malham Tarn,
>>high in the Yorkshire Dales, has been damaged by nature lovers. A
>>septic tank in a field studies centre on its shores polluted it for years;
>>it has also been invaded by Canadian pondweed, probably brought
>>on an angler's rod or a hiker's boots.
>>
>>Perhaps the saddest story of all is at Semerwater in Wensleydale -
>>which, by legend, covers a once-thriving city, cursed after turning
>>away a poor man seeking food. It, said Dr Stewart Clarke, an
>>ecologist at Natural England, has "suffered massive enrichment"
>>from the dung of the cattle raised around it. As a result, he said,
>>"virtually no submerged plants are left in Semerwater any more".
>>
>>Norfolk Broads
>>
>>Polluted by sewage. Phosphorous from sewage works remains
>>in sediment
>>
>>Frensham Great Pond, Surrey
>>
>>Threatened by polluted soil disturbed by road building
>>
>>Malham Tarn, Yorkshire Dales
>>
>>Plagued by Canadian pondweed, probably introduced by anglers
>>or hikers
>>
>>Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria
>>
>>Soil contaminated by sheep droppings has washed into the lake
>>
>>http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2258886.ece
>>

>
>Old story, well known

Still very relevant currently.

>
>In broads, too much arable agriculture,

Arable nothing. It's too much herbicide and pesticides, and farmers
dumping tonnes of chemicals on their produce. Go organic.

> too much ploughing
>In Lakes, local authorities got away with tipping untreated sewage in lakes

Not even 1% of that dumped by selfish farmers, who even when
prosecuted, get to laugh it off!

>(as did boat owners) but they are finally being reigned in,

No they are not. Whilst boat owners are a very small part of the
problem, it is nonetheless amazing that they can still dump raw
sewage, and gray water into a river!

>Also too many septic tanks in the area round about, but they blame farms
>because the planning authority don't want to take the blame for giving all
>those planning permissions for caravan sites etc

Septic tanks make up a fraction of farming waste that is dumped,
legally and illegally. Tidy up your own house before condemning
others.
--









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Pearl
2007-02-12 08:09:40 EST
"Pete <(.¿.)>" <farmingfacts@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:lo4vs25nqlqnm5ei1rb6dsd8bpask1jbbk@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 19:01:50 -0000, "Jim Webster"
> <jim@websterpagebank.freeswerve.co.uk> wrote:
>
> >On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 18:50:34 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:
> >
> >>Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes
..
> >>Mostly they are being fed to death by sewage and - especially -
> >>wastes and fertilisers from agriculture. These cause weeds and algae
> >>to flourish, soaking up oxygen from the water and suffocating other
> >>life. And, partly as a result, they are often plagued by alien, invasive
> >>species.
> >>
> >>Bassenthwaite Lake, in the north of the Lake District, exemplifies
> >>many of the problems.
..
> >>More pollution comes from the droppings of the sheep that graze its
> >>catchment. And allowing too many sheep on to the fells make things
> >>worse; overgrazing erodes the soil, bringing it -and the wastes - down
> >>into the lake.
..
> >>Windermere, to the south, is struggling against another set of perils.
> >>It, too, is polluted by sewage, augmented by a staggering six million
> >>visitors a year. It also receives run-off from cattle farming. Last year,
> >>its blue-green algal blooms were so bad that notices had to be put
> >>up warning people, and their dogs, not to go into the water.
..
> >>The bonny banks of Loch Lomond similarly wash pollution into the
> >>lake from agriculture, and from fertilised golf courses - and it, too,
> >>is polluted by sewage.
..
> >>Perhaps the saddest story of all is at Semerwater in Wensleydale -
> >>which, by legend, covers a once-thriving city, cursed after turning
> >>away a poor man seeking food. It, said Dr Stewart Clarke, an
> >>ecologist at Natural England, has "suffered massive enrichment"
> >>from the dung of the cattle raised around it. As a result, he said,
> >>"virtually no submerged plants are left in Semerwater any more".
..
> >>Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria
> >>
> >>Soil contaminated by sheep droppings has washed into the lake
> >>
> >>http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2258886.ece
> >
> >Old story, well known
>
> Still very relevant currently.

Nahhhh..., just eat, drink and be merry..

> >In broads, too much arable agriculture,
>
> Arable nothing. It's too much herbicide and pesticides, and farmers
> dumping tonnes of chemicals on their produce. Go organic.

"The UK uses 1.3 million tonnes of nitrogen fertiliser and 400,000
tonnes of phosphate per year, much of it used on grassland and
crops grown for feed

450 active chemical ingredients are approved for pesticide use in
the UK, a 30-fold increase since 1950 (winter wheat receives an
average of 8 chemical sprays)
...'
http://www.ivu.org/oxveg/Talks/animalfarmenv.html

'The grass on the other side.

The future's bright, the future's green with the growing popularity
of vegan organic farming

Food scares, health concerns, pesticide problems, environmental
worries and animal welfare issues have brought farming methods
into the spotlight. Most farmers are dependent on chemicals and
animal by-products - and even those specialising in organic farming
use animal manures and slaughterhouse by-products. This presents
a difficult dilemma for vegans who refuse animal-derived food yet
are still linked to the meat industry by their seemingly innocent
groceries. However, despite popular beliefs, animals aren't
necessary to agriculture.

The number of farmed animals in the world has quadrupled in the
last 50 years, and food production no longer nurtures the land.
Both animals and soil are pushed to their limits to satisfy the
West's demand for animal products and profits. At present modern
agriculture is far from sustainable and the meat industry directly
contributes to all the major environmental catastrophes:

*Rainforests are still being chopped down at an alarming rate either
for grazing or to grow crops to feed to animals.

*Crops (mostly grown for animal feed) are doused in pesticides and
fertilisers that leach into waterways and cause massive pollution.

*The increased number of animals means more manure, which
contributes to acid rain and river and lake pollution - rendering
drinking water unsafe.

*Soil is pushed beyond its fertility limits, is not replenished or
fallowed and becomes prone to erosion.

*Oceans are being destroyed by over-fishing, which is
devastating entire marine ecosystems, while coastal fish farms
are causing extensive pollution and wildlife decline.

*Growing feed for livestock requires intense use of synthetic
fertilisers and thus causes the release of nitrous oxide into the
atmosphere.

*Producing feed and heating buildings that house animals uses
fossil fuels, emitting CO2. And the decomposition of liquid
manure releases large amounts of methane as well as forming
nitrous oxide - all of which are contributing significantly to
global warming.

Millions of consumers in the West are dying from diseases such
as heart attacks, strokes, diabetes and cancer, caused by eating
animal products, while the world's poor are dying from diseases
of poverty. Children in the developing world starve next to fields
of fodder destined for export as animal feed, to support the rich,
meat-hungry cultures. Livestock farming is generally inefficient:
an area of land the size of five football pitches will grow enough
meat to feed two people; or maize to feed 10; or grain to feed 24;
or soya to feed 61. If everyone in the world ate the typical US
meat-centred diet (where 35% of calories come from animal
products), the world could support only 2.5 billion people. On a
vegetarian diet all 6 billion of us could be fed healthily. The world
can feed less than half its present population on a meat-based diet.

In order to feed the world it is imperative that vegan organic
farming becomes widespread.

But it's not all bad news!

Recent years has seen a growth in awareness and popularity of
vegan organic farming. Vegan-organics is any system of
cultivation that avoids artificial chemicals and sprays, GMOs,
livestock manures and animal remains from slaughterhouses or
fish processing etc. Fertility is maintained by vegetable composts,
green manures, crop rotation, mulches, and any other method
that is sustainable, ecologically viable and not dependent upon
animal exploitation. This ensures long-term fertility, and
wholesome food for our and future generations.

Organic growing involves treating the soil, the growing environment,
and the world environment as a resource to be husbanded for future
generations, rather than exploited in the short term. The maxim of
vegan organic growing is to feed the soil and the soil will feed the
plants.

Instead of scattering animal manures and slaughterhouse waste
products on the land the above time-honoured techniques can be
used to grow over 60 different vegetables in the UK climate.
Perennial crops including perennial vegetables like artichokes and
asparagus, perennial soft fruit like strawberries, raspberries and
currants and tree crops like apples, cherries and nuts can also be
grown successfully.

The vegan organic system finally rejects the long-standing reliance
on animal products. It offers a different quality of food that stands a
part from the industrially produced, money-led foodstuffs available
now. Even small scale 'grow your own' farming can help promote
awareness of self-sufficiency and give something back to nature -
whether it's a multi-functional allotment, a small vegetable patch in
your back garden or just a window box containing a few herbs!
It's easier than you think!

A vision for the future

"If it was up to you there'd be no animals in the fields anymore!"
Vegans often hear this ignorant argument from meat-eaters who
like to see their food as well as eat it. True, farmed animals are
bred for people to eat and as the demand for meat falls, less
animals will be bred. But instead of being the end of the
countryside as we know it, like many imagine, in fact a huge toll
of suffering would be eliminated and wildlife allowed to recover
from the pressures of the animal industry.

The vast majority of farmed animals are kept in indoor units
where they never see the light of day. Those that are outside
are only kept alive for a fraction of their natural lifespans
before being slaughtered for meat - often in the most barbaric
manner imaginable.

Modern farmed animals have been bred and mutated over
generations to produce as much meat as possible, and have
become a far cry from their wild ancestors. For example birds
are often so obese they can barely walk and suffer from
crippling leg disorders. Dairy cows are bred to produce so
much milk that their udders can become painfully swollen and
infected. Sheep have been genetically manipulated to give birth
earlier in the year, and as a result each year 20 per cent of new
born lambs die within days of birth from sickness, exposure,
malnutrition and disease.

If people ate crops directly we would need far less land for
food production. In the UK, birds, butterflies and wild flowers
would even start to appear. And around the world the ancestors
of today's farm animals could begin to thrive, as they would
once again have space. For example:

*Wild turkeys live in North and Central America. They roost
in trees and roam in woodlands, eating vegetation and insects.
An adult bird can fly up to 50mph.

*Chickens are decended from the red jungle fowl (gallus gallus)
in Asia. Wild hens like to move around almost ceaselessly in
daylight hours. Also they lay only 20 eggs a year and need a
safe, private place for laying.

*It is believed cattle originally descended from the wild auroch,
of Eurasia and North Africa, a species that did not become
extinct until the 17th century. Banteng are a shy species of wild
South East Asian cattle found in hill forests.

*The European Wild Boar is the ancestor of the farmed pig.
They live in forested areas, eating a wide variety of plants
and occasionally small animals and insects. They lived wild
in Britain's woodlands until hunted to extinction in the 17th
century. They can still be found in countries such as Germany
and France.

*Most wild sheep and goats live in mountains but some inhabit
desert grasslands, tropical forests or Arctic tundra. Habitat loss,
hunting and resource competition from farmed animals have
resulted in most species being classed by the IUCN (World
Conservation Union) as threatened, endangered or critical.

Going veggie is a big step, going vegan is huge, and going vegan
organic is even larger than that. Although the option of completely
cruelty free food is available to very few of us at the moment, the
ethos of animal free farming is spreading. And, due to the number
of support groups setting up, anyone who wants to try it
themselves will not be alone.

Support Viva! and help us spread the vegan word. Click here to
join. http://www.viva.org.uk/supporter/membershipform.htm

Another organisation that helps is the Vegan Organic Network:
"Our commitment is to peace and justice for people, animals and
the environment in a sustainable balance. To achieve this we must
change our lifestyles and introduce a philosophy which will
continue to maintain our unique planet. VON attempts to come
to grips with politics and ethics in everyday living."

They provide practical advice on how to start growing your own
food, details of the issues surrounding vegan organic farming
and links to other useful groups. Have a look at their website.
www.veganorganic.net

For more information on the issues raised above see Viva!'s
Planet on a Plate
http://www.viva.org.uk/guides/planetonaplate.htm
and Feed the World guides.
http://www.viva.org.uk/guides/feedtheworld.htm
Also read The Silent Ark.
http://www.viva.org.uk/books/ark/intro.html

Viva! Vegetarians International Voice for Animals
8 York Court, Wilder Street, Bristol BS2 8QH, UK
T: 0117 944 1000 F: 0117 924 4646 E: info @ viva.org.uk
(close spaces to email)
http://www.viva.org.uk/campaigns/other/veganfarming.html

Jim Webster
2007-02-12 08:12:25 EST

"pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote

nothing

it was all cut and paste



Pearl
2007-02-12 09:16:19 EST
"Jim Webster" <jim@websterpagebank.freeswerve.co.uk> wrote in message news:53b7dtF1r9k71U1@mid.individual.net...
>
> "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote
>
> nothing

Not true.

> it was all cut and paste

'Copy-and-paste refers to the popular, simple method of
reproducing text or other data from a source to a destination,
which is different from cut and paste in that the original source
text or data is not deleted or removed as it is with the latter
process.
..'
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cut_and_paste

That pathetic excuse for a human being can't get anything right.



Pete ‹•¿•›
2007-02-12 09:40:49 EST
On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 13:12:25 -0000, "Jim Webster"
<*m@websterpagebank.freeswerve.co.uk> wrote:

>
>"pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote
.

>nothing

Wrong. It speaks volumes.

"Pete <(.=BF.)>" <farmingfacts@yahoo.com> wrote in message =
news:lo4vs25nqlqnm5ei1rb6dsd8bpask1jbbk@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 19:01:50 -0000, "Jim Webster"
> <jim@websterpagebank.freeswerve.co.uk> wrote:
>
> >On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 18:50:34 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> =
wrote:
> >
> >>Poisoned: 400 of Britain's lakes=20
..
> >>Mostly they are being fed to death by sewage and - especially -
> >>wastes and fertilisers from agriculture. These cause weeds and algae
> >>to flourish, soaking up oxygen from the water and suffocating other
> >>life. And, partly as a result, they are often plagued by alien, =
invasive
> >>species.
> >>
> >>Bassenthwaite Lake, in the north of the Lake District, exemplifies
> >>many of the problems.=20
..
> >>More pollution comes from the droppings of the sheep that graze its
> >>catchment. And allowing too many sheep on to the fells make things
> >>worse; overgrazing erodes the soil, bringing it -and the wastes - =
down
> >>into the lake.
..
> >>Windermere, to the south, is struggling against another set of =
perils.
> >>It, too, is polluted by sewage, augmented by a staggering six =
million
> >>visitors a year. It also receives run-off from cattle farming. Last =
year,
> >>its blue-green algal blooms were so bad that notices had to be put
> >>up warning people, and their dogs, not to go into the water.
..
> >>The bonny banks of Loch Lomond similarly wash pollution into the
> >>lake from agriculture, and from fertilised golf courses - and it, =
too,
> >>is polluted by sewage.
..
> >>Perhaps the saddest story of all is at Semerwater in Wensleydale -
> >>which, by legend, covers a once-thriving city, cursed after turning
> >>away a poor man seeking food. It, said Dr Stewart Clarke, an
> >>ecologist at Natural England, has "suffered massive enrichment"
> >>from the dung of the cattle raised around it. As a result, he said,
> >>"virtually no submerged plants are left in Semerwater any more".
..
> >>Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria
> >>
> >>Soil contaminated by sheep droppings has washed into the lake
> >>
> >>http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2258886.ece
> >
> >Old story, well known
>
> Still very relevant currently.

Nahhhh..., just eat, drink and be merry.. =20

> >In broads, too much arable agriculture,
>
> Arable nothing. It's too much herbicide and pesticides, and farmers
> dumping tonnes of chemicals on their produce. Go organic.

"The UK uses 1.3 million tonnes of nitrogen fertiliser and 400,000=20
tonnes of phosphate per year, much of it used on grassland and=20
crops grown for feed

450 active chemical ingredients are approved for pesticide use in=20
the UK, a 30-fold increase since 1950 (winter wheat receives an=20
average of 8 chemical sprays)
...'
http://www.ivu.org/oxveg/Talks/animalfarmenv.html=20

'The grass on the other side.

The future's bright, the future's green with the growing popularity
of vegan organic farming

Food scares, health concerns, pesticide problems, environmental
worries and animal welfare issues have brought farming methods
into the spotlight. Most farmers are dependent on chemicals and
animal by-products - and even those specialising in organic farming
use animal manures and slaughterhouse by-products. This presents
a difficult dilemma for vegans who refuse animal-derived food yet
are still linked to the meat industry by their seemingly innocent
groceries. However, despite popular beliefs, animals aren't
necessary to agriculture.

The number of farmed animals in the world has quadrupled in the
last 50 years, and food production no longer nurtures the land.
Both animals and soil are pushed to their limits to satisfy the
West's demand for animal products and profits. At present modern
agriculture is far from sustainable and the meat industry directly
contributes to all the major environmental catastrophes:

*Rainforests are still being chopped down at an alarming rate either
for grazing or to grow crops to feed to animals.

*Crops (mostly grown for animal feed) are doused in pesticides and
fertilisers that leach into waterways and cause massive pollution.

*The increased number of animals means more manure, which
contributes to acid rain and river and lake pollution - rendering
drinking water unsafe.

*Soil is pushed beyond its fertility limits, is not replenished or
fallowed and becomes prone to erosion.

*Oceans are being destroyed by over-fishing, which is
devastating entire marine ecosystems, while coastal fish farms
are causing extensive pollution and wildlife decline.

*Growing feed for livestock requires intense use of synthetic
fertilisers and thus causes the release of nitrous oxide into the
atmosphere.

*Producing feed and heating buildings that house animals uses
fossil fuels, emitting CO2. And the decomposition of liquid
manure releases large amounts of methane as well as forming
nitrous oxide - all of which are contributing significantly to
global warming.

Millions of consumers in the West are dying from diseases such
as heart attacks, strokes, diabetes and cancer, caused by eating
animal products, while the world's poor are dying from diseases
of poverty. Children in the developing world starve next to fields
of fodder destined for export as animal feed, to support the rich,
meat-hungry cultures. Livestock farming is generally inefficient:
an area of land the size of five football pitches will grow enough
meat to feed two people; or maize to feed 10; or grain to feed 24;
or soya to feed 61. If everyone in the world ate the typical US
meat-centred diet (where 35% of calories come from animal
products), the world could support only 2.5 billion people. On a
vegetarian diet all 6 billion of us could be fed healthily. The world
can feed less than half its present population on a meat-based diet.

In order to feed the world it is imperative that vegan organic
farming becomes widespread.

But it's not all bad news!

Recent years has seen a growth in awareness and popularity of
vegan organic farming. Vegan-organics is any system of
cultivation that avoids artificial chemicals and sprays, GMOs,
livestock manures and animal remains from slaughterhouses or
fish processing etc. Fertility is maintained by vegetable composts,
green manures, crop rotation, mulches, and any other method
that is sustainable, ecologically viable and not dependent upon
animal exploitation. This ensures long-term fertility, and
wholesome food for our and future generations.

Organic growing involves treating the soil, the growing environment,
and the world environment as a resource to be husbanded for future
generations, rather than exploited in the short term. The maxim of
vegan organic growing is to feed the soil and the soil will feed the
plants.

Instead of scattering animal manures and slaughterhouse waste
products on the land the above time-honoured techniques can be
used to grow over 60 different vegetables in the UK climate.
Perennial crops including perennial vegetables like artichokes and
asparagus, perennial soft fruit like strawberries, raspberries and
currants and tree crops like apples, cherries and nuts can also be
grown successfully.

The vegan organic system finally rejects the long-standing reliance
on animal products. It offers a different quality of food that stands
a
part from the industrially produced, money-led foodstuffs available
now. Even small scale 'grow your own' farming can help promote
awareness of self-sufficiency and give something back to nature -
whether it's a multi-functional allotment, a small vegetable patch in
your back garden or just a window box containing a few herbs!
It's easier than you think!

A vision for the future

"If it was up to you there'd be no animals in the fields anymore!"
Vegans often hear this ignorant argument from meat-eaters who
like to see their food as well as eat it. True, farmed animals are
bred for people to eat and as the demand for meat falls, less
animals will be bred. But instead of being the end of the
countryside as we know it, like many imagine, in fact a huge toll
of suffering would be eliminated and wildlife allowed to recover
from the pressures of the animal industry.

The vast majority of farmed animals are kept in indoor units
where they never see the light of day. Those that are outside
are only kept alive for a fraction of their natural lifespans
before being slaughtered for meat - often in the most barbaric
manner imaginable.

Modern farmed animals have been bred and mutated over
generations to produce as much meat as possible, and have
become a far cry from their wild ancestors. For example birds
are often so obese they can barely walk and suffer from
crippling leg disorders. Dairy cows are bred to produce so
much milk that their udders can become painfully swollen and
infected. Sheep have been genetically manipulated to give birth
earlier in the year, and as a result each year 20 per cent of new
born lambs die within days of birth from sickness, exposure,
malnutrition and disease.

If people ate crops directly we would need far less land for
food production. In the UK, birds, butterflies and wild flowers
would even start to appear. And around the world the ancestors
of today's farm animals could begin to thrive, as they would
once again have space. For example:

*Wild turkeys live in North and Central America. They roost=20
in trees and roam in woodlands, eating vegetation and insects.
An adult bird can fly up to 50mph.

*Chickens are decended from the red jungle fowl (gallus gallus)
in Asia. Wild hens like to move around almost ceaselessly in
daylight hours. Also they lay only 20 eggs a year and need a
safe, private place for laying.

*It is believed cattle originally descended from the wild auroch,
of Eurasia and North Africa, a species that did not become
extinct until the 17th century. Banteng are a shy species of wild
South East Asian cattle found in hill forests.

*The European Wild Boar is the ancestor of the farmed pig.
They live in forested areas, eating a wide variety of plants
and occasionally small animals and insects. They lived wild
in Britain's woodlands until hunted to extinction in the 17th
century. They can still be found in countries such as Germany
and France.

*Most wild sheep and goats live in mountains but some inhabit
desert grasslands, tropical forests or Arctic tundra. Habitat loss,
hunting and resource competition from farmed animals have
resulted in most species being classed by the IUCN (World
Conservation Union) as threatened, endangered or critical.

Going veggie is a big step, going vegan is huge, and going vegan
organic is even larger than that. Although the option of completely
cruelty free food is available to very few of us at the moment, the
ethos of animal free farming is spreading. And, due to the number
of support groups setting up, anyone who wants to try it
themselves will not be alone.

Support Viva! and help us spread the vegan word. Click here to
join. http://www.viva.org.uk/supporter/membershipform.htm

Another organisation that helps is the Vegan Organic Network:
"Our commitment is to peace and justice for people, animals and
the environment in a sustainable balance. To achieve this we must
change our lifestyles and introduce a philosophy which will
continue to maintain our unique planet. VON attempts to come
to grips with politics and ethics in everyday living."

They provide practical advice on how to start growing your own
food, details of the issues surrounding vegan organic farming=20
and links to other useful groups. Have a look at their website.
www.veganorganic.net

For more information on the issues raised above see Viva!'s
Planet on a Plate
http://www.viva.org.uk/guides/planetonaplate.htm
and Feed the World guides.
http://www.viva.org.uk/guides/feedtheworld.htm
Also read The Silent Ark.
http://www.viva.org.uk/books/ark/intro.html

Viva! Vegetarians International Voice for Animals
8 York Court, Wilder Street, Bristol BS2 8QH, UK
T: 0117 944 1000 F: 0117 924 4646 E: info @ viva.org.uk
(close spaces to email)
http://www.viva.org.uk/campaigns/other/veganfarming.html


>it was all cut and paste

It's called copying. The foundation of education.

Read it and weep.

--









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