Vegetarian Discussion: Report: 83 Percent Of Grocery Store Chicken Meat Found Infected With Bacteria

Report: 83 Percent Of Grocery Store Chicken Meat Found Infected With Bacteria
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Jan Drew
2006-12-10 00:31:46 EST

http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html

NewsTarget.com printable article
Originally published December 7 2006
Report: 83 percent of grocery store chicken meat found infected with
bacteria
by Ben Kage

(NewsTarget) A report released Monday by Consumer Reports found that 83
percent of the 525 chickens it tested were infected with campylobacter,
salmonella bacteria, or both, and recommended that consumers cook all
chicken to 165 degrees and wash their hands with soap and water after
handling it.
The chickens tested by Consumer Reports were purchased from grocery stores,
bulk retailers, gourmet shops and natural food stores in 23 U.S. states.
Both bacteria are known to cause diarrhea, cramping, fever, nausea and
vomiting. They can even cause lethal infections in the elderly, babies and
people with immune system impairment.

"If accurate, these findings are downright astonishing," said Mike Adams,
author of "Grocery Warning," a book that details the health dangers of
certain foods and food ingredients. "Consumers should be wary about unseen
dangers in everyday groceries, and bacteria contamination is only the
beginning. Many dangerous ingredients, such as sodium nitrite, are
intentionally added by meat processors."

Richard Lobb of the National Chicken Council said that the Consumer Report
figures were "greatly exaggerated" and Richard Raymond of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture said the sample size was too small.

"That's 500 samples out of 9 billion chickens slaughtered a year," he said.
He added that the report showed a salmonella rate of 15 percent, which jibes
with USDA figures for 2005 showing a rate of 16.3 percent. However, 81
percent of the chickens tested by Consumer Reports had campylobacter
infections, up from a 2003 test that found the bacteria in 42 percent of the
test sample. Currently, the USDA does not test for campylobacter, but
Raymond said the department was researching a testing protocol.

Jean Halloran of the Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, said
that federal regulation was "beyond overdue."

"They may criticize our testing methodology but they're not doing any
testing at all," she said.

Earlier studies by the USDA and the FDA produced different results than the
Consumer Reports test. In 2005, the USDA and National Chicken Council tested
4,200 broiler carcasses and found campylobacter in 26 percent, while the FDA
found campylobacter in 60 percent of chicken breasts during a 2004 study.
Each agency used a different testing method.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3.4 million
Americans fall ill and 700 die due to salmonella and campylobacter from all
sources, but the CDC notes that campylobacteriosis infections are down 30
percent since 1998 to 12.6 infections for every 100,000 people. Robert Tauxe
of the CDC said soap, hot water, cooking or freezing easily destroys
campylobacter.

"You leave salmonella out overnight on the counter and it grows. You leave
campylobacter out and it dies," he said.



George
2006-12-10 00:36:42 EST

"Jan Drew" <jdrew1374@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:6ZMeh.917$yC5.669@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net...
>
> http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html
>
> NewsTarget.com printable article
> Originally published December 7 2006
> Report: 83 percent of grocery store chicken meat found infected with
> bacteria
> by Ben Kage
>
> (NewsTarget) A report released Monday by Consumer Reports found that 83
> percent of the 525 chickens it tested were infected with campylobacter,
> salmonella bacteria, or both, and recommended that consumers cook all
> chicken to 165 degrees and wash their hands with soap and water after
> handling it.
> The chickens tested by Consumer Reports were purchased from grocery
> stores, bulk retailers, gourmet shops and natural food stores in 23 U.S.
> states. Both bacteria are known to cause diarrhea, cramping, fever,
> nausea and vomiting. They can even cause lethal infections in the
> elderly, babies and people with immune system impairment.
>
> "If accurate, these findings are downright astonishing," said Mike Adams,
> author of "Grocery Warning," a book that details the health dangers of
> certain foods and food ingredients. "Consumers should be wary about
> unseen dangers in everyday groceries, and bacteria contamination is only
> the beginning. Many dangerous ingredients, such as sodium nitrite, are
> intentionally added by meat processors."
>
> Richard Lobb of the National Chicken Council said that the Consumer
> Report figures were "greatly exaggerated" and Richard Raymond of the U.S.
> Department of Agriculture said the sample size was too small.
>
> "That's 500 samples out of 9 billion chickens slaughtered a year," he
> said. He added that the report showed a salmonella rate of 15 percent,
> which jibes with USDA figures for 2005 showing a rate of 16.3 percent.
> However, 81 percent of the chickens tested by Consumer Reports had
> campylobacter infections, up from a 2003 test that found the bacteria in
> 42 percent of the test sample. Currently, the USDA does not test for
> campylobacter, but Raymond said the department was researching a testing
> protocol.
>
> Jean Halloran of the Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, said
> that federal regulation was "beyond overdue."
>
> "They may criticize our testing methodology but they're not doing any
> testing at all," she said.
>
> Earlier studies by the USDA and the FDA produced different results than
> the Consumer Reports test. In 2005, the USDA and National Chicken Council
> tested 4,200 broiler carcasses and found campylobacter in 26 percent,
> while the FDA found campylobacter in 60 percent of chicken breasts during
> a 2004 study. Each agency used a different testing method.
>
> According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3.4 million
> Americans fall ill and 700 die due to salmonella and campylobacter from
> all sources, but the CDC notes that campylobacteriosis infections are
> down 30 percent since 1998 to 12.6 infections for every 100,000 people.
> Robert Tauxe of the CDC said soap, hot water, cooking or freezing easily
> destroys campylobacter.
>
> "You leave salmonella out overnight on the counter and it grows. You
> leave campylobacter out and it dies," he said.
>

Can't eat chicken, beef, eat pork. I guess all that's left is canabalism.

George



Dutch
2006-12-10 04:30:21 EST

"Jan Drew" <jdrew1374@sbcglobal.net> wrote
>
> http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html

That's hardly news, that's why there are recommended temperatures for
cooking meat, to kill bacteria.


Right above that article on that same page
Chicken soup helps heal, shows research
12/7/2006 - Down through the ages, homemade chicken soup has been valued and
appreciated for its soothing and healing qualities when it comes to colds
and the flu.





Pearl
2006-12-10 09:45:01 EST
"Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote in message news:NsQeh.460372$5R2.348319@pd7urf3no...
>
> "Jan Drew" <jdrew1374@sbcglobal.net> wrote
> >
> > http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html
>
> That's hardly news, that's why there are recommended temperatures for
> cooking meat, to kill bacteria.
>
>
> Right above that article on that same page
> Chicken soup helps heal, shows research
> 12/7/2006 - Down through the ages, homemade chicken soup has been valued and
> appreciated for its soothing and healing qualities when it comes to colds
> and the flu.

All quotes below from http://www.newstarget.com/021260.html .

"I reviewed several studies, including the pioneering work by
Stephen Rennard, MD at the University of Nebraska. All the
research agrees that chicken soup helps break up congestion
and eases the flow of nasal secretions. Many say it also inhibits
white blood cells that trigger the inflammatory response,
causing sore throats and the production of phlegm. "

'... his chicken soup research has been officially published in
the Oct. 17 issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal of the
American College of Chest Physicians. It is titled, "Chicken
Soup Inhibits Neutrophil Chemotaxis In Vitro."
...
'The study focus was to find out if the movement of neutrophils
- the most common white cell in the blood that defends the body
against infection - would be blocked or reduced by chicken soup.

[... er ... surely I'm not the only one to see a problem with that.]

Researchers suspect the reduction in movement of neutrophils
may reduce activity in the upper respiratory tract that can cause
symptoms associated with a cold.

Colds are the result of infection in the upper respiratory tract,
which causes inflammation. Although colds are not completely
understood, it is believed the inflammation contributes to cold
symptoms. Dr. Rennard theorized if soup can stop or reduce
inflammation, it might reduce the symptoms of a cold.

In the laboratory, UNMC scientists diluted the soup and subjected
the neutrophils to several variations of the soup, including vegetables,
chicken and a combination of the ingredients. The team found the
movement of neutrophils were reduced. Samples taken during the
initial stages of the soup with chicken broth alone were not found
effective in inhibiting neutrophil movement.

The researchers were not able to identify the exact ingredient or
ingredients in the soup that made it effective against fighting colds
but theorize it may be a combination of ingredients in the soup
that work together to have beneficial effects. "All vegetables and
the soup had activity," Dr. Rennard said. "I think it's the
concoction."

Known as "Grandma's Soup," the recipe includes chicken, onions,
sweet potatoes, parsnips, turnips, carrots, celery stems, parsley, salt
and pepper. For comparison purposes, commercial soups were
obtained from a local supermarket and prepared according to the
directions on the label. Many of the soups had the same inhibitory
effect.

"A variety of soup preparations were evaluated and found to be
variably, but generally, able to inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis,"
Dr. Rennard said. "The current study, therefore, presents evidence
that chicken soup might have an anti-inflammatory activity, ." namely
the inhibition of neutrophil migration.

Researchers noted that "Grandma's soup" has several unusual features.
It contains strained vegetables. Dr. Rennard noted, however, that the
inhibitory activity was observed with several other recipes that lack the
particles from vegetables. "Thus," he said, "while the identity of the
biologically active materials is unknown, it seems likely they are water-
soluble or extractable. Pureed carrots or other vegetables are not
recommended as a remedy while chicken soup is."
...'
http://www.unmc.edu/publicaffairs/chickensoup/newsrelease.htm

Oh dear. From the newstarget article, some emphasis * added:

'...Remove the chicken (not used further for the soup- ...

Healing benefits of ingredients:

1. Onions -contain protein, calcium, sulfur, vitamin A, B complex,
C and E. They contain sulfur compounds and have *anti-inflammatory*
effects. Like garlic, onions have the antibiotic oil- allicin, which gives
them their pungent flavor.
2. Garlic-has powerful antibiotic, antiviral and antifungal properties .
Is being used for *boosting the immune system*, lowering blood
pressure, assisting in treatment of heart disease, and cancer and
lowering cholesterol.
3. Sweet potato- excellent source of vitamin A (beta-carotene),
vitamin C , manganese, copper, dietary fiber, vitamin B6,
potassium and iron. Having significant antioxidant capacities, they
stabilize blood sugar levels and lower insulin resistance.
4. Parsnips- a good source of the antioxidants vitamin C and vitamin E,
which help to *boost the immune system*, plus they're a good source
of fibre, which protects against colon cancer and helps maintain healthy
bowels. Parsnips are a good to reduce high blood pressure, because
they have a high potassium content.
5. Turnips- are rich in beta-carotene and protect mucous membranes
(especially in the lungs and intestinal tract) from cancer and free-radical
damage. Also high in vitamin C, indoles, calcium and other minerals.
6. Carrots- Carrots, one of the routine vegetable ingredients found in
chicken soup, are the best natural source of beta-carotene. The body
takes that beta-carotene and converts it to vitamin A. Vitamin A
*helps prevent and fight off infections by enhancing the actions
of white blood cells that destroy harmful bacteria and viruses.*
7. Celery - carminative, diuretic, tonic, nervine. Used to promote
restfulness and sleep, celery is also excellent for relieving rheumatism
and gout. Its high magnesium and iron content is invaluable as a food
for blood cells. Because of its anitspasmodic properties, celery is
good for all lung conditions, including asthma and bronchitis.
8. Parsley - contains two components that provide unique health
benefits- 1. volatile oils-including myristicin, limonene, eugenol,
and alpha-thujene. 2. flavonoids- including apiin, apigenin, crisoeriol,
and luteolin. The activity of parsley's volatile oils qualifies it as a
"chemoprotective" food- a food that can neutralize particular types of
carcinogens (like benzopyrenes from cigarette and charcoal grill smoke).
9. Sea Salt- natural balance of sodium, magnesium and potassium- helps
to lower blood pressure and promote good health. Mineral salts create
electrolytes, the sparks of life- carry electrical currents to cells
throughout the body. Electrolytes are necessary for enzyme production.
Enzymes are responsible for breaking down food, absorbing nutrients,
muscle function, hormone production, etc. Electrolytes and enzymes
are linked to *healthy immune function*, proper regulation of bodily
fluids, and *adrenal health*.
10. Black pepper- contains volatile oils, alkaloids, proteins and minerals.
It has the following healing actions: *circulatory stimulant*, diuretic,
cerebral stimulant, *reduces infection*, diaphoretic (induces sweating),
astringent (tightens mucous membranes) and *stimulates sinuses to drain*.
..'
http://www.newstarget.com/021260.html

"Chicken also contains an amino acid called cysteine that is released
when you make the soup. This amino acid thins mucus in the lungs,
aiding in the healing process."

So do garlic and onions...

'Food sources of cysteine
The body can synthesize cysteine from the amino acid methionine
but is also found in high protein foods such as poultry, wheat,
broccoli, eggs as well as garlic, onions and red peppers.
http://www.anyvitamins.com/cysteine-info.htm





Ronald 'More-More' Moshki
2006-12-13 23:10:34 EST

Jan Drew wrote:
> http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html
>
> NewsTarget.com printable article
> Originally published December 7 2006
> Report: 83 percent of grocery store chicken meat found infected with
> bacteria
> by Ben Kage
>
> (NewsTarget) A report released Monday by Consumer Reports found that 83
> percent of the 525 chickens it tested were infected with campylobacter,
> salmonella bacteria, or both, and recommended that consumers cook all
> chicken to 165 degrees and wash their hands with soap and water after
> handling it.
> The chickens tested by Consumer Reports were purchased from grocery stores,
> bulk retailers, gourmet shops and natural food stores in 23 U.S. states.
> Both bacteria are known to cause diarrhea, cramping, fever, nausea and
> vomiting. They can even cause lethal infections in the elderly, babies and
> people with immune system impairment.
>
> "If accurate, these findings are downright astonishing," said Mike Adams,
> author of "Grocery Warning," a book that details the health dangers of
> certain foods and food ingredients. "Consumers should be wary about unseen
> dangers in everyday groceries, and bacteria contamination is only the
> beginning. Many dangerous ingredients, such as sodium nitrite, are
> intentionally added by meat processors."
>
> Richard Lobb of the National Chicken Council said that the Consumer Report
> figures were "greatly exaggerated" and Richard Raymond of the U.S.
> Department of Agriculture said the sample size was too small.
>
> "That's 500 samples out of 9 billion chickens slaughtered a year," he said.
> He added that the report showed a salmonella rate of 15 percent, which jibes
> with USDA figures for 2005 showing a rate of 16.3 percent. However, 81
> percent of the chickens tested by Consumer Reports had campylobacter
> infections, up from a 2003 test that found the bacteria in 42 percent of the
> test sample. Currently, the USDA does not test for campylobacter, but
> Raymond said the department was researching a testing protocol.
>
> Jean Halloran of the Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, said
> that federal regulation was "beyond overdue."
>
> "They may criticize our testing methodology but they're not doing any
> testing at all," she said.
>
> Earlier studies by the USDA and the FDA produced different results than the
> Consumer Reports test. In 2005, the USDA and National Chicken Council tested
> 4,200 broiler carcasses and found campylobacter in 26 percent, while the FDA
> found campylobacter in 60 percent of chicken breasts during a 2004 study.
> Each agency used a different testing method.
>
> According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3.4 million
> Americans fall ill and 700 die due to salmonella and campylobacter from all
> sources, but the CDC notes that campylobacteriosis infections are down 30
> percent since 1998 to 12.6 infections for every 100,000 people. Robert Tauxe
> of the CDC said soap, hot water, cooking or freezing easily destroys
> campylobacter.
>
> "You leave salmonella out overnight on the counter and it grows. You leave
> campylobacter out and it dies," he said.

thera are 8,000,000,000 humans and humanoids, 83% too many.


Carole
2006-12-14 19:06:37 EST

Ronald 'More-More' Moshki wrote:
> Jan Drew wrote:
> > http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html
> >
> >

>
> thera are 8,000,000,000 humans and humanoids, 83% too many.

Who says this?
The problem isn't that there are too many human beings, but rather that
they are causing too much pollution and displacement of nature.

Carole
http://www.conspiracee.com


Ronald 'More-More' Moshki
2006-12-14 23:34:42 EST

carole wrote:
> Ronald 'More-More' Moshki wrote:
> > Jan Drew wrote:
> > > http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html
> > >
> > >
>
> >
> > thera are 8,000,000,000 humans and humanoids, 83% too many.
>
> Who says this?
> The problem isn't that there are too many human beings, but rather that
> they are causing too much pollution and displacement of nature.
>
> Carole
> http://www.conspiracee.com

same thing


H*@yahoo.com.au
2006-12-19 12:17:03 EST

Ronald 'More-More' Moshki wrote:
> carole wrote:
> > Ronald 'More-More' Moshki wrote:
> > > Jan Drew wrote:
> > > > http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html
> > > >
> > > >
> >
> > >
> > > thera are 8,000,000,000 humans and humanoids, 83% too many.
> >
> > Who says this?
> > The problem isn't that there are too many human beings, but rather that
> > they are causing too much pollution and displacement of nature.
> >
> > Carole
> > http://www.conspiracee.com
>
> same thing

Not quite the same thing.
Nikila Tesla apparently invented free electricity which was self
generating out of the atmosphere, a type of electricity which the power
companies couldn't make any money out of and it was suppressed.
Similar to other discoveries that eliminate the need for consumption of
fossil fuels -- all suppressed.

Carole
http://www.conspiracee.com
http://www.cellsalts.net


Vonne
2006-12-21 08:57:53 EST
and 100% of all people are infected with a potentially deadly strain of
e.coli. looks like we should all have both the small and large
intestines removed to prevent death.

There is bacteria on everything, including your skin. you are covered
in it. so you don't want to eat bacteria? wash your hands and cook
your meat. oh, and try not to get e.coli from your vegetables.


David Wright
2006-12-29 18:08:02 EST
In article <1166548623.290235.103090@48g2000cwx.googlegroups.com>,
<*3@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
>
>Ronald 'More-More' Moshki wrote:
>> carole wrote:
>> > Ronald 'More-More' Moshki wrote:
>> > > Jan Drew wrote:
>> > > > http://www.newstarget.com/z021258.html
>> > >
>> > > thera are 8,000,000,000 humans and humanoids, 83% too many.
>> >
>> > Who says this?
>> > The problem isn't that there are too many human beings, but rather that
>> > they are causing too much pollution and displacement of nature.
>> >
>> > Carole
>> > http://www.conspiracee.com
>>
>> same thing
>
>Not quite the same thing.
>Nikila Tesla apparently invented free electricity which was self
>generating out of the atmosphere, a type of electricity which the power
>companies couldn't make any money out of and it was suppressed.
>Similar to other discoveries that eliminate the need for consumption of
>fossil fuels -- all suppressed.

It was Nikola Tesla, and the word "apparently" is used quite
advisely. He didn't really do that, it's just that the conspiracy
loons (like Carole, who has apparently been released from the funny
farm again) believe he did. Any of her claims that cannot be
verified, or that make no sense whatever, are true but are being
"suppressed." It's a recurring pattern with her.

-- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
"If George Bush were my dad, I'd be drunk in public so often that
James Baker would have me killed." -- Bill Maher on the Bush twins
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