Vegetarian Discussion: Speciesism' Touted As Topic For Grade 12 Social Justice Course

Speciesism' Touted As Topic For Grade 12 Social Justice Course
Posts: 46

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2 3 4 5   Next  (First | Last)

Pearl
2006-09-30 09:16:05 EST
Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course
Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
Published: Monday, September 25, 2006

VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
akin to racism and sexism, an animal activist is urging the
province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
Grade 12 course on social justice.

"If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.

Fox was a surprise guest last week at a three-day meeting
of educators and social-justice experts organized by the
B.C. Education Ministry to brainstorm about the new course,
which is being developed as part of a deal the government
signed last spring with gay activists Murray and Peter Corren
to settle a human-rights complaint.

Speciesism is a relatively new term and involves assigning
values or rights to beings on the basis of their species. An
example, according to Fox, is the special status given to
dogs and cats in North America but not to cows, pigs and
chickens.

Fox, who was in the news last year after persuading the
Vancouver school board to become the first major Canadian
district to develop a policy allowing students to opt out of
animal dissections in science class, said she was thrilled to
be invited to the meeting.

She was also anxious that her point not be perceived as an
attempt to dilute the experiences of people who have suffered
discrimination.

"It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
it is interlinked.

"How we treat animals says a lot about how we treat one another."

\ufffd Times Colonist (Victoria) 2006
http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=00372cbc-1ba5-4b25-9e02-54c9a62c864e&k=50989



D*@.
2006-09-30 10:53:54 EST
On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 14:16:05 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:

>Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course
>Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
>Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
>
>VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
>akin to racism and sexism, an animal activist is urging the
>province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
>Grade 12 course on social justice.
>
>"If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
>oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
>Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.
. . .

>"It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
>better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
>about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
>it is interlinked.

I wonder if she wants people to keep in mind that animals
killed for food would not have any life at all if they weren't
raised for that purpose, but that wildlife killed in construction,
production of wood, paper, crops, electricity etc, would have
longer lives if they weren't killed in those processes. I doubt
very much she would want to examine that end of things,
don't you? She probably doesn't want to examine "speciesism"
to the point that people see how "aras" could be considered
LESS ethical than everyone else.

Pearl
2006-09-30 18:34:06 EST
<*h@.> wrote in message news:gn0th25d535gdllmd5hldi9tuvj39hijsk@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 14:16:05 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:
>
> >Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course
> >Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
> >Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
> >
> >VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
> >akin to racism and sexism, an animal activist is urging the
> >province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
> >Grade 12 course on social justice.
> >
> >"If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
> >oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
> >Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.
> . . .
>
> >"It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
> >better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
> >about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
> >it is interlinked.
>
> I wonder if she wants people to keep in mind that animals
> killed for food would not have any life at all if they weren't
> raised for that purpose,

'Wyoming state biologists have estimated that one cow eats
enough forage to support 6.9 bighorn sheep, 10.8 antelope,
7.8 deer or 2.1 elk.'
http://www.organicconsumers.org/corp/cattle_grazing.cfm





Rupert
2006-10-01 04:17:06 EST

dh@. wrote:
> On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 14:16:05 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:
>
> >Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course
> >Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
> >Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
> >
> >VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
> >akin to racism and sexism, an animal activist is urging the
> >province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
> >Grade 12 course on social justice.
> >
> >"If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
> >oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
> >Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.
> . . .
>
> >"It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
> >better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
> >about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
> >it is interlinked.
>
> I wonder if she wants people to keep in mind that animals
> killed for food would not have any life at all if they weren't
> raised for that purpose, but that wildlife killed in construction,
> production of wood, paper, crops, electricity etc, would have
> longer lives if they weren't killed in those processes. I doubt
> very much she would want to examine that end of things,
> don't you? She probably doesn't want to examine "speciesism"
> to the point that people see how "aras" could be considered
> LESS ethical than everyone else.

Hopefully, she'll encourage the students to consider a number of
different points of view and come to their own conclusions. Your
argument that ARAs are less ethical than other people is incredibly
weak.


Dutch
2006-10-01 06:19:37 EST

"pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote
> Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course

By one AR loon, it will NOT happen.

> Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
> Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
>
> VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
> akin to racism and sexism,

What rubbish.

> an animal activist is urging the
> province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
> Grade 12 course on social justice.

She's barely out of her Grade 12 herself. Look at her
http://www.vancouverhumanesociety.bc.ca/about%20us_directors.html

> "If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
> oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
> Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.

I've given them money, I thought they were a legitimate Animal Welfare
organization. They better keep tabs on their young eager beaver program
directors that they don't go off the deep-end. The vast majority of their
supporters are regular people who want to see better treatment of animals,
not pie-eyed fanatics who imagine they are going to fundamentally
revolutionize society.

> Fox was a surprise guest last week at a three-day meeting
> of educators and social-justice experts organized by the
> B.C. Education Ministry to brainstorm about the new course,
> which is being developed as part of a deal the government
> signed last spring with gay activists Murray and Peter Corren
> to settle a human-rights complaint.
>
> Speciesism is a relatively new term and involves assigning
> values or rights to beings on the basis of their species.

A bullshit term that attempts to besmirch a legitimate part of thought.
Everyone assigns values or rights based on species.

An
> example, according to Fox, is the special status given to
> dogs and cats in North America but not to cows, pigs and
> chickens.

What a surprise, right off the hop vegan propaganda. What about rats, mice,
frogs, toads, snakes, lizards, rabbits, or any other animal killed
intentionall and collaterally by nearly every form of human activity?

> Fox, who was in the news last year after persuading the
> Vancouver school board to become the first major Canadian
> district to develop a policy allowing students to opt out of
> animal dissections in science class, said she was thrilled to
> be invited to the meeting.

I'm sure they were "thrilled" that they had to allow her to attend to spew
her disrespectful, presumptuous garbage.

> She was also anxious that her point not be perceived as an
> attempt to dilute the experiences of people who have suffered
> discrimination.

I'll bet she was, even though it does exactly that.

> "It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
> better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
> about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
> it is interlinked.
>
> "How we treat animals says a lot about how we treat one another."

Equivocating between abuse and legitimate use.

> \ufffd Times Colonist (Victoria) 2006
> http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=00372cbc-1ba5-4b25-9e02-54c9a62c864e&k=50989

I wonder if she was up-front about her intent to dispense AR propaganda to
children.



Pearl
2006-10-01 08:40:12 EST
"Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote in message news:12hv5hpi5hlhg97@news.supernews.com...
>
> "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote
> > Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course
>
> By one AR loon,

"How we treat animals says a lot about how we treat one another."

> it will NOT happen.

:) You're NOT a prophet, ditch.

> > Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
> > Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
> >
> > VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
> > akin to racism and sexism,
>
> What rubbish.

ar\ufffdbi\ufffdtrar\ufffdy
adj.
1. Determined by chance, whim, or impulse, and not by necessity,
reason, or principle:
2. Based on or subject to individual judgment or preference:
..
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=arbitrary

con\ufffdtin\ufffdu\ufffdum
n. pl. con\ufffdtin\ufffdu\ufffda (-tny-) or con\ufffdtin\ufffdu\ufffdums
..
A continuous extent, succession, or whole, no part of which can be
distinguished from neighboring parts except by arbitrary division.
..
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=continuum

'Neurophysiologists have so far discovered no fundamental difference
between the structure or functions of neurons in men and other animals."
[19] Anthropomorphism he calls an obsolete straitjacket.

After I read Griffin's book, my quest for a context into which an
understanding of ocean mind might grow met with another stroke of
luck. At the 1980 Conference on Cetacean Intelligence in Washington
DC, I met psychologist Dr Michael Bossley of Magill University,
South Australia. Later he sent me an extraordinary unpublished
manuscript - his review of the scientific evidence for non-human mind,
which was a global survey of formal research into cognitive ethology
since Griffin had defined it. I read this with utter delight and suggested
a title, Continuum, which Dr Bossley accepted.

The implications of Bossley's survey could upset many. He insists
that an entirely new ethical system is required, and presents compelling
evidence for a continuity between human psychological processes and
those of other life forms. He urges our species to climb down from its
imaginary pedestal: 'Everything grades into everything else. We are part
of the natural world.' Much of the research Bossley examines is recent
and ongoing. For the most part it has appeared only in highly technical
literature accessible to specialised academics. It may be several
generations before the full implications are heeded. Like the Copernican
and Darwinian revolutions, it could alter the way we view our place on
this planet, how we treat other life forms and each other.

Legitimate evidence that five vital aspects of being human can be traced
to other animals exists in the published work of established scientists.
In each of five chapters, Bossley summarises that evidence.
..'
http://www.wadedoak.com/projectinterlock.htm

> > an animal activist is urging the
> > province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
> > Grade 12 course on social justice.
>
> She's barely out of her Grade 12 herself. Look at her
> http://www.vancouverhumanesociety.bc.ca/about%20us_directors.html

Looks may be deceiving. Healthy people have a youthful appearance.

'Lesley Fox is the Humane Education Program Director for Power
of One and is a Certified Humane Education Specialist from the
National Association for Humane and Environmental Education.
She is also a former radio personality who has extensive experience
speaking to a wide variety of community groups, school groups,
media and government bodies
http://www.powerofonehumaneeducation.org/about.htm

> > "If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
> > oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
> > Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.
>
> I've given them money, I thought they were a legitimate Animal Welfare
> organization.

But you are not a legitimate animal welfare supporter, as has
been shown. Put your gut where your money is, hypocrite.

> They better keep tabs on their young eager beaver program
> directors that they don't go off the deep-end. The vast majority of their
> supporters are regular people who want to see better treatment of animals,
> not pie-eyed fanatics who imagine they are going to fundamentally
> revolutionize society.

Where do you draw the "better treatment" line? Nowhere at all.

> > Fox was a surprise guest last week at a three-day meeting
> > of educators and social-justice experts organized by the
> > B.C. Education Ministry to brainstorm about the new course,
> > which is being developed as part of a deal the government
> > signed last spring with gay activists Murray and Peter Corren
> > to settle a human-rights complaint.
> >
> > Speciesism is a relatively new term and involves assigning
> > values or rights to beings on the basis of their species.
>
> A bullshit term that attempts to besmirch a legitimate part of thought.
> Everyone assigns values or rights based on species.

.. or gender... or race... or religion.. Doesn't make any of it legitimate.

> > An example, according to Fox, is the special status given to
> > dogs and cats in North America but not to cows, pigs and
> > chickens.
>
> What a surprise, right off the hop vegan propaganda. What about rats, mice,
> frogs, toads, snakes, lizards, rabbits, or any other animal killed

What about the many humans who die so that a minority can eat meat??

> intentionall and collaterally by nearly every form of human activity?

Destructive and wasteful practices should be rejected; wise choices made.

'Students learn valuable lesson about ethical issues

What if the fast food sandwich you buy causes animal suffering? Or,
maybe the mp3 player you threw away is poisoning an African village.

Grade 10 and 11 students are learning how their consumer choices reverberate
around the planet in an innovative new program run by the humane society at
Langley secondary school.

Students are discussing animal suffering, factory farming and the ethical
treatment of animals, in addition to environmental issues and human rights.

Social science teacher Charles McGill invited Lesley Fox, humane education
program director for the Vancouver Humane Society, into his classroom to
wrap up a year-long discussion on humane treatment of animals and human rights.

The educational campaign for student activism included a student fundraiser
to build a primary school in Uganda, Africa.

"I've always been interested in humane issues," said McGill.

McGill received a notice from the humane society about free educational
programs for secondary school students to promote respect for animals,
environmental ethics and human rights.

The Power of One project begun by Fox explores what she refers to as the
"three pillars of social justice": animals, the environment and people. Fox says
even the disposal of a pocket-sized MP3 player can create enough pollution to
harm animals and humans.

McGill, a teacher for more than 20 years, sees Fox's presentation as an
opportunity for students to critically analyse the impact of buying must-have
gadgets.

"I am caught up in the same consumerism," said McGill. "But if we continue on
the path we are on today, we won't have the same earth in the future."

Fox believes consumer power comes from the ability to choose, but she says
students should learn to take responsibility for their consumer choices.

"Buying consumer goods is like voting," said Fox. "Choosing who you give your
money to is powerful. I want students to know what the true cost of consumer
goods are."

Fox hopes the Power of One project can be integrated into the social justice
course curriculum, a course recently accepted by the B.C. government.

GRAPHIC:
Colour Photo: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun; Humane Society education program
director Lesley Fox will be teaching a workshop at Langley secondary school.

DOCUMENT-TYPE: News
http://www.ultraviolet.co.uk/students-learn-valuable-lesson-about-eth.html

> > Fox, who was in the news last year after persuading the
> > Vancouver school board to become the first major Canadian
> > district to develop a policy allowing students to opt out of
> > animal dissections in science class, said she was thrilled to
> > be invited to the meeting.
>
> I'm sure they were "thrilled" that they had to allow her to attend to spew
> her disrespectful, presumptuous garbage.

Ms. Fox was invited. I'm sure everyone here is -not- "thrilled"
with your usual spew: disrespectful, presumptuous garbage.

> > She was also anxious that her point not be perceived as an
> > attempt to dilute the experiences of people who have suffered
> > discrimination.
>
> I'll bet she was, even though it does exactly that.

Let's hear from someone who has suffered discrimination:

>From 'Jewsweek' - http://www.jewsweek.com/aande/156.htm

Exclusive Book Excerpt: Eternal Treblinka

One of the most powerful pro-animal voices of the twentieth
century was the Yiddish writer Isaac Bashevis Singer (1904-91),
winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978. Although Singer
survived the Holocaust by following his older brother Joshua to
the United States in 1935, his mother, younger brother, and
many members of his extended family who remained in Poland
were killed.
..
Treblinka Was Everywhere

Singer's observation that "every man is a Nazi" when it comes
to animals is also found in Enemies, A Love Story, his first novel
set in America. Its protagonist, Herman Broder, is another Singer
character who has lost his entire family in the Holocaust and
sees the reality of might makes right triumphant all around him.
..
When Masha takes Herman to the Bronx Zoo, he sees it as a
depressing prison. The eyes of the lion "expressed the despondency
of those who are allowed neither to live nor to die" and the wolf

paced to and fro, circling his own madness." To Herman, the zoo
is a concentration camp. "The air here was full of longing -- for
deserts, hills, valleys, dens, families. Like the Jews, the animals
had been dragged here from all parts of the world, condemned to
isolation and boredom." Some of the animals cry out their woes,
while others remain silent. "Parrots demanded their rights with
raucous screeching. A bird with a banana-shaped beak turned
its head from right to left as if looking for the culprit who had
played this trick on him."

When Herman takes a trip to upstate New York with Masha,
he thinks he can hear the screeching of chickens and ducks.
"Somewhere on this lovely summer morning, fowl were being
slaughtered; Treblinka was everywhere." When flies, bees, and
butterflies fly in through the window of their bungalow, Herman
refuses to take action. "To Herman these were not parasites to
be driven away; he saw in each of these creatures the
manifestations of the eternal will to live, experience, comprehend."

Early one morning in Brooklyn, when Herman sees a sunlit bay
"filled with boats, many of them just returned from early-dawn
trips to the open sea," he thinks about the fish who had been
swimming in the water only a few hours before, but now lay on
the boat decks "with glassy eyes, wounded mouths, bloodstained
scales. The fishermen, well-to-do sportsmen, were weighing the
fish and boasting about their catches." It reminds him of the same
Nazi mind-set that killed his family. "As often as Herman had
witnessed the slaughter of animals and fish, he always had the
same thought: in their behavior toward creatures, all men were
Nazis. The smugness with which man could do with other species
as he pleased exemplified the most extreme racist theories, the
principle that might is right."
..
Singer concluded his foreword with a warning: as long as human
beings go on shedding the blood of animals, there will never be
any peace. "There is only one little step from killing animals to
creating gas chambers \ufffd la Hitler and concentration camps \ufffd la
Stalin..There will be no justice as long as man will stand with
a knife or with a gun and destroy those who are weaker than he is."
..
http://www.jewsweek.com/aande/156.htm

> > "It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
> > better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
> > about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
> > it is interlinked.
> >
> > "How we treat animals says a lot about how we treat one another."
>
> Equivocating between abuse and legitimate use.

'Legitimate' in your lexicon means 'anything we choose to do'.

You've run away from the issue of systematic abuse repeatedly.

> > \ufffd Times Colonist (Victoria) 2006
> > http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=00372cbc-1ba5-4b25-9e02-54c9a62c864e&k=50989
>
> I wonder if she was up-front about her intent to dispense AR propaganda to
> children.

'Aim
The aim of Humane Education is to create a culture of empathy
and caring by stimulating the moral development of individuals to
form a compassionate, responsible and just society. It is a means
of introducing children to the reactions and emotions of animals,
as well as linking this to an understanding of environmental issues
and ecosystems.

Definition
Humane Education can be defined as "a process that
encourages an understanding of the need for compassion and
respect for people, animals and the environment and recognises
the interdependence of all living things."

Methods
Humane Education can be delivered in numerous different ways
including non-formal methods such as campaigning, or the more
obvious and more formal approach used in schools. Changes in
attitude and behaviour have been successfully achieved as a result
of powerful campaigns which are a way of bringing awareness to
specific issues relatively quickly. Because of its long-term
effectiveness, formal Humane Education in schools is especially
important since this is the way to develop caring attitudes for the
next generation of citizens.

The Link
The recognition of the importance of the link between animal
cruelty and criminal behaviour is currently drawing increased
attention to the humane movement.

http://worldanimal.net/humane-ed.html

It's not too late to get a sorely-needed education, ditch.
This is where you're at:

'in\ufffdhu\ufffdman
adj.
1. Lacking kindness, pity, or compassion; cruel. See Synonyms at cruel.
2. Deficient in emotional warmth; cold.
3. Not suited for human needs: an inhuman environment.
4. Not of ordinary human form; monstrous.
..
inhuman
adj 1: without compunction or human feeling; "in cold blood";
"cold-blooded killing"; "insensate destruction" [syn: cold,
cold-blooded, insensate] 2: belonging to or resembling something
nonhuman; "something dark and inhuman in form"; "a babel of
inhuman noises"

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?qinhuman




Pearl
2006-10-01 13:00:18 EST
'Japan to Publish Widely Acclaimed American Book 'Eternal Treblinka' --
Thought by Many To Be the Most Powerful Animal Rights Book Ever
Written

Fri Sep 29, 8:00 AM ET

(PRWEB) September 29, 2006 -- The publishing house of Ryokufu in
Tokyo will publish the Japanese edition of Eternal Treblinka: Our
Treatment of Animals and the Holocaust in the spring of 2007.

The book's title comes from the Yiddish writer and Nobel Laureate,
Isaac Bashevis Singer, to whom the book is dedicated. He was the
first major modern author to describe the exploitation and slaughter
of animals in terms of the Holocaust. "In relation to them, all
people are Nazis," he wrote, "for animals it is an eternal
Treblinka." (Treblinka was the Nazi death camp north of Warsaw.)

Ryokufu Shuppan-sha (Ryokufu means "Green Wind") publishes
books about ecology, politics, war and peace, and social issues. The
Japanese edition of Eternal Treblinka will be the first animal rights
book Ryokufu has ever published.

Dr. Toda Kiyosi, Associate Professor of the Faculty of Environmental
Studies, Nagasaki University is working on the book's translation,
and Lydia Tanabe, representing Small Animals Support Association
(SASA), negotiated the terms of the book's publication. She is
writing the Introduction, and Dr. Toda will write the Afterword.

In addition to the Japanese edition, French, Spanish, and Portuguese
editions of Eternal Trelbinka will also be published in 2007.

Earlier in 2006 the Pardes Publishing House in Haifa, Israel published
the Hebrew edition of Eternal Treblinka (ISBN 965-7171-26-1).
The Hebrew translation by Oded Wolkstein was Eternal Treblinka's
sixth translation since Lantern Books published the English edition
(ISBN 1-930051-99-9) four years ago.

Eternal Treblinka had previously been translated and published in
Germany, Italy, Poland, Croatia, and the Czech Republic.

In February, 2004, a jury of 30 of the Germany's leading scholars and
media figures chose "F\ufffdr die Tiere ist jeden Tag Treblinka" (ISBN 3-
6150-649-1), the German edition of Eternal Treblinka, as one of the
country's ten most important non-fiction books. It was honored
alongside books about Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and World
War I.

Eternal Treblinka examines the common roots of animal and human
oppression and the similarities between how the Nazis treated their
victims and how modern society treats the animals it slaughters for
food.

The first part of the book describes the emergence of humans as
the "master species" and how we came to dominate the earth and its
other inhabitants. The second part examines the industrialization of
slaughter of both animals and humans in modern times, while the last
part of the book profiles Jewish and German animal advocates on both
sides of the Holocaust, including Isaac Bashevis Singer himself.

Praise From Around The World--

"The moral challenge posed by Eternal Treblinka turns it into a must
for anyone who seeks to delve into the universal lesson of the
Holocaust." --Maariv (Israeli newspaper)

"A thought-provoking masterpiece meticulously and brilliantly
articulated." --Dr. Ndubuisi Eke, Head, Department of Surgery,
University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

"I believe, along with many others, that your book is one of the most
important books of the century." --Tanja Tuma, publisher, Ljubljana,
Slovenia

"Necessary reading matter...very thought-provoking."
--S\ufffdddeutsche Zeitung (Germany)

"A great book that catches the reader's attention right from the
beginning. Charles Patterson has found the right balance to make his
book perfect." --Dr. Guido P. Lombardi, anthropologist, historian,
Lima, Peru.

"Eternal Treblinka disturbs us because (inevitably though tactfully)
it holds up to us, its readers, a clear mirror to look at ourselves
anew....Kafka would have applauded Eternal Treblinka. It grips like a
thriller." --The Freethinker, UK

"Thank you, thank you for your book. Its strength will certainly
bring more light to the darker places of animal oppression." --Albie
Clemmer, Keflavik, Iceland

"Very well researched and written with great sensitivity...a
compelling, useful and informative book, which I strongly recommend
to others in sub-Saharan Africa." --Professor P S Igbigbi, Head,
Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Malawi

"Sure to provoke, stir the emotions, incite debate and perhaps after
the soul-searching is done lead to a more humane world." --Sukanya
Datta, journalist, India

"The book does a perfect and professional job of showing the
similarity between the mistreatment of people and of animals...
written with great sensitivity. Will no doubt be a valuable
addition to everyone's collection." --Dr. Vugar Huseynov, Baku,
Azerbaijan Republic.

"Exciting, passionate, and daring." --Tom Salsberg, Toronto, Canada

"A very important achievement for animals and humans alike. Most
probably your work will only be truly appreciated in years to come,
but this is the fate of nearly all original and independent
authors." --Christa Blanke, Freiburg, Germany

"It's one of the few books which totally grabs the reader, not only
while reading it, but afterwards also, and probably forever...it
profoundly disturbs, shocks and destroys." --Croatian philosopher
Hrvoje Juric, Zagreb, Croatia

"Very thrilling to read...one of the most important books I have ever
read." --Marianne Kristiansson, Stockholm, Sweden

"I have rarely read a book that made me cry. This one did. It truly
is one of those books that you cannot put down. The message is
haunting. The book is life changing. It has certainly changed my
life. I have not stopped talking about this book. It is truly a
superb work!" --John Williamson, UK

"You must read this carefully documented book." --La Stampa (Italian
national newspaper)

"Thanks a lot for your book, it is the greatest gift one could give
to animal rights movement." --Jayasimha N.G, Campaigns & Legal
Affairs, PETA, India

"Important may be an understatement when describing this book. It is
the literary equivalent of a swift kick to the head that will jar the
reader's perception of animal cruelty hopefully beyond their next few
meals." --Sara Singer, Bucharest, Romania

"It's wonderful how Eternal Treblinka is reaching so many people and
it's only the beginning. Your brave book will remain and be a strong
testimony when we're all long gone." --Patty Mark, Australia

"A thorough and thought-provoking book." --Ha'aretz (Israeli
newspaper)

"It is a book that will cause controversy, even outrage. But it will
shake the complacency of all who are involved with food production
and food consumption...an essential weapon in our struggle for a non-
violent world." --David Graham, UK

"An eye-opening, thought-provoking book that I highly recommend as
way of gaining additional insight into the psychology of the
Holocaust." --Michael Fein, Gantseh Megillah, Montreal, Canada

"The book that breaks all taboos. The book that fires up
controversies all over the world." --Prijatelji Zivotinja (Animal
Friends Croatia), Zagreb, Croatia

http://news.yahoo.com/s/prweb/20060929/bs_prweb/prweb443981_2



D*@.
2006-10-01 14:21:52 EST
On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 13:40:12 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:

>But you are not a legitimate animal welfare supporter,

He sure isn't. He--like you!--refuses to consider the animals' lives:

"I decline to "consider" the lives of animals" - Dutch

You and Dutch are the same.

. . .

>What about the many humans who die so that a minority can eat meat??

What do you think you're talking about, have you any idea at all?
If you try to "explain" it, present something to back it up.

D*@.
2006-10-01 14:51:29 EST
On 1 Oct 2006 01:17:06 -0700, "Rupert" <rupertmccallum@yahoo.com> wrote:

>
>*h@. wrote:
>> On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 14:16:05 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:
>>
>> >Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course
>> >Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
>> >Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
>> >
>> >VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
>> >akin to racism and sexism, an animal activist is urging the
>> >province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
>> >Grade 12 course on social justice.
>> >
>> >"If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
>> >oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
>> >Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.
>> . . .
>>
>> >"It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
>> >better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
>> >about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
>> >it is interlinked.
>>
>> I wonder if she wants people to keep in mind that animals
>> killed for food would not have any life at all if they weren't
>> raised for that purpose, but that wildlife killed in construction,
>> production of wood, paper, crops, electricity etc, would have
>> longer lives if they weren't killed in those processes. I doubt
>> very much she would want to examine that end of things,
>> don't you? She probably doesn't want to examine "speciesism"
>> to the point that people see how "aras" could be considered
>> LESS ethical than everyone else.
>
>Hopefully, she'll encourage the students to consider a number of
>different points of view and come to their own conclusions.

Not very likely if she's an "ara" or some sort of veg*n.

>Your
>argument that ARAs are less ethical than other people is incredibly
>weak.

They contribute to the same animal deaths that everyone
else does except for those of animals who would have no
life at all if they weren't raised for food. They don't avoid
contributing to killing--they avoid contributing to LIFE. That
can easily be viewed as less ethical even than people who
just don't care, and certainly as less ethical than people who
try to be conscientious consumers of animal products.

D*@.
2006-10-01 15:04:37 EST
On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 23:34:06 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:

><dh@.> wrote in message news:gn0th25d535gdllmd5hldi9tuvj39hijsk@4ax.com...
>> On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 14:16:05 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:
>>
>> >Speciesism' touted as topic for Grade 12 social justice course
>> >Janet Steffenhagen, CanWest News Service
>> >Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
>> >
>> >VANCOUVER -- Arguing that "speciesism" is a prejudice
>> >akin to racism and sexism, an animal activist is urging the
>> >province to include the topic in the curriculum for a new
>> >Grade 12 course on social justice.
>> >
>> >"If we are going to discuss social justice concepts such as
>> >oppression and exploitation, animals should be included,"
>> >Lesley Fox of the Vancouver Humane Society said yesterday.
>> . . .
>>
>> >"It isn't that humans are better than animals, or animals are
>> >better than humans," she said in an interview. "When we talk
>> >about oppression, we need to look at it as a whole and how
>> >it is interlinked.
>>
>> I wonder if she wants people to keep in mind that animals
>> killed for food would not have any life at all if they weren't
>> raised for that purpose,
>
>'Wyoming state biologists have estimated that one cow eats
>enough forage to support 6.9 bighorn sheep, 10.8 antelope,
>7.8 deer or 2.1 elk.'
>http://www.organicconsumers.org/corp/cattle_grazing.cfm

It doesn't matter, or how many rabbits, or geese, or
grasshoppers...because by far the majority of the time no
one has any reason to raise animals like that INSTEAD
of cattle. One the rare occasions when they do, they do
it and it has nothing to do with what people buy at the
grocery store. They need to teach the 12 graders that is
part of the "whole and how it is interlinked", instead of
whatever the hell it was you were trying to do. Right?
Right!!!
Page: 1 2 3 4 5   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron