Vegetarian Discussion: Grass Fed Beef

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Scented Nectar
2006-08-26 13:23:22 EST
Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada and the US,
from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields. These fields are
cultivated and machined like any other crop.

Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge shitload of
it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much to cattle I
suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if they've lived
most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture, and
completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.


B*@canada.com
2006-08-26 13:30:59 EST

Scented Nectar wrote:
> Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada and the US,
> from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields. These fields are
> cultivated and machined like any other crop.
>
> Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge shitload of
> it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much to cattle I
> suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if they've lived
> most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture, and
> completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.



Another "mad cow" has been dicovered in Alberta, Canada. The experts
are saying it most likely picked up the prion from FEED.

No news yet on what type of feed,.......


Scented Nectar
2006-08-26 15:43:18 EST
b*g@canada.com wrote:
> Scented Nectar wrote:
> > Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada and the US,
> > from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields. These fields are
> > cultivated and machined like any other crop.
> >
> > Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge shitload of
> > it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much to cattle I
> > suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if they've lived
> > most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture, and
> > completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.
>
>
>
> Another "mad cow" has been dicovered in Alberta, Canada. The experts
> are saying it most likely picked up the prion from FEED.
>
> No news yet on what type of feed,.......

I subscribe to ProMed. It's great for finding out about outbreaks of
diseases affecting humans, animals and plants worldwide. Here's their
latest post on the mad cow in Alberta:

BSE, BOVINE - CANADA (ALBERTA)(05)
**************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
<http://www.promedmail.org>
ProMED-mail, a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
<http://www.isid.org>

Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2006 12:17:49 -0500
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. <flounder9@verizon.net>
Source: Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 24 Aug 2006 [edited]
<http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/newcom/2006/20060824e.shtml>


Investigators from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) have
concluded their epidemiological investigation of the 50-month-old dairy
cow
from Alberta diagnosed with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) on
13
Jul 2006. No part of the animal's carcass entered the human food or
animal
feed systems.

The animal died of causes unrelated to BSE and would likely have lived
for
an additional 4-6 months before the onset of BSE-related clinical
signs.
This age range is not significantly different from that of previous
Canadian cases and indicates exposure to only a very low dose of BSE
infectivity. The detection of this case at the earliest possible moment

demonstrates the highly sensitive nature of Canada's national BSE
surveillance program, which targets cattle from the highest-risk
populations and has tested more than 117 000 animals since 2003.

Because the animal was exposed to BSE after the 1997 implementation of
Canada's feed ban, the CFIA placed priority on conducting a
comprehensive
review of all potential routes of BSE exposure. In general,
investigators
observed good levels of compliance with the feed ban at the farm,
retail
and manufacturing levels. A particular incident was documented in one
commercial feed facility that may have permitted the contamination of a

single batch of cattle feed with prohibited material. The entire batch
of
feed was shipped to the BSE-positive animal's farm. While the
investigation
looked at all possible routes of exposure, this particular batch of
feed is
the most probable source of infection. The CFIA has launched an
enforcement
investigation.

In 2005, Canadian and American officials reviewed and confirmed the
effectiveness of Canada's feed ban. In addition, the surveillance
program
continues to indicate that the feed ban has prevented the level of
infectivity in Canada from increasing. Nonetheless, the extremely small

infective dose of BSE means that even very limited opportunities for
contamination may permit periodic cases. The emergence of such cases is

common to almost every country reporting the disease. The enhanced feed
ban
announced on 26 Jun 2006 will further limit potential BSE spread.
Potentially harmful cattle tissues -- which are currently prohibited in

feeds for cattle, sheep, goats and other ruminants -- are being banned
from
all animal feeds. This action prevents more than 99 percent of
potential
infectivity from entering the top of the animal feed chain, thereby
addressing any downstream contamination that could occur.

The animal component of the investigation traced 172 cattle born or
raised
on the same premises as the positive animal. Using Canada's cattle
identification system, the CFIA fully accounted for all but 8 of these
animals and located 38 live cattle. Most of these animals have been
humanely euthanized and incinerated. The remainder are under quarantine
and
will be destroyed once calving or harvesting of genetic material, as
allowed by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), is complete.

A complete summary of the investigation is available on the CFIA's
website.

CFIA Media relations: (613) 228-6682

--
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
<*9@verizon.net>

[see also:
BSE, bovine - Canada (AB)(04) 20060823.2384
BSE, bovine - Canada (AB)(03) 20060714.1937
BSE, bovine - Canada (MB) 20060706.1855
BSE, bovine - Canada (BC)(03) 20060617.1680
BSE, bovine - Canada (BC)(02): herd tracing 20060430.1249
BSE, bovine - Canada (BC) 20060416.1134
BSE, bovine - Canada (AB)(02) 20060220.0549
BSE, bovine - Canada (AB) 20060123.0219]
...............tg/pg/dk


*##########################################################*
************************************************************
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are posted, but the accuracy and completeness of the
information, and of any statements or opinions based
thereon, are not guaranteed. The reader assumes all risks in
using information posted or archived by ProMED-mail. ISID
and its associated service providers shall not be held
responsible for errors or omissions or held liable for any
damages incurred as a result of use or reliance upon posted
or archived material.
************************************************************
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Visit ProMED-mail's web site at <http://www.promedmail.org>.
Send all items for posting to: promed@promedmail.org
(NOT to an individual moderator). If you do not give your
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commands to subscribe/unsubscribe, get archives, help,
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D*@.
2006-08-27 19:04:01 EST
On 26 Aug 2006 10:23:22 -0700, "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote:

>Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada and the US,
>from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields. These fields are
>cultivated and machined like any other crop.
>
>Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge shitload of
>it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much to cattle I
>suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if they've lived
>most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture, and
>completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.

Though hay no doubt must involve some cds, it can't be nearly
as many as those involved with corn, rice, soy etc since the ground
isn't turned inside out every year like in grain production.

Scented Nectar
2006-08-27 21:40:57 EST

dh@. wrote:
> On 26 Aug 2006 10:23:22 -0700, "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote:
>
> >Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada and the US,
> >from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields. These fields are
> >cultivated and machined like any other crop.
> >
> >Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge shitload of
> >it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much to cattle I
> >suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if they've lived
> >most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture, and
> >completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.
>
> Though hay no doubt must involve some cds, it can't be nearly
> as many as those involved with corn, rice, soy etc since the ground
> isn't turned inside out every year like in grain production.

Hay probably has its ground turned like any other crop. Botanically,
it is just another grain/grass.


Rick
2006-08-27 22:27:30 EST

"Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
news:1156729257.922989.15100@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>
> dh@. wrote:
>> On 26 Aug 2006 10:23:22 -0700, "Scented Nectar"
>> <me@scentednectar.com> wrote:
>>
>> >Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada and
>> >the US,
>> >from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields. These
>> >fields are
>> >cultivated and machined like any other crop.
>> >
>> >Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge
>> >shitload of
>> >it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much to
>> >cattle I
>> >suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if they've
>> >lived
>> >most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture, and
>> >completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.
>>
>> Though hay no doubt must involve some cds, it can't be
>> nearly
>> as many as those involved with corn, rice, soy etc since the
>> ground
>> isn't turned inside out every year like in grain production.
>
> Hay probably has its ground turned like any other crop.
> Botanically,
> it is just another grain/grass.
>==================
Still as stupid and reading impaired as before I see, eh killer?



Scented Nectar
2006-08-28 10:54:06 EST
dicky wrote:
> "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
> news:1156729257.922989.15100@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > dh@. wrote:
> >> On 26 Aug 2006 10:23:22 -0700, "Scented Nectar"
> >> <me@scentednectar.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> >Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada and
> >> >the US,
> >> >from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields. These
> >> >fields are
> >> >cultivated and machined like any other crop.
> >> >
> >> >Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge
> >> >shitload of
> >> >it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much to
> >> >cattle I
> >> >suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if they've
> >> >lived
> >> >most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture, and
> >> >completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.
> >>
> >> Though hay no doubt must involve some cds, it can't be
> >> nearly
> >> as many as those involved with corn, rice, soy etc since the
> >> ground
> >> isn't turned inside out every year like in grain production.
> >
> > Hay probably has its ground turned like any other crop.
> > Botanically,
> > it is just another grain/grass.
> >==================
> Still as stupid and reading impaired as before I see, eh killer?

If you have an argument to make, make it. What are you disputing, and
on what grounds? If you have any evidence (even anecdotal) that
hayfields don't have their soil turned and worked, please provide it.
Note that I said "Hay probably...".

Scented Nectar
http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/


Rick
2006-08-28 12:22:03 EST

"Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
news:1156776845.899118.310640@74g2000cwt.googlegroups.com...
> dicky wrote:
>> "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
>> news:1156729257.922989.15100@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>> >
>> > dh@. wrote:
>> >> On 26 Aug 2006 10:23:22 -0700, "Scented Nectar"
>> >> <me@scentednectar.com> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> >Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada
>> >> >and
>> >> >the US,
>> >> >from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields.
>> >> >These
>> >> >fields are
>> >> >cultivated and machined like any other crop.
>> >> >
>> >> >Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge
>> >> >shitload of
>> >> >it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much
>> >> >to
>> >> >cattle I
>> >> >suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if
>> >> >they've
>> >> >lived
>> >> >most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture,
>> >> >and
>> >> >completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.
>> >>
>> >> Though hay no doubt must involve some cds, it can't be
>> >> nearly
>> >> as many as those involved with corn, rice, soy etc since
>> >> the
>> >> ground
>> >> isn't turned inside out every year like in grain
>> >> production.
>> >
>> > Hay probably has its ground turned like any other crop.
>> > Botanically,
>> > it is just another grain/grass.
>> >==================
>> Still as stupid and reading impaired as before I see, eh
>> killer?
>
> If you have an argument to make, make it. What are you
> disputing, and
> on what grounds? If you have any evidence (even anecdotal)
> that
> hayfields don't have their soil turned and worked, please
> provide it.
> Note that I said "Hay probably...".
=========================
And note what he wrote first, fool.


>
> Scented Nectar
> http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/
>Lys, delusion and ignorance, all in one stop shopping...



Scented Nectar
2006-08-28 13:50:48 EST
little dicky wrote:
> "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
> news:1156776845.899118.310640@74g2000cwt.googlegroups.com...
> > dicky wrote:
> >> "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
> >> news:1156729257.922989.15100@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> >> >
> >> > dh@. wrote:
> >> >> On 26 Aug 2006 10:23:22 -0700, "Scented Nectar"
> >> >> <me@scentednectar.com> wrote:
> >> >>
> >> >> >Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada
> >> >> >and
> >> >> >the US,
> >> >> >from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields.
> >> >> >These
> >> >> >fields are
> >> >> >cultivated and machined like any other crop.
> >> >> >
> >> >> >Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge
> >> >> >shitload of
> >> >> >it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much
> >> >> >to
> >> >> >cattle I
> >> >> >suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if
> >> >> >they've
> >> >> >lived
> >> >> >most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture,
> >> >> >and
> >> >> >completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.
> >> >>
> >> >> Though hay no doubt must involve some cds, it can't be
> >> >> nearly
> >> >> as many as those involved with corn, rice, soy etc since
> >> >> the
> >> >> ground
> >> >> isn't turned inside out every year like in grain
> >> >> production.
> >> >
> >> > Hay probably has its ground turned like any other crop.
> >> > Botanically,
> >> > it is just another grain/grass.
> >> >==================
> >> Still as stupid and reading impaired as before I see, eh
> >> killer?
> >
> > If you have an argument to make, make it. What are you
> > disputing, and
> > on what grounds? If you have any evidence (even anecdotal)
> > that
> > hayfields don't have their soil turned and worked, please
> > provide it.
> > Note that I said "Hay probably...".
> =========================
> And note what he wrote first, fool.

Ricky, don't mutter. What the fuck are you referring to? What was
written first?

Scented Nectar
http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/


Shrubkiller
2006-08-28 13:55:10 EST

Scented Nectar wrote:
> little dicky wrote:
> > "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
> > news:1156776845.899118.310640@74g2000cwt.googlegroups.com...
> > > dicky wrote:
> > >> "Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
> > >> news:1156729257.922989.15100@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> > >> >
> > >> > dh@. wrote:
> > >> >> On 26 Aug 2006 10:23:22 -0700, "Scented Nectar"
> > >> >> <me@scentednectar.com> wrote:
> > >> >>
> > >> >> >Anywhere you go in the countryside, both here in Canada
> > >> >> >and
> > >> >> >the US,
> > >> >> >from what I've seen, there are zillions of hayfields.
> > >> >> >These
> > >> >> >fields are
> > >> >> >cultivated and machined like any other crop.
> > >> >> >
> > >> >> >Here's the thing. Hay is a type of grass. There's a huge
> > >> >> >shitload of
> > >> >> >it being grown out there. It's all going somewhere, much
> > >> >> >to
> > >> >> >cattle I
> > >> >> >suspect, cattle who can be called grass fed even if
> > >> >> >they've
> > >> >> >lived
> > >> >> >most/all their lives completely away from a real pasture,
> > >> >> >and
> > >> >> >completely dependent on the cd-ridden growing of hay.
> > >> >>
> > >> >> Though hay no doubt must involve some cds, it can't be
> > >> >> nearly
> > >> >> as many as those involved with corn, rice, soy etc since
> > >> >> the
> > >> >> ground
> > >> >> isn't turned inside out every year like in grain
> > >> >> production.
> > >> >
> > >> > Hay probably has its ground turned like any other crop.
> > >> > Botanically,
> > >> > it is just another grain/grass.
> > >> >==================
> > >> Still as stupid and reading impaired as before I see, eh
> > >> killer?
> > >
> > > If you have an argument to make, make it. What are you
> > > disputing, and
> > > on what grounds? If you have any evidence (even anecdotal)
> > > that
> > > hayfields don't have their soil turned and worked, please
> > > provide it.
> > > Note that I said "Hay probably...".
> > =========================
> > And note what he wrote first, fool.
>
> Ricky, don't mutter. What the fuck are you referring to? What was
> written first?



He doesn't know! He's just yammering as usual.
Ask him to supply photographic evidence of cds............he can't come
up with any.






>
> Scented Nectar
> http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/

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