Vegetarian Discussion: Vegetarian Diet Is Good For Obese People

Vegetarian Diet Is Good For Obese People
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Medianext05
2006-08-11 13:17:38 EST
Please Check the Link :
http://obesitydiet.blogspot.com/


Chico Chupacabra
2006-08-11 14:17:50 EST
medianext05 wrote:

> Please Check the Link :

I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he maintained his
"principles" and did it on a vegetarian diet. The diet is irrelevant;
he had put on quite a lot of weight on a vegetarian diet in the first
place. Diet's role in weight management is determined by factors that
include age, metabolic rate, level of activity, and so on.

As for your rankings of foods, I would submit egg whites and fish,
neither of which is vegetarian, should be in your free list because
they're high in quality protein and the oil in the fish is beneficial
(egg whites are fat-free). I would also argue that there are no "foods
to be avoided" unless one has underlying legitimate medical reasons for
avoiding foods. Everything in moderation -- including vegetarianism.

As for soft drinks and "science," see:
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,207870,00.html

Derek
2006-08-11 15:42:07 EST
On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 18:17:50 GMT, chico chupacabra <no@way.jose> wrote:
>medianext05 wrote:
>
>> Please Check the Link :
>
>I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
>has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he maintained his
>"principles" and did it on a vegetarian diet. The diet is irrelevant;
>he had put on quite a lot of weight on a vegetarian diet in the first
>place.

Exactly! While following a strict vegetarian diet (vegan) my
weight steadily increased to just over 250 lbs. I gave myself
a second chance and decided to lose that excess, losing 60 lb
in just 6 months. I've lost another 10 lb quite naturally since
quitting my diet nearly a year ago, which leaves me at just
under 13 stone (181 lbs) today. My vegetarianism had
nothing to do with my weight loss, and it has nothing to do
with my being able to maintain my now reasonable weight,
either. I was over-eating, and that's all there is to it. Had I
been eating bacon sandwiches with 3 or 4 slices of German
salami (an old favourite of mine before going vegan decades
ago) I would still have lost my excess weight and been able
to maintain it. The trick is simple: don't over-eat, and make
sure you don't go hungry while dieting. I found that when I
near-starved myself during the final week of the month to
reach my 10 lb goal, I didn't lose as much as when I ate in
moderation.

>Diet's role in weight management is determined by factors that
>include age, metabolic rate, level of activity, and so on.
>
>As for your rankings of foods, I would submit egg whites and fish,
>neither of which is vegetarian, should be in your free list because
>they're high in quality protein and the oil in the fish is beneficial
>(egg whites are fat-free). I would also argue that there are no "foods
>to be avoided" unless one has underlying legitimate medical reasons for
>avoiding foods. Everything in moderation -- including vegetarianism.
>As for soft drinks and "science," see:
>http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,207870,00.html

Leif Erikson
2006-08-11 16:13:47 EST
Derek wrote:
> On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 18:17:50 GMT, chico chupacabra <no@way.jose> wrote:
> >medianext05 wrote:
> >
> >> Please Check the Link :
> >
> >I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
> >has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he maintained his
> >"principles" and did it on a vegetarian diet. The diet is irrelevant;
> >he had put on quite a lot of weight on a vegetarian diet in the first
> >place.
>
> Exactly! While following a strict vegetarian diet (vegan) my
> weight steadily increased to just over 250 lbs. I gave myself
> a second chance and decided to lose that excess, losing 60 lb
> in just 6 months. I've lost another 10 lb quite naturally since
> quitting my diet nearly a year ago, which leaves me at just
> under 13 stone (181 lbs) today. My vegetarianism had
> nothing to do with my weight loss, and it has nothing to do
> with my being able to maintain my now reasonable weight,
> either. I was over-eating, and that's all there is to it. Had I
> been eating bacon sandwiches with 3 or 4 slices of German
> salami (an old favourite of mine before going vegan decades
> ago) I would still have lost my excess weight and been able
> to maintain it. The trick is simple: don't over-eat, and make
> sure you don't go hungry while dieting. I found that when I
> near-starved myself during the final week of the month to
> reach my 10 lb goal, I didn't lose as much as when I ate in
> moderation.

Weight gain or loss follows very simple arithmetic rules: If you
consume more calories than you expend, you gain weight; if you consume
fewer calories than you expend, you lose weight.

My wife gained quite a lot of weight *after* childbirth, and it was
because her physical activity was low and she was eating too much. She
joined a women-only fitness center, and began watching her portion
sizes. She didn't change what she ate at all; she simply ate less of
everything. She began reading labels that *always* indicate what a
standard portion is, and she realized she had been eating two to three
portions of most foods (keeping in mind that standard portions are
pretty small). She was concerned not to lose too much weight too
quickly, so her weight drop was moderately paced, but in about 15
months, she lost something like 45 pounds.

A friend of mine once saw a comedy sketch on some cable channel in
which a group of women at some diet class asked the doctor why they
were fat. The doctor, who I think was supposed to be an East Indian
character, looked at them and said, "You're fat because you eat [begins
to shout] TOO MUCH FUCKING FOOD!!!" That, and too little exercise, are
all there are to it.


>
> >Diet's role in weight management is determined by factors that
> >include age, metabolic rate, level of activity, and so on.
> >
> >As for your rankings of foods, I would submit egg whites and fish,
> >neither of which is vegetarian, should be in your free list because
> >they're high in quality protein and the oil in the fish is beneficial
> >(egg whites are fat-free). I would also argue that there are no "foods
> >to be avoided" unless one has underlying legitimate medical reasons for
> >avoiding foods. Everything in moderation -- including vegetarianism.
> >As for soft drinks and "science," see:
> >http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,207870,00.html


Derek
2006-08-11 17:28:27 EST
On 11 Aug 2006 13:13:47 -0700, "Leif Erikson" <notgenx32@yahoo.com> wrote:
>Derek wrote:
>> On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 18:17:50 GMT, chico chupacabra <no@way.jose> wrote:
>> >medianext05 wrote:
>> >
>> >> Please Check the Link :
>> >
>> >I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
>> >has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he maintained his
>> >"principles" and did it on a vegetarian diet. The diet is irrelevant;
>> >he had put on quite a lot of weight on a vegetarian diet in the first
>> >place.
>>
>> Exactly! While following a strict vegetarian diet (vegan) my
>> weight steadily increased to just over 250 lbs. I gave myself
>> a second chance and decided to lose that excess, losing 60 lb
>> in just 6 months. I've lost another 10 lb quite naturally since
>> quitting my diet nearly a year ago, which leaves me at just
>> under 13 stone (181 lbs) today. My vegetarianism had
>> nothing to do with my weight loss, and it has nothing to do
>> with my being able to maintain my now reasonable weight,
>> either. I was over-eating, and that's all there is to it. Had I
>> been eating bacon sandwiches with 3 or 4 slices of German
>> salami (an old favourite of mine before going vegan decades
>> ago) I would still have lost my excess weight and been able
>> to maintain it. The trick is simple: don't over-eat, and make
>> sure you don't go hungry while dieting. I found that when I
>> near-starved myself during the final week of the month to
>> reach my 10 lb goal, I didn't lose as much as when I ate in
>> moderation.
>
>Weight gain or loss follows very simple arithmetic rules: If you
>consume more calories than you expend, you gain weight; if you
>consume fewer calories than you expend, you lose weight.
>
>My wife gained quite a lot of weight *after* childbirth, and it was
>because her physical activity was low and she was eating too much.
>She joined a women-only fitness center, and began watching her
>portion sizes. She didn't change what she ate at all; she simply ate
>less of everything. She began reading labels that *always* indicate
>what a standard portion is, and she realized she had been eating two
>to three portions of most foods (keeping in mind that standard portions
>are pretty small). She was concerned not to lose too much weight too
>quickly, so her weight drop was moderately paced, but in about 15
>months, she lost something like 45 pounds.

Please forward my congratulations. With all due respect, being
naturally fit and not prone to over-eating you might not fully
appreciate her sense of achievement as well as I can, even
though you undoubtedly share the benefits she's now enjoying
because of it. Like me she's learned something very important;
we can eat what we like without getting fat if done in moderation.
She's very fortunate to realise this and I'm very happy for her
because not many do. It's because of this that I'm sure she'll
always be able to maintain her current weight.

>A friend of mine once saw a comedy sketch on some cable channel in
>which a group of women at some diet class asked the doctor why they
>were fat. The doctor, who I think was supposed to be an East Indian
>character, looked at them and said, "You're fat because you eat [begins
>to shout] TOO MUCH FUCKING FOOD!!!" That, and too little
>exercise, are all there are to it.

Actually, as strange as it might seem, I don't believe exercise
played much if any part in my weight loss at all. My ability, or
rather lack of it because of my physical restrictions to maintain
an exercise regimen for any length of time meant I went without
it some weeks, and the weight fell off just as quick. Unless you're
an avid cyclist like chico, exercise plays a very small part in my
ignorant opinion.

Chico Chupacabra
2006-08-11 17:49:54 EST
Derek <usenet.email@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 11 Aug 2006 13:13:47 -0700, "Leif Erikson" <notgenx32@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> >Derek wrote:
> >> On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 18:17:50 GMT, chico chupacabra <no@way.jose>
> >> wrote:
> >> >medianext05 wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> Please Check the Link :
> >> >
> >> >I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
> >> >has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he maintained his
> >> >"principles" and did it on a vegetarian diet. The diet is
> >> >irrelevant; he had put on quite a lot of weight on a vegetarian
> >> >diet in the first place.
> >>
> >> Exactly! While following a strict vegetarian diet (vegan) my
> >> weight steadily increased to just over 250 lbs. I gave myself
> >> a second chance and decided to lose that excess, losing 60 lb
> >> in just 6 months. I've lost another 10 lb quite naturally since
> >> quitting my diet nearly a year ago, which leaves me at just
> >> under 13 stone (181 lbs) today. My vegetarianism had
> >> nothing to do with my weight loss, and it has nothing to do
> >> with my being able to maintain my now reasonable weight,
> >> either. I was over-eating, and that's all there is to it. Had I
> >> been eating bacon sandwiches with 3 or 4 slices of German
> >> salami (an old favourite of mine before going vegan decades
> >> ago) I would still have lost my excess weight and been able
> >> to maintain it. The trick is simple: don't over-eat, and make
> >> sure you don't go hungry while dieting. I found that when I
> >> near-starved myself during the final week of the month to
> >> reach my 10 lb goal, I didn't lose as much as when I ate in
> >> moderation.
> >
> >Weight gain or loss follows very simple arithmetic rules: If you
> >consume more calories than you expend, you gain weight; if you
> >consume fewer calories than you expend, you lose weight.
> >
> >My wife gained quite a lot of weight *after* childbirth, and it was
> >because her physical activity was low and she was eating too much.
> >She joined a women-only fitness center, and began watching her
> >portion sizes. She didn't change what she ate at all; she simply
> >ate less of everything. She began reading labels that *always*
> >indicate what a standard portion is, and she realized she had been
> >eating two to three portions of most foods (keeping in mind that
> >standard portions are pretty small). She was concerned not to lose
> >too much weight too quickly, so her weight drop was moderately
> >paced, but in about 15 months, she lost something like 45 pounds.
>
> Please forward my congratulations. With all due respect, being
> naturally fit and not prone to over-eating you might not fully
> appreciate her sense of achievement as well as I can, even
> though you undoubtedly share the benefits she's now enjoying
> because of it. Like me she's learned something very important;
> we can eat what we like without getting fat if done in moderation.
> She's very fortunate to realise this and I'm very happy for her
> because not many do. It's because of this that I'm sure she'll
> always be able to maintain her current weight.
>
> >A friend of mine once saw a comedy sketch on some cable channel in
> >which a group of women at some diet class asked the doctor why they
> >were fat. The doctor, who I think was supposed to be an East Indian
> >character, looked at them and said, "You're fat because you eat
> >[begins to shout] TOO MUCH FUCKING FOOD!!!" That, and too little
> >exercise, are all there are to it.
>
> Actually, as strange as it might seem, I don't believe exercise
> played much if any part in my weight loss at all. My ability, or
> rather lack of it because of my physical restrictions to maintain
> an exercise regimen for any length of time meant I went without
> it some weeks, and the weight fell off just as quick. Unless you're
> an avid cyclist like chico, exercise plays a very small part in my
> ignorant opinion.

Don't underestimate spotty exercise. Exercising less often than one
should is still beneficial over the longhaul. Those benefits stick and
still accrue as long as exercise isn't totally abandoned. Just because
you went a week or two (or three) with slumps doesn't mean whatever
regular exercise you had before that period is lost: your basal
metabolic rate is still increased over where it was before and, even
though it may decline gradually over extended periods of
inactivity, it's quick to rebound. So it's better to get some exercise
even infrequently than none at all.

Leif Erikson
2006-08-11 17:50:01 EST
Derek wrote:
> On 11 Aug 2006 13:13:47 -0700, "Leif Erikson" <notgenx32@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >Derek wrote:
> >> On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 18:17:50 GMT, chico chupacabra <no@way.jose> wrote:
> >> >medianext05 wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> Please Check the Link :
> >> >
> >> >I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
> >> >has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he maintained his
> >> >"principles" and did it on a vegetarian diet. The diet is irrelevant;
> >> >he had put on quite a lot of weight on a vegetarian diet in the first
> >> >place.
> >>
> >> Exactly! While following a strict vegetarian diet (vegan) my
> >> weight steadily increased to just over 250 lbs. I gave myself
> >> a second chance and decided to lose that excess, losing 60 lb
> >> in just 6 months. I've lost another 10 lb quite naturally since
> >> quitting my diet nearly a year ago, which leaves me at just
> >> under 13 stone (181 lbs) today. My vegetarianism had
> >> nothing to do with my weight loss, and it has nothing to do
> >> with my being able to maintain my now reasonable weight,
> >> either. I was over-eating, and that's all there is to it. Had I
> >> been eating bacon sandwiches with 3 or 4 slices of German
> >> salami (an old favourite of mine before going vegan decades
> >> ago) I would still have lost my excess weight and been able
> >> to maintain it. The trick is simple: don't over-eat, and make
> >> sure you don't go hungry while dieting. I found that when I
> >> near-starved myself during the final week of the month to
> >> reach my 10 lb goal, I didn't lose as much as when I ate in
> >> moderation.
> >
> >Weight gain or loss follows very simple arithmetic rules: If you
> >consume more calories than you expend, you gain weight; if you
> >consume fewer calories than you expend, you lose weight.
> >
> >My wife gained quite a lot of weight *after* childbirth, and it was
> >because her physical activity was low and she was eating too much.
> >She joined a women-only fitness center, and began watching her
> >portion sizes. She didn't change what she ate at all; she simply ate
> >less of everything. She began reading labels that *always* indicate
> >what a standard portion is, and she realized she had been eating two
> >to three portions of most foods (keeping in mind that standard portions
> >are pretty small). She was concerned not to lose too much weight too
> >quickly, so her weight drop was moderately paced, but in about 15
> >months, she lost something like 45 pounds.
>
> Please forward my congratulations. With all due respect, being
> naturally fit and not prone to over-eating you might not fully
> appreciate her sense of achievement as well as I can, even
> though you undoubtedly share the benefits she's now enjoying
> because of it.

She looks better now, 13 years and one child later, than she did when I
met her.


> Like me she's learned something very important;
> we can eat what we like without getting fat if done in moderation.
> She's very fortunate to realise this and I'm very happy for her
> because not many do. It's because of this that I'm sure she'll
> always be able to maintain her current weight.
>
> >A friend of mine once saw a comedy sketch on some cable channel in
> >which a group of women at some diet class asked the doctor why they
> >were fat. The doctor, who I think was supposed to be an East Indian
> >character, looked at them and said, "You're fat because you eat [begins
> >to shout] TOO MUCH FUCKING FOOD!!!" That, and too little
> >exercise, are all there are to it.
>
> Actually, as strange as it might seem, I don't believe exercise
> played much if any part in my weight loss at all. My ability, or
> rather lack of it because of my physical restrictions to maintain
> an exercise regimen for any length of time meant I went without
> it some weeks, and the weight fell off just as quick. Unless you're
> an avid cyclist like chico, exercise plays a very small part in my
> ignorant opinion.

It doesn't need to play all that big a role, provided you get the food
intake under control. However, it certainly can be part of the
expenditure side of the equation.


Pearl
2006-08-11 22:06:17 EST
"chico chupacabra" <no@way.jose> wrote in message news:20060811131753.af69deb9.no@way.jose...
> medianext05 wrote:
>
> > Please Check the Link :
>
> I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
> has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he

"self-reporting" .... "small sample size" ... thought you deemed
such as "unacceptable evidence", chumpo? Only when it suits
your disgusting agenda, eh. And I see that you are conveniently
now 'forgetting' that your 'subject' is confined to a wheeelchair.

<sigh>

'New Scientific Review Shows Vegetarian Diets Cause
Major Weight Loss Without Exercise or Calorie Counting
31-03-2006 05:01
WASHINGTON, March 31 /PRNewswire/ --

- Controlled Research Trials Prove Diet's Efficacy

A scientific review in April's Nutrition Reviews shows that a
vegetarian diet is highly effective for weight loss. Vegetarian
populations tend to be slimmer than meat-eaters, and they
experience lower rates of heart disease, diabetes, high blood
pressure, and other life-threatening conditions linked to
overweight and obesity. The new review, compiling data from
87 previous studies, shows the weight-loss effect does not
depend on exercise or calorie-counting, and it occurs at a
rate of approximately 1 pound per week.

Rates of obesity in the general population are skyrocketing,
while in vegetarians, obesity prevalence ranges from 0 percent
to 6 percent, note study authors Susan E. Berkow, Ph.D.,
C.N.S., and Neal D. Barnard, M.D., of the Physicians
Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM).

The authors found that the body weight of both male and
female vegetarians is, on average, 3 percent to 20 percent
lower than that of meat-eaters. Vegetarian and vegan diets
have also been put to the test in clinical studies, as the
review notes. The best of these clinical studies isolated the
effects of diet by keeping exercise constant. The researchers
found that a low-fat vegan diet leads to weight loss of about
1 pound per week, even without additional exercise or limits
on portion sizes, calories, or carbohydrates.

"Our research reveals that people can enjoy unlimited
portions of high-fiber foods such as fruits, vegetables, and
whole grains to achieve or maintain a healthy body weight
without feeling hungry," says Dr. Berkow, the lead author.

"There is evidence that a vegan diet causes an increased
calorie burn after meals, meaning plant-based foods are
being used more efficiently as fuel for the body, as
opposed to being stored as fat," says Dr. Barnard. Insulin
sensitivity is increased by a vegan diet, allowing nutrients
to more rapidly enter the cells of the body to be converted
to heat rather than to fat.

Earlier this month, a team of researchers led by Tim Key
of Oxford University found that meat-eaters who switched
to a plant-based diet gained less weight over a period of
five years. Papers reviewed by Drs. Berkow and Barnard
include several published by Dr. Key and his colleagues,
as well as a recent study of more than 55,000 Swedish
women showing that meat-eaters are more likely to be
overweight than vegetarians and vegans.
..
http://media.netpr.pl/notatka_54444.html





Derek
2006-08-12 05:47:42 EST
On Sat, 12 Aug 2006 03:06:17 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie> wrote:
>"chico chupacabra" <no@way.jose> wrote in message news:20060811131753.af69deb9.no@way.jose...
>> medianext05 wrote:
>>
>> > Please Check the Link :
>>
>> I did. It's BS. Derek, whose posts you'll find in this group,
>> has recently lost a lot of weight. I suspect he
>
>"self-reporting" .... "small sample size" ... thought you deemed
>such as "unacceptable evidence", chumpo? Only when it suits
>your disgusting agenda, eh. And I see that you are conveniently
>now 'forgetting' that your 'subject' is confined to a wheeelchair.

Not at all times, Pearl. You knew that. I can walk short
distances if I don't overdo it and rest up afterwards, and
what I lack in my legs is easily compensated by my upper-
body strength and mobility. Even at 250 lbs I was able to
do 2 x 8 chin-ups from a hanging position without too much
effort, and I can squeeze the life out of Bullworker all day
long if I want to. In fact I always keep one right by my side
at my PC station upstairs.

Though I would never promote meat there's no doubt that
everyone can eat it and still maintain excellent health as
well as lose excess weight. As per the subject title of this
thread, a "vegetarian diet is good for obese people", but
then so is a meat-centric diet. Leif is correct when saying,
"Weight gain or loss follows a very simple arithmetic rule",
and that rule can be paraphrased using Kirchoff's first
law; the sum of currents (calories in this case) entering a
node (body) plus the sum of currents leaving a node sum
to zero.

Derek
2006-08-12 06:18:36 EST
On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 21:49:54 GMT, chico chupacabra <no@way.jose> wrote:
>Derek <usenet.email@gmail.com> wrote:
[..]
>> Actually, as strange as it might seem, I don't believe exercise
>> played much if any part in my weight loss at all. My ability, or
>> rather lack of it because of my physical restrictions to maintain
>> an exercise regimen for any length of time meant I went without
>> it some weeks, and the weight fell off just as quick. Unless you're
>> an avid cyclist like chico, exercise plays a very small part in my
>> ignorant opinion.
>
>Don't underestimate spotty exercise. Exercising less often than one
>should is still beneficial over the longhaul. Those benefits stick and
>still accrue as long as exercise isn't totally abandoned. Just because
>you went a week or two (or three) with slumps doesn't mean whatever
>regular exercise you had before that period is lost: your basal
>metabolic rate is still increased over where it was before and, even
>though it may decline gradually over extended periods of
>inactivity, it's quick to rebound. So it's better to get some exercise
>even infrequently than none at all.

I understand that. Thanks. Without going into too much detail
about my meds, it's not uncommon for me to take between 20
and 40mg of morphine salts every four hours when the pain
gets out of control, and then there's the valium on top of that
(up to 40mg a day) which makes me feel quite weak and not
up to any form of exercise at all. Laying flat for days on end
isn't uncommon either, and by the time I'm ready for exercise
I'm back to square one again. Nevertheless, I do make that
extra bit of effort and exercise when I can.
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