Vegetarian Discussion: Leather Gloves Vs. Synthetic Gloves

Leather Gloves Vs. Synthetic Gloves
Posts: 200

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11   Next  (First | Last)

Magnulus
2006-08-04 04:09:02 EST
I have this dilema. I am an ovo-lacto vegetarian. I wear wool but not
leather usually. I am riding a scooter, I got my motorcycle license a few
months ago. I use it to commute and run errands. I wear alot of
protective gear. Almost all of it is easy to get in nonleather, and is of
high quality. My boots are Italian and they are made from Lorica, which is
actually better than leather- no maintanence needed and it breaths better.
My jacket is heavy polyester mesh, heavy nylon, and polypropylene armor.
The pants and helmet are likewise all synthetic.

But the sticking point is gloves. Not just in terms of animal use but
environmentalism. I bought some Tourmaster Airflow gloves. They cost 20
bucks. They are made from Amara, a microfiber polyester suede, and
polyester mesh on the top with an Amara reinforced knucklepad. Amara is
somewhat abrasion resistant, but it wears out. My gloves have only been
used for about 300 miles of riding and already they are starting to pill up
in the palm. Apparrently it is not usual to have to buy a new pair of
gloves every season or so for synthetics. A good pair of leather gloves,
OTOH, could last for a decade or more.

Now, given that I don't know if these synthetic gloves can be recycled (I
doubt it, at least locally in Florida), what is the ethics of buying a new
pair of gloves every 6 months (1 pair summer, 1 pair winter) vs. buying 2
pairs of leather gloves and wearing them for decades. Cost is also a
factor. Synthetic MC gloves will cost 20-35 dollars. A leather glove of
comparable quality will cost about 40 dollars. Spend 50 dollars per year
vs. 4 dollars per year, the cost is compelling for the leather gloves.

Let's just say I feel sorely tempted to wear leather. Which is wierd
because everything else in my life is pretty much non-animal, save except
for maybe gelatin in vitamins, which I find impossible to find a substitute
for. No leather shoes in general, no leather belts. I have a wool hat, but
I'm not a vegan per se, just leather shunning.



Misterina
2006-08-04 04:20:19 EST
Just thought I would post and say I like you :)

Well um. Unfortunately I cannot help you here. I live in South Africa and we
are pretty backwards and you probably have more options in a First World
country. I don't know what is available. Have you asked at the scooter
company whether they know of anything? Or glove manufacturers?



"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:0eDAg.43443$Nt.31894@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
> I have this dilema. I am an ovo-lacto vegetarian. I wear wool but not
> leather usually. I am riding a scooter, I got my motorcycle license a few
> months ago. I use it to commute and run errands. I wear alot of
> protective gear. Almost all of it is easy to get in nonleather, and is of
> high quality. My boots are Italian and they are made from Lorica, which
is
> actually better than leather- no maintanence needed and it breaths better.
> My jacket is heavy polyester mesh, heavy nylon, and polypropylene armor.
> The pants and helmet are likewise all synthetic.
>
> But the sticking point is gloves. Not just in terms of animal use but
> environmentalism. I bought some Tourmaster Airflow gloves. They cost 20
> bucks. They are made from Amara, a microfiber polyester suede, and
> polyester mesh on the top with an Amara reinforced knucklepad. Amara is
> somewhat abrasion resistant, but it wears out. My gloves have only been
> used for about 300 miles of riding and already they are starting to pill
up
> in the palm. Apparrently it is not usual to have to buy a new pair of
> gloves every season or so for synthetics. A good pair of leather gloves,
> OTOH, could last for a decade or more.
>
> Now, given that I don't know if these synthetic gloves can be recycled
(I
> doubt it, at least locally in Florida), what is the ethics of buying a new
> pair of gloves every 6 months (1 pair summer, 1 pair winter) vs. buying 2
> pairs of leather gloves and wearing them for decades. Cost is also a
> factor. Synthetic MC gloves will cost 20-35 dollars. A leather glove
of
> comparable quality will cost about 40 dollars. Spend 50 dollars per year
> vs. 4 dollars per year, the cost is compelling for the leather gloves.
>
> Let's just say I feel sorely tempted to wear leather. Which is wierd
> because everything else in my life is pretty much non-animal, save except
> for maybe gelatin in vitamins, which I find impossible to find a
substitute
> for. No leather shoes in general, no leather belts. I have a wool hat,
but
> I'm not a vegan per se, just leather shunning.
>
>



Vicky Conlan
2006-08-04 04:53:42 EST
According to <magnulus@bellsouth.net>:
> Now, given that I don't know if these synthetic gloves can be recycled (I
>doubt it, at least locally in Florida), what is the ethics of buying a new
>pair of gloves every 6 months (1 pair summer, 1 pair winter) vs. buying 2
>pairs of leather gloves and wearing them for decades. Cost is also a
>factor. Synthetic MC gloves will cost 20-35 dollars. A leather glove of
>comparable quality will cost about 40 dollars. Spend 50 dollars per year
>vs. 4 dollars per year, the cost is compelling for the leather gloves.

I have a similar problem with shoes - in the summer I'm happy enough to
wear canvas shoes, although they also tend to not last all that long; in
the winter I normally give in and wear leather. I can sort of justify it
by thinking of leather as a by-product of the meat industry, so the cows
aren't generally actually killed for the leather (afaik, anyhow), so until
the meat industry is slowed down enough for it to matter, I'm not actually
funding the killing. Yeah, it's a bit of a crap excuse, and even I don't
really believe it, but I have to have something.

> Let's just say I feel sorely tempted to wear leather. Which is wierd
>because everything else in my life is pretty much non-animal, save except
>for maybe gelatin in vitamins, which I find impossible to find a substitute
>for.

A balanced diet? ;-)
(sorry, never approved of the whole vitamin culture thing, it just seems a
bit, well, pointless really. But obviously, it's none of my business)
--

Rick
2006-08-04 09:39:12 EST

"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:0eDAg.43443$Nt.31894@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
> I have this dilema. I am an ovo-lacto vegetarian. I wear
> wool but not leather usually. I am riding a scooter, I got my
> motorcycle license a few months ago. I use it to commute and
> run errands. I wear alot of protective gear. Almost all of
> it is easy to get in nonleather, and is of high quality. My
> boots are Italian and they are made from Lorica, which is
> actually better than leather- no maintanence needed and it
> breaths better. My jacket is heavy polyester mesh, heavy nylon,
> and polypropylene armor. The pants and helmet are likewise all
> synthetic.

Since you like to support the petro-chemical industry, go ahead
and but/wear the synthetics. Afterall, the deaths of billions of
animals that are left to rot mean nothing to you, so why use the
obvious by-products of animals. Afterall, they're already in the
tires for your bike and propably many other components. Plus,
they die for you entertainment here on usenet, so again, why
worry, eh hypocrite?


>
> But the sticking point is gloves. Not just in terms of animal
> use but environmentalism. I bought some Tourmaster Airflow
> gloves. They cost 20 bucks. They are made from Amara, a
> microfiber polyester suede, and polyester mesh on the top with
> an Amara reinforced knucklepad. Amara is somewhat abrasion
> resistant, but it wears out. My gloves have only been used for
> about 300 miles of riding and already they are starting to pill
> up in the palm. Apparrently it is not usual to have to buy a
> new pair of gloves every season or so for synthetics. A good
> pair of leather gloves, OTOH, could last for a decade or more.
>
> Now, given that I don't know if these synthetic gloves can be
> recycled (I doubt it, at least locally in Florida), what is the
> ethics of buying a new pair of gloves every 6 months (1 pair
> summer, 1 pair winter) vs. buying 2 pairs of leather gloves and
> wearing them for decades. Cost is also a factor. Synthetic
> MC gloves will cost 20-35 dollars. A leather glove of
> comparable quality will cost about 40 dollars. Spend 50
> dollars per year vs. 4 dollars per year, the cost is compelling
> for the leather gloves.
>
> Let's just say I feel sorely tempted to wear leather. Which
> is wierd because everything else in my life is pretty much
> non-animal, save except for maybe gelatin in vitamins, which I
> find impossible to find a substitute for. No leather shoes in
> general, no leather belts. I have a wool hat, but I'm not a
> vegan per se, just leather shunning.
>



Magnulus
2006-08-04 14:56:06 EST
That's one problem with being fully vegan. Most of the non-animal
alternatives for clothing have significant deficiencies. Canvas shoes just
don't last that long. You can buy hemp shoes that last longer but they cost
more, and still you can buy leather shoes cheaper that will last just as
long.

Me, I wear nylon/synthetic shoes that I buy from Wal-Mart. Hey, I'm not
rich so I take what I can get. They last a year or so, then I buy more.



Magnulus
2006-08-04 15:00:15 EST
I'm not a hypocrite. If anything, you are the one with the simple minded
devotion to a cause. Me, I am consider the ramifications of all my actions.
The meat/animal husbandry industry is responsible for a great deal of
environmental destruction. It takes about 8 calories of petroleum to
produce one calorie of food. If you are feeding the food to cows and pigs
in turn, that's even more inefficient. Who knows how much petroleum is
simply going to feeding peoples unnecessary appetites for flesh.

In the future eating meat will be unsustainable for all but the elite. 10
billion people are not going to be fed Big Macs. Therefore, my
vegetarianism is a sign of solidarity with the reality of the masses, since
I am not an elitist. Are you?

I never claimed to be morally blameless. But in this life we are given
two choices. We can be asleep or awake. Oblivious to the problem (and thus
part of the problem), or part of the solution. You get to choose, even if
you don't know you have the choice.



Rick
2006-08-04 15:13:24 EST

"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:DMMAg.7395$l7.3072@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> I'm not a hypocrite. If anything, you are the one with the
> simple minded devotion to a cause. Me, I am consider the
> ramifications of all my actions.
==================
No, you do not. or you would have already known that your
synthetics are far from cruelty-free.



> The meat/animal husbandry industry is responsible for a great
> deal of environmental destruction.
==================================
As is mono-culture crop production.


It takes about 8 calories of petroleum to
> produce one calorie of food. If you are feeding the food to
> cows and pigs in turn, that's even more inefficient.
==============================
ROTFLMAo What a hoot! How much petro does it take to get grass
to grow, killer? I seem to have a hard time getting it to slow
down. There is NO requirement to feed any crops to animals.
There is no need for anywhere near the petro input as there is
for your crop foods.


Who knows how much petroleum is
> simply going to feeding peoples unnecessary appetites for
> flesh.
==========================
And how much for your selfish entertainment? Afterall, being on
usenet is not a need. You're here for entertainment. I suggest
if you really want to kill fewer animals get off the computer and
go to bullfights. far fewer bulls have died in all bullfights
than for power generation, hypocrite.


>
> In the future eating meat will be unsustainable for all but
> the elite. 10 billion people are not going to be fed Big Macs.
===========================
More ignorant spew. ^ billion are not now eating big macs dolt.

Therefore, my
> vegetarianism is a sign of solidarity with the reality of the
> masses, since I am not an elitist. Are you?
================================
Yes, you are, or wish to be. A smug, self-rightious, elite of
hypocrisy. Too bad you're just stupid enough to yearn for the
title...


>
> I never claimed to be morally blameless. But in this life we
> are given two choices. We can be asleep or awake. Oblivious
> to the problem (and thus part of the problem), or part of the
> solution. You get to choose, even if you don't know you have
> the choice.
=====================
And you're choices are killing more animals than necessary.
Welcome to hypocrisy, fool...

>
>



D*@.
2006-08-04 16:26:18 EST
On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 13:39:12 GMT, "rick" <stop@stop.net> wrote:

>
>"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
>news:0eDAg.43443$Nt.31894@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
>> I have this dilema. I am an ovo-lacto vegetarian. I wear
>> wool but not leather usually. I am riding a scooter, I got my
>> motorcycle license a few months ago. I use it to commute and
>> run errands. I wear alot of protective gear. Almost all of
>> it is easy to get in nonleather, and is of high quality. My
>> boots are Italian and they are made from Lorica, which is
>> actually better than leather- no maintanence needed and it
>> breaths better. My jacket is heavy polyester mesh, heavy nylon,
>> and polypropylene armor. The pants and helmet are likewise all
>> synthetic.
>
>Since you like to support the petro-chemical industry, go ahead
>and but/wear the synthetics. Afterall, the deaths of billions of
>animals that are left to rot mean nothing to you, so why use the
>obvious by-products of animals. Afterall, they're already in the
>tires for your bike and propably many other components. Plus,
>they die for you entertainment here on usenet, so again, why
>worry, eh hypocrite?

They never appear to care about the deaths they cause to
wildlife...all those many deaths they contribute to like everyone
else does. The only deaths these "aras" pretend to care about
contributing to, are the *lives* and deaths of animals who would
not have had any life at all if they hadn't been raised deliberately
by humans. Quite disgusting people. It's those same people who
dishonestly pretend to promote "rights" for livestock, when the
truth is that "ar" wouldn't provide better lives, longer lives, *any*
lives--much less rights or anything else--for livestock. Disgusting!
I have seen at least one of them--disgustingly--claim that he
respects the right to life of potential future animals that he would
prevent from having any life at all! More? Yes, here we see "aras"
lying to children telling them that vegetarianism helps livestock:
_________________________________________________________
Here you come to save the day!
[...]
And while Viacom and the dairy industries are counting
their cash, cows are counting on you to save them. Cows
make milk for their babies, not for people!
[...]
Please don't eat cheese or other dairy products. You'll
be saving some mother cows and their babies if you make
your life cheese-free!

http://www.peta-online.org/kids/kidaction.html
¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
Distgusting!!!

D*@.
2006-08-04 16:27:20 EST
On Fri, 4 Aug 2006 04:09:02 -0400, "Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:

> I have this dilema. I am an ovo-lacto vegetarian. I wear wool but not
>leather usually.

That doesn't matter. You're already contributing to raising cattle
with dairy products, so you're contributing to their hides as well.
Whether you contribute to it by buying gloves too is an apparently
useless thing for you to worry about. Since their hides are another
by-product, you're also contributing in the same ways whenever
you contribute to things containing any animal by-products. More
on that after the next paragraph....

Do you buy cage free eggs? If not, you should be quite ashamed
and need to start doing so if you care at all about the animals as
you're pretending. If you do, then you can feel better about that than
if you ate no eggs, since you're contributing to decent lives for laying
hens instead of trying not to contribute to anything.

· Vegans contribute to the deaths of animals by their use of
wood and paper products, electricity, roads and all types of
buildings, their own diet, etc... just as everyone else does.
What they try to avoid are products which provide life
(and death) for farm animals, but even then they would have
to avoid the following items containing animal by-products
in order to be successful:

Tires, Paper, Upholstery, Floor waxes, Glass, Water
Filters, Rubber, Fertilizer, Antifreeze, Ceramics, Insecticides,
Insulation, Linoleum, Plastic, Textiles, Blood factors, Collagen,
Heparin, Insulin, Solvents, Biodegradable Detergents, Herbicides,
Gelatin Capsules, Adhesive Tape, Laminated Wood Products,
Plywood, Paneling, Wallpaper and Wallpaper Paste, Cellophane
Wrap and Tape, Abrasives, Steel Ball Bearings

The meat industry provides life for the animals that it
slaughters, and the animals live and die as a result of it
as animals do in other habitats. They also depend on it for
their lives as animals do in other habitats. If people consume
animal products from animals they think are raised in decent
ways, they will be promoting life for more such animals in the
future. People who want to contribute to decent lives for
livestock with their lifestyle must do it by being conscientious
consumers of animal products, because they can not do it by
being vegan.
From the life and death of a thousand pound grass raised
steer and whatever he happens to kill during his life, people
get over 500 pounds of human consumable meat...that's well
over 500 servings of meat. From a grass raised dairy cow people
get thousands of dairy servings. Due to the influence of farm
machinery, and *icides, and in the case of rice the flooding and
draining of fields, one serving of soy or rice based product is
likely to involve more animal deaths than hundreds of servings
derived from grass raised animals. Grass raised animal products
contribute to fewer wildlife deaths, better wildlife habitat, and
better lives for livestock than soy or rice products. ·

Leif Erikson
2006-08-04 17:06:24 EST
Magnulus wrote:
> I have this dilema. I am an ovo-lacto vegetarian.

In other words, you're not a vegetarian at all. Eggs and dairy
products are not vegetarian.

You're a silly, pompous, egotistical, *hypocritical* fruitcake.
"veganism" is a complete sham in terms of ethics.

> I wear wool but not
> leather usually. I am riding a scooter, I got my motorcycle license a few
> months ago. I use it to commute and run errands. I wear alot of
> protective gear. Almost all of it is easy to get in nonleather, and is of
> high quality. My boots are Italian and they are made from Lorica, which is
> actually better than leather- no maintanence needed and it breaths better.
> My jacket is heavy polyester mesh, heavy nylon, and polypropylene armor.
> The pants and helmet are likewise all synthetic.
>
> But the sticking point is gloves. Not just in terms of animal use but
> environmentalism. I bought some Tourmaster Airflow gloves. They cost 20
> bucks. They are made from Amara, a microfiber polyester suede, and
> polyester mesh on the top with an Amara reinforced knucklepad. Amara is
> somewhat abrasion resistant, but it wears out. My gloves have only been
> used for about 300 miles of riding and already they are starting to pill up
> in the palm. Apparrently it is not usual to have to buy a new pair of
> gloves every season or so for synthetics. A good pair of leather gloves,
> OTOH, could last for a decade or more.
>
> Now, given that I don't know if these synthetic gloves can be recycled (I
> doubt it, at least locally in Florida), what is the ethics of buying a new
> pair of gloves every 6 months (1 pair summer, 1 pair winter) vs. buying 2
> pairs of leather gloves and wearing them for decades. Cost is also a
> factor. Synthetic MC gloves will cost 20-35 dollars. A leather glove of
> comparable quality will cost about 40 dollars. Spend 50 dollars per year
> vs. 4 dollars per year, the cost is compelling for the leather gloves.
>
> Let's just say I feel sorely tempted to wear leather. Which is wierd
> because everything else in my life is pretty much non-animal, save except
> for maybe gelatin in vitamins, which I find impossible to find a substitute
> for. No leather shoes in general, no leather belts. I have a wool hat, but
> I'm not a vegan per se, just leather shunning.

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron