Vegetarian Discussion: I_like_my_dogs_grilled_or_sautéed, _reveals_Danish_prince?

I_like_my_dogs_grilled_or_sautéed, _reveals_Danish_prince?
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666
2006-05-03 10:48:30 EST
I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
By Kate Connolly in Berlin
(Filed: 03/05/2006)

Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal lovers
by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his favourite
dishes.

The 72-year-old prince, a Frenchman by birth, said his penchant for dog
meat had developed from the time he spent growing up and studying in
Vietnam.

But the disclosure, made in an interview with a Danish magazine, has
shocked the nation, particularly as the prince is the honorary
president of the Danish Dachshund Club.

He has several dachshunds and, despite publishing a cookery book called
Ikke Altid Gaselever (Not Always Goose Liver), has even published
eulogies to them.

He invited Danes to try eating dog meat themselves. "I do not mind
eating dog meat at all," he said. "The dogs I eat have been bred to be
eaten anyway, just like chickens.

"It tastes like rabbit, like dry venison, or like veal - just drier."
He said the meat tasted best when it was sautéed or grilled and cut
into thin slices.

A book of Prince Henrik's poems, in which he praised his dogs, was
published last year. A poem to his dachshund Evita compares her paws to
"wings".

"I love to stroke your coat and to see how it shines/ You dear, you
special dog..../ You receive me with papal pride."

He previously provoked nationwide debate when he suggested that parents
should use the skills of dog training to bring up their children.

Since the prince's admission in the magazine Ud&Se, Danish newspapers
have reopened their files on a royal dachshund that disappeared from
Amalienborg palace, Copenhagen, in the early 1990s. Despite a
countrywide search, it never reappeared.

Prince Henrik learnt Danish and changed his name, religion and
nationality to marry Queen Margrethe II in 1967. But he has repeatedly
complained about the Danes' lack of willingness to accept him.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/05/03/wdog03.xml&sSheet=/news/2006/05/03/ixworld.html


Leif Erikson
2006-05-03 11:13:01 EST
666 wrote:

> I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
> By Kate Connolly in Berlin
> (Filed: 03/05/2006)
>
> Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal lovers
> by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his favourite
> dishes.

I've often wondered what is the basis for the western
aversion to eating most predator species. Apart from
crackers in the south eating alligator on occasion,
western civilization doesn't generally eat predators,
e.g. wolves/dogs, bears, large cats, etc.

Conspiracy Of Doves
2006-05-03 12:34:17 EST

Leif Erikson wrote:
> 666 wrote:
>
> > I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
> > By Kate Connolly in Berlin
> > (Filed: 03/05/2006)
> >
> > Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal lovers
> > by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his favourite
> > dishes.
>
> I've often wondered what is the basis for the western
> aversion to eating most predator species. Apart from
> crackers in the south eating alligator on occasion,
> western civilization doesn't generally eat predators,
> e.g. wolves/dogs, bears, large cats, etc.

Probably because we feel a kinship with them. As far as I know, we have
an aversion to eating small cats too.

I've had alligator. It's pretty good. It was at a cajun restaurant in
Baltimore, MD.


R. Pierce Butler
2006-05-03 12:36:03 EST
Leif Erikson <pipes@thedismalscience.net> wrote in news:1M36g.714$Ae1.30
@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net:

> 666 wrote:
>
>> I like my dogs grilled or saut\ufffded, reveals Danish prince
>> By Kate Connolly in Berlin
>> (Filed: 03/05/2006)
>>
>> Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal lovers
>> by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his favourite
>> dishes.
>
> I've often wondered what is the basis for the western
> aversion to eating most predator species. Apart from
> crackers in the south eating alligator on occasion,
> western civilization doesn't generally eat predators,
> e.g. wolves/dogs, bears, large cats, etc.
>

or insects, monkeys, and snakes.

Man is a predator so maybe it is just professional courtesy and in the case
of monkeys, respect for ones distant family.

Chris H. Fleming
2006-05-03 13:36:29 EST
Leif Erikson wrote:
> 666 wrote:
>
> > I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
> > By Kate Connolly in Berlin
> > (Filed: 03/05/2006)
> >
> > Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal lovers
> > by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his favourite
> > dishes.
>
> I've often wondered what is the basis for the western
> aversion to eating most predator species. Apart from
> crackers in the south eating alligator on occasion,
> western civilization doesn't generally eat predators,
> e.g. wolves/dogs, bears, large cats, etc.


Alligator is yummy.

And people generally don't eat predators and scavengers because their
meat generally doesn't taste as good and because they can contain more
harmful chemicals from being higher up in the food chain. Go to the
Gulf of Mexico and live off a diet of game fish and you will die from
mercury poisoning among other things.


Rev. Prunefinger
2006-05-03 14:16:56 EST
"R. Pierce Butler" <spamsucks@google.com> wrote in message
news:Xns97B87602AD4B7mc2500183316chgoill@10.232.1.1...
: Leif Erikson <pipes@thedismalscience.net> wrote in
news:1M36g.714$Ae1.30
: @newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net:
:
: > 666 wrote:
: >
: >> I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
: >> By Kate Connolly in Berlin
: >> (Filed: 03/05/2006)
: >>
: >> Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal
lovers
: >> by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his
favourite
: >> dishes.
: >
: > I've often wondered what is the basis for the western
: > aversion to eating most predator species. Apart from
: > crackers in the south eating alligator on occasion,
: > western civilization doesn't generally eat predators,
: > e.g. wolves/dogs, bears, large cats, etc.
: >
:
: or insects, monkeys, and snakes.

Deep-fried waxworms are very tasty...with a bit of salt, it's like
eating popcorn. Oddly enough, monkey meat is a tad difficult to find
around here, but I understand that rattlesnake is quite good. I think
it's funny, the fact that I like to eat some things like insects,
brains, marrow (well, used to, anyway), haggis (YUM!), organ
meat....but I can't stand a lot of things that other people seem to
really get into...like beans, celery, eggplant....hmmm...my dislikes
seem to all be veggies.

I don't see any good reason for people to freak out about other people
eating dog. Now, if it's someone's pet, that's a different story.
That bit about the missing dachshund....do they really think he might
have eaten it, or are they just trying to make him look bad?

: Man is a predator so maybe it is just professional courtesy and in
the case
: of monkeys, respect for ones distant family.

Happiness is a having a large, close-knit family........in another
city. I know, it doesn't really have anything to do with anything,
just popped into my head, and I had to share.


Shrubkiller
2006-05-03 19:38:05 EST

Leif Erikson wrote:
> 666 wrote:
>
> > I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
> > By Kate Connolly in Berlin
> > (Filed: 03/05/2006)
> >
> > Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal lovers
> > by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his favourite
> > dishes.
>
> I've often wondered what is the basis for the western
> aversion to eating most predator species. Apart from
> crackers in the south eating alligator on occasion,
> western civilization doesn't generally eat predators,
> e.g. wolves/dogs, bears, large cats, etc.


Well, you're always being made to eat shit...............


Shrubkiller
2006-05-03 19:39:40 EST

Rev. Prunefinger wrote:
> "R. Pierce Butler" <spamsucks@google.com> wrote in message
> news:Xns97B87602AD4B7mc2500183316chgoill@10.232.1.1...
> : Leif Erikson <pipes@thedismalscience.net> wrote in
> news:1M36g.714$Ae1.30
> : @newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net:
> :
> : > 666 wrote:
> : >
> : >> I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
> : >> By Kate Connolly in Berlin
> : >> (Filed: 03/05/2006)
> : >>
> : >> Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal
> lovers
> : >> by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his
> favourite
> : >> dishes.
> : >
> : > I've often wondered what is the basis for the western
> : > aversion to eating most predator species. Apart from
> : > crackers in the south eating alligator on occasion,
> : > western civilization doesn't generally eat predators,
> : > e.g. wolves/dogs, bears, large cats, etc.
> : >
> :
> : or insects, monkeys, and snakes.
>
> Deep-fried waxworms are very tasty...with a bit of salt, it's like
> eating popcorn. Oddly enough, monkey meat is a tad difficult to find
> around here, but I understand that rattlesnake is quite good. I think
> it's funny, the fact that I like to eat some things like insects,
> brains, marrow (well, used to, anyway), haggis (YUM!), organ
> meat....but I can't stand a lot of things that other people seem to
> really get into...like beans, celery, eggplant....hmmm...my dislikes
> seem to all be veggies.




You could eat shit.

Goo says it's tasty.




>
> I don't see any good reason for people to freak out about other people
> eating dog. Now, if it's someone's pet, that's a different story.
> That bit about the missing dachshund....do they really think he might
> have eaten it, or are they just trying to make him look bad?
>
> : Man is a predator so maybe it is just professional courtesy and in
> the case
> : of monkeys, respect for ones distant family.
>
> Happiness is a having a large, close-knit family........in another
> city. I know, it doesn't really have anything to do with anything,
> just popped into my head, and I had to share.


Thomas P
2006-05-04 05:55:22 EST

666 skrev:

> I like my dogs grilled or sautéed, reveals Danish prince
> By Kate Connolly in Berlin
> (Filed: 03/05/2006)
>
> Prince Henrik, the prince consort of Denmark, has shocked animal lovers
> by declaring that dog meat - fried or grilled - is one of his favourite
> dishes.
>
> The 72-year-old prince, a Frenchman by birth, said his penchant for dog
> meat had developed from the time he spent growing up and studying in
> Vietnam.
>
> But the disclosure, made in an interview with a Danish magazine, has
> shocked the nation, particularly as the prince is the honorary
> president of the Danish Dachshund Club.


The nation is not shocked. The nation is not even aware of it. I have
not heard one comment from anybody. It is a non-issue.
snip


Pearl
2006-05-06 09:01:21 EST
"R. Pierce Butler" <spamsucks@google.com> wrote in message news:Xns97B87602AD4B7mc2500183316chgoill@10.232.1.1...

> Man is a predator

Medical News Today
Main Category: Biology/Biochemistry News
Article Date: 20 Feb 2006 - 0:00am (UK)

Humans Evolved To Be Peaceful, Cooperative And Social
Animals, Not Predators

by Neil Schoenherr
Washington University in St. Louis

You wouldn't know it by current world events, but humans
actually evolved to be peaceful, cooperative and social animals,
not the predators modern mythology would have us believe,
says an anthropologist at Washington University in St. Louis.

Robert W. Sussman, Ph.D., professor anthropology in Arts &
Sciences, spoke at a press briefing, "Early Humans on the Menu,"
during the American Association for the Advancement of the
Science's Annual Meeting at 2 p.m. on Feb. 18.

Also scheduled to speak at the briefing were Karen Strier,
University of Wisconsin; Agustin Fuentes, University of Notre
Dame; Douglas Fry, Abo Akademi University in Helsinki and
University of Arizona; and James Rilling, Emory University.

In his latest book, "Man the Hunted: Primates, Predators and
Human Evolution," Sussman goes against the prevailing view
and argues that primates, including early humans, evolved not
as hunters but as prey of many predators, including wild dogs
and cats, hyenas, eagles and crocodiles.

Despite popular theories posed in research papers and popular
literature, early man was not an aggressive killer, Sussman argues.
He poses a new theory, based on the fossil record and living
primate species, that primates have been prey for millions of
years, a fact that greatly influenced the evolution of early man.

"Our intelligence, cooperation and many other features we have
as modern humans developed from our attempts to out-smart
the predator," says Sussman.

Since the 1924 discovery of the first early humans, australopithicenes,
which lived from seven million years ago to two million years ago,
many scientists theorized that those early human ancestors were
hunters and possessed a killer instinct.

The idea of "Man the Hunter" is the generally accepted paradigm
of human evolution, says Sussman, "It developed from a basic
Judeo-Christian ideology of man being inherently evil, aggressive
and a natural killer. In fact, when you really examine the fossil
and living non-human primate evidence, that is just not the case."

Sussman's research is based on studying the fossil evidence
dating back nearly seven million years. "Most theories on Man
the Hunter fail to incorporate this key fossil evidence," Sussman
says. "We wanted evidence, not just theory.

We thoroughly examined literature available on the skulls,
bones, footprints and on environmental evidence, both of our
hominid ancestors and the predators that coexisted with them."

Since the process of human evolution is so long and varied,
Sussman and his co-author, Donna L. Hart, decided to focus
their research on one specific species, Australopithecus
afarensis, which lived between five million and two and a half
million years ago and is one of the better known early human
species. Most paleontologists agree that Australopithecus
afarensis is the common link between fossils that came before
and those that came after. It shares dental, cranial and skeletal
traits with both. It's also a very well-represented species in the
fossil record.

"Australopithecus afarensis was probably quite strong, like a
small ape," Sussman says. Adults ranged from around 3 to 5
feet and they weighed 60-100 pounds. They were basically
smallish bipedal primates. Their teeth were relatively small, very
much like modern humans, and they were fruit and nut eaters.

But what Sussman and Hart discovered is that Australopithecus
afarensis was not dentally pre-adapted to eat meat.

"It didn't have the sharp shearing blades necessary to retain and
cut such foods," Sussman says. "These early humans simply
couldn't eat meat. If they couldn't eat meat, why would they hunt?"

It was not possible for early humans to consume a large amount
of meat until fire was controlled and cooking was possible.

Sussman points out that the first tools didn't appear until two
million years ago. And there wasn't good evidence of fire until
after 800,000 years ago. "In fact, some archaeologists and
paleontologists don't think we had a modern, systematic method
of hunting until as recently as 60,000 years ago," he says.

"Furthermore, Australopithecus afarensis was an edge species,"
adds Sussman. They could live in the trees and on the ground
and could take advantage of both. "Primates that are edge
species, even today, are basically prey species, not predators,"
Sussman argues.

The predators living at the same time as Australopithecus
afarensis were huge and there were 10 times as many as today.
There were hyenas as big as bears, as well as saber-toothed cats
and many other mega-sized carnivores, reptiles and raptors.
Australopithecus afarensis didn't have tools, didn't have big teeth
and was three feet tall. He was using his brain, his agility and his
social skills to get away from these predators. "He wasn't hunting
them," says Sussman. "He was avoiding them at all costs."

Approximately 6 percent to 10 percent of early humans were
preyed upon according to evidence that includes teeth marks
on bones, talon marks on skulls and holes in a fossil cranium
into which sabertooth cat fangs fit, says Sussman. The predation
rate on savannah antelope and certain ground-living monkeys
today is around 6 percent to 10 percent as well.

Sussman and Hart provide evidence that many of our modern
human traits, including those of cooperation and socialization,
developed as a result of being a prey species and the early human's
ability to out-smart the predators. These traits did not result from
trying to hunt for prey or kill our competitors, says Sussman.

"One of the main defenses against predators by animals without
physical defenses is living in groups," says Sussman. "In fact,
all diurnal primates (those active during the day) live in
permanent social groups. Most ecologists agree that predation
pressure is one of the major adaptive reasons for this group-living.
In this way there are more eyes and ears to locate the predators
and more individuals to mob them if attacked or to confuse them
by scattering. There are a number of reasons that living in groups
is beneficial for animals that otherwise would be very prone to
being preyed upon."

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=38011




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