Vegetarian Discussion: Animals Do Not "anticipate"

Animals Do Not "anticipate"
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N*@goobalnews.com
2006-04-21 15:32:07 EST
"Many times, a human *anticipates* something without
even being told. That's because the human has an
understanding of the passage of time and the repetition
of intermediate events.

Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
anything. If the dog's owner tells the dog "I'm going
to take you for a walk next Saturday", that is
MEANINGLESS to the dog - he does not anticipate going
for the walk. If the owner picks up the leash, as he
always does before taking the dog for a walk, the dog
may react to that *signal* and get excited. It is not
"anticipating" the walk; it is merely giving a
CONDITIONED RESPONSE to a signal.

This difference is *elementary* to people who really
understand the issue" - Goobenicus

Leif Erikson
2006-04-21 15:45:08 EST
Fuckwit David Harrison, ordinary pig-fucking fuckwit in Lake Lanier,
GA, helpfully reposted:

> "Many times, a human *anticipates* something without
> even being told. That's because the human has an
> understanding of the passage of time and the repetition
> of intermediate events.
>
> Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
> of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
> anything. If the dog's owner tells the dog "I'm going
> to take you for a walk next Saturday", that is
> MEANINGLESS to the dog - he does not anticipate going
> for the walk. If the owner picks up the leash, as he
> always does before taking the dog for a walk, the dog
> may react to that *signal* and get excited. It is not
> "anticipating" the walk; it is merely giving a
> CONDITIONED RESPONSE to a signal.
>
> This difference is *elementary* to people who really
> understand the issue.


Thanks for reposting that, Fuckwit. Maybe you're beginning to catch
on. Doubtful, though.


Rocky
2006-04-21 16:37:24 EST
n*o@goobalnews.com said in rec.pets.dogs.behavior:

> If the owner picks up the leash, as he
> always does before taking the dog for a walk, the dog
> may react to that *signal* and get excited. It is not
> "anticipating" the walk; it is merely giving a
> CONDITIONED RESPONSE to a signal.

Late-breaking news?

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.

Stormmee
2006-04-21 18:05:13 EST
guess you never saw my father's setter anticipate his arrival, no matter
what schedule he was on or if he was just popping out for a gallon of milk,
not only did that dog know when he was returning, she would would wake from
a dead sleep to sit by the door to greet him, Lee
<*o@goobalnews.com> wrote in message
news:7kci42h0hv6krgle62i9psuvcoanl7bmga@4ax.com...
> "Many times, a human *anticipates* something without
> even being told. That's because the human has an
> understanding of the passage of time and the repetition
> of intermediate events.
>
> Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
> of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
> anything. If the dog's owner tells the dog "I'm going
> to take you for a walk next Saturday", that is
> MEANINGLESS to the dog - he does not anticipate going
> for the walk. If the owner picks up the leash, as he
> always does before taking the dog for a walk, the dog
> may react to that *signal* and get excited. It is not
> "anticipating" the walk; it is merely giving a
> CONDITIONED RESPONSE to a signal.
>
> This difference is *elementary* to people who really
> understand the issue" - Goobenicus



Mixu Lauronen
2006-04-21 19:46:35 EST
On Fri, 21 Apr 2006 22:32:07 +0300, <newgoo@goobalnews.com> wrote:

> Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
> of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
> anything.
>
This is arguable. Experiences with gorillas and chimpanzees who had been
taught sign language have showed their capability of anticipating things.
They have talked about a wish to become a mother and about tomorrow, even
about death. That seems pretty anticipatory to me.
--
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

D*@.
2006-04-21 19:57:54 EST
On 21 Apr 2006 Goo wrote:

>> "Many times, a human *anticipates* something without
>> even being told. That's because the human has an
>> understanding of the passage of time and the repetition
>> of intermediate events.
>>
>> Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
>> of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
>> anything. If the dog's owner tells the dog "I'm going
>> to take you for a walk next Saturday", that is
>> MEANINGLESS to the dog - he does not anticipate going
>> for the walk. If the owner picks up the leash, as he
>> always does before taking the dog for a walk, the dog
>> may react to that *signal* and get excited. It is not
>> "anticipating" the walk; it is merely giving a
>> CONDITIONED RESPONSE to a signal.
>>
>> This difference is *elementary* to people who really
>> understand the issue" - Goobenicus
>
>
>Thanks for reposting that, Fuckwit. Maybe you're beginning to catch
>on.

Their response is caused by their anticipation, Goo, not
by a human's emotion somehow being projected into the
animal causing a change in its behavior.

Leif Erikson
2006-04-21 20:17:06 EST
Fuckwit David Harrison, pig-fucking cracker, lied:
> On 21 Apr 2006 Leif Erikson wrote:
>
> >> "Many times, a human *anticipates* something without
> >> even being told. That's because the human has an
> >> understanding of the passage of time and the repetition
> >> of intermediate events.
> >>
> >> Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
> >> of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
> >> anything. If the dog's owner tells the dog "I'm going
> >> to take you for a walk next Saturday", that is
> >> MEANINGLESS to the dog - he does not anticipate going
> >> for the walk. If the owner picks up the leash, as he
> >> always does before taking the dog for a walk, the dog
> >> may react to that *signal* and get excited. It is not
> >> "anticipating" the walk; it is merely giving a
> >> CONDITIONED RESPONSE to a signal.
> >>
> >> This difference is *elementary* to people who really
> >> understand the issue.
> >
> >
> >Thanks for reposting that, Fuckwit. Maybe you're beginning to catch
> >on.
>
> Their response is caused by their anticipation, Leif,

No, Fuckwit. Anticipation is a mental state that animals do not have.

YOU are projecting the way you "think" you would feel in that situation
onto the animals. They do not "anticipate" in that way at all, Fuckwit.


Opinicus
2006-04-21 23:48:39 EST
<*o@goobalnews.com> wrote

> Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
> of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
> anything.

You obviously haven't lived with many animals.

--
Bob
http://www.kanyak.com



Leif Erikson
2006-04-22 02:34:00 EST
Fuckwit David Harrison, fat ignorant cracker in Lake
Lanier, GA, blabbered:

> On 21 Apr 2006 Leif Erikson wrote:
>
>>Fuckwit David Harrison, ordinary pig-fucking fuckwit in Lake Lanier,
>>GA, helpfully reposted:
>>
>>>"Many times, a human *anticipates* something without
>>>even being told. That's because the human has an
>>>understanding of the passage of time and the repetition
>>>of intermediate events.
>>>
>>>Dogs and other animals ABSOLUTELY DO NOT HAVE this kind
>>>of understanding, and THEREFORE do not "anticipate"
>>>anything. If the dog's owner tells the dog "I'm going
>>>to take you for a walk next Saturday", that is
>>>MEANINGLESS to the dog - he does not anticipate going
>>>for the walk. If the owner picks up the leash, as he
>>>always does before taking the dog for a walk, the dog
>>>may react to that *signal* and get excited. It is not
>>> "anticipating" the walk; it is merely giving a
>>>CONDITIONED RESPONSE to a signal.
>>>
>>>This difference is *elementary* to people who really
>>>understand the issue" - Goobenicus
>>
>>
>>Thanks for reposting that, Fuckwit. Maybe you're beginning to catch
>>on.
>
>
> Their response is

Fuckwit, your troll doesn't seem to be doing too well.

Coldwarrior
2006-04-22 12:16:59 EST
Every afternoon around 6:00 pm my 2 Brits. start their antics to urge
me to go out and play "Wing" which is a pheasant wing on a string at
the end of a fishing pole. If I'm sitting and get up they run for the
door. If I go to the door they run out to the garage where the wing is.
If that isn't anticipation in dogs then maybe you just have the wrong
definition of the word.
Have you ever heard of "Pavlov"?

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