Vegetarian Discussion: Vegetarian Cuisine

Vegetarian Cuisine
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E*@yahoo.com
2006-03-31 07:48:23 EST
Vegetarian cuisine is cookery of food that meets vegetarian ethical
principles and health standards. In terms of lacto-ovo vegetarianism,
which is the most common type of vegetarianism in the Western world,
this means food which excludes ingredients for which an animal must
have died, such as meat, meat broth, cheeses that use animal rennet
(some vegetarians will eat all cheeses and others none, because of its
milk content), gelatin (from animal skin and connective tissue), and
for the strictest, even some sugars that are whitened with bone char
(e.g. cane sugar, but not beet sugar).
Although not essential, certain special ingredients such as tofu and
TVP have often been associated with vegetarian cuisine. Although tofu
and TVP play a key role in many 'mock meat' dishes, a person can be
vegetarian for life and never touch them. Vegetarianism being closely
linked to Tofu consumption is a largely US based phenomenon.
Ignoring the different types of vegetarians (lacto-ovo vegetarianism
versus veganism, for example), one can roughly divide vegetarian
cuisine into two categories:
* Meat analogues, which mimic the taste, texture, and appearance of
meats, and are used in a recipe that traditionally contained meat. Meat
analogues vary in quality and similarity to meats, and may be bought
commercially or made at home.
* Traditional meals that have always been vegetarian.
Many vegans will simply also use analogues for dairy and eggs in
traditional Western recipes. These analogues are both commercially
available and homemade from recipes. But just as lacto-ovo vegetarians
might never touch meat analogues, some vegans may eat, for example,
traditional Chinese or Indian dishes that were vegan before the term
even came into popular usage.
http://vegetarian.0me.com/homevege.htm


Winkerbean
2006-04-02 04:24:59 EST
vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?


Pink Wallpaper
2006-04-02 06:01:52 EST
winkerbean wrote:
> vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?
>


"Cuisine" : manner of preparing food : style of cooking; also : the food
prepared.

Nothing has been explicitly or implicitly used to describe the standard.
quality or taste of the cooking, say for example "haute cuisine".

Your attempted jibe has demonstrated your ignorance in two subjects.

S*@yahoo.com
2006-04-12 19:41:21 EST

Pink Wallpaper wrote:
> winkerbean wrote:
> > vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?
> >
>
>
> "Cuisine" : manner of preparing food : style of cooking; also : the food
> prepared.
>
> Nothing has been explicitly or implicitly used to describe the standard.
> quality or taste of the cooking, say for example "haute cuisine".
>
> Your attempted jibe has demonstrated your ignorance in two subjects.

He meant "redundancy". A clear example.


Pink Wallpaper
2006-04-13 15:47:55 EST
s*4@yahoo.com wrote:
> Pink Wallpaper wrote:
>> winkerbean wrote:
>>> vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?
>>>
>>
>> "Cuisine" : manner of preparing food : style of cooking; also : the food
>> prepared.
>>
>> Nothing has been explicitly or implicitly used to describe the standard.
>> quality or taste of the cooking, say for example "haute cuisine".
>>
>> Your attempted jibe has demonstrated your ignorance in two subjects.
>
> He meant "redundancy". A clear example.
>

Oxymoron : The combination of two or more words that are normally
opposites, in order to startle.

Nothing about "redundancy".

How do you *know* "winkerbean" is a "he" and how do you *know* what he
meant?

The only thing that's clear is your apparent error and ignorance.

S*@yahoo.com
2006-04-13 18:15:06 EST

Pink Wallpaper wrote:
> shevek4@yahoo.com wrote:
> > Pink Wallpaper wrote:
> >> winkerbean wrote:
> >>> vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?
> >>>
> >>
> >> "Cuisine" : manner of preparing food : style of cooking; also : the food
> >> prepared.
> >>
> >> Nothing has been explicitly or implicitly used to describe the standard.
> >> quality or taste of the cooking, say for example "haute cuisine".
> >>
> >> Your attempted jibe has demonstrated your ignorance in two subjects.
> >
> > He meant "redundancy". A clear example.
> >
>
> Oxymoron : The combination of two or more words that are normally
> opposites, in order to startle.
>
> Nothing about "redundancy".
>

Vegetarian: referring to food
Cuisine: again referring to food

Vegetarian Cuisine: a redundancy.

> How do you *know* "winkerbean" is a "he" and how do you *know* what he
> meant?
>

My apologies, I call anything a "he" until I know it is a "she". Seems
to be de rigeur in most languages.

> The only thing that's clear is your apparent error and ignorance.

It must not be so clear if you felt the need to add "apparent" :)

Cheers - shevek


Pink Wallpaper
2006-04-14 08:00:11 EST
s*4@yahoo.com wrote:
> Pink Wallpaper wrote:
>> shevek4@yahoo.com wrote:
>>> Pink Wallpaper wrote:
>>>> winkerbean wrote:
>>>>> vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?
>>>>>
>>>> "Cuisine" : manner of preparing food : style of cooking; also : the food
>>>> prepared.
>>>>
>>>> Nothing has been explicitly or implicitly used to describe the standard.
>>>> quality or taste of the cooking, say for example "haute cuisine".
>>>>
>>>> Your attempted jibe has demonstrated your ignorance in two subjects.
>>> He meant "redundancy". A clear example.
>>>
>> Oxymoron : The combination of two or more words that are normally
>> opposites, in order to startle.
>>
>> Nothing about "redundancy".
>>
>
> Vegetarian: referring to food
> Cuisine: again referring to food
>
> Vegetarian Cuisine: a redundancy.

True, but I'm sure that was not the implicit message from "winkerbean".

>
>> How do you *know* "winkerbean" is a "he" and how do you *know* what he
>> meant?
>>
>
> My apologies, I call anything a "he" until I know it is a "she". Seems
> to be de rigeur in most languages.

Noted that you answered half the question.



http://www.bartleby.com/64/5.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_gender

Are you an expert in gender expression of the World's languages?

From:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender-neutral_pronoun :

"In British and American Sign Language, all pronouns are gender-neutral."

"In modern Chinese, there is no gender distinction in pronouns."

"Like other Finno-Ugric languages, Finnish pronouns make no distinction
between male and female."

"The French singular indefinite pronoun on, like English one, makes no
reference to gender. On is commonly used in the sense of a first-person
plural pronoun."

"Since Hungarian does not have any grammatical gender, all personal
pronouns are gender-neutral."

"Japanese does not have personal pronouns of any kind, with all words
meaning "I", "you", and, in general, all other words meaning people,
being grammatically nouns."

In some dialects of the Swedish language there is a word hän that means
either han (him) or hon (her). It has spread to hacker slang. Some more
common gender-neutral pronouns however are hen (he/she) and henom
(him/her). The Swedish Language Council recommends den (it) for third
person singular of indefinite gender.

"Tagalog has no gender distinction in grammar, so the third person
pronoun siya can mean either he or she."

"The respectful/plural third-person Tamil pronoun avar can be used to
refer to a gender-neutral third person."

Finally:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singular_they


>
>> The only thing that's clear is your apparent error and ignorance.
>
> It must not be so clear if you felt the need to add "apparent" :)

Very true; I don't know you at all, and I may have interpreted your
comments inaccurately (I try not to make assumptions).


>
> Cheers - shevek
>

Cheers.



S*@yahoo.com
2006-04-14 09:05:08 EST

Pink Wallpaper wrote:
> shevek4@yahoo.com wrote:
> > Pink Wallpaper wrote:
> >> shevek4@yahoo.com wrote:
> >>> Pink Wallpaper wrote:
> >>>> winkerbean wrote:
> >>>>> vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?
> >>>>>
> >>>> "Cuisine" : manner of preparing food : style of cooking; also : the food
> >>>> prepared.
> >>>>
> >>>> Nothing has been explicitly or implicitly used to describe the standard.
> >>>> quality or taste of the cooking, say for example "haute cuisine".
> >>>>
> >>>> Your attempted jibe has demonstrated your ignorance in two subjects.
> >>> He meant "redundancy". A clear example.
> >>>
> >> Oxymoron : The combination of two or more words that are normally
> >> opposites, in order to startle.
> >>
> >> Nothing about "redundancy".
> >>
> >
> > Vegetarian: referring to food
> > Cuisine: again referring to food
> >
> > Vegetarian Cuisine: a redundancy.
>
> True, but I'm sure that was not the implicit message from "winkerbean".
>

I agree. More likely he meant that vegetables are not good food..

> >
> >> How do you *know* "winkerbean" is a "he" and how do you *know* what he
> >> meant?
> >>
> >
> > My apologies, I call anything a "he" until I know it is a "she". Seems
> > to be de rigeur in most languages.
>
> Noted that you answered half the question.
>
>

The other half didn't really apply.. except in the sense that when you
correct someone you somehow know "what they really meant".

>
> http://www.bartleby.com/64/5.html
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_gender
>
> Are you an expert in gender expression of the World's languages?
>

No, but I am interested in linguistics. Thanks for your post!


> From:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender-neutral_pronoun :
>
> "In British and American Sign Language, all pronouns are gender-neutral."
>
> "In modern Chinese, there is no gender distinction in pronouns."
>
> "Like other Finno-Ugric languages, Finnish pronouns make no distinction
> between male and female."
>
> "The French singular indefinite pronoun on, like English one, makes no
> reference to gender. On is commonly used in the sense of a first-person
> plural pronoun."
>
> "Since Hungarian does not have any grammatical gender, all personal
> pronouns are gender-neutral."
>
> "Japanese does not have personal pronouns of any kind, with all words
> meaning "I", "you", and, in general, all other words meaning people,
> being grammatically nouns."
>
> In some dialects of the Swedish language there is a word hän that means
> either han (him) or hon (her). It has spread to hacker slang. Some more
> common gender-neutral pronouns however are hen (he/she) and henom
> (him/her). The Swedish Language Council recommends den (it) for third
> person singular of indefinite gender.
>
> "Tagalog has no gender distinction in grammar, so the third person
> pronoun siya can mean either he or she."
>
> "The respectful/plural third-person Tamil pronoun avar can be used to
> refer to a gender-neutral third person."
>
> Finally:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singular_they
>
>

I would add to that that the plural is more common for substituting a
masculine pronoun for indeterminate gender. For example, the spanish
"ellos" or the french "Ils" (them/they). The gender-neutral pronoun
languages you mention (well I only know a little bit of one) don't
share that feature, for example the chinese "ta men" (they).

I'm curious if 3 gender languages like greek, german, or russian use
the neuter pronoun for unkown gender..

Cheers - shevek


Pink Wallpaper
2006-04-14 12:07:18 EST
s*4@yahoo.com wrote:
> Pink Wallpaper wrote:
>> shevek4@yahoo.com wrote:
>>> Pink Wallpaper wrote:
>>>> shevek4@yahoo.com wrote:
>>>>> Pink Wallpaper wrote:
>>>>>> winkerbean wrote:
>>>>>>> vegetarian cuisine.....bit of an oxymoron,isn't it?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Cuisine" : manner of preparing food : style of cooking; also : the food
>>>>>> prepared.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Nothing has been explicitly or implicitly used to describe the standard.
>>>>>> quality or taste of the cooking, say for example "haute cuisine".
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Your attempted jibe has demonstrated your ignorance in two subjects.
>>>>> He meant "redundancy". A clear example.
>>>>>
>>>> Oxymoron : The combination of two or more words that are normally
>>>> opposites, in order to startle.
>>>>
>>>> Nothing about "redundancy".
>>>>
>>> Vegetarian: referring to food
>>> Cuisine: again referring to food
>>>
>>> Vegetarian Cuisine: a redundancy.
>> True, but I'm sure that was not the implicit message from "winkerbean".
>>
>
> I agree. More likely he meant that vegetables are not good food..
>
>>>> How do you *know* "winkerbean" is a "he" and how do you *know* what he
>>>> meant?
>>>>
>>> My apologies, I call anything a "he" until I know it is a "she". Seems
>>> to be de rigeur in most languages.
>> Noted that you answered half the question.
>>
>>
>
> The other half didn't really apply.. except in the sense that when you
> correct someone you somehow know "what they really meant".
>
>> http://www.bartleby.com/64/5.html
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_gender
>>
>> Are you an expert in gender expression of the World's languages?
>>
>
> No, but I am interested in linguistics. Thanks for your post!

:-)


>
>
>> From:
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender-neutral_pronoun :
>>
>> "In British and American Sign Language, all pronouns are gender-neutral."
>>
>> "In modern Chinese, there is no gender distinction in pronouns."
>>
>> "Like other Finno-Ugric languages, Finnish pronouns make no distinction
>> between male and female."
>>
>> "The French singular indefinite pronoun on, like English one, makes no
>> reference to gender. On is commonly used in the sense of a first-person
>> plural pronoun."
>>
>> "Since Hungarian does not have any grammatical gender, all personal
>> pronouns are gender-neutral."
>>
>> "Japanese does not have personal pronouns of any kind, with all words
>> meaning "I", "you", and, in general, all other words meaning people,
>> being grammatically nouns."
>>
>> In some dialects of the Swedish language there is a word hän that means
>> either han (him) or hon (her). It has spread to hacker slang. Some more
>> common gender-neutral pronouns however are hen (he/she) and henom
>> (him/her). The Swedish Language Council recommends den (it) for third
>> person singular of indefinite gender.
>>
>> "Tagalog has no gender distinction in grammar, so the third person
>> pronoun siya can mean either he or she."
>>
>> "The respectful/plural third-person Tamil pronoun avar can be used to
>> refer to a gender-neutral third person."
>>
>> Finally:
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singular_they
>>
>>
>
> I would add to that that the plural is more common for substituting a
> masculine pronoun for indeterminate gender. For example, the spanish
> "ellos" or the french "Ils" (them/they). The gender-neutral pronoun
> languages you mention (well I only know a little bit of one) don't
> share that feature, for example the chinese "ta men" (they).
>
> I'm curious if 3 gender languages like greek, german, or russian use
> the neuter pronoun for unkown gender..

I don't know, and I haven't a burning interest to investigate at the
moment. :-(

A good th/read. :-)

You might find these interesting:

http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/default.aspx

http://www.csit.fsu.edu/~burkardt/fun/wordplay/back_slang.html
(I knew people that could speak this fluently).



>
> Cheers - shevek
>
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