Vegetarian Discussion: Wife Swap Vegan Episode

Wife Swap Vegan Episode
Posts: 260

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11   Next  (First | Last)

Usual Suspect
2005-11-14 21:56:36 EST
For benefit of those who missed this show (or who turned it off early
because she felt picked on again), here's a brief summary. This show
would benefit anyone who's never had the misfortune of encountering a
vegan. It showed what vegans are like, what they think and believe, and
how they interact with normal people.

The vegan wife, Jackie, forces her entire household (including the cat)
to consume a raw vegan diet. Her actions extend beyond herself and her
household: she protests meat and hands out leaflets to strangers on the
street in an attempt to get them to live according to her peculiar
"principles." Part of those principles at home included getting rid of
their stove and many of their possessions; her home became increasingly
spartan as she sank deeper into her kooky vegan abyss.

The best way to explain her average day is that she focuses on the
things most out of her control and avoids dealing with the things most
within her control. Her husband Harold WANTS to eat meat but fears doing
so for the consequences he'd face from Jackie (note: he expressed no
fear of consequences to his health from it). Harold also overworks to
avoid coming home because Jackie is too busy navel-gazing, sun-gazing,
bitching, domineering, and protesting to clean house or do other mundane
things; he's adopted the role of housemaid by default. The whole family
were kind of drifting apart and becoming more dysfunctional, with Harold
and the daughter afraid to speak up about any of the changes (dietary,
anti-"decorating," etc.).

Jackie ends up trading places with a wife from a family who hunt out of
necessity. With her vegan psyche already very weak and fragile, Jackie
assesses her new situation by going through the fridge (filled with
meat) and the home (filled with taxidermy). As most vegans are, she's
condescending in sizing up her new family. To her credit, though, I
didn't think she was nearly as condescending as the vegan witch Barbara
from Fox's _Trading Spouses_ last year.

During one memorable segment, Jackie became emotional -- nearly
hysterical -- trying to explain how difficult it was for her to go to an
all raw diet. She offered some psychobabble comparing the whole
experience to alcoholism. To that bizarre melodrama, the other husband
(Ricky) apologized and said he didn't realize it would be so traumatic
for her.

As in the _Trading Spouses_ episodes on Fox in this vein last year, the
vegan wife felt compelled to show her new family some videos from animal
rights groups even after preaching to them about veganism for an entire
week. Jackie became an emotional wreck while watching them, even though
she said she's seen them many times before. Though the kids were briefly
stunned by such portrayals of farming (which are atypical), they didn't
exactly embrace the idea of eating nuts and fruits.

Ultimately, her attempts to convert the family in Kentucky failed. Since
the swap, they've added more vegetables to their meals but haven't given
up hunting or eating meat. Meanwhile, Jackie's kept the stove Bobbi (the
normal wife who ended up having to deal with milquetoast Harold) had
brought in and has even resumed eating some cooked foods. She admitted
maybe she was taking things too far. I'm sure her husband agrees she
*had* taken things too far, even if he lacks the courage to tell her how
fucked up he really thinks she is.

The moral of the story is that vegans DO take things too far. They try
to proselytize others, and they're usually very emotional and aggressive
about it. They think they're doing something virtuous and informative by
telling others not to eat meat, but vegans always end up coming across
as emotive, uninformed jackasses.

I also think vegans should go on more shows like this. First, it's very
entertaining. Second, it's illuminating for the wider population --
especially those in areas without or with very few vegans. Finally, it's
therapeutic in the sense that vegans on these shows seem to benefit from
interacting with *normal* people. For example, Jackie is again eating
cooked food. The vegan mother in the Fox show (Barbara) even ate meat
with the Cajun family.

Beach Runner
2005-11-14 22:30:09 EST


usual suspect wrote:

> For benefit of those who missed this show (or who turned it off early
> because she felt picked on again), here's a brief summary. This show
> would benefit anyone who's never had the misfortune of encountering a
> vegan. It showed what vegans are like, what they think and believe, and
> how they interact with normal people.
>
> The vegan wife, Jackie, forces her entire household (including the cat)
> to consume a raw vegan diet. Her actions extend beyond herself and her
> household: she protests meat and hands out leaflets to strangers on the
> street in an attempt to get them to live according to her peculiar
> "principles." Part of those principles at home included getting rid of
> their stove and many of their possessions; her home became increasingly
> spartan as she sank deeper into her kooky vegan abyss.
>
> The best way to explain her average day is that she focuses on the
> things most out of her control and avoids dealing with the things most
> within her control. Her husband Harold WANTS to eat meat but fears doing
> so for the consequences he'd face from Jackie (note: he expressed no
> fear of consequences to his health from it). Harold also overworks to
> avoid coming home because Jackie is too busy navel-gazing, sun-gazing,
> bitching, domineering, and protesting to clean house or do other mundane
> things; he's adopted the role of housemaid by default. The whole family
> were kind of drifting apart and becoming more dysfunctional, with Harold
> and the daughter afraid to speak up about any of the changes (dietary,
> anti-"decorating," etc.).
>
> Jackie ends up trading places with a wife from a family who hunt out of
> necessity. With her vegan psyche already very weak and fragile, Jackie
> assesses her new situation by going through the fridge (filled with
> meat) and the home (filled with taxidermy). As most vegans are, she's
> condescending in sizing up her new family. To her credit, though, I
> didn't think she was nearly as condescending as the vegan witch Barbara
> from Fox's _Trading Spouses_ last year.
>
> During one memorable segment, Jackie became emotional -- nearly
> hysterical -- trying to explain how difficult it was for her to go to an
> all raw diet. She offered some psychobabble comparing the whole
> experience to alcoholism. To that bizarre melodrama, the other husband
> (Ricky) apologized and said he didn't realize it would be so traumatic
> for her.
>
> As in the _Trading Spouses_ episodes on Fox in this vein last year, the
> vegan wife felt compelled to show her new family some videos from animal
> rights groups even after preaching to them about veganism for an entire
> week. Jackie became an emotional wreck while watching them, even though
> she said she's seen them many times before. Though the kids were briefly
> stunned by such portrayals of farming (which are atypical), they didn't
> exactly embrace the idea of eating nuts and fruits.
>
> Ultimately, her attempts to convert the family in Kentucky failed. Since
> the swap, they've added more vegetables to their meals but haven't given
> up hunting or eating meat. Meanwhile, Jackie's kept the stove Bobbi (the
> normal wife who ended up having to deal with milquetoast Harold) had
> brought in and has even resumed eating some cooked foods. She admitted
> maybe she was taking things too far. I'm sure her husband agrees she
> *had* taken things too far, even if he lacks the courage to tell her how
> fucked up he really thinks she is.
>
> The moral of the story is that vegans DO take things too far. They try
> to proselytize others, and they're usually very emotional and aggressive
> about it. They think they're doing something virtuous and informative by
> telling others not to eat meat, but vegans always end up coming across
> as emotive, uninformed jackasses.
>
> I also think vegans should go on more shows like this. First, it's very
> entertaining. Second, it's illuminating for the wider population --
> especially those in areas without or with very few vegans. Finally, it's
> therapeutic in the sense that vegans on these shows seem to benefit from
> interacting with *normal* people. For example, Jackie is again eating
> cooked food. The vegan mother in the Fox show (Barbara) even ate meat
> with the Cajun family.

A typical US post, taking one example and making every VEG*N one
behavior. How prejudicial and bigoted. Obviously the producers sought
extremists to make the sure more interesting.

Scented Nectar
2005-11-14 22:39:13 EST
"usual suspect" <support@our.troops> wrote in message
news:E7cef.19830$th3.4226@tornado.texas.rr.com...
> For benefit of those who missed this show (or who turned it off early
> because she felt picked on again), here's a brief summary. This show
> would benefit anyone who's never had the misfortune of encountering a
> vegan. It showed what vegans are like, what they think and believe, and
> how they interact with normal people.
>
> The vegan wife, Jackie, forces her entire household (including the cat)
> to consume a raw vegan diet. Her actions extend beyond herself and her
> household: she protests meat and hands out leaflets to strangers on the
> street in an attempt to get them to live according to her peculiar
> "principles." Part of those principles at home included getting rid of
> their stove and many of their possessions; her home became increasingly
> spartan as she sank deeper into her kooky vegan abyss.
>
> The best way to explain her average day is that she focuses on the
> things most out of her control and avoids dealing with the things most
> within her control. Her husband Harold WANTS to eat meat but fears doing
> so for the consequences he'd face from Jackie (note: he expressed no
> fear of consequences to his health from it). Harold also overworks to
> avoid coming home because Jackie is too busy navel-gazing, sun-gazing,
> bitching, domineering, and protesting to clean house or do other mundane
> things; he's adopted the role of housemaid by default. The whole family
> were kind of drifting apart and becoming more dysfunctional, with Harold
> and the daughter afraid to speak up about any of the changes (dietary,
> anti-"decorating," etc.).
>
> Jackie ends up trading places with a wife from a family who hunt out of
> necessity. With her vegan psyche already very weak and fragile, Jackie
> assesses her new situation by going through the fridge (filled with
> meat) and the home (filled with taxidermy). As most vegans are, she's
> condescending in sizing up her new family. To her credit, though, I
> didn't think she was nearly as condescending as the vegan witch Barbara
> from Fox's _Trading Spouses_ last year.
>
> During one memorable segment, Jackie became emotional -- nearly
> hysterical -- trying to explain how difficult it was for her to go to an
> all raw diet. She offered some psychobabble comparing the whole
> experience to alcoholism. To that bizarre melodrama, the other husband
> (Ricky) apologized and said he didn't realize it would be so traumatic
> for her.
>
> As in the _Trading Spouses_ episodes on Fox in this vein last year, the
> vegan wife felt compelled to show her new family some videos from animal
> rights groups even after preaching to them about veganism for an entire
> week. Jackie became an emotional wreck while watching them, even though
> she said she's seen them many times before. Though the kids were briefly
> stunned by such portrayals of farming (which are atypical), they didn't
> exactly embrace the idea of eating nuts and fruits.
>
> Ultimately, her attempts to convert the family in Kentucky failed. Since
> the swap, they've added more vegetables to their meals but haven't given
> up hunting or eating meat. Meanwhile, Jackie's kept the stove Bobbi (the
> normal wife who ended up having to deal with milquetoast Harold) had
> brought in and has even resumed eating some cooked foods. She admitted
> maybe she was taking things too far. I'm sure her husband agrees she
> *had* taken things too far, even if he lacks the courage to tell her how
> fucked up he really thinks she is.
>
> The moral of the story is that vegans DO take things too far. They try
> to proselytize others, and they're usually very emotional and aggressive
> about it. They think they're doing something virtuous and informative by
> telling others not to eat meat, but vegans always end up coming across
> as emotive, uninformed jackasses.
>
> I also think vegans should go on more shows like this. First, it's very
> entertaining. Second, it's illuminating for the wider population --
> especially those in areas without or with very few vegans. Finally, it's
> therapeutic in the sense that vegans on these shows seem to benefit from
> interacting with *normal* people. For example, Jackie is again eating
> cooked food. The vegan mother in the Fox show (Barbara) even ate meat
> with the Cajun family.

You are assuming all vegans are like
each other. It's like watching Jerry
Springer and coming to the conclusion
that all couples have bizarre problems.


--
SN
http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/



Dutch
2005-11-15 02:42:03 EST
"Beach Runner" <bob@nospam.com> wrote

> A typical US post, taking one example and making every VEG*N one behavior.
> How prejudicial and bigoted.

The family had to be typical of raw-food vegan/ ARAs.

> Obviously the producers sought extremists to make the sure more
> interesting.

The other family were extreme also, hunting every day and eating mostly
meat.

The vegan family shopped at a local market, imported nuts, fruit,
vegetables, seeds, etc.. while the hunters got most of their food from the
local woods. The issue of cds never came up, but I am quite sure that once
the hidden collateral cost in animal death and suffering was tallied up, the
hunter family would fare quite well by comparison.



RobDar
2005-11-15 09:06:12 EST
First...I am not sure it is fair to generalize the vegan lifestyle and
assume they are all like the goof pot on the show...
I cannot say that I have known more than a handful of vegans...but none of
them were as...interesting...as the lady on wife swap.
Our conversation during the show?....Where the hell do they find all these
people? Nearly everyone on these shows has some serious quirk or
another...I guess living my " average joe american" life in my hard working
neighborhood on a blue collar street...I have lost touch with just how many
off kilter folks there are around me!
There is a part of me that feels sorry for people like her. There is
something sorely lacking in their lives. Some part of themselves that is
empty and out of balance....anyone with so strict a mind set or activist
personality, and I mean those people who have become so engrossed that they
have lost the ability/willingness to understand and/or associate with people
outside their idealology, has something missing in themselves. People look
at activists and see dedication and strength of conviction...I see weakness.
I deal with activists and "want to be" activists everyday and you cannot
talk to even one of them. If offered a descenting opinion they react with
emotional outcry...why?...because they nothing else to offer. They are the
perpetual victims. People who, if they do not have some cause or issue to
rally around and cry about, have very little else about themselves to make
them feel alive or valued.




"usual suspect" <support@our.troops> wrote in message
news:E7cef.19830$th3.4226@tornado.texas.rr.com...
> For benefit of those who missed this show (or who turned it off early
> because she felt picked on again), here's a brief summary. This show would
> benefit anyone who's never had the misfortune of encountering a vegan. It
> showed what vegans are like, what they think and believe, and how they
> interact with normal people.
>
> The vegan wife, Jackie, forces her entire household (including the cat) to
> consume a raw vegan diet. Her actions extend beyond herself and her
> household: she protests meat and hands out leaflets to strangers on the
> street in an attempt to get them to live according to her peculiar
> "principles." Part of those principles at home included getting rid of
> their stove and many of their possessions; her home became increasingly
> spartan as she sank deeper into her kooky vegan abyss.
>
> The best way to explain her average day is that she focuses on the things
> most out of her control and avoids dealing with the things most within her
> control. Her husband Harold WANTS to eat meat but fears doing so for the
> consequences he'd face from Jackie (note: he expressed no fear of
> consequences to his health from it). Harold also overworks to avoid coming
> home because Jackie is too busy navel-gazing, sun-gazing, bitching,
> domineering, and protesting to clean house or do other mundane things;
> he's adopted the role of housemaid by default. The whole family were kind
> of drifting apart and becoming more dysfunctional, with Harold and the
> daughter afraid to speak up about any of the changes (dietary,
> anti-"decorating," etc.).
>
> Jackie ends up trading places with a wife from a family who hunt out of
> necessity. With her vegan psyche already very weak and fragile, Jackie
> assesses her new situation by going through the fridge (filled with meat)
> and the home (filled with taxidermy). As most vegans are, she's
> condescending in sizing up her new family. To her credit, though, I didn't
> think she was nearly as condescending as the vegan witch Barbara from
> Fox's _Trading Spouses_ last year.
>
> During one memorable segment, Jackie became emotional -- nearly
> hysterical -- trying to explain how difficult it was for her to go to an
> all raw diet. She offered some psychobabble comparing the whole experience
> to alcoholism. To that bizarre melodrama, the other husband (Ricky)
> apologized and said he didn't realize it would be so traumatic for her.
>
> As in the _Trading Spouses_ episodes on Fox in this vein last year, the
> vegan wife felt compelled to show her new family some videos from animal
> rights groups even after preaching to them about veganism for an entire
> week. Jackie became an emotional wreck while watching them, even though
> she said she's seen them many times before. Though the kids were briefly
> stunned by such portrayals of farming (which are atypical), they didn't
> exactly embrace the idea of eating nuts and fruits.
>
> Ultimately, her attempts to convert the family in Kentucky failed. Since
> the swap, they've added more vegetables to their meals but haven't given
> up hunting or eating meat. Meanwhile, Jackie's kept the stove Bobbi (the
> normal wife who ended up having to deal with milquetoast Harold) had
> brought in and has even resumed eating some cooked foods. She admitted
> maybe she was taking things too far. I'm sure her husband agrees she *had*
> taken things too far, even if he lacks the courage to tell her how fucked
> up he really thinks she is.
>
> The moral of the story is that vegans DO take things too far. They try to
> proselytize others, and they're usually very emotional and aggressive
> about it. They think they're doing something virtuous and informative by
> telling others not to eat meat, but vegans always end up coming across as
> emotive, uninformed jackasses.
>
> I also think vegans should go on more shows like this. First, it's very
> entertaining. Second, it's illuminating for the wider population --
> especially those in areas without or with very few vegans. Finally, it's
> therapeutic in the sense that vegans on these shows seem to benefit from
> interacting with *normal* people. For example, Jackie is again eating
> cooked food. The vegan mother in the Fox show (Barbara) even ate meat with
> the Cajun family.



C. James Strutz
2005-11-15 10:27:31 EST

"RobDar" <robdar@houndsong.com> wrote in message
news:nXlef.10$%L5.5@fe06.highwinds-media.phx...

> First...I am not sure it is fair to generalize the vegan lifestyle and
> assume they are all like the goof pot on the show...

You're right, it's unfair to make wide generalizations about any group of
people.

> I cannot say that I have known more than a handful of vegans...but none of
> them were as...interesting...as the lady on wife swap.
> Our conversation during the show?....Where the hell do they find all these
> people? Nearly everyone on these shows has some serious quirk or
> another...I guess living my " average joe american" life in my hard
> working neighborhood on a blue collar street...I have lost touch with just
> how many off kilter folks there are around me!

You're right again. It's a reality show and producers screen people and put
them in circumstances that provide the best entertainment value. It's silly
for anyone to believe that characters on some reality show are
representitive of, well, reality....

> There is a part of me that feels sorry for people like her. There is
> something sorely lacking in their lives. Some part of themselves that is
> empty and out of balance....anyone with so strict a mind set or activist
> personality, and I mean those people who have become so engrossed that
> they have lost the ability/willingness to understand and/or associate with
> people outside their idealology, has something missing in themselves.
> People look at activists and see dedication and strength of conviction...I
> see weakness. I deal with activists and "want to be" activists everyday
> and you cannot talk to even one of them. If offered a descenting opinion
> they react with emotional outcry...why?...because they nothing else to
> offer. They are the perpetual victims. People who, if they do not have
> some cause or issue to rally around and cry about, have very little else
> about themselves to make them feel alive or valued.

Strength and weakness is a dichotomy - there cannot be one without the
other. Don't pity people like the woman in the reality show. She obviously
feels as though her ideology is a strength, not a weakness. It's not that
they're "perpetual victims", rather their focus is so narrow that there's
very little overlap with mainstream thinking. That's okay as long as it
doesn't hurt anyone or anything.



RobDar
2005-11-16 11:19:16 EST
issue of cd's? not sure I am following....
"Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote in message
news:fjgef.509881$tl2.224390@pd7tw3no...
> "Beach Runner" <bob@nospam.com> wrote
>
>> A typical US post, taking one example and making every VEG*N one
>> behavior. How prejudicial and bigoted.
>
> The family had to be typical of raw-food vegan/ ARAs.
>
>> Obviously the producers sought extremists to make the sure more
>> interesting.
>
> The other family were extreme also, hunting every day and eating mostly
> meat.
>
> The vegan family shopped at a local market, imported nuts, fruit,
> vegetables, seeds, etc.. while the hunters got most of their food from the
> local woods. The issue of cds never came up, but I am quite sure that once
> the hidden collateral cost in animal death and suffering was tallied up,
> the hunter family would fare quite well by comparison.
>
>



RobDar
2005-11-16 11:20:32 EST
Does anyone still watch Jerry Springer?

There are a fair number of folks who think that crap is real...and the way
it is!

"Scented Nectar" <me@scentednectar.com> wrote in message
news:qJmdnTRkuOeWxeTenZ2dnUVZ_vmdnZ2d@rogers.com...
> "usual suspect" <support@our.troops> wrote in message
> news:E7cef.19830$th3.4226@tornado.texas.rr.com...
>> For benefit of those who missed this show (or who turned it off early
>> because she felt picked on again), here's a brief summary. This show
>> would benefit anyone who's never had the misfortune of encountering a
>> vegan. It showed what vegans are like, what they think and believe, and
>> how they interact with normal people.
>>
>> The vegan wife, Jackie, forces her entire household (including the cat)
>> to consume a raw vegan diet. Her actions extend beyond herself and her
>> household: she protests meat and hands out leaflets to strangers on the
>> street in an attempt to get them to live according to her peculiar
>> "principles." Part of those principles at home included getting rid of
>> their stove and many of their possessions; her home became increasingly
>> spartan as she sank deeper into her kooky vegan abyss.
>>
>> The best way to explain her average day is that she focuses on the
>> things most out of her control and avoids dealing with the things most
>> within her control. Her husband Harold WANTS to eat meat but fears doing
>> so for the consequences he'd face from Jackie (note: he expressed no
>> fear of consequences to his health from it). Harold also overworks to
>> avoid coming home because Jackie is too busy navel-gazing, sun-gazing,
>> bitching, domineering, and protesting to clean house or do other mundane
>> things; he's adopted the role of housemaid by default. The whole family
>> were kind of drifting apart and becoming more dysfunctional, with Harold
>> and the daughter afraid to speak up about any of the changes (dietary,
>> anti-"decorating," etc.).
>>
>> Jackie ends up trading places with a wife from a family who hunt out of
>> necessity. With her vegan psyche already very weak and fragile, Jackie
>> assesses her new situation by going through the fridge (filled with
>> meat) and the home (filled with taxidermy). As most vegans are, she's
>> condescending in sizing up her new family. To her credit, though, I
>> didn't think she was nearly as condescending as the vegan witch Barbara
>> from Fox's _Trading Spouses_ last year.
>>
>> During one memorable segment, Jackie became emotional -- nearly
>> hysterical -- trying to explain how difficult it was for her to go to an
>> all raw diet. She offered some psychobabble comparing the whole
>> experience to alcoholism. To that bizarre melodrama, the other husband
>> (Ricky) apologized and said he didn't realize it would be so traumatic
>> for her.
>>
>> As in the _Trading Spouses_ episodes on Fox in this vein last year, the
>> vegan wife felt compelled to show her new family some videos from animal
>> rights groups even after preaching to them about veganism for an entire
>> week. Jackie became an emotional wreck while watching them, even though
>> she said she's seen them many times before. Though the kids were briefly
>> stunned by such portrayals of farming (which are atypical), they didn't
>> exactly embrace the idea of eating nuts and fruits.
>>
>> Ultimately, her attempts to convert the family in Kentucky failed. Since
>> the swap, they've added more vegetables to their meals but haven't given
>> up hunting or eating meat. Meanwhile, Jackie's kept the stove Bobbi (the
>> normal wife who ended up having to deal with milquetoast Harold) had
>> brought in and has even resumed eating some cooked foods. She admitted
>> maybe she was taking things too far. I'm sure her husband agrees she
>> *had* taken things too far, even if he lacks the courage to tell her how
>> fucked up he really thinks she is.
>>
>> The moral of the story is that vegans DO take things too far. They try
>> to proselytize others, and they're usually very emotional and aggressive
>> about it. They think they're doing something virtuous and informative by
>> telling others not to eat meat, but vegans always end up coming across
>> as emotive, uninformed jackasses.
>>
>> I also think vegans should go on more shows like this. First, it's very
>> entertaining. Second, it's illuminating for the wider population --
>> especially those in areas without or with very few vegans. Finally, it's
>> therapeutic in the sense that vegans on these shows seem to benefit from
>> interacting with *normal* people. For example, Jackie is again eating
>> cooked food. The vegan mother in the Fox show (Barbara) even ate meat
>> with the Cajun family.
>
> You are assuming all vegans are like
> each other. It's like watching Jerry
> Springer and coming to the conclusion
> that all couples have bizarre problems.
>
>
> --
> SN
> http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/
>
>



RobDar
2005-11-16 11:59:01 EST
You are right C.J....the question is...do they hurt anyone?
I do not know. I think that the effect extremist positions have on public
opinion can be damaging...it can be helpful as well...I guess the question
of whether they hurt anyone can only be answered with "It depends on what
kind of damage you are looking for". I think that many of the extremist
positions have some unintended social consequences. I think these positions
sometimes allow questionable laws and questionable practices to enter the
mainstream as a kind of "tolerable compromise" or a "lesser of two evils"
kind of thing.

and you are right...all of this is okay...but as Mark Twain said...the
weakest of all things is a virtue that has not been tested in fire. I find
that the narrow focus of many of the extremists I come across is narrow for
just this reason...their virtue will not withstand fire...or even discussion
of dissenting opinion. I find these people very troubling...

"C. James Strutz" <strutzj@NOSPAMstrutz.com> wrote in message
news:11njvj5mqks7u17@news.supernews.com...
>
> "RobDar" <robdar@houndsong.com> wrote in message
> news:nXlef.10$%L5.5@fe06.highwinds-media.phx...
>
>> First...I am not sure it is fair to generalize the vegan lifestyle and
>> assume they are all like the goof pot on the show...
>
> You're right, it's unfair to make wide generalizations about any group of
> people.
>
>> I cannot say that I have known more than a handful of vegans...but none
>> of them were as...interesting...as the lady on wife swap.
>> Our conversation during the show?....Where the hell do they find all
>> these people? Nearly everyone on these shows has some serious quirk or
>> another...I guess living my " average joe american" life in my hard
>> working neighborhood on a blue collar street...I have lost touch with
>> just how many off kilter folks there are around me!
>
> You're right again. It's a reality show and producers screen people and
> put them in circumstances that provide the best entertainment value. It's
> silly for anyone to believe that characters on some reality show are
> representitive of, well, reality....
>
>> There is a part of me that feels sorry for people like her. There is
>> something sorely lacking in their lives. Some part of themselves that is
>> empty and out of balance....anyone with so strict a mind set or activist
>> personality, and I mean those people who have become so engrossed that
>> they have lost the ability/willingness to understand and/or associate
>> with people outside their idealology, has something missing in
>> themselves. People look at activists and see dedication and strength of
>> conviction...I see weakness. I deal with activists and "want to be"
>> activists everyday and you cannot talk to even one of them. If offered a
>> descenting opinion they react with emotional outcry...why?...because they
>> nothing else to offer. They are the perpetual victims. People who, if
>> they do not have some cause or issue to rally around and cry about, have
>> very little else about themselves to make them feel alive or valued.
>
> Strength and weakness is a dichotomy - there cannot be one without the
> other. Don't pity people like the woman in the reality show. She obviously
> feels as though her ideology is a strength, not a weakness. It's not that
> they're "perpetual victims", rather their focus is so narrow that there's
> very little overlap with mainstream thinking. That's okay as long as it
> doesn't hurt anyone or anything.
>



Usual Suspect
2005-11-16 12:52:15 EST
Beach Runner wrote:
>> For benefit of those who missed this show (or who turned it off early
>> because she felt picked on again), here's a brief summary. This show
>> would benefit anyone who's never had the misfortune of encountering a
>> vegan. It showed what vegans are like, what they think and believe,
>> and how they interact with normal people.
>>
>> The vegan wife, Jackie, forces her entire household (including the
>> cat) to consume a raw vegan diet. Her actions extend beyond herself
>> and her household: she protests meat and hands out leaflets to
>> strangers on the street in an attempt to get them to live according to
>> her peculiar "principles." Part of those principles at home included
>> getting rid of their stove and many of their possessions; her home
>> became increasingly spartan as she sank deeper into her kooky vegan
>> abyss.
>>
>> The best way to explain her average day is that she focuses on the
>> things most out of her control and avoids dealing with the things most
>> within her control. Her husband Harold WANTS to eat meat but fears
>> doing so for the consequences he'd face from Jackie (note: he
>> expressed no fear of consequences to his health from it). Harold also
>> overworks to avoid coming home because Jackie is too busy
>> navel-gazing, sun-gazing, bitching, domineering, and protesting to
>> clean house or do other mundane things; he's adopted the role of
>> housemaid by default. The whole family were kind of drifting apart and
>> becoming more dysfunctional, with Harold and the daughter afraid to
>> speak up about any of the changes (dietary, anti-"decorating," etc.).
>>
>> Jackie ends up trading places with a wife from a family who hunt out
>> of necessity. With her vegan psyche already very weak and fragile,
>> Jackie assesses her new situation by going through the fridge (filled
>> with meat) and the home (filled with taxidermy). As most vegans are,
>> she's condescending in sizing up her new family. To her credit,
>> though, I didn't think she was nearly as condescending as the vegan
>> witch Barbara from Fox's _Trading Spouses_ last year.
>>
>> During one memorable segment, Jackie became emotional -- nearly
>> hysterical -- trying to explain how difficult it was for her to go to
>> an all raw diet. She offered some psychobabble comparing the whole
>> experience to alcoholism. To that bizarre melodrama, the other husband
>> (Ricky) apologized and said he didn't realize it would be so traumatic
>> for her.
>>
>> As in the _Trading Spouses_ episodes on Fox in this vein last year,
>> the vegan wife felt compelled to show her new family some videos from
>> animal rights groups even after preaching to them about veganism for
>> an entire week. Jackie became an emotional wreck while watching them,
>> even though she said she's seen them many times before. Though the
>> kids were briefly stunned by such portrayals of farming (which are
>> atypical), they didn't exactly embrace the idea of eating nuts and
>> fruits.
>>
>> Ultimately, her attempts to convert the family in Kentucky failed.
>> Since the swap, they've added more vegetables to their meals but
>> haven't given up hunting or eating meat. Meanwhile, Jackie's kept the
>> stove Bobbi (the normal wife who ended up having to deal with
>> milquetoast Harold) had brought in and has even resumed eating some
>> cooked foods. She admitted maybe she was taking things too far. I'm
>> sure her husband agrees she *had* taken things too far, even if he
>> lacks the courage to tell her how fucked up he really thinks she is.
>>
>> The moral of the story is that vegans DO take things too far. They try
>> to proselytize others, and they're usually very emotional and
>> aggressive about it. They think they're doing something virtuous and
>> informative by telling others not to eat meat, but vegans always end
>> up coming across as emotive, uninformed jackasses.
>>
>> I also think vegans should go on more shows like this. First, it's
>> very entertaining. Second, it's illuminating for the wider population
>> -- especially those in areas without or with very few vegans. Finally,
>> it's therapeutic in the sense that vegans on these shows seem to
>> benefit from interacting with *normal* people. For example, Jackie is
>> again eating cooked food. The vegan mother in the Fox show (Barbara)
>> even ate meat with the Cajun family.
>
>
> A typical US post, taking one example and making every VEG*N one
> behavior.

The Koplin family from Arizona are much more typical of vegans,
especially raw faddists, than they're atypical.

> How prejudicial and bigoted.

Vegans ARE prejudiced bigots.

> Obviously the producers sought
> extremists to make the sure more interesting.

Irrelevant. I pointed out that the inclusion of nuts makes shows like
this more interesting (see my first point in the last paragraph, dumb
ass). Vegans are kooks. They're extremists. They don't mesh well with
normal people. That's why they tend to make shows like this interesting
and amusing.
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron