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ROCKLAND PRIVATE SCHOOL GOES VEGGIE
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Dr. Jai Maharaj
2005-09-24 02:11:02 EST
Rockland private school goes veggie

By Randi Weiner
The Journal News
September 19, 2005

Cooking for a crowd

Executive chef Richard LaCossade created
this Cheery Cherry Compote as a dessert
or side dish. It is served at Rockland
Country Day School. The dish serves 24.

2 packages kosher vegetarian cherry gelatin
2 cups boiling water
10 oz. strawberries
11 oz. cherries
20 oz. pineapple
15 oz. pear halves
3 firm bananas
2 navel oranges, peeled and separated
2 tart apples
1 cup fresh blackberries

In a large bowl, dissolve the gelatin in the
water. Stir in the other ingredients. Transfer
to a 4-quart serving bowl, cover and refrigerate
for three to four hours before serving.

CONGERS - Monday's deli special features meatless hot
dogs and soy-based pork; Friday's specialty cuisine lunch
can involve veggie burgers and egg-free pasta.

The cafeteria at Rockland Country Day School has gone
vegetarian.

"I'm a vegetarian and I had lunch today. It was pretty
good. Last year, I didn't eat lunch at all. I'm really
happy that they're there," Matt Zeltzer, 14, of Nyack, a
ninth-grader at the 165-student private school, said of
the menu options. "It's so much better than last year."

For the first time in more than a decade, Rockland
Country Day has changed lunch vendors from a commercial
organization to a local restaurant. After a year of
committee meetings, taste tests and student and parent
comment, the school signed a one-year contract with Main
Essentials, a Haverstraw vegetarian restaurant that
caters to vegans \ufffd vegetarians who also don't eat dairy
or other animal products.

"We know there's an obesity crisis and a crisis of
disease in this country, and a lot of it stems from the
kind of foods and the fast foods that people ingest,"
said Martha Roth, a parent and member of the committee
that selected Main Essentials as the school's food
vendor. "If you start early, if you teach children to eat
well at an early age, it won't be an issue when they get
older."

Local public schools usually offer a meatless option for
students and have tried to cut down on sugar and salt in
other foods, but none has done what Rockland Country Day
has \ufffd hired a vegetarian restaurant to provide school
lunches.

Two years ago, parents and students approached James
Handlin, the headmaster of Rockland Country Day, about
the school's food. Research showed that many children
nationwide were eating high-sugar, high-fat foods that
contributed to health problems such as asthma and
diabetes. There had been concern among organic-foods
activists for years about chemical fertilizers,
genetically engineered foodstuffs and commercial feed
lots.

"We did two things: We took a hard look at all of the
snack foods we were offering in all our machines and
decided to get rid of what wasn't healthy, mainly those
with corn sweeteners. We put in a lot more juices and so-
called natural sodas," Handlin said.

"We're really concerned about the obesity and lack of
nutritional awareness that so many families seem to have.
Because we're a school that goes from 3-year-olds to
12th-graders, we would have kids on these sort of sugar
highs. We took a long look at what we were going to put
into those machines."

Beginning in the spring, granola, pretzels and soy-based
cookies replaced candy bars, chips and Pop-Tarts in the
snack machines. Water, juice and seltzer-based sodas
ousted Coke and Pepsi products. The food, provided by
Kristo Beverage, costs 75 cents to $1.50.

The change was not made effortlessly. Students and staff
complained they didn't like the options in the snack and
soda machines. Handlin said the complainers agreed to
live with healthy snacks for the rest of the school year,
and no one has complained about the machine offerings
since school started last week.

Handlin said the organic chips were selling better than
regular chips used to and the school wasn't selling as
much soda.

As for student behavior \ufffd it's too soon to tell, he said.
But the younger children now have access to the machines,
which they weren't permitted with the former snack
offerings.

With that project completed, the school launched its
second initiative. Earlier in the summer, parents and
students fenced in a 100-foot-by-100-foot lot and began
an organic garden. Roth and local greenhouse owner Ron
Breland plotted a simple vegetable garden as a start and
asked students and parents to help. Eventually, the
garden will be used with the curriculum and for some of
the school's mandated community-service projects.

Adam Darer, 15, of Chestnut Ridge, a 10th-grader at the
school, was drafted by his mother to come help, but it
wasn't a hardship, he said. His grandmother got him
hooked on growing things, and he already had had a garden
at home for four years.

"I came to a meeting one day and it sounded interesting,"
he said. "It's been a lot of fun coming here in the
summer. It seems weird to come here in the summer, but
when you have a lot of students working toward a goal,
it's really nice."

While the garden project was getting started, the same
committee began looking at food vendors for the
cafeteria. Because the school receives little public
money, students now pay about $4.50 for lunch each day,
compared with about $1.75 for an average public-school
hot lunch.

Richard LaCossade, 27, is the executive chef in charge of
Rockland Country Day School's cafeteria. He worked in the
kitchen of the Manhattan Woods Golf Course and a Marriott
Inn before joining Main Essentials. He takes standard
cafeteria fare and makes it meatless.

"I just try to keep it healthy. This is a school," he
said. "But we'll use soy cheese for the quesadillas, and
soy-based products for the ham and cheese omelets. The
kids that still eat ham will still taste the difference,
but the rest don't seem to notice."

Unlike at Main Essentials, the school cafeteria has a
meat option: turkey hot dogs. LaCossade will use real
cheese in his sandwiches, he said, although soy-based
cheeses are available.

The vegetables and fruits are from local farmers markets,
and once the school garden starts producing in bulk, that
food will be part of the menu. Scraps from the lunchroom
will go to the school compost heap.

Eliza Martin Simpson, 15, of Wesley Hills, a 10th-grader,
said she just appreciated the ability to eat a school
lunch.

"It's really made it a lot easier for me to be a
vegetarian, and the food is really interesting," she
said. "I really like to eat, so it's been a highlight of
the year coming here."

Nonvegetarians such as ninth-graders Norma Kuhling, 14,
of Valley Cottage; Hailey Fyfe, also 14, of Piermont; and
10th-grader Katie Crispi, 15, of New City said they found
the school lunches infinitely better than last year.

"You just sort of feel good," Fyfe said, "after eating a
healthy meal."

More at:
http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050919/NEWS03/509190350/1017

Visit:
http://www.pcrm.org

Jai Maharaj
http://www.mantra.com/jai
Om Shanti

Hindu Holocaust Museum
http://www.mantra.com/holocaust

Hindu life, principles, spirituality and philosophy
http://www.hindu.org
http://www.hindunet.org

The truth about Islam and Muslims
http://www.flex.com/~jai/satyamevajayate

The terrorist mission of Jesus stated in the Christian bible:

"Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not so send
peace, but a sword.
"For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the
daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in
law.
"And a man's foes shall be they of his own household.
- Matthew 10:34-36.

o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the educational
purposes of research and open discussion. The contents of this post may not
have been authored by, and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the
poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for
fair use of copyrighted works.
o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read,
considered or answered if it does not contain your full legal name, current
e-mail and postal addresses, and live-voice telephone number.
o Posted for information and discussion. Views expressed by others are
not necessarily those of the poster who may or may not have read the article.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This article may contain copyrighted material the use of
which may or may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright
owner. This material is being made available in efforts to advance the
understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic,
democratic, scientific, social, and cultural, etc., issues. It is believed
that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as
provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title
17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without
profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included
information for research, comment, discussion and educational purposes by
subscribing to USENET newsgroups or visiting web sites. For more information
go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml
If you wish to use copyrighted material from this article for purposes of
your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the
copyright owner.

Since newsgroup posts are being removed
by forgery by one or more net terrorists,
this post may be reposted several times.

2005-09-24 16:51:11 EST

Dr. Jai Maharaj wrote:
> Rockland private school goes veggie
>
> By Randi Weiner
> The Journal News
> September 19, 2005
>
> Cooking for a crowd
>
> Executive chef Richard LaCossade created
> this Cheery Cherry Compote as a dessert
> or side dish. It is served at Rockland
> Country Day School. The dish serves 24.
>
> 2 packages kosher vegetarian cherry gelatin

What is vegetarian gelatin made from?

> 2 cups boiling water
> 10 oz. strawberries
> 11 oz. cherries
> 20 oz. pineapple
> 15 oz. pear halves
> 3 firm bananas
> 2 navel oranges, peeled and separated
> 2 tart apples
> 1 cup fresh blackberries
>
> In a large bowl, dissolve the gelatin in the
> water. Stir in the other ingredients. Transfer
> to a 4-quart serving bowl, cover and refrigerate
> for three to four hours before serving.
>
> CONGERS - Monday's deli special features meatless hot
> dogs and soy-based pork; Friday's specialty cuisine lunch
> can involve veggie burgers and egg-free pasta.
>
> The cafeteria at Rockland Country Day School has gone
> vegetarian.
>
> "I'm a vegetarian and I had lunch today. It was pretty
> good. Last year, I didn't eat lunch at all. I'm really
> happy that they're there," Matt Zeltzer, 14, of Nyack, a
> ninth-grader at the 165-student private school, said of
> the menu options. "It's so much better than last year."
>
> For the first time in more than a decade, Rockland
> Country Day has changed lunch vendors from a commercial
> organization to a local restaurant. After a year of
> committee meetings, taste tests and student and parent
> comment, the school signed a one-year contract with Main
> Essentials, a Haverstraw vegetarian restaurant that
> caters to vegans - vegetarians who also don't eat dairy
> or other animal products.


Pearl
2005-09-24 17:02:57 EST
<ranjit_mathews@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:1127595071.442144.86000@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>
> Dr. Jai Maharaj wrote:
> > Rockland private school goes veggie

Brilliant!

> > By Randi Weiner
> > The Journal News
> > September 19, 2005
> >
> > Cooking for a crowd
> >
> > Executive chef Richard LaCossade created
> > this Cheery Cherry Compote as a dessert
> > or side dish. It is served at Rockland
> > Country Day School. The dish serves 24.
> >
> > 2 packages kosher vegetarian cherry gelatin
>
> What is vegetarian gelatin made from?

Agar Agar -- Carrageen ....
See http://www.vegsoc.org/info/gelling.html .

> > 2 cups boiling water
> > 10 oz. strawberries
> > 11 oz. cherries
> > 20 oz. pineapple
> > 15 oz. pear halves
> > 3 firm bananas
> > 2 navel oranges, peeled and separated
> > 2 tart apples
> > 1 cup fresh blackberries
> >
> > In a large bowl, dissolve the gelatin in the
> > water. Stir in the other ingredients. Transfer
> > to a 4-quart serving bowl, cover and refrigerate
> > for three to four hours before serving.
> >
> > CONGERS - Monday's deli special features meatless hot
> > dogs and soy-based pork; Friday's specialty cuisine lunch
> > can involve veggie burgers and egg-free pasta.
> >
> > The cafeteria at Rockland Country Day School has gone
> > vegetarian.
> >
> > "I'm a vegetarian and I had lunch today. It was pretty
> > good. Last year, I didn't eat lunch at all. I'm really
> > happy that they're there," Matt Zeltzer, 14, of Nyack, a
> > ninth-grader at the 165-student private school, said of
> > the menu options. "It's so much better than last year."
> >
> > For the first time in more than a decade, Rockland
> > Country Day has changed lunch vendors from a commercial
> > organization to a local restaurant. After a year of
> > committee meetings, taste tests and student and parent
> > comment, the school signed a one-year contract with Main
> > Essentials, a Haverstraw vegetarian restaurant that
> > caters to vegans - vegetarians who also don't eat dairy
> > or other animal products.
>



Rich
2005-09-24 17:09:41 EST

<ranjit_mathews@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1127595071.442144.86000@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>
> Dr. Jai Maharaj wrote:
>> Rockland private school goes veggie
>>
>> By Randi Weiner
>> The Journal News
>> September 19, 2005
>>
>> Cooking for a crowd
>>
>> Executive chef Richard LaCossade created
>> this Cheery Cherry Compote as a dessert
>> or side dish. It is served at Rockland
>> Country Day School. The dish serves 24.
>>
>> 2 packages kosher vegetarian cherry gelatin
>
> What is vegetarian gelatin made from?
>

Probably carrageenan or agar-agar or both. Possibly some soy protein, too.
Be careful about kosher gelatin, though. Just because it's kosher doesn't
mean it's vegetarian. Most kosher gelatin is made from fish bones.

Oy vey.
--


--Rich

Recommended websites:

http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles
http://www.acahf.org.au
http://www.quackwatch.org/
http://www.skeptic.com/
http://www.csicop.org/


--Rich



Harmony
2005-09-26 11:36:14 EST
this is just great.
where is this rockland town at?

it amuses me nevertheless, that american veggie dishes are made to mimic
meaty flavors. and retain the names too: "soy-based pork"!!!??? veggie "hot
dogs"

well, it's a great welcome change, and let's be thankful.

o lord, we thank thee for the food we are about to receive that carol will
curse you for.


"Dr. Jai Maharaj" <usenet@mantra.com> wrote in message
news:liOHA0089UCAvA@DluEx...
> Rockland private school goes veggie
>
> By Randi Weiner
> The Journal News
> September 19, 2005
>
> Cooking for a crowd
>
> Executive chef Richard LaCossade created
> this Cheery Cherry Compote as a dessert
> or side dish. It is served at Rockland
> Country Day School. The dish serves 24.
>
> 2 packages kosher vegetarian cherry gelatin
> 2 cups boiling water
> 10 oz. strawberries
> 11 oz. cherries
> 20 oz. pineapple
> 15 oz. pear halves
> 3 firm bananas
> 2 navel oranges, peeled and separated
> 2 tart apples
> 1 cup fresh blackberries
>
> In a large bowl, dissolve the gelatin in the
> water. Stir in the other ingredients. Transfer
> to a 4-quart serving bowl, cover and refrigerate
> for three to four hours before serving.
>
> CONGERS - Monday's deli special features meatless hot
> dogs and soy-based pork; Friday's specialty cuisine lunch
> can involve veggie burgers and egg-free pasta.
>
> The cafeteria at Rockland Country Day School has gone
> vegetarian.
>
> "I'm a vegetarian and I had lunch today. It was pretty
> good. Last year, I didn't eat lunch at all. I'm really
> happy that they're there," Matt Zeltzer, 14, of Nyack, a
> ninth-grader at the 165-student private school, said of
> the menu options. "It's so much better than last year."
>
> For the first time in more than a decade, Rockland
> Country Day has changed lunch vendors from a commercial
> organization to a local restaurant. After a year of
> committee meetings, taste tests and student and parent
> comment, the school signed a one-year contract with Main
> Essentials, a Haverstraw vegetarian restaurant that
> caters to vegans \ufffd vegetarians who also don't eat dairy
> or other animal products.
>
> "We know there's an obesity crisis and a crisis of
> disease in this country, and a lot of it stems from the
> kind of foods and the fast foods that people ingest,"
> said Martha Roth, a parent and member of the committee
> that selected Main Essentials as the school's food
> vendor. "If you start early, if you teach children to eat
> well at an early age, it won't be an issue when they get
> older."
>
> Local public schools usually offer a meatless option for
> students and have tried to cut down on sugar and salt in
> other foods, but none has done what Rockland Country Day
> has \ufffd hired a vegetarian restaurant to provide school
> lunches.
>
> Two years ago, parents and students approached James
> Handlin, the headmaster of Rockland Country Day, about
> the school's food. Research showed that many children
> nationwide were eating high-sugar, high-fat foods that
> contributed to health problems such as asthma and
> diabetes. There had been concern among organic-foods
> activists for years about chemical fertilizers,
> genetically engineered foodstuffs and commercial feed
> lots.
>
> "We did two things: We took a hard look at all of the
> snack foods we were offering in all our machines and
> decided to get rid of what wasn't healthy, mainly those
> with corn sweeteners. We put in a lot more juices and so-
> called natural sodas," Handlin said.
>
> "We're really concerned about the obesity and lack of
> nutritional awareness that so many families seem to have.
> Because we're a school that goes from 3-year-olds to
> 12th-graders, we would have kids on these sort of sugar
> highs. We took a long look at what we were going to put
> into those machines."
>
> Beginning in the spring, granola, pretzels and soy-based
> cookies replaced candy bars, chips and Pop-Tarts in the
> snack machines. Water, juice and seltzer-based sodas
> ousted Coke and Pepsi products. The food, provided by
> Kristo Beverage, costs 75 cents to $1.50.
>
> The change was not made effortlessly. Students and staff
> complained they didn't like the options in the snack and
> soda machines. Handlin said the complainers agreed to
> live with healthy snacks for the rest of the school year,
> and no one has complained about the machine offerings
> since school started last week.
>
> Handlin said the organic chips were selling better than
> regular chips used to and the school wasn't selling as
> much soda.
>
> As for student behavior \ufffd it's too soon to tell, he said.
> But the younger children now have access to the machines,
> which they weren't permitted with the former snack
> offerings.
>
> With that project completed, the school launched its
> second initiative. Earlier in the summer, parents and
> students fenced in a 100-foot-by-100-foot lot and began
> an organic garden. Roth and local greenhouse owner Ron
> Breland plotted a simple vegetable garden as a start and
> asked students and parents to help. Eventually, the
> garden will be used with the curriculum and for some of
> the school's mandated community-service projects.
>
> Adam Darer, 15, of Chestnut Ridge, a 10th-grader at the
> school, was drafted by his mother to come help, but it
> wasn't a hardship, he said. His grandmother got him
> hooked on growing things, and he already had had a garden
> at home for four years.
>
> "I came to a meeting one day and it sounded interesting,"
> he said. "It's been a lot of fun coming here in the
> summer. It seems weird to come here in the summer, but
> when you have a lot of students working toward a goal,
> it's really nice."
>
> While the garden project was getting started, the same
> committee began looking at food vendors for the
> cafeteria. Because the school receives little public
> money, students now pay about $4.50 for lunch each day,
> compared with about $1.75 for an average public-school
> hot lunch.
>
> Richard LaCossade, 27, is the executive chef in charge of
> Rockland Country Day School's cafeteria. He worked in the
> kitchen of the Manhattan Woods Golf Course and a Marriott
> Inn before joining Main Essentials. He takes standard
> cafeteria fare and makes it meatless.
>
> "I just try to keep it healthy. This is a school," he
> said. "But we'll use soy cheese for the quesadillas, and
> soy-based products for the ham and cheese omelets. The
> kids that still eat ham will still taste the difference,
> but the rest don't seem to notice."
>
> Unlike at Main Essentials, the school cafeteria has a
> meat option: turkey hot dogs. LaCossade will use real
> cheese in his sandwiches, he said, although soy-based
> cheeses are available.
>
> The vegetables and fruits are from local farmers markets,
> and once the school garden starts producing in bulk, that
> food will be part of the menu. Scraps from the lunchroom
> will go to the school compost heap.
>
> Eliza Martin Simpson, 15, of Wesley Hills, a 10th-grader,
> said she just appreciated the ability to eat a school
> lunch.
>
> "It's really made it a lot easier for me to be a
> vegetarian, and the food is really interesting," she
> said. "I really like to eat, so it's been a highlight of
> the year coming here."
>
> Nonvegetarians such as ninth-graders Norma Kuhling, 14,
> of Valley Cottage; Hailey Fyfe, also 14, of Piermont; and
> 10th-grader Katie Crispi, 15, of New City said they found
> the school lunches infinitely better than last year.
>
> "You just sort of feel good," Fyfe said, "after eating a
> healthy meal."
>
> More at:
>
http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050919/NEWS03/509190350/1017
>
> Visit:
> http://www.pcrm.org
>
> Jai Maharaj
> http://www.mantra.com/jai
> Om Shanti
>
> Hindu Holocaust Museum
> http://www.mantra.com/holocaust
>
> Hindu life, principles, spirituality and philosophy
> http://www.hindu.org
> http://www.hindunet.org
>
> The truth about Islam and Muslims
> http://www.flex.com/~jai/satyamevajayate
>
> The terrorist mission of Jesus stated in the Christian bible:
>
> "Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not so send
> peace, but a sword.
> "For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the
> daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in
> law.
> "And a man's foes shall be they of his own household.
> - Matthew 10:34-36.
>
> o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the
educational
> purposes of research and open discussion. The contents of this post may
not
> have been authored by, and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the
> poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for
> fair use of copyrighted works.
> o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read,
> considered or answered if it does not contain your full legal name,
current
> e-mail and postal addresses, and live-voice telephone number.
> o Posted for information and discussion. Views expressed by others
are
> not necessarily those of the poster who may or may not have read the
article.
>
> FAIR USE NOTICE: This article may contain copyrighted material the use of
> which may or may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright
> owner. This material is being made available in efforts to advance the
> understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic,
> democratic, scientific, social, and cultural, etc., issues. It is believed
> that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as
> provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with
Title
> 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without
> profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the
included
> information for research, comment, discussion and educational purposes by
> subscribing to USENET newsgroups or visiting web sites. For more
information
> go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml
> If you wish to use copyrighted material from this article for purposes of
> your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the
> copyright owner.
>
> Since newsgroup posts are being removed
> by forgery by one or more net terrorists,
> this post may be reposted several times.



Dr. Homilete
2005-09-26 13:51:25 EST
harmony aka Pradipshit Parekh wrote:

> this is just great.
> where is this rockland town at?

You're an idiot.


> it amuses me nevertheless, that american veggie dishes are made to mimic
> meaty flavors. and retain the names too: "soy-based pork"!!!??? veggie "hot
> dogs"
>
> well, it's a great welcome change, and let's be thankful.
>
> o lord, we thank thee for the food we are about to receive that carol will
> curse you for.

Indian meat consumption to rise:
http://www.ifpri.org/pubs/books/ufa/ufa_ch13.pdf
http://www.researchconnect.com/buyreport/report_8066.asp
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/msid-1226451,prtpage-1.cms

Dr. Jai Maharaj
2005-09-26 18:40:02 EST
In article <XsUZe.26810$tT.19023@okepread02>,
harmony posted:
>
> this is just great.
> where is this rockland town at?

It is in New York -- in the neighborhood of the criminal
Prem Thomas (recently posting as Homo-toilet, Homilet or
some name like that):

http://www.flex.com/~jai/articles/PremThomasThreat.html

> it amuses me nevertheless, that american veggie dishes are made to mimic
> meaty flavors. and retain the names too: "soy-based pork"!!!??? veggie "hot
> dogs"
>
> well, it's a great welcome change, and let's be thankful.

It helps them in their transition to better health.

> o lord, we thank thee for the food we are about to receive that carol will
> curse you for.

Heh.

Jai Maharaj
http://www.mantra.com/jai
Om Shanti

> Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
>
> > Rockland private school goes veggie
> >
> > By Randi Weiner
> > The Journal News
> > September 19, 2005
> >
> > Cooking for a crowd
> >
> > Executive chef Richard LaCossade created
> > this Cheery Cherry Compote as a dessert
> > or side dish. It is served at Rockland
> > Country Day School. The dish serves 24.
> >
> > 2 packages kosher vegetarian cherry gelatin
> > 2 cups boiling water
> > 10 oz. strawberries
> > 11 oz. cherries
> > 20 oz. pineapple
> > 15 oz. pear halves
> > 3 firm bananas
> > 2 navel oranges, peeled and separated
> > 2 tart apples
> > 1 cup fresh blackberries
> >
> > In a large bowl, dissolve the gelatin in the
> > water. Stir in the other ingredients. Transfer
> > to a 4-quart serving bowl, cover and refrigerate
> > for three to four hours before serving.
> >
> > CONGERS - Monday's deli special features meatless hot
> > dogs and soy-based pork; Friday's specialty cuisine lunch
> > can involve veggie burgers and egg-free pasta.
> >
> > The cafeteria at Rockland Country Day School has gone
> > vegetarian.
> >
> > "I'm a vegetarian and I had lunch today. It was pretty
> > good. Last year, I didn't eat lunch at all. I'm really
> > happy that they're there," Matt Zeltzer, 14, of Nyack, a
> > ninth-grader at the 165-student private school, said of
> > the menu options. "It's so much better than last year."
> >
> > For the first time in more than a decade, Rockland
> > Country Day has changed lunch vendors from a commercial
> > organization to a local restaurant. After a year of
> > committee meetings, taste tests and student and parent
> > comment, the school signed a one-year contract with Main
> > Essentials, a Haverstraw vegetarian restaurant that
> > caters to vegans \ufffd vegetarians who also don't eat dairy
> > or other animal products.
> >
> > "We know there's an obesity crisis and a crisis of
> > disease in this country, and a lot of it stems from the
> > kind of foods and the fast foods that people ingest,"
> > said Martha Roth, a parent and member of the committee
> > that selected Main Essentials as the school's food
> > vendor. "If you start early, if you teach children to eat
> > well at an early age, it won't be an issue when they get
> > older."
> >
> > Local public schools usually offer a meatless option for
> > students and have tried to cut down on sugar and salt in
> > other foods, but none has done what Rockland Country Day
> > has \ufffd hired a vegetarian restaurant to provide school
> > lunches.
> >
> > Two years ago, parents and students approached James
> > Handlin, the headmaster of Rockland Country Day, about
> > the school's food. Research showed that many children
> > nationwide were eating high-sugar, high-fat foods that
> > contributed to health problems such as asthma and
> > diabetes. There had been concern among organic-foods
> > activists for years about chemical fertilizers,
> > genetically engineered foodstuffs and commercial feed
> > lots.
> >
> > "We did two things: We took a hard look at all of the
> > snack foods we were offering in all our machines and
> > decided to get rid of what wasn't healthy, mainly those
> > with corn sweeteners. We put in a lot more juices and so-
> > called natural sodas," Handlin said.
> >
> > "We're really concerned about the obesity and lack of
> > nutritional awareness that so many families seem to have.
> > Because we're a school that goes from 3-year-olds to
> > 12th-graders, we would have kids on these sort of sugar
> > highs. We took a long look at what we were going to put
> > into those machines."
> >
> > Beginning in the spring, granola, pretzels and soy-based
> > cookies replaced candy bars, chips and Pop-Tarts in the
> > snack machines. Water, juice and seltzer-based sodas
> > ousted Coke and Pepsi products. The food, provided by
> > Kristo Beverage, costs 75 cents to $1.50.
> >
> > The change was not made effortlessly. Students and staff
> > complained they didn't like the options in the snack and
> > soda machines. Handlin said the complainers agreed to
> > live with healthy snacks for the rest of the school year,
> > and no one has complained about the machine offerings
> > since school started last week.
> >
> > Handlin said the organic chips were selling better than
> > regular chips used to and the school wasn't selling as
> > much soda.
> >
> > As for student behavior \ufffd it's too soon to tell, he said.
> > But the younger children now have access to the machines,
> > which they weren't permitted with the former snack
> > offerings.
> >
> > With that project completed, the school launched its
> > second initiative. Earlier in the summer, parents and
> > students fenced in a 100-foot-by-100-foot lot and began
> > an organic garden. Roth and local greenhouse owner Ron
> > Breland plotted a simple vegetable garden as a start and
> > asked students and parents to help. Eventually, the
> > garden will be used with the curriculum and for some of
> > the school's mandated community-service projects.
> >
> > Adam Darer, 15, of Chestnut Ridge, a 10th-grader at the
> > school, was drafted by his mother to come help, but it
> > wasn't a hardship, he said. His grandmother got him
> > hooked on growing things, and he already had had a garden
> > at home for four years.
> >
> > "I came to a meeting one day and it sounded interesting,"
> > he said. "It's been a lot of fun coming here in the
> > summer. It seems weird to come here in the summer, but
> > when you have a lot of students working toward a goal,
> > it's really nice."
> >
> > While the garden project was getting started, the same
> > committee began looking at food vendors for the
> > cafeteria. Because the school receives little public
> > money, students now pay about $4.50 for lunch each day,
> > compared with about $1.75 for an average public-school
> > hot lunch.
> >
> > Richard LaCossade, 27, is the executive chef in charge of
> > Rockland Country Day School's cafeteria. He worked in the
> > kitchen of the Manhattan Woods Golf Course and a Marriott
> > Inn before joining Main Essentials. He takes standard
> > cafeteria fare and makes it meatless.
> >
> > "I just try to keep it healthy. This is a school," he
> > said. "But we'll use soy cheese for the quesadillas, and
> > soy-based products for the ham and cheese omelets. The
> > kids that still eat ham will still taste the difference,
> > but the rest don't seem to notice."
> >
> > Unlike at Main Essentials, the school cafeteria has a
> > meat option: turkey hot dogs. LaCossade will use real
> > cheese in his sandwiches, he said, although soy-based
> > cheeses are available.
> >
> > The vegetables and fruits are from local farmers markets,
> > and once the school garden starts producing in bulk, that
> > food will be part of the menu. Scraps from the lunchroom
> > will go to the school compost heap.
> >
> > Eliza Martin Simpson, 15, of Wesley Hills, a 10th-grader,
> > said she just appreciated the ability to eat a school
> > lunch.
> >
> > "It's really made it a lot easier for me to be a
> > vegetarian, and the food is really interesting," she
> > said. "I really like to eat, so it's been a highlight of
> > the year coming here."
> >
> > Nonvegetarians such as ninth-graders Norma Kuhling, 14,
> > of Valley Cottage; Hailey Fyfe, also 14, of Piermont; and
> > 10th-grader Katie Crispi, 15, of New City said they found
> > the school lunches infinitely better than last year.
> >
> > "You just sort of feel good," Fyfe said, "after eating a
> > healthy meal."
> >
> > More at:
> >
> http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050919/NEWS03/509190350/1017
> >
> > Visit:
> > http://www.pcrm.org
> >
> > Jai Maharaj
> > http://www.mantra.com/jai
> > Om Shanti
> >
> > Hindu Holocaust Museum
> > http://www.mantra.com/holocaust
> >
> > Hindu life, principles, spirituality and philosophy
> > http://www.hindu.org
> > http://www.hindunet.org
> >
> > The truth about Islam and Muslims
> > http://www.flex.com/~jai/satyamevajayate
> >
> > The terrorist mission of Jesus stated in the Christian bible:
> >
> > "Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not so send
> > peace, but a sword.
> > "For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the
> > daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in
> > law.
> > "And a man's foes shall be they of his own household.
> > - Matthew 10:34-36.
> >
> > o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the
> educational
> > purposes of research and open discussion. The contents of this post may
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> > poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for
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> > o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read,
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>
>

Dr. Homilete
2005-09-27 13:24:26 EST
Johnny Judas Jay "the jaded jyotishithead" Maharaj wrote:

> In article <XsUZe.26810$tT.19023@okepread02>,
> harmony posted:
>
>>this is just great.
>>where is this rockland town at?
>
>
> It is in New York -- in the neighborhood of the criminal
> Prem Thomas (recently posting as Homo-toilet, Homilet or
> some name like that):

Hmmm.....still trailing old ghosts, I see, Johnny boya! I would have
thought you'd be more familiar with Rockland, since you sent a bunch of
skinny saffron goons to try to beat up or otherwise intimidate Prem
Thomas. However, Rockland is not a town, as you and your homo-rectal pal
Pardipshit Parikh seem to think.

Hey, how about a one-on-one between you and Prem Thomas? What's that?
You don't fight one-on-one? Okay, how about two-on-one, you and
Pardipshit against Prem? Say again? Pardipshit has no balls? Yes, I know
that, but perhaps he can mouth words of encouragement as he swings from
your ass?

Got mangoes, Johnny boya, you piece of jyotishit?
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