Vegetarian Discussion: New Orleans: Loss Of Wetlands Opens Floodgates To Disaster

New Orleans: Loss Of Wetlands Opens Floodgates To Disaster
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The Angry Hierophant
2005-09-01 13:08:43 EST
New Orleans: Loss of wetlands opens floodgates to disaster
By David Usborne
Published: 01 September 2005
The worst has happened in New Orleans and not everyone is surprised.
For years, specialists have warned that the city, built partly below
sea level and in an area of radically depleted wetlands, was a natural
disaster waiting to happen. And when it did, they said, we would have
no one to blame but ourselves.

That the Crescent City is where it is does not make sense in the first
place. But the first European settlers, in 1718, made the same
calculation that generations have made ever since. The site was right
for commerce, and commerce means dollars. In the battle between dollars
and nature, you know who wins.

What has happened in recent decades has made matters worse. Not just in
New Orleans but all along the Gulf Coast, human encroachment has
accelerated without pause. This has meant taming natural water flows -
including the gradual straightening of the Mississippi itself - and
draining wetlands.

Among those lamenting past mistakes is John Barry, the author of Rising
Tide, a book about the Mississippi flood of 1927. "People have said for
a long time that we can't continue to do the things we're doing, but
the reality is that we don't take natural disasters seriously until
they happen," he said.

Arguments are already breaking out over the connection between global
warming and Katrina. Most agree the rising sea levels and temperatures
may have contributed to the damage it caused. But many scientists say
the real problem is what has been wrought on the ground in the Gulf
Coast region itself. And most serious of all may be the loss of the
wetlands. Wetlands, along the edges of rivers and near the coast
itself, are vital for absorbing and storing floodwaters. As such, they
provided New Orleans with a natural defence against storm surges such
as the one generated by Katrina.

But, according to the US Geological Survey, Louisiana has lost 1,900
square miles of wetland in the past seven decades - an area larger than
the state of Rhode Island.

The draining of the wetlands to make way for roads, malls, beach
communities, marinas and condominiums has also meant shrinkage of the
shoreline. Louisiana, in fact, loses 25 square miles of coast every
year.

General Robert Flowers, the head of the Corps of Engineers until last
year, is concerned by the loss of a "natural storm protection", along
Louisiana's coast. "With that loss of wetlands ... we had to build
hurricane protection. I think a longer-term solution that replenishes
Louisiana's wetlands will better serve us."

It was to protect the city from hurricanes and disastrous floods that
the levees and dams have been built. There are thousands of miles of
them alongthe river. They usually do a fine job.

Except there is a bad side-effect. The millions of tons of silt that
flow down the Mississippi would once be deposited all along its edges
and in the flood plains when it broke its banks. Those deposits that
once replenished the Delta region are now missing and the Delta, along
with New Orleans, is sinking. Barrier islands that protected the city
are shrinking for the same reason.

More people live in hurricane territory than ever before. More people
to be hurt and more property to be damaged. Professor Kerry Emanuel of
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said: "We have to put stuff
in harm's way for there to be a disaster, and we're good at doing
that."

The worst has happened in New Orleans and not everyone is surprised.
For years, specialists have warned that the city, built partly below
sea level and in an area of radically depleted wetlands, was a natural
disaster waiting to happen. And when it did, they said, we would have
no one to blame but ourselves.

That the Crescent City is where it is does not make sense in the first
place. But the first European settlers, in 1718, made the same
calculation that generations have made ever since. The site was right
for commerce, and commerce means dollars. In the battle between dollars
and nature, you know who wins.

What has happened in recent decades has made matters worse. Not just in
New Orleans but all along the Gulf Coast, human encroachment has
accelerated without pause. This has meant taming natural water flows -
including the gradual straightening of the Mississippi itself - and
draining wetlands.

Among those lamenting past mistakes is John Barry, the author of Rising
Tide, a book about the Mississippi flood of 1927. "People have said for
a long time that we can't continue to do the things we're doing, but
the reality is that we don't take natural disasters seriously until
they happen," he said.

Arguments are already breaking out over the connection between global
warming and Katrina. Most agree the rising sea levels and temperatures
may have contributed to the damage it caused. But many scientists say
the real problem is what has been wrought on the ground in the Gulf
Coast region itself. And most serious of all may be the loss of the
wetlands. Wetlands, along the edges of rivers and near the coast
itself, are vital for absorbing and storing floodwaters. As such, they
provided New Orleans with a natural defence against storm surges such
as the one generated by Katrina.
But, according to the US Geological Survey, Louisiana has lost 1,900
square miles of wetland in the past seven decades - an area larger than
the state of Rhode Island.

The draining of the wetlands to make way for roads, malls, beach
communities, marinas and condominiums has also meant shrinkage of the
shoreline. Louisiana, in fact, loses 25 square miles of coast every
year.

General Robert Flowers, the head of the Corps of Engineers until last
year, is concerned by the loss of a "natural storm protection", along
Louisiana's coast. "With that loss of wetlands ... we had to build
hurricane protection. I think a longer-term solution that replenishes
Louisiana's wetlands will better serve us."

It was to protect the city from hurricanes and disastrous floods that
the levees and dams have been built. There are thousands of miles of
them alongthe river. They usually do a fine job.

Except there is a bad side-effect. The millions of tons of silt that
flow down the Mississippi would once be deposited all along its edges
and in the flood plains when it broke its banks. Those deposits that
once replenished the Delta region are now missing and the Delta, along
with New Orleans, is sinking. Barrier islands that protected the city
are shrinking for the same reason.

More people live in hurricane territory than ever before. More people
to be hurt and more property to be damaged. Professor Kerry Emanuel of
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said: "We have to put stuff
in harm's way for there to be a disaster, and we're good at doing
that."

THAT'S WHAT YOU GET YOU FUCKING ASSHOLES WHEN YOU THINK YOU ARE SO COOL
THAT YOU CAN KILL AND DESTROY ANY ANIMAL OR HABITAT YOU WANT FOR YOUR
HUMANITY'S SAKE.

FUCK AMERICA.

FUCK THE WH*RE OF B*BYL*N. __
|_|__
__| |


ריעין ברתון‎/Riain Barton
2005-09-01 18:11:28 EST
No the lack of the government to build a proper dyke along the Gulf
coast of Louisiana is to blame -- just ask the Dutch, see how much land
they reclaimed from the sea.




"The Angry Hierophant" <bghilliotti@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1125594523.686618.215460@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
: New Orleans: Loss of wetlands opens floodgates to disaster
: By David Usborne
: Published: 01 September 2005
: The worst has happened in New Orleans and not everyone is surprised.
: For years, specialists have warned that the city, built partly below
: sea level and in an area of radically depleted wetlands, was a natural
: disaster waiting to happen. And when it did, they said, we would have
: no one to blame but ourselves.
:
: That the Crescent City is where it is does not make sense in the first
: place. But the first European settlers, in 1718, made the same
: calculation that generations have made ever since. The site was right
: for commerce, and commerce means dollars. In the battle between
dollars
: and nature, you know who wins.
:
: What has happened in recent decades has made matters worse. Not just
in
: New Orleans but all along the Gulf Coast, human encroachment has
: accelerated without pause. This has meant taming natural water flows -
: including the gradual straightening of the Mississippi itself - and
: draining wetlands.
:
: Among those lamenting past mistakes is John Barry, the author of
Rising
: Tide, a book about the Mississippi flood of 1927. "People have said
for
: a long time that we can't continue to do the things we're doing, but
: the reality is that we don't take natural disasters seriously until
: they happen," he said.
:
: Arguments are already breaking out over the connection between global
: warming and Katrina. Most agree the rising sea levels and temperatures
: may have contributed to the damage it caused. But many scientists say
: the real problem is what has been wrought on the ground in the Gulf
: Coast region itself. And most serious of all may be the loss of the
: wetlands. Wetlands, along the edges of rivers and near the coast
: itself, are vital for absorbing and storing floodwaters. As such, they
: provided New Orleans with a natural defence against storm surges such
: as the one generated by Katrina.
:
: But, according to the US Geological Survey, Louisiana has lost 1,900
: square miles of wetland in the past seven decades - an area larger
than
: the state of Rhode Island.
:
: The draining of the wetlands to make way for roads, malls, beach
: communities, marinas and condominiums has also meant shrinkage of the
: shoreline. Louisiana, in fact, loses 25 square miles of coast every
: year.
:
: General Robert Flowers, the head of the Corps of Engineers until last
: year, is concerned by the loss of a "natural storm protection", along
: Louisiana's coast. "With that loss of wetlands ... we had to build
: hurricane protection. I think a longer-term solution that replenishes
: Louisiana's wetlands will better serve us."
:
: It was to protect the city from hurricanes and disastrous floods that
: the levees and dams have been built. There are thousands of miles of
: them alongthe river. They usually do a fine job.
:
: Except there is a bad side-effect. The millions of tons of silt that
: flow down the Mississippi would once be deposited all along its edges
: and in the flood plains when it broke its banks. Those deposits that
: once replenished the Delta region are now missing and the Delta, along
: with New Orleans, is sinking. Barrier islands that protected the city
: are shrinking for the same reason.
:
: More people live in hurricane territory than ever before. More people
: to be hurt and more property to be damaged. Professor Kerry Emanuel of
: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said: "We have to put stuff
: in harm's way for there to be a disaster, and we're good at doing
: that."
:
: The worst has happened in New Orleans and not everyone is surprised.
: For years, specialists have warned that the city, built partly below
: sea level and in an area of radically depleted wetlands, was a natural
: disaster waiting to happen. And when it did, they said, we would have
: no one to blame but ourselves.
:
: That the Crescent City is where it is does not make sense in the first
: place. But the first European settlers, in 1718, made the same
: calculation that generations have made ever since. The site was right
: for commerce, and commerce means dollars. In the battle between
dollars
: and nature, you know who wins.
:
: What has happened in recent decades has made matters worse. Not just
in
: New Orleans but all along the Gulf Coast, human encroachment has
: accelerated without pause. This has meant taming natural water flows -
: including the gradual straightening of the Mississippi itself - and
: draining wetlands.
:
: Among those lamenting past mistakes is John Barry, the author of
Rising
: Tide, a book about the Mississippi flood of 1927. "People have said
for
: a long time that we can't continue to do the things we're doing, but
: the reality is that we don't take natural disasters seriously until
: they happen," he said.
:
: Arguments are already breaking out over the connection between global
: warming and Katrina. Most agree the rising sea levels and temperatures
: may have contributed to the damage it caused. But many scientists say
: the real problem is what has been wrought on the ground in the Gulf
: Coast region itself. And most serious of all may be the loss of the
: wetlands. Wetlands, along the edges of rivers and near the coast
: itself, are vital for absorbing and storing floodwaters. As such, they
: provided New Orleans with a natural defence against storm surges such
: as the one generated by Katrina.
: But, according to the US Geological Survey, Louisiana has lost 1,900
: square miles of wetland in the past seven decades - an area larger
than
: the state of Rhode Island.
:
: The draining of the wetlands to make way for roads, malls, beach
: communities, marinas and condominiums has also meant shrinkage of the
: shoreline. Louisiana, in fact, loses 25 square miles of coast every
: year.
:
: General Robert Flowers, the head of the Corps of Engineers until last
: year, is concerned by the loss of a "natural storm protection", along
: Louisiana's coast. "With that loss of wetlands ... we had to build
: hurricane protection. I think a longer-term solution that replenishes
: Louisiana's wetlands will better serve us."
:
: It was to protect the city from hurricanes and disastrous floods that
: the levees and dams have been built. There are thousands of miles of
: them alongthe river. They usually do a fine job.
:
: Except there is a bad side-effect. The millions of tons of silt that
: flow down the Mississippi would once be deposited all along its edges
: and in the flood plains when it broke its banks. Those deposits that
: once replenished the Delta region are now missing and the Delta, along
: with New Orleans, is sinking. Barrier islands that protected the city
: are shrinking for the same reason.
:
: More people live in hurricane territory than ever before. More people
: to be hurt and more property to be damaged. Professor Kerry Emanuel of
: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said: "We have to put stuff
: in harm's way for there to be a disaster, and we're good at doing
: that."
:
: THAT'S WHAT YOU GET YOU FUCKING ASSHOLES WHEN YOU THINK YOU ARE SO
COOL
: THAT YOU CAN KILL AND DESTROY ANY ANIMAL OR HABITAT YOU WANT FOR YOUR
: HUMANITY'S SAKE.
:
: FUCK AMERICA.
:
: FUCK THE WH*RE OF B*BYL*N. __
: |_|__
: __| |
:



Dutch
2005-09-01 21:44:00 EST

"\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd \ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd/Riain Barton" <riain@zion.org.il> wrote
> No the lack of the government to build a proper dyke along the Gulf
> coast of Louisiana is to blame -- just ask the Dutch, see how much land
> they reclaimed from the sea.

afaik they never see category 5 hurricanes in The Netherlands.




ריעין ברתון‎/Riain Barton
2005-09-01 21:58:03 EST
I bet you haven't a fucking clue about WINTER STORMS in the North
Atlantic, or where all those Hurricanes go to when they follow the gulf
stream do you????



"Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote in message
news:11hfbj08nblrl33@news.supernews.com...
:
: "\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd \ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd/Riain Barton" <riain@zion.org.il> wrote
: > No the lack of the government to build a proper dyke along the Gulf
: > coast of Louisiana is to blame -- just ask the Dutch, see how much
land
: > they reclaimed from the sea.
:
: afaik they never see category 5 hurricanes in The Netherlands.
:
:
:



????? ??????/Riain Barton
2005-09-01 22:56:24 EST
This is a common situation not only for Ireland but anywhere in the
North Atlantic from September to April -- these storms can produce
amazingly large surges, but it is Holland that is below sea-level:

Storm warnings issued as gales of 100 mph forecast
Alison Healy

Storm-force winds will hit the country later today, with structural
damage and flooding predicted, particularly along the north-west and
western coasts, writes Alison Healy

Met \ufffdireann has issued a severe weather warning and forecasts gusts of
up to 100 m.p.h. in exposed parts of the west and south this evening.
Gusts of up to 80 m.p.h. were predicted for the rest of the country.

There will be widespread rain this morning, adding to the risk of
flooding in waterlogged areas.

The gale-force winds will start building up from about midday and are
expected to continue until midnight.

Ms Evelyn Cusack of Met \ufffdireann said a combination of very high tides
and onshore gales would increase the risk of coastal flooding. The
Shannon estuary and other coastal areas in Munster, Connacht and Ulster
would be most at risk, Ms Cusack said.

"We can expect some structural damage in areas, with further fallen
trees," she added.

Iarnr\ufffdd \ufffdireann track-inspection staff will be monitoring areas at risk
of fallen trees today, according to its spokesman, Mr Barry Kenny.

Yesterday, Iarnr\ufffdd \ufffdireann re- opened a section of track between
Longford and Dromod after flooding had caused the closure. The Camolin
river burst its banks on Sunday morning and flooded the track.

Stena Line and Irish Ferries have advised passengers to phone their
helplines before travelling, to ensure that their sailings have not been
disrupted. The 24-hour Stena Line number is 01-2047799. The Irish
Ferries helpline is 01-6610715.

An Aer Lingus spokeswoman said high winds might disrupt some flights,
but passengers should check in as normal.

Aer Arann advised passengers to contact their information line (0818 210
210) before travelling. Stormy conditions caused the cancellation of
about 10 Aer Arann flights on Sunday, and the diversion of others.

Meanwhile, hundreds of passengers were stranded at Shannon Airport on
Sunday night after bad weather caused the diversion of 23 flights from
Dublin, Cork and Knock airports. Some diverted passengers had delays of
up to 10 hours in getting coaches to ferry them back to their original
destinations.

Irish Water Safety has warned people to be on the alert for dangerous
flood conditions.

Mr John Leech, Irish Water Safety's chief executive, said motorists
needed to be particularly vigilant to avoid flooded areas on roads and
near rivers.

He also warned people crossing flooded areas that fast-moving water
could exert pressure of up to four times its speed against a person's
legs.

Yesterday, roads were closed in parts of Galway, Clare, Kerry and
Monaghan due to flooding.




"Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote in message
news:11hfbj08nblrl33@news.supernews.com...
:
: "????? ??????/Riain Barton" <riain@zion.org.il> wrote
: > No the lack of the government to build a proper dyke along the Gulf
: > coast of Louisiana is to blame -- just ask the Dutch, see how much
land
: > they reclaimed from the sea.
:
: afaik they never see category 5 hurricanes in The Netherlands.
:
:
:



Tilly
2005-09-02 00:33:40 EST
The Angry Hierophant wrote:
> New Orleans: Loss of wetlands opens floodgates to disaster
> By David Usborne
> Published: 01 September 2005

Some are suggesting that global warming may also have a role to play,
something Bush chooses to ignore.


T*r@hotmail.com



Norma
2005-09-02 02:13:57 EST

"Tilly" <Striking1583REMOVE@yahoo.co.nz> wrote in message
news:aFQRe.7845$iM2.799057@news.xtra.co.nz...
> The Angry Hierophant wrote:
>> New Orleans: Loss of wetlands opens floodgates to disaster
>> By David Usborne
>> Published: 01 September 2005
>
> Some are suggesting that global warming may also have a role to play,
> something Bush chooses to ignore.
>
>
> TillyGr@hotmail.com

Unfortunately, it hasn't been a priority with him. There are other areas of
neglect as well, but that is a big one. I have noted that his goals are not
aimed far into the future.

Norma



Dutch
2005-09-02 04:11:46 EST

"\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd \ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd/Riain Barton" <riain@zion.org.il> wrote
>I bet you haven't a fucking clue about WINTER STORMS in the North
> Atlantic, or where all those Hurricanes go to when they follow the gulf
> stream do you????

A winter storm is not a category 5 hurricane.

> "Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote in message
> news:11hfbj08nblrl33@news.supernews.com...
> :
> : "\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd \ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd/Riain Barton" <riain@zion.org.il> wrote
> : > No the lack of the government to build a proper dyke along the Gulf
> : > coast of Louisiana is to blame -- just ask the Dutch, see how much
> land
> : > they reclaimed from the sea.
> :
> : afaik they never see category 5 hurricanes in The Netherlands.
> :
> :
> :
>
>



Dutch
2005-09-02 04:16:02 EST

"????? ??????/Riain Barton" <riain@zion.org.il> wrote
> This is a common situation not only for Ireland but anywhere in the
> North Atlantic from September to April -- these storms can produce
> amazingly large surges, but it is Holland that is below sea-level:
>
> Storm warnings issued as gales of 100 mph forecast
> Alison Healy

That's category two, damage typically moderate.

Category five hurrricanes are predicted to inflict catastrophic damage.

Apples.. Oranges



Tw
2005-09-02 07:15:16 EST

"\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd \ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd\ufffd/Riain Barton" <riain@zion.org.il> wrote in message
news:ehORe.11327$xw1.10584@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
> I bet you haven't a fucking clue about WINTER STORMS in the North
> Atlantic, or where all those Hurricanes go to when they follow the gulf
> stream do you????

Neither do you, apparently. they tend to hit the British Isles (well
Ireland, anyway) first and peter out. And they tend to lose a hell of a lot
of power on the way over from the US too and are rarely even storm force by
the time they get here - do you think hurricanse just keep circling the
world at the same intensity and windspeed?! Britain gets hit by hurricane
force winds (and mild ones at that) maybe once or twice a decade, I imagine
the figure is lower for the Netherlands.

>


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