Vegetarian Discussion: Study Says Homeopathic Medicines Don't Work

Study Says Homeopathic Medicines Don't Work
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Rudy Canoza
2005-08-27 00:09:24 EST
"Evidence suggests remedies offer placebo effect, but
no real benefits"

Reuters

LONDON - The world may be beating a path to the doors
of homeopathic practitioners as an alternative to
conventional medicines, but according to a new study
they may just as well be taking nothing.

The study, published in Friday's edition of the
respected Lancet medical journal, is likely to anger
the growing numbers of devoted practitioners of and
adherents to alternative therapies that include homeopathy.

more at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9078909/


Just like "reflexology", better known as foot massage.
These therapies are quackery. They have appeal for
uneducated, credulous dummies.

Michael Balarama
2005-08-27 09:45:52 EST

"Rudy Canoza" <someguy@ph.con> wrote in message
news:UHRPe.2617$_84.2179@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> "Evidence suggests remedies offer placebo effect, but
> no real benefits"
>
> Reuters
>
> LONDON - The world may be beating a path to the doors
> of homeopathic practitioners as an alternative to
> conventional medicines, but according to a new study
> they may just as well be taking nothing.
>
> The study, published in Friday's edition of the
> respected Lancet medical journal, is likely to anger
> the growing numbers of devoted practitioners of and
> adherents to alternative therapies that include homeopathy.
>
> more at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9078909/
>
>
> Just like "reflexology", better known as foot massage.
> These therapies are quackery. They have appeal for
> uneducated, credulous dummies.

This study is not true--who did it..probably some medical group...I had a
serious problem not able to pass water and traditional medicines drugs did
not work--this homeopathic remedy had me passing water like Niagara
falls...it worked -while the traditional medicine did not ..
Michael



Ron
2005-08-27 11:19:45 EST

Rudy Canoza wrote:
> "Evidence suggests remedies offer placebo effect, but
> no real benefits"
>
> Reuters
>
> LONDON - The world may be beating a path to the doors
> of homeopathic practitioners as an alternative to
> conventional medicines, but according to a new study
> they may just as well be taking nothing.
>
> The study, published in Friday's edition of the
> respected Lancet medical journal, is likely to anger
> the growing numbers of devoted practitioners of and
> adherents to alternative therapies that include homeopathy.
>
> more at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9078909/
>
>
> Just like "reflexology", better known as foot massage.
> These therapies are quackery. They have appeal for
> uneducated, credulous dummies.





"Study Says Rudy Cucumber's Brain Don't Work"


Scented Nectar
2005-08-27 11:31:53 EST
"Ron" <banmilk@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1125155985.591743.304580@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
> Rudy Canoza wrote:
> > "Evidence suggests remedies offer placebo effect, but
> > no real benefits"
> >
> > Reuters
> >
> > LONDON - The world may be beating a path to the doors
> > of homeopathic practitioners as an alternative to
> > conventional medicines, but according to a new study
> > they may just as well be taking nothing.
> >
> > The study, published in Friday's edition of the
> > respected Lancet medical journal, is likely to anger
> > the growing numbers of devoted practitioners of and
> > adherents to alternative therapies that include homeopathy.
> >
> > more at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9078909/
> >
> >
> > Just like "reflexology", better known as foot massage.
> > These therapies are quackery. They have appeal for
> > uneducated, credulous dummies.
>
>
>
>
>
> "Study Says Rudy Cucumber's Brain Don't Work"

That's because it's really a sour
pickle and he stores it up his ass!!!


--
SN
http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/



Ron
2005-08-27 11:47:56 EST

Scented Nectar wrote:
> "Ron" <banmilk@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1125155985.591743.304580@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > Rudy Canoza wrote:
> > > "Evidence suggests remedies offer placebo effect, but
> > > no real benefits"
> > >
> > > Reuters
> > >
> > > LONDON - The world may be beating a path to the doors
> > > of homeopathic practitioners as an alternative to
> > > conventional medicines, but according to a new study
> > > they may just as well be taking nothing.
> > >
> > > The study, published in Friday's edition of the
> > > respected Lancet medical journal, is likely to anger
> > > the growing numbers of devoted practitioners of and
> > > adherents to alternative therapies that include homeopathy.
> > >
> > > more at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9078909/
> > >
> > >
> > > Just like "reflexology", better known as foot massage.
> > > These therapies are quackery. They have appeal for
> > > uneducated, credulous dummies.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Study Says Rudy Cucumber's Brain Don't Work"
>
> That's because it's really a sour
> pickle and he stores it up his ass!!!
>


LOL!!;o)



>
> --
> SN
> http://www.scentednectar.com/veg/


Jerry Story
2005-08-27 13:16:33 EST
Nothing works better than allopathy.
This means: try nothing.


Rudy Canoza's Empty Skull
2005-08-27 13:38:59 EST

Jerry Story wrote:
> Nothing works better than allopathy.

How can "nothing" work better than "nothing"?


> This means: try nothing.


Rudy Canoza
2005-08-27 14:19:22 EST
Michael Balarama wrote:

> "Rudy Canoza" <someguy@ph.con> wrote in message
> news:UHRPe.2617$_84.2179@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
>
>>"Evidence suggests remedies offer placebo effect, but
>>no real benefits"
>>
>>Reuters
>>
>>LONDON - The world may be beating a path to the doors
>>of homeopathic practitioners as an alternative to
>>conventional medicines, but according to a new study
>>they may just as well be taking nothing.
>>
>>The study, published in Friday's edition of the
>>respected Lancet medical journal, is likely to anger
>>the growing numbers of devoted practitioners of and
>>adherents to alternative therapies that include homeopathy.
>>
>>more at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9078909/
>>
>>
>>Just like "reflexology", better known as foot massage.
>> These therapies are quackery. They have appeal for
>>uneducated, credulous dummies.
>
>
> This study is not true

You're a moron, Mikie. The study is *legitimate*
(studies aren't "true", you dope), and its conclusion
is probably correct.

You can't question its methodology, Mikie, because you
don't know a thing about science. You like
"homeopathy" for some non-scientific reason, and now
you feel that your non-scientific beliefs are being
attacked by the study's conclusion.

Rudy Canoza's Empty Skull
2005-08-27 14:41:12 EST

Rudy Canoza wrote:
> Michael Balarama wrote:
>
> > "Rudy Canoza" <someguy@ph.con> wrote in message
> > news:UHRPe.2617$_84.2179@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> >
> >>"Evidence suggests remedies offer placebo effect, but
> >>no real benefits"
> >>
> >>Reuters
> >>
> >>LONDON - The world may be beating a path to the doors
> >>of homeopathic practitioners as an alternative to
> >>conventional medicines, but according to a new study
> >>they may just as well be taking nothing.
> >>
> >>The study, published in Friday's edition of the
> >>respected Lancet medical journal, is likely to anger
> >>the growing numbers of devoted practitioners of and
> >>adherents to alternative therapies that include homeopathy.
> >>
> >>more at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9078909/
> >>
> >>
> >>Just like "reflexology", better known as foot massage.
> >> These therapies are quackery. They have appeal for
> >>uneducated, credulous dummies.
> >
> >
> > This study is not true
>
> You're a moron, Mikie. The study is *legitimate*
> (studies aren't "true", you dope), and its conclusion
> is probably correct.
>
> You can't question its methodology, Mikie, because you
> don't know a thing about science. You like
> "homeopathy" for some non-scientific reason, and now
> you feel that your non-scientific beliefs are being
> attacked by the study's conclusion.



Why is there noise coming out of my head when I didn't say anything!?

Someone please shoot me!


Rudy Canoza
2005-08-27 14:55:18 EST
Jerry Story wrote:

> Nothing works better than allopathy.
> This means: try nothing.

Have you ever seen L.I.A.R., the Lexicon of
Inconspicuously Ambiguous Recommendations?

http://www-personal.monash.edu.au/~nate/humor/liar.html


You're called upon for an opinion of a friend who is
extremely lazy. You don't want to lie --- but you also
don't want to risk losing even a lazy friend.

Try this line: "In my opinion," you say as sincerely as
you can manage, "you will be very fortunate to get this
person to work for you."

This gem of double meaning is the creation of Robert
Thornton, a professor of economics at Lehigh University
in Bethlehem, PA.

Thornton was frustrated about an occupational hazard
for teachers, having to write letters of recommendation
for people with dubious qualifications, so he put
together an arsenal of statements that can be read two
ways.

He calls his collection the Lexicon of Inconspicuously
Ambiguous Recommendations. Or LIAR, for short.

LIAR may be used to offer a negative opinion of the
personal qualities, work habits or motivation of the
candidate while allowing the candidate to believe that
it is high praise, Thornton explained last week.
Some examples from LIAR

To describe a person who is totally inept: I most
enthusiastically recommend this candidate with no
qualifications whatsoever.

To describe an ex-employee who had problems getting
along with fellow workers: I am pleased to say that
this candidate is a former colleague of mine.

To describe a candidate who is so unproductive that the
job would be better left unfilled: I can assure you
that no person would be better for the job.

To describe a job applicant who is not worth further
consideration: I would urge you to waste no time in
making this candidate an offer of employment.

To describe a person with lackluster credentials: All
in all, I cannot say enough good things about this
candidate or recommend him too highly.

Thornton pointed out that LIAR is not only useful in
preserving friendships, but it also can help avoid
serious legal trouble in a time when laws have eroded
the confidentiality of letters of recommendation.

In most states, he noted, job applicants have the right
to read the letters of recommendations and can even
file suit against the writer if the contents are negative.

When the writer uses LIAR, however, whether perceived
correctly or not by the candidate, the phrases are
virtually litigation-proof, Thornton said.

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