Vegetarian Discussion: Anticipation In Finches

Anticipation In Finches
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D*@.
2013-06-18 18:14:35 EST
I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin the process
of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes down to the
area in anticipation. Sometimes the male joins her, meaning that he's also aware
of and anticipating what's about to happen even though he doesn't always come in
close. Sometimes I let the female come down and grab a worm, but sometimes not
because her wings blow the litter around making a bit of a mess. Whether I let
her or not though both birds definitely anticipate getting mealworms when they
see me begin the process.

George Plimpton
2013-06-18 18:41:39 EST
On 6/18/2013 3:14 PM, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* - stupid,
illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeated entirely in 1999 and
doing nothing but wasting time ever since, lied:


> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin the process
> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes down to the
> area in anticipation.

Nothing but conditioned response to a signal. If you didn't enter the
room and start doing it, she wouldn't come down.

Finches do not anticipate.


MarkA
2013-06-18 19:47:09 EST
On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 18:14:35 -0400, dh wrote:

> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin the
> process
> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes down
> to the area in anticipation. Sometimes the male joins her, meaning that
> he's also aware of and anticipating what's about to happen even though he
> doesn't always come in close. Sometimes I let the female come down and
> grab a worm, but sometimes not because her wings blow the litter around
> making a bit of a mess. Whether I let her or not though both birds
> definitely anticipate getting mealworms when they see me begin the
> process.

When I'm putting my dog's food in a bowl (I'm always sure to make LOTS of
noise when doing so), she stands at her feeding spot, with drool dripping
out of her mouth.

--
MarkA
Keeper of Things Put There Only Just The Night Before
About eight o'clock


Dhu On Gate
2013-06-18 19:51:56 EST
On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 15:41:39 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:

> On 6/18/2013 3:14 PM, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* - stupid,
> illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeated entirely in 1999 and
> doing nothing but wasting time ever since, lied:
>
>
>> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin
>> the process
>> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes
>> down to the area in anticipation.
>
> Nothing but conditioned response to a signal. If you didn't enter the
> room and start doing it, she wouldn't come down.
>
> Finches do not anticipate.

HTF would you know?

Dhu


--
Ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco.

George Plimpton
2013-06-18 20:24:04 EST
On 6/18/2013 4:47 PM, MarkA wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 18:14:35 -0400, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* - stupid, illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeate
>
>> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin the
>> process
>> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes down
>> to the area in anticipation. Sometimes the male joins her, meaning that
>> he's also aware of and anticipating what's about to happen even though he
>> doesn't always come in close. Sometimes I let the female come down and
>> grab a worm, but sometimes not because her wings blow the litter around
>> making a bit of a mess. Whether I let her or not though both birds
>> definitely anticipate getting mealworms when they see me begin the
>> process.
>
> When I'm putting my dog's food in a bowl (I'm always sure to make LOTS of
> noise when doing so), she stands at her feeding spot, with drool dripping
> out of her mouth.

That's nothing but a conditioned response to a signal. It's not an
emotion. The anticipation being discussed is the *emotional* state of a
person contemplating an expected event. It's a completely different
meaning of the word anticipation. Fuckwit Harrison is deliberately
equivocating on the word. His finches do not have *any* emotional
reaction at all, and the physical reaction they have does not occur
until they receive the visual signal that he is preparing food for them;
and then the response is immediate.

A little child old enough to know the days of the week who is told on
Monday that she will be taken to Disneyland on Saturday does not require
any signal to begin to experience an emotional excitement - anticipation
- on Friday afternoon.


George Plimpton
2013-06-18 20:24:37 EST
On 6/18/2013 4:51 PM, Dhu on Gate wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 15:41:39 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:
>
>> On 6/18/2013 3:14 PM, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* - stupid,
>> illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeated entirely in 1999 and
>> doing nothing but wasting time ever since, lied:
>>
>>
>>> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin
>>> the process
>>> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes
>>> down to the area in anticipation.
>>
>> Nothing but conditioned response to a signal. If you didn't enter the
>> room and start doing it, she wouldn't come down.
>>
>> Finches do not anticipate.
>
> HTF would you know?

I do know. You couldn't possibly understand how.


Dhu On Gate
2013-06-18 21:55:07 EST
On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 17:24:37 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:

> On 6/18/2013 4:51 PM, Dhu on Gate wrote:
>> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 15:41:39 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:
>>
>>> On 6/18/2013 3:14 PM, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* - stupid,
>>> illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeated entirely in 1999 and
>>> doing nothing but wasting time ever since, lied:
>>>
>>>
>>>> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin
>>>> the process
>>>> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes
>>>> down to the area in anticipation.
>>>
>>> Nothing but conditioned response to a signal. If you didn't enter the
>>> room and start doing it, she wouldn't come down.
>>>
>>> Finches do not anticipate.
>>
>> HTF would you know?
>
> I do know. You couldn't possibly understand how.

You are quite correct about my inability to comprehend your mental
processes, to be sure, but for reasons *you* cannot understand.

Dhu



--
Ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco.

Dhu On Gate
2013-06-18 21:58:38 EST
On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 17:24:04 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:

> On 6/18/2013 4:47 PM, MarkA wrote:
>> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 18:14:35 -0400, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* -
>> stupid, illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeate
>>
>>> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin
>>> the process
>>> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes
>>> down to the area in anticipation. Sometimes the male joins her,
>>> meaning that he's also aware of and anticipating what's about to
>>> happen even though he doesn't always come in close. Sometimes I let
>>> the female come down and grab a worm, but sometimes not because her
>>> wings blow the litter around making a bit of a mess. Whether I let her
>>> or not though both birds definitely anticipate getting mealworms when
>>> they see me begin the process.
>>
>> When I'm putting my dog's food in a bowl (I'm always sure to make LOTS
>> of noise when doing so), she stands at her feeding spot, with drool
>> dripping out of her mouth.
>
> That's nothing but a conditioned response to a signal. It's not an
> emotion. The anticipation being discussed is the *emotional* state of a
> person contemplating an expected event. It's a completely different
> meaning of the word anticipation. Fuckwit Harrison is deliberately
> equivocating on the word. His finches do not have *any* emotional
> reaction at all, and the physical reaction they have does not occur
> until they receive the visual signal that he is preparing food for them;
> and then the response is immediate.
>
> A little child old enough to know the days of the week who is told on
> Monday that she will be taken to Disneyland on Saturday does not require
> any signal to begin to experience an emotional excitement - anticipation
> - on Friday afternoon.

*Beetles* can anticipate their own mortality, you dolt:

http://phys.org/news/2013-06-older-males-fathers-mature-male.html

You imagine everything as obtuse as yourself. Thank G*d it's not so.

Dhu


--
Ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco.

George Plimpton
2013-06-18 22:19:14 EST
On 6/18/2013 6:55 PM, Dhu on Gate wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 17:24:37 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:
>
>> On 6/18/2013 4:51 PM, Dhu on Gate wrote:
>>> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 15:41:39 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 6/18/2013 3:14 PM, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* - stupid,
>>>> illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeated entirely in 1999 and
>>>> doing nothing but wasting time ever since, lied:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin
>>>>> the process
>>>>> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes
>>>>> down to the area in anticipation.
>>>>
>>>> Nothing but conditioned response to a signal. If you didn't enter the
>>>> room and start doing it, she wouldn't come down.
>>>>
>>>> Finches do not anticipate.
>>>
>>> HTF would you know?
>>
>> I do know. You couldn't possibly understand how.
>
> You are quite correct about my inability to comprehend

I know.


George Plimpton
2013-06-18 22:25:24 EST
On 6/18/2013 6:58 PM, Dhu on Gate wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 17:24:04 -0700, George Plimpton wrote:
>
>> On 6/18/2013 4:47 PM, MarkA wrote:
>>> On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 18:14:35 -0400, Fuckwit David Harrison - *Goo* -
>>> stupid, illiterate cracker and convicted felon, defeate
>>>
>>>> I feed mealworms to my finches a few times a week. When I begin
>>>> the process
>>>> of sifting the worms out of the litter my female society finch comes
>>>> down to the area in anticipation. Sometimes the male joins her,
>>>> meaning that he's also aware of and anticipating what's about to
>>>> happen even though he doesn't always come in close. Sometimes I let
>>>> the female come down and grab a worm, but sometimes not because her
>>>> wings blow the litter around making a bit of a mess. Whether I let her
>>>> or not though both birds definitely anticipate getting mealworms when
>>>> they see me begin the process.
>>>
>>> When I'm putting my dog's food in a bowl (I'm always sure to make LOTS
>>> of noise when doing so), she stands at her feeding spot, with drool
>>> dripping out of her mouth.
>>
>> That's nothing but a conditioned response to a signal. It's not an
>> emotion. The anticipation being discussed is the *emotional* state of a
>> person contemplating an expected event. It's a completely different
>> meaning of the word anticipation. Fuckwit Harrison is deliberately
>> equivocating on the word. His finches do not have *any* emotional
>> reaction at all, and the physical reaction they have does not occur
>> until they receive the visual signal that he is preparing food for them;
>> and then the response is immediate.
>>
>> A little child old enough to know the days of the week who is told on
>> Monday that she will be taken to Disneyland on Saturday does not require
>> any signal to begin to experience an emotional excitement - anticipation
>> - on Friday afternoon.
>
> *Beetles* can anticipate their own mortality, you dolt:
>
> http://phys.org/news/2013-06-older-males-fathers-mature-male.html

That paper does not say or suggest that the beetles can anticipate their
mortality. Anyway, that's the wrong meaning of anticipation.
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