Vegetarian Discussion: Does Raising Farm Animals Increase Their Intrinsic Value And Is That A Benefit?

Does Raising Farm Animals Increase Their Intrinsic Value And Is That A Benefit?
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Immortalist
2013-05-31 14:57:38 EST
1. Instrumental Value: The value of things
as means to further some other ends.

2. Intrinsic Value: The value of things as ends
in themselves regardless of whether they
are also useful as means to other ends.

For instance, certain fruits have instrumental value for bats who feed
on them, since feeding on the fruits is a means to survival for the
bats. However, it is not widely agreed that fruits have value as ends
in themselves.

We can likewise think of a person who teaches others as having
instrumental value for those who want to acquire knowledge. Yet, in
addition to any such value, it is normally said that a person, as a
person, has intrinsic value, i.e., value in his or her own right
independently of his or her prospects for serving the ends of others.

For another example, a certain wild plant may have instrumental value
because it provides the ingredients for some medicine or as an
aesthetic object for human observers. But if the plant also has some
value in itself independently of its prospects for furthering some
other ends such as human health, or the pleasure from aesthetic
experience, then the plant also has intrinsic value.

Because the intrinsically valuable is that which is good as an end in
itself, it is commonly agreed that something's possession of intrinsic
value generates a prima facie direct moral duty on the part of moral
agents to protect it or at least refrain from damaging it.

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-environmental/

Does raising farm animals increase their intrinsic value and is that a
benefit?

%
2013-05-31 15:04:30 EST
Immortalist wrote:
> 1. Instrumental Value: The value of things
> as means to further some other ends.
>
> 2. Intrinsic Value: The value of things as ends
> in themselves regardless of whether they
> are also useful as means to other ends.
>
> For instance, certain fruits have instrumental value for bats who feed
> on them, since feeding on the fruits is a means to survival for the
> bats. However, it is not widely agreed that fruits have value as ends
> in themselves.
>
> We can likewise think of a person who teaches others as having
> instrumental value for those who want to acquire knowledge. Yet, in
> addition to any such value, it is normally said that a person, as a
> person, has intrinsic value, i.e., value in his or her own right
> independently of his or her prospects for serving the ends of others.
>
> For another example, a certain wild plant may have instrumental value
> because it provides the ingredients for some medicine or as an
> aesthetic object for human observers. But if the plant also has some
> value in itself independently of its prospects for furthering some
> other ends such as human health, or the pleasure from aesthetic
> experience, then the plant also has intrinsic value.
>
> Because the intrinsically valuable is that which is good as an end in
> itself, it is commonly agreed that something's possession of intrinsic
> value generates a prima facie direct moral duty on the part of moral
> agents to protect it or at least refrain from damaging it.
>
> http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-environmental/
>
> Does raising farm animals increase their intrinsic value and is that a
> benefit?

a benifit to what

George Plimpton
2013-05-31 15:35:16 EST
On 5/31/2013 11:57 AM, Immortalist wrote:
> 1. Instrumental Value: The value of things
> as means to further some other ends.
>
> 2. Intrinsic Value: The value of things as ends
> in themselves regardless of whether they
> are also useful as means to other ends.

The answer is "no", it does not increase their intrinsic value. If farm
animals have any intrinsic value at all, what breeding them into
existence does is *establish* that value, but it does not increase it.


Sir Fred M. McNeill
2013-05-31 16:20:38 EST
'Humans' need food, As hunter-gatherers 'we' evolved
that way. That evolvement included meat. So 'we' are.
Such is the way of this shit ass spooky place.

Animal 'husbandry' occurred along with agriculture.

Dutch
2013-05-31 16:45:25 EST


"Immortalist" <reanimater_2000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:66737fb4-bae9-499d-a7d5-eb2792029968@qn4g2000pbc.googlegroups.com...
> 1. Instrumental Value: The value of things
> as means to further some other ends.
>
> 2. Intrinsic Value: The value of things as ends
> in themselves regardless of whether they
> are also useful as means to other ends.
>
> For instance, certain fruits have instrumental value for bats who feed
> on them, since feeding on the fruits is a means to survival for the
> bats. However, it is not widely agreed that fruits have value as ends
> in themselves.
>
> We can likewise think of a person who teaches others as having
> instrumental value for those who want to acquire knowledge. Yet, in
> addition to any such value, it is normally said that a person, as a
> person, has intrinsic value, i.e., value in his or her own right
> independently of his or her prospects for serving the ends of others.
>
> For another example, a certain wild plant may have instrumental value
> because it provides the ingredients for some medicine or as an
> aesthetic object for human observers. But if the plant also has some
> value in itself independently of its prospects for furthering some
> other ends such as human health, or the pleasure from aesthetic
> experience, then the plant also has intrinsic value.
>
> Because the intrinsically valuable is that which is good as an end in
> itself, it is commonly agreed that something's possession of intrinsic
> value generates a prima facie direct moral duty on the part of moral
> agents to protect it or at least refrain from damaging it.
>
> http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-environmental/
>
> Does raising farm animals increase their intrinsic value and is that a
> benefit?

The question doesn't make sense. We could discuss whether or not livestock,
or anything for that matter, has intrinsic value. We could discuss whether
or not various influences on a given entity are beneficial or not. What do
you mean by "raising"? Feeding? Feeding benefits farm animals in that it
prevents them from starving to death.



Ben Kaufman
2013-05-31 19:16:51 EST
On Fri, 31 May 2013 11:57:38 -0700 (PDT), Immortalist
<reanimater_2000@yahoo.com> wrote:

<SNIP>
>For instance, certain fruits have instrumental value for bats who feed
>on them, since feeding on the fruits is a means to survival for the
>bats. However, it is not widely agreed that fruits have value as ends
>in themselves.
<SNIP>

The plant evolved an edible fruit because it is ultimately of benefit to the
plant, usually something related to reproduction.

Ben

Olrik
2013-06-01 00:00:50 EST

I've just ordered a bucket of KFC's intrinsically extra-valued yummy
chicken parts.

Thanks!

<snipage>

Dutch
2013-06-01 00:18:55 EST
"Ben Kaufman" <spaXm-mXe-anXd-paXy-5000-dollars@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:nabiq8lmh0s4lit0206qks86njqfccbjjp@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 31 May 2013 11:57:38 -0700 (PDT), Immortalist
> <reanimater_2000@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> <SNIP>
>>For instance, certain fruits have instrumental value for bats who feed
>>on them, since feeding on the fruits is a means to survival for the
>>bats. However, it is not widely agreed that fruits have value as ends
>>in themselves.
> <SNIP>
>
> The plant evolved an edible fruit because it is ultimately of benefit to
> the
> plant, usually something related to reproduction.
>
> Ben

Species of plants with edible fruit tended to survive and propagate above
those that didn't because animals spread the seeds in the fruit. That is
maybe what you were trying to say, but plants don't develop fruit in order
to make their species survive better, edible fruit is a natural variation
that favors success.

What I am trying to say is that edible fruit enhanced success of those
species, the species didn't develop fruit in order to survive better.


Dutch
2013-06-01 00:27:54 EST
"Olrik" <olrik666@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:kobrdc$8ug$1@dont-email.me...
>
> I've just ordered a bucket of KFC's intrinsically extra-valued yummy
> chicken parts.
>
> Thanks!
>
> <snipage>

Congratulations, according to the fuckwit theory you just encouraged farmers
to raise more broiler chickens causing them to possibly enjoy a few weeks of
life. That makes you their benefactor and clearly a more moral person that
any vegan who chooses to deny future chicken a chance at life.

Circular logic makes ethics easy.


Bret Cahill
2013-06-01 01:10:11 EST
GOP bottom fishing.is pretty much the same thing as cultivating farm
animals.

Did that increase the value of the GOP?


Bret Cahill





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