Vegetarian Discussion: The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving - By Rynn Berry

The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving - By Rynn Berry
Posts: 50

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2 3 4 5   Next  (First | Last)

And/or Www.mantra.com/jai Dr. Jai Maharaj
2012-11-21 20:18:53 EST
The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving

[ Subject: The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
[ From: fi...@yahoo.com
[ Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004

The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving

By Rynn Berry

http://all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html

[Ed.] "But it's tradition," is the cry when vegetarians
wonder why killing an animal should make Thanksgiving
special. Vegetarian historian Rynn Berry begs to differ.

The story of the Pilgrim's First Thanksgiving -- and
turkey's place in it -- has been shown to be largely a
myth. It was only in 1863 that Abraham Lincoln declared
Thanksgiving to be a national holiday -- mainly as a
public relations ploy to whip up a sense of patriotism
and national unity during the Civil War. Pilgrims
themselves didn't become a part of the national
celebration until the 1890s.

The legend that one hundred odd English men and women who
landed at Plymouth Harbor feasted on turkey and all the
trimmings is a myth. When they first arrived, on November
11 1620, the settlers had so little food that they raised
the houses of the Native American inhabitants and made
off with stores of beans and corn. There was simply no
animal flesh to be had. It is likely that the first
Thanksgiving would have had to have been a vegan one,
consisting of corn and beans served on pottery that the
so-called Pilgrim Fathers stole from the so-called
Indians. If, instead of the Plymouth Pilgrims, we go back
a decade or so and look to the Jamestown colonists to
provide us with role models for Thanksgiving, we will be
even more scandalized. In her book Settling with the
Indians, Karen Kupperman tells us that the Jamestown
colonists were so lacking in farming skills (they spent
most of the time digging random holes in the hope of
finding gold) that they sank so low as to feed on corpses
that they dug up from Native American gravesites. By
rights we should be commemorating Thanksgiving by eating
corpses. On second thoughts, isn't that exactly what
we're doing?

Equal Exchange?

To be sure, the Plymouth Pilgrims were given a friendly
reception by the Native Americans: Massassoit, chief of
the Wapanoags, Samoset, chief of the Pemaquids, and the
ever faithful Squanto. Indeed, the peoples of the region
overlooked the Pilgrims' depredations and taught them how
to farm, fish, and eventually how to set up trading
posts. The reason why the Indians were so receptive to
the newcomers is that most of New England had been
depopulated by epidemics from prior contacts with
European traders and settlers. Europeans had introduced
such diseases as diphtheria, TB, streptococcus, scurvy,
cholera, typhus measles and chicken pox and smallpox.
It's estimated that, before the invasion of Europeans and
their diseases, northern America was home to as many as
20 million inhabitants from coast to coast. The diseases
ravaged the native populations from south to north
America, reducing them by as much as 90 percent.

Europeans were not very unhygienic. While Squanto tried
to get the settlers to bathe, he met with little success
because the settlers considered it un-Christian to bathe.
In cities such as London and Paris, raw sewage ran in the
streets. By contrast, most Native Americans were highly
skilled agriculturists. When Europeans arrived they found
a country that was already cleared and farmed. The
settlers simply walked into the indigenous communities
that had been depopulated by plague and took over. This
is why so many of the early New England towns have the
name attached to them-Deerfield, Richfield, and so on.
The colonists started their communities in the middle of
fields that had been cleared by the indigenous peoples

The Real First Thanksgiving?

The folklore taught in schools has it that the Pilgrims
originated the Thanksgiving festival and that they
provided the Native Americans with a feast they had never
seen. In fact, the opposite is true. In November 1621,
one year after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth, the
Pilgrims celebrated harvest festival jointly with the
Native Americans-a harvest festival that the native
inhabitants had been celebrating for hundreds, perhaps
thousands of years. Most of the food at this festival was
supplied by Native Americans. It was a meal that the
Pilgrims had never witnessed, consisting of native
American foodstuffs. The main meal was a sort of corn
meal mush along with nuts and fruits such as
gooseberries, strawberries, plums, cherries, cranberries
and a groundnut known as the bogg bean. Popcorn and
popcorn balls made by the Indians with maple syrup were
served as a sweet. There was a variety of breadstuffs
such as cornpone, ashcakes, and hoe cakes, made by Native
Americans from their own recipes. It is also possible
that other native foods such as pumpkin and squash were
served. In his Food Encyclopedia, James Trager tells us
that there is a live possibility that turkey wasn't even
served. It's true that the Indians provided some deer
meat, and game birds, but they were side dishes and not
the focus of the meal. So the 1620 Thanksgiving dinner
proper in 1620 was probably a totally vegetarian one,
because the Pilgrims were unable to find animal flesh.
The second Thanksgiving in 1621 was also catered by the
Native Americans. Not only was it probably turkeyless,
but it was mainly vegetarian. Doesn't it make more sense,
therefore, that instead of celebrating Thanksgiving as an
orgy of Turkey slaughter, Americans should celebrate a
vegetarian harvest festival?

Rynn Berry is the historical advisor to the North
American Vegetarian Society. He is the author of Famous
Vegetarians and Their Favorite Recipes ($15.95) and Food
for the Gods: Vegetarianism and the World's Religions
($19.95). Copies may be ordered from the author at 159
Eastern Parkway, Suite 2H, Brooklyn, NY 11238.

http://www.all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html

Visit:
http://www.pcrm.org

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

H*@inderofl.com
2012-11-21 20:37:19 EST

"11 1620, the settlers had so little food that they raised
the houses of the Native American inhabitants and made
off with stores of beans and corn. There was simply no
animal flesh to be had. It is likely that the first"

Of course not, animals were consumed as soon as caught. Beans and corn
were dry stores that kept through the winter.

Make no mistake about it, the indians ate every animal they got their hands
on and they were very skilled hunters and fishermen.



And/or Www.mantra.com/jai Dr. Jai Maharaj
2012-11-21 20:51:35 EST
Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
>
> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
>
> [ Subject: The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> [ From: fi...@yahoo.com
> [ Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004
>
> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
>
> By Rynn Berry
>
> http://all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html
>
> [Ed.] "But it's tradition," is the cry when vegetarians
> wonder why killing an animal should make Thanksgiving
> special. Vegetarian historian Rynn Berry begs to differ.
>
> The story of the Pilgrim's First Thanksgiving -- and
> turkey's place in it -- has been shown to be largely a
> myth. It was only in 1863 that Abraham Lincoln declared
> Thanksgiving to be a national holiday -- mainly as a
> public relations ploy to whip up a sense of patriotism
> and national unity during the Civil War. Pilgrims
> themselves didn't become a part of the national
> celebration until the 1890s.
>
> The legend that one hundred odd English men and women who
> landed at Plymouth Harbor feasted on turkey and all the
> trimmings is a myth. When they first arrived, on November
> 11 1620, the settlers had so little food that they raised
> the houses of the Native American inhabitants and made
> off with stores of beans and corn. There was simply no
> animal flesh to be had. It is likely that the first
> Thanksgiving would have had to have been a vegan one,
> consisting of corn and beans served on pottery that the
> so-called Pilgrim Fathers stole from the so-called
> Indians. If, instead of the Plymouth Pilgrims, we go back
> a decade or so and look to the Jamestown colonists to
> provide us with role models for Thanksgiving, we will be
> even more scandalized. In her book Settling with the
> Indians, Karen Kupperman tells us that the Jamestown
> colonists were so lacking in farming skills (they spent
> most of the time digging random holes in the hope of
> finding gold) that they sank so low as to feed on corpses
> that they dug up from Native American gravesites. By
> rights we should be commemorating Thanksgiving by eating
> corpses. On second thoughts, isn't that exactly what
> we're doing?
>
> Equal Exchange?
>
> To be sure, the Plymouth Pilgrims were given a friendly
> reception by the Native Americans: Massassoit, chief of
> the Wapanoags, Samoset, chief of the Pemaquids, and the
> ever faithful Squanto. Indeed, the peoples of the region
> overlooked the Pilgrims' depredations and taught them how
> to farm, fish, and eventually how to set up trading
> posts. The reason why the Indians were so receptive to
> the newcomers is that most of New England had been
> depopulated by epidemics from prior contacts with
> European traders and settlers. Europeans had introduced
> such diseases as diphtheria, TB, streptococcus, scurvy,
> cholera, typhus measles and chicken pox and smallpox.
> It's estimated that, before the invasion of Europeans and
> their diseases, northern America was home to as many as
> 20 million inhabitants from coast to coast. The diseases
> ravaged the native populations from south to north
> America, reducing them by as much as 90 percent.
>
> Europeans were not very unhygienic. While Squanto tried
> to get the settlers to bathe, he met with little success
> because the settlers considered it un-Christian to bathe.
> In cities such as London and Paris, raw sewage ran in the
> streets. By contrast, most Native Americans were highly
> skilled agriculturists. When Europeans arrived they found
> a country that was already cleared and farmed. The
> settlers simply walked into the indigenous communities
> that had been depopulated by plague and took over. This
> is why so many of the early New England towns have the
> name attached to them-Deerfield, Richfield, and so on.
> The colonists started their communities in the middle of
> fields that had been cleared by the indigenous peoples
>
> The Real First Thanksgiving?
>
> The folklore taught in schools has it that the Pilgrims
> originated the Thanksgiving festival and that they
> provided the Native Americans with a feast they had never
> seen. In fact, the opposite is true. In November 1621,
> one year after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth, the
> Pilgrims celebrated harvest festival jointly with the
> Native Americans-a harvest festival that the native
> inhabitants had been celebrating for hundreds, perhaps
> thousands of years. Most of the food at this festival was
> supplied by Native Americans. It was a meal that the
> Pilgrims had never witnessed, consisting of native
> American foodstuffs. The main meal was a sort of corn
> meal mush along with nuts and fruits such as
> gooseberries, strawberries, plums, cherries, cranberries
> and a groundnut known as the bogg bean. Popcorn and
> popcorn balls made by the Indians with maple syrup were
> served as a sweet. There was a variety of breadstuffs
> such as cornpone, ashcakes, and hoe cakes, made by Native
> Americans from their own recipes. It is also possible
> that other native foods such as pumpkin and squash were
> served. In his Food Encyclopedia, James Trager tells us
> that there is a live possibility that turkey wasn't even
> served. It's true that the Indians provided some deer
> meat, and game birds, but they were side dishes and not
> the focus of the meal. So the 1620 Thanksgiving dinner
> proper in 1620 was probably a totally vegetarian one,
> because the Pilgrims were unable to find animal flesh.
> The second Thanksgiving in 1621 was also catered by the
> Native Americans. Not only was it probably turkeyless,
> but it was mainly vegetarian. Doesn't it make more sense,
> therefore, that instead of celebrating Thanksgiving as an
> orgy of Turkey slaughter, Americans should celebrate a
> vegetarian harvest festival?
>
> Rynn Berry is the historical advisor to the North
> American Vegetarian Society. He is the author of Famous
> Vegetarians and Their Favorite Recipes ($15.95) and Food
> for the Gods: Vegetarianism and the World's Religions
> ($19.95). Copies may be ordered from the author at 159
> Eastern Parkway, Suite 2H, Brooklyn, NY 11238.
>
http://www.all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html

Visit:
http://www.pcrm.org

Thanksgiving the Hinduism way

By Sohoni Das
SF Hindu Examiner
November 20, 2009

Thanksgiving is a way to express one's gratitude toward
our families and friends. Interestingly the Hindu
religion also expresses thanks to our families and
friends and it has its unique way to do so.

The Hindu religion worships many Gods and it also
believes in giving respect to the elders. Parents are
considered next to God. In Hindu religion the gesture of
touching one's feet to seek blessings is a way to show
one's respect and gratitude. Youngsters touch elder's
feet seeking for blessings and in return the elders bless
them for long life and success. Evidently the Hindus also
share the equal amount of respect to anyone who is old
aged. Every festival in the Hindu religion contains
rituals where youngsters express their thanks and
gratitude to the God, their parents and to the elders in
the family.

The Gita also states that in order to do good karma one
should always respect elders and be humble and grateful
to the Supreme Being. The Gita also goes on to say that
even Teachers should be shown respect and thankfulness
for their contributions in one's life. Guru, in Hindi
means Teacher, is also considered next to God. In India,
Teacher's Day is celebrated every year on 5th September
and is in the honor of the birthday of India's 2nd
President Dr.Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan. On Teacher's Day
students show their appreciation and thankfulness to the
teachers.

The Hindus also believe that the various rituals in the
Hindu festivals are a way to express thanks to the God
Almighty for his blessings. During every festival the
custom of exchanging gifts and extending invitations for
visit is also a way to show "Thanks". The Hindu festivals
are always filled with fun and excitement no matter which
God one worships or which state they belong to. Sharing
gifts and sweets among the loved ones is a way to express
out gratefulness for their friendship, help and support.

The Hindu religion has nearly 13 festivals in a year and
in each festival the Hindus say "Thanks" with fun and
enthusiasm. Dhanyavad in Hindi means "Thank You" and it
is the least one can say for all the love and blessings
showered by the God Almighty.*

More at: http://www.examiner.com/hindu-in-san-
francisco/thanksgiving-the-hinduism-way

Footnote:

* "God" is a Judeo-Christian construct. We Hindus
consider Paramatma to be the Divine Supreme Soul. - Jai
Maharaj

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj

George Plimpton
2012-11-21 21:25:52 EST
On 11/21/2012 5:18 PM, Dr. Jai Maharaj wrote:
> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
>
> [ Subject: The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> [ From: fi...@yahoo.com
> [ Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004
>
> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving

The first Thanksgiving featured meat. The Pilgrims were thankful for it.

And/or Www.mantra.com/jai Dr. Jai Maharaj
2012-11-21 21:35:41 EST
Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
>
> > The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> >
> > [ Subject: The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> > [ From: fi...@yahoo.com
> > [ Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004
> >
> > The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> >
> > By Rynn Berry
> >
> > http://all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html
> >
> > [Ed.] "But it's tradition," is the cry when vegetarians
> > wonder why killing an animal should make Thanksgiving
> > special. Vegetarian historian Rynn Berry begs to differ.
> >
> > The story of the Pilgrim's First Thanksgiving -- and
> > turkey's place in it -- has been shown to be largely a
> > myth. It was only in 1863 that Abraham Lincoln declared
> > Thanksgiving to be a national holiday -- mainly as a
> > public relations ploy to whip up a sense of patriotism
> > and national unity during the Civil War. Pilgrims
> > themselves didn't become a part of the national
> > celebration until the 1890s.
> >
> > The legend that one hundred odd English men and women who
> > landed at Plymouth Harbor feasted on turkey and all the
> > trimmings is a myth. When they first arrived, on November
> > 11 1620, the settlers had so little food that they raised
> > the houses of the Native American inhabitants and made
> > off with stores of beans and corn. There was simply no
> > animal flesh to be had. It is likely that the first
> > Thanksgiving would have had to have been a vegan one,
> > consisting of corn and beans served on pottery that the
> > so-called Pilgrim Fathers stole from the so-called
> > Indians. If, instead of the Plymouth Pilgrims, we go back
> > a decade or so and look to the Jamestown colonists to
> > provide us with role models for Thanksgiving, we will be
> > even more scandalized. In her book Settling with the
> > Indians, Karen Kupperman tells us that the Jamestown
> > colonists were so lacking in farming skills (they spent
> > most of the time digging random holes in the hope of
> > finding gold) that they sank so low as to feed on corpses
> > that they dug up from Native American gravesites. By
> > rights we should be commemorating Thanksgiving by eating
> > corpses. On second thoughts, isn't that exactly what
> > we're doing?
> >
> > Equal Exchange?
> >
> > To be sure, the Plymouth Pilgrims were given a friendly
> > reception by the Native Americans: Massassoit, chief of
> > the Wapanoags, Samoset, chief of the Pemaquids, and the
> > ever faithful Squanto. Indeed, the peoples of the region
> > overlooked the Pilgrims' depredations and taught them how
> > to farm, fish, and eventually how to set up trading
> > posts. The reason why the Indians were so receptive to
> > the newcomers is that most of New England had been
> > depopulated by epidemics from prior contacts with
> > European traders and settlers. Europeans had introduced
> > such diseases as diphtheria, TB, streptococcus, scurvy,
> > cholera, typhus measles and chicken pox and smallpox.
> > It's estimated that, before the invasion of Europeans and
> > their diseases, northern America was home to as many as
> > 20 million inhabitants from coast to coast. The diseases
> > ravaged the native populations from south to north
> > America, reducing them by as much as 90 percent.
> >
> > Europeans were not very unhygienic. While Squanto tried
> > to get the settlers to bathe, he met with little success
> > because the settlers considered it un-Christian to bathe.
> > In cities such as London and Paris, raw sewage ran in the
> > streets. By contrast, most Native Americans were highly
> > skilled agriculturists. When Europeans arrived they found
> > a country that was already cleared and farmed. The
> > settlers simply walked into the indigenous communities
> > that had been depopulated by plague and took over. This
> > is why so many of the early New England towns have the
> > name attached to them-Deerfield, Richfield, and so on.
> > The colonists started their communities in the middle of
> > fields that had been cleared by the indigenous peoples
> >
> > The Real First Thanksgiving?
> >
> > The folklore taught in schools has it that the Pilgrims
> > originated the Thanksgiving festival and that they
> > provided the Native Americans with a feast they had never
> > seen. In fact, the opposite is true. In November 1621,
> > one year after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth, the
> > Pilgrims celebrated harvest festival jointly with the
> > Native Americans-a harvest festival that the native
> > inhabitants had been celebrating for hundreds, perhaps
> > thousands of years. Most of the food at this festival was
> > supplied by Native Americans. It was a meal that the
> > Pilgrims had never witnessed, consisting of native
> > American foodstuffs. The main meal was a sort of corn
> > meal mush along with nuts and fruits such as
> > gooseberries, strawberries, plums, cherries, cranberries
> > and a groundnut known as the bogg bean. Popcorn and
> > popcorn balls made by the Indians with maple syrup were
> > served as a sweet. There was a variety of breadstuffs
> > such as cornpone, ashcakes, and hoe cakes, made by Native
> > Americans from their own recipes. It is also possible
> > that other native foods such as pumpkin and squash were
> > served. In his Food Encyclopedia, James Trager tells us
> > that there is a live possibility that turkey wasn't even
> > served. It's true that the Indians provided some deer
> > meat, and game birds, but they were side dishes and not
> > the focus of the meal. So the 1620 Thanksgiving dinner
> > proper in 1620 was probably a totally vegetarian one,
> > because the Pilgrims were unable to find animal flesh.
> > The second Thanksgiving in 1621 was also catered by the
> > Native Americans. Not only was it probably turkeyless,
> > but it was mainly vegetarian. Doesn't it make more sense,
> > therefore, that instead of celebrating Thanksgiving as an
> > orgy of Turkey slaughter, Americans should celebrate a
> > vegetarian harvest festival?
> >
> > Rynn Berry is the historical advisor to the North
> > American Vegetarian Society. He is the author of Famous
> > Vegetarians and Their Favorite Recipes ($15.95) and Food
> > for the Gods: Vegetarianism and the World's Religions
> > ($19.95). Copies may be ordered from the author at 159
> > Eastern Parkway, Suite 2H, Brooklyn, NY 11238.
> >
http://www.all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html
>
Visit:
http://www.pcrm.org
>
> Thanksgiving the Hinduism way
>
> By Sohoni Das
> SF Hindu Examiner
> November 20, 2009
>
> Thanksgiving is a way to express one's gratitude toward
> our families and friends. Interestingly the Hindu
> religion also expresses thanks to our families and
> friends and it has its unique way to do so.
>
> The Hindu religion worships many Gods and it also
> believes in giving respect to the elders. Parents are
> considered next to God. In Hindu religion the gesture of
> touching one's feet to seek blessings is a way to show
> one's respect and gratitude. Youngsters touch elder's
> feet seeking for blessings and in return the elders bless
> them for long life and success. Evidently the Hindus also
> share the equal amount of respect to anyone who is old
> aged. Every festival in the Hindu religion contains
> rituals where youngsters express their thanks and
> gratitude to the God, their parents and to the elders in
> the family.
>
> The Gita also states that in order to do good karma one
> should always respect elders and be humble and grateful
> to the Supreme Being. The Gita also goes on to say that
> even Teachers should be shown respect and thankfulness
> for their contributions in one's life. Guru, in Hindi
> means Teacher, is also considered next to God. In India,
> Teacher's Day is celebrated every year on 5th September
> and is in the honor of the birthday of India's 2nd
> President Dr.Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan. On Teacher's Day
> students show their appreciation and thankfulness to the
> teachers.
>
> The Hindus also believe that the various rituals in the
> Hindu festivals are a way to express thanks to the God
> Almighty for his blessings. During every festival the
> custom of exchanging gifts and extending invitations for
> visit is also a way to show "Thanks". The Hindu festivals
> are always filled with fun and excitement no matter which
> God one worships or which state they belong to. Sharing
> gifts and sweets among the loved ones is a way to express
> out gratefulness for their friendship, help and support.
>
> The Hindu religion has nearly 13 festivals in a year and
> in each festival the Hindus say "Thanks" with fun and
> enthusiasm. Dhanyavad in Hindi means "Thank You" and it
> is the least one can say for all the love and blessings
> showered by the God Almighty.*
>
> More at: http://www.examiner.com/hindu-in-san-
> francisco/thanksgiving-the-hinduism-way
>
> Footnote:
>
> * "God" is a Judeo-Christian construct. We Hindus
> consider Paramatma to be the Divine Supreme Soul. - Jai
> Maharaj
>
> Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
> Om Shanti
>
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj

A Vegetarian Thanksgiving

Hindu Press International
Hinduism Today
http://www.hinduismtoday.com
November 10, 2010

Source - www.nytimes.com

USA, November 11, 2010: Tempeh with Wild Mushrooms. Zucchini boats.
Maple-roasted brussel sprouts. Baked katalfi-wrapped goat cheese.
Pan-Seared Oatmeal with warm fruit compote.

Who needs turkey, anyway?

Deferring to a fast-growing audience of vegetarians, the New York
Times' healthy lifestyle blog, called Well, is compiling vegetarian
recipes from master chefs for thanksgiving. More recipes will be
added daily until the holiday. You can see them here:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/08/health/20101108_thanksgiving.html?hp#-1

http://64.151.103.91/blogs-news/hindu-press-international/a-vegetarian-thanksgiving/10625.html

More at:

Hinduism Today
http://www.hinduismtoday.com

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

George Plimpton
2012-11-21 21:48:24 EST
On 11/21/2012 6:35 PM, Dr. Jai Maharaj wrote:
> Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
>> [a big steaming load of bollocks]

The Pilgrims ate meat at the first Thanksgiving, and they were damned
glad of it.


And/or Www.mantra.com/jai Dr. Jai Maharaj
2012-11-21 22:14:18 EST
Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
>
>>> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
>>>
>>> [ Subject: The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
>>> [ From: fi...@yahoo.com
>>> [ Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004
>>>
>>> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
>>>
>>> By Rynn Berry
>>>
>>> http://all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html
>>>
>>> [Ed.] "But it's tradition," is the cry when vegetarians
>>> wonder why killing an animal should make Thanksgiving
>>> special. Vegetarian historian Rynn Berry begs to differ.
>>>
>>> The story of the Pilgrim's First Thanksgiving -- and
>>> turkey's place in it -- has been shown to be largely a
>>> myth. It was only in 1863 that Abraham Lincoln declared
>>> Thanksgiving to be a national holiday -- mainly as a
>>> public relations ploy to whip up a sense of patriotism
>>> and national unity during the Civil War. Pilgrims
>>> themselves didn't become a part of the national
>>> celebration until the 1890s.
>>>
>>> The legend that one hundred odd English men and women who
>>> landed at Plymouth Harbor feasted on turkey and all the
>>> trimmings is a myth. When they first arrived, on November
>>> 11 1620, the settlers had so little food that they raised
>>> the houses of the Native American inhabitants and made
>>> off with stores of beans and corn. There was simply no
>>> animal flesh to be had. It is likely that the first
>>> Thanksgiving would have had to have been a vegan one,
>>> consisting of corn and beans served on pottery that the
>>> so-called Pilgrim Fathers stole from the so-called
>>> Indians. If, instead of the Plymouth Pilgrims, we go back
>>> a decade or so and look to the Jamestown colonists to
>>> provide us with role models for Thanksgiving, we will be
>>> even more scandalized. In her book Settling with the
>>> Indians, Karen Kupperman tells us that the Jamestown
>>> colonists were so lacking in farming skills (they spent
>>> most of the time digging random holes in the hope of
>>> finding gold) that they sank so low as to feed on corpses
>>> that they dug up from Native American gravesites. By
>>> rights we should be commemorating Thanksgiving by eating
>>> corpses. On second thoughts, isn't that exactly what
>>> we're doing?
>>>
>>> Equal Exchange?
>>>
>>> To be sure, the Plymouth Pilgrims were given a friendly
>>> reception by the Native Americans: Massassoit, chief of
>>> the Wapanoags, Samoset, chief of the Pemaquids, and the
>>> ever faithful Squanto. Indeed, the peoples of the region
>>> overlooked the Pilgrims' depredations and taught them how
>>> to farm, fish, and eventually how to set up trading
>>> posts. The reason why the Indians were so receptive to
>>> the newcomers is that most of New England had been
>>> depopulated by epidemics from prior contacts with
>>> European traders and settlers. Europeans had introduced
>>> such diseases as diphtheria, TB, streptococcus, scurvy,
>>> cholera, typhus measles and chicken pox and smallpox.
>>> It's estimated that, before the invasion of Europeans and
>>> their diseases, northern America was home to as many as
>>> 20 million inhabitants from coast to coast. The diseases
>>> ravaged the native populations from south to north
>>> America, reducing them by as much as 90 percent.
>>>
>>> Europeans were not very unhygienic. While Squanto tried
>>> to get the settlers to bathe, he met with little success
>>> because the settlers considered it un-Christian to bathe.
>>> In cities such as London and Paris, raw sewage ran in the
>>> streets. By contrast, most Native Americans were highly
>>> skilled agriculturists. When Europeans arrived they found
>>> a country that was already cleared and farmed. The
>>> settlers simply walked into the indigenous communities
>>> that had been depopulated by plague and took over. This
>>> is why so many of the early New England towns have the
>>> name attached to them-Deerfield, Richfield, and so on.
>>> The colonists started their communities in the middle of
>>> fields that had been cleared by the indigenous peoples
>>>
>>> The Real First Thanksgiving?
>>>
>>> The folklore taught in schools has it that the Pilgrims
>>> originated the Thanksgiving festival and that they
>>> provided the Native Americans with a feast they had never
>>> seen. In fact, the opposite is true. In November 1621,
>>> one year after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth, the
>>> Pilgrims celebrated harvest festival jointly with the
>>> Native Americans-a harvest festival that the native
>>> inhabitants had been celebrating for hundreds, perhaps
>>> thousands of years. Most of the food at this festival was
>>> supplied by Native Americans. It was a meal that the
>>> Pilgrims had never witnessed, consisting of native
>>> American foodstuffs. The main meal was a sort of corn
>>> meal mush along with nuts and fruits such as
>>> gooseberries, strawberries, plums, cherries, cranberries
>>> and a groundnut known as the bogg bean. Popcorn and
>>> popcorn balls made by the Indians with maple syrup were
>>> served as a sweet. There was a variety of breadstuffs
>>> such as cornpone, ashcakes, and hoe cakes, made by Native
>>> Americans from their own recipes. It is also possible
>>> that other native foods such as pumpkin and squash were
>>> served. In his Food Encyclopedia, James Trager tells us
>>> that there is a live possibility that turkey wasn't even
>>> served. It's true that the Indians provided some deer
>>> meat, and game birds, but they were side dishes and not
>>> the focus of the meal. So the 1620 Thanksgiving dinner
>>> proper in 1620 was probably a totally vegetarian one,
>>> because the Pilgrims were unable to find animal flesh.
>>> The second Thanksgiving in 1621 was also catered by the
>>> Native Americans. Not only was it probably turkeyless,
>>> but it was mainly vegetarian. Doesn't it make more sense,
>>> therefore, that instead of celebrating Thanksgiving as an
>>> orgy of Turkey slaughter, Americans should celebrate a
>>> vegetarian harvest festival?
>>>
>>> Rynn Berry is the historical advisor to the North
>>> American Vegetarian Society. He is the author of Famous
>>> Vegetarians and Their Favorite Recipes ($15.95) and Food
>>> for the Gods: Vegetarianism and the World's Religions
>>> ($19.95). Copies may be ordered from the author at 159
>>> Eastern Parkway, Suite 2H, Brooklyn, NY 11238.
>>>
http://www.all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html

Visit:
http://www.pcrm.org
>>
>> Thanksgiving the Hinduism way
>>
>> By Sohoni Das
>> SF Hindu Examiner
>> November 20, 2009
>>
>> Thanksgiving is a way to express one's gratitude toward
>> our families and friends. Interestingly the Hindu
>> religion also expresses thanks to our families and
>> friends and it has its unique way to do so.
>>
>> The Hindu religion worships many Gods and it also
>> believes in giving respect to the elders. Parents are
>> considered next to God. In Hindu religion the gesture of
>> touching one's feet to seek blessings is a way to show
>> one's respect and gratitude. Youngsters touch elder's
>> feet seeking for blessings and in return the elders bless
>> them for long life and success. Evidently the Hindus also
>> share the equal amount of respect to anyone who is old
>> aged. Every festival in the Hindu religion contains
>> rituals where youngsters express their thanks and
>> gratitude to the God, their parents and to the elders in
>> the family.
>>
>> The Gita also states that in order to do good karma one
>> should always respect elders and be humble and grateful
>> to the Supreme Being. The Gita also goes on to say that
>> even Teachers should be shown respect and thankfulness
>> for their contributions in one's life. Guru, in Hindi
>> means Teacher, is also considered next to God. In India,
>> Teacher's Day is celebrated every year on 5th September
>> and is in the honor of the birthday of India's 2nd
>> President Dr.Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan. On Teacher's Day
>> students show their appreciation and thankfulness to the
>> teachers.
>>
>> The Hindus also believe that the various rituals in the
>> Hindu festivals are a way to express thanks to the God
>> Almighty for his blessings. During every festival the
>> custom of exchanging gifts and extending invitations for
>> visit is also a way to show "Thanks". The Hindu festivals
>> are always filled with fun and excitement no matter which
>> God one worships or which state they belong to. Sharing
>> gifts and sweets among the loved ones is a way to express
>> out gratefulness for their friendship, help and support.
>>
>> The Hindu religion has nearly 13 festivals in a year and
>> in each festival the Hindus say "Thanks" with fun and
>> enthusiasm. Dhanyavad in Hindi means "Thank You" and it
>> is the least one can say for all the love and blessings
>> showered by the God Almighty.*
>>
>> More at: http://www.examiner.com/hindu-in-san-
>> francisco/thanksgiving-the-hinduism-way
>>
>> Footnote:
>>
>> * "God" is a Judeo-Christian construct. We Hindus
>> consider Paramatma to be the Divine Supreme Soul. - Jai
>> Maharaj
>>
>> Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
>> Om Shanti
>>
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj
>
> A Vegetarian Thanksgiving
>
> Hindu Press International
> Hinduism Today
> http://www.hinduismtoday.com
> November 10, 2010
>
> Source - www.nytimes.com
>
> USA, November 11, 2010: Tempeh with Wild Mushrooms. Zucchini boats.
> Maple-roasted brussel sprouts. Baked katalfi-wrapped goat cheese.
> Pan-Seared Oatmeal with warm fruit compote.
>
> Who needs turkey, anyway?
>
> Deferring to a fast-growing audience of vegetarians, the New York
> Times' healthy lifestyle blog, called Well, is compiling vegetarian
> recipes from master chefs for thanksgiving. More recipes will be
> added daily until the holiday. You can see them here:
>
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/08/health/20101108_thanksgiving.html?hp#-1
>
http://64.151.103.91/blogs-news/hindu-press-international/a-vegetarian-thanksgiving/10625.html
>
> More at:
>
Hinduism Today
http://www.hinduismtoday.com

Recipes for a Gentle Thanksgiving

http://www.gentlethanksgiving.org/recipes.htm

There is no end to the delicious turkey-free alternatives
you can prepare for your vegetarian Thanksgiving feast.
Most of the wonderful foods that people enjoy at
Thanksgiving are cruelty-free!

Think lovely comfort foods like candied yams, seasoned
bread stuffing, squash, vegan mashed potatoes and gravy!
Fresh steamed vegetables and freshly baked breads! And
all those wonderful vegan desserts! Even the carcass of
the wretched bird can be replaced by an 'unturkey' (see
below) or a beautiful baked squash filled with savory
dressing.

Here is a sample menu for you to try:

MAIN COURSE:

Tofurky or Unturkey, available by mail or from your
natural foods store. (see below)

SIDE DISHES:

CANDIED SWEET POTATOES (from the International Vegetarian
Union)

6 medium-size sweet potatoes, cooked and sliced
Pan spray
Salt
1/4 cup margarine
1/3 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
1 teaspoon orange juice

Arrange cooked sweet potato slices in sprayed baking
dish.
Sprinkle lightly with salt.
Melt margarine in saucepan over low heat.
Add syrup, sugar, cinnamon, and orange juice.
Simmer, stirring frequently, until slightly thickened.
Pour sauce over sweet potatoes.
Bake at 375 F for 20 minutes, basting frequently.
NOTES: Can be served topped with the vegan whipped
topping of your choice.

HARVEST WILD RICE (from the International Vegetarian
Union)

3 cups vegetable or imitation chicken broth
3 cups water
1/2 pound dried flageolets or Great Northern beans --
picked over
3/4 cup wild rice (about 4 ounces)
2 large leeks -- white and pale green parts only
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 pound fresh shiitake mushrooms -- sliced thin
1/4 cup hazelnuts -- toasted and skinned and chopped
coarse
1/4 cup dried cranberries

In a large saucepan simmer broth, water, and beans,
covered, 45 minutes.
Stir in wild rice and simmer, covered, 45 minutes, or
until beans and rice are tender.
Drain rice mixture and return to pan.
Cut leeks crosswise into 1/2-inch slices and in a bowl
soak in water, agitating occasionally to dislodge any
sand.
Lift leeks out of water and drain in a colander.
In a non-stick skillet saut\ufffd leeks in oil over moderately
high heat, stirring occasionally, until almost tender.
Add mushrooms with salt to taste and cook, stirring occasionally,
2 minutes, or until vegetables are tender.
Stir leek mixture into rice mixture.
Reheat mixture, adding water to prevent it from sticking
to skillet, before proceeding.
Stir hazelnuts and cranberries into rice mixture and
serve warm.

WINE-GLAZED BRUSSELS SPROUTS (from Nava Atlas)

2 pounds Brussels sprouts
1/2 cup dry red wine
3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup
1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari
1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch

Trim the stems from the Brussels sprouts and cut an X
into the base, about 1/4 inch deep.
In a small bowl, combine the wine, honey, and soy sauce
and stir together. Transfer to a 3-quart saucepan along
with 1/2 cup water and the Brussels sprouts. Stir
together, then cook, covered, at a gentle simmer for 15
minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and cook, stirring occasionally, for another 10 minutes.
Dissolve the cornstarch in a small amount of water. Stir
into the saucepan quickly, then cook for another 5
minutes. Remove from heat and transfer to a covered
casserole dish to serve.

VEGAN PUMPKIN OR SQUASH PIE (from Nava Atlas)

2 cups well-baked and mashed butternut squash or sugar
pumpkin (see Notes)
3/4 cup silken tofu (about half of a 12.3-ounce aseptic
package)
1/2 cup natural granulated sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (or 1/4 teaspoon each
ground nutmeg and ginger)
9-inch good quality graham cracker or whole grain pie
crust

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
Combine the pumpkin or squash pulp in a food processor
with the remaining ingredients (except the crust, of
course). Process until velvety smooth.
Pour the mixture into the crust. Bake for 40 to 45
minutes, or until the mixture is set and the crust is
golden. Let the pie cool to room temperature. cut into 6
or 8 wedges to serve.

NOTES: To bake butternut squash or sugar pumpkin, halve
the squash or pumpkin (you need a really good knife to do
so!) and scoop out the seeds and fibers. Place the the
halves cut side up in a foil-lined, shallow baking dish
and cover tightly with more foil. Bake for 40 to 50
minutes, or until easily pierced with a knife. When cool
enough to handle, scoop out the pulp and discard the
skin. Use any leftover squash or pumpkin pulp for another
purpose. If you want to make this in a hurry, you can use
a 16-ounce can of pureed pumpkin.

MUSHROOM GRAVY (from Sonya at vegweb.com)

1/2 cup dried mushrooms, chopped into small pieces
1 cup strong broth
1 small onion, diced
2 Tbs. flour
1 1/2 Tbs. margarine

Hydrate your chopped mushrooms with about 1/2 cup boiling
water.
Cover and let sit for 10 minutes.

Melt margarine in a small-medium saucepan over medium
heat. Saut\ufffd the onion lightly. Don't brown too much. Add
the flour, and stir constantly with a wooden spoon until
frothy. Do not let it burn! Add the mushrooms and their
liquid and your vegetable broth. Cook over medium heat to
a boil, stirring constantly. After it comes to a boil,
turn the heat down a bit and let thicken.

Serves: 6 - Preparation time: 10-15 minutes

For more recipes, please consult:

http://www.ivu.org/recipes/holiday/
http://www.vegetarian1.net/tgiving.html
http://www.vegweb.com/misc/thanksgiving.shtml
http://www.vegkitchen.com/thanksgiving.html
http://www.peta.org/feat/canada/
http://www.vegsource.com/thanks.htm
http://www.vegetarian.about.com
http://www.dietforthenewage.com/html/turkeyfree_thanksgiving_menu.html

For delicious turkey-alternatives, please visit:
http://www.tofurky.com
http://www.freshtofu.com/tofu_turkey.html
http://wwwwww.nowandzen.net/products.html

End of forwarded message

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

George Plimpton
2012-11-22 00:30:00 EST
jyotishithead Jay Stevens - not a doctor, not a Hindoo - spewed a big
bucket of bullshit:
> Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
>>
>>>> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving

At the first Thanksgiving, the Pilgrims ate meat.


And/or Www.mantra.com/jai Dr. Jai Maharaj
2012-11-22 00:57:27 EST
Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
> >
> >>> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> >>>
> >>> [ Subject: The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> >>> [ From: fi...@yahoo.com
> >>> [ Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004
> >>>
> >>> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> >>>
> >>> By Rynn Berry
> >>>
> >>> http://all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html
> >>>
> >>> [Ed.] "But it's tradition," is the cry when vegetarians
> >>> wonder why killing an animal should make Thanksgiving
> >>> special. Vegetarian historian Rynn Berry begs to differ.
> >>>
> >>> The story of the Pilgrim's First Thanksgiving -- and
> >>> turkey's place in it -- has been shown to be largely a
> >>> myth. It was only in 1863 that Abraham Lincoln declared
> >>> Thanksgiving to be a national holiday -- mainly as a
> >>> public relations ploy to whip up a sense of patriotism
> >>> and national unity during the Civil War. Pilgrims
> >>> themselves didn't become a part of the national
> >>> celebration until the 1890s.
> >>>
> >>> The legend that one hundred odd English men and women who
> >>> landed at Plymouth Harbor feasted on turkey and all the
> >>> trimmings is a myth. When they first arrived, on November
> >>> 11 1620, the settlers had so little food that they raised
> >>> the houses of the Native American inhabitants and made
> >>> off with stores of beans and corn. There was simply no
> >>> animal flesh to be had. It is likely that the first
> >>> Thanksgiving would have had to have been a vegan one,
> >>> consisting of corn and beans served on pottery that the
> >>> so-called Pilgrim Fathers stole from the so-called
> >>> Indians. If, instead of the Plymouth Pilgrims, we go back
> >>> a decade or so and look to the Jamestown colonists to
> >>> provide us with role models for Thanksgiving, we will be
> >>> even more scandalized. In her book Settling with the
> >>> Indians, Karen Kupperman tells us that the Jamestown
> >>> colonists were so lacking in farming skills (they spent
> >>> most of the time digging random holes in the hope of
> >>> finding gold) that they sank so low as to feed on corpses
> >>> that they dug up from Native American gravesites. By
> >>> rights we should be commemorating Thanksgiving by eating
> >>> corpses. On second thoughts, isn't that exactly what
> >>> we're doing?
> >>>
> >>> Equal Exchange?
> >>>
> >>> To be sure, the Plymouth Pilgrims were given a friendly
> >>> reception by the Native Americans: Massassoit, chief of
> >>> the Wapanoags, Samoset, chief of the Pemaquids, and the
> >>> ever faithful Squanto. Indeed, the peoples of the region
> >>> overlooked the Pilgrims' depredations and taught them how
> >>> to farm, fish, and eventually how to set up trading
> >>> posts. The reason why the Indians were so receptive to
> >>> the newcomers is that most of New England had been
> >>> depopulated by epidemics from prior contacts with
> >>> European traders and settlers. Europeans had introduced
> >>> such diseases as diphtheria, TB, streptococcus, scurvy,
> >>> cholera, typhus measles and chicken pox and smallpox.
> >>> It's estimated that, before the invasion of Europeans and
> >>> their diseases, northern America was home to as many as
> >>> 20 million inhabitants from coast to coast. The diseases
> >>> ravaged the native populations from south to north
> >>> America, reducing them by as much as 90 percent.
> >>>
> >>> Europeans were not very unhygienic. While Squanto tried
> >>> to get the settlers to bathe, he met with little success
> >>> because the settlers considered it un-Christian to bathe.
> >>> In cities such as London and Paris, raw sewage ran in the
> >>> streets. By contrast, most Native Americans were highly
> >>> skilled agriculturists. When Europeans arrived they found
> >>> a country that was already cleared and farmed. The
> >>> settlers simply walked into the indigenous communities
> >>> that had been depopulated by plague and took over. This
> >>> is why so many of the early New England towns have the
> >>> name attached to them-Deerfield, Richfield, and so on.
> >>> The colonists started their communities in the middle of
> >>> fields that had been cleared by the indigenous peoples
> >>>
> >>> The Real First Thanksgiving?
> >>>
> >>> The folklore taught in schools has it that the Pilgrims
> >>> originated the Thanksgiving festival and that they
> >>> provided the Native Americans with a feast they had never
> >>> seen. In fact, the opposite is true. In November 1621,
> >>> one year after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth, the
> >>> Pilgrims celebrated harvest festival jointly with the
> >>> Native Americans-a harvest festival that the native
> >>> inhabitants had been celebrating for hundreds, perhaps
> >>> thousands of years. Most of the food at this festival was
> >>> supplied by Native Americans. It was a meal that the
> >>> Pilgrims had never witnessed, consisting of native
> >>> American foodstuffs. The main meal was a sort of corn
> >>> meal mush along with nuts and fruits such as
> >>> gooseberries, strawberries, plums, cherries, cranberries
> >>> and a groundnut known as the bogg bean. Popcorn and
> >>> popcorn balls made by the Indians with maple syrup were
> >>> served as a sweet. There was a variety of breadstuffs
> >>> such as cornpone, ashcakes, and hoe cakes, made by Native
> >>> Americans from their own recipes. It is also possible
> >>> that other native foods such as pumpkin and squash were
> >>> served. In his Food Encyclopedia, James Trager tells us
> >>> that there is a live possibility that turkey wasn't even
> >>> served. It's true that the Indians provided some deer
> >>> meat, and game birds, but they were side dishes and not
> >>> the focus of the meal. So the 1620 Thanksgiving dinner
> >>> proper in 1620 was probably a totally vegetarian one,
> >>> because the Pilgrims were unable to find animal flesh.
> >>> The second Thanksgiving in 1621 was also catered by the
> >>> Native Americans. Not only was it probably turkeyless,
> >>> but it was mainly vegetarian. Doesn't it make more sense,
> >>> therefore, that instead of celebrating Thanksgiving as an
> >>> orgy of Turkey slaughter, Americans should celebrate a
> >>> vegetarian harvest festival?
> >>>
> >>> Rynn Berry is the historical advisor to the North
> >>> American Vegetarian Society. He is the author of Famous
> >>> Vegetarians and Their Favorite Recipes ($15.95) and Food
> >>> for the Gods: Vegetarianism and the World's Religions
> >>> ($19.95). Copies may be ordered from the author at 159
> >>> Eastern Parkway, Suite 2H, Brooklyn, NY 11238.
> >>>
> http://www.all-creatures.org/articles/tgveg-rb.html
>
> Visit:
> http://www.pcrm.org
> >>
> >> Thanksgiving the Hinduism way
> >>
> >> By Sohoni Das
> >> SF Hindu Examiner
> >> November 20, 2009
> >>
> >> Thanksgiving is a way to express one's gratitude toward
> >> our families and friends. Interestingly the Hindu
> >> religion also expresses thanks to our families and
> >> friends and it has its unique way to do so.
> >>
> >> The Hindu religion worships many Gods and it also
> >> believes in giving respect to the elders. Parents are
> >> considered next to God. In Hindu religion the gesture of
> >> touching one's feet to seek blessings is a way to show
> >> one's respect and gratitude. Youngsters touch elder's
> >> feet seeking for blessings and in return the elders bless
> >> them for long life and success. Evidently the Hindus also
> >> share the equal amount of respect to anyone who is old
> >> aged. Every festival in the Hindu religion contains
> >> rituals where youngsters express their thanks and
> >> gratitude to the God, their parents and to the elders in
> >> the family.
> >>
> >> The Gita also states that in order to do good karma one
> >> should always respect elders and be humble and grateful
> >> to the Supreme Being. The Gita also goes on to say that
> >> even Teachers should be shown respect and thankfulness
> >> for their contributions in one's life. Guru, in Hindi
> >> means Teacher, is also considered next to God. In India,
> >> Teacher's Day is celebrated every year on 5th September
> >> and is in the honor of the birthday of India's 2nd
> >> President Dr.Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan. On Teacher's Day
> >> students show their appreciation and thankfulness to the
> >> teachers.
> >>
> >> The Hindus also believe that the various rituals in the
> >> Hindu festivals are a way to express thanks to the God
> >> Almighty for his blessings. During every festival the
> >> custom of exchanging gifts and extending invitations for
> >> visit is also a way to show "Thanks". The Hindu festivals
> >> are always filled with fun and excitement no matter which
> >> God one worships or which state they belong to. Sharing
> >> gifts and sweets among the loved ones is a way to express
> >> out gratefulness for their friendship, help and support.
> >>
> >> The Hindu religion has nearly 13 festivals in a year and
> >> in each festival the Hindus say "Thanks" with fun and
> >> enthusiasm. Dhanyavad in Hindi means "Thank You" and it
> >> is the least one can say for all the love and blessings
> >> showered by the God Almighty.*
> >>
> >> More at: http://www.examiner.com/hindu-in-san-
> >> francisco/thanksgiving-the-hinduism-way
> >>
> >> Footnote:
> >>
> >> * "God" is a Judeo-Christian construct. We Hindus
> >> consider Paramatma to be the Divine Supreme Soul. - Jai
> >> Maharaj
> >>
> >> Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
> >> Om Shanti
> >>
> http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj
> >
> > A Vegetarian Thanksgiving
> >
> > Hindu Press International
> > Hinduism Today
> > http://www.hinduismtoday.com
> > November 10, 2010
> >
> > Source - www.nytimes.com
> >
> > USA, November 11, 2010: Tempeh with Wild Mushrooms. Zucchini boats.
> > Maple-roasted brussel sprouts. Baked katalfi-wrapped goat cheese.
> > Pan-Seared Oatmeal with warm fruit compote.
> >
> > Who needs turkey, anyway?
> >
> > Deferring to a fast-growing audience of vegetarians, the New York
> > Times' healthy lifestyle blog, called Well, is compiling vegetarian
> > recipes from master chefs for thanksgiving. More recipes will be
> > added daily until the holiday. You can see them here:
> >
> http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/08/health/20101108_thanksgiving.htm
> l?hp#-1
> >
> http://64.151.103.91/blogs-news/hindu-press-international/a-vegetarian-thanksg
> iving/10625.html
> >
> > More at:
> >
> Hinduism Today
> http://www.hinduismtoday.com
>
> Recipes for a Gentle Thanksgiving
>
> http://www.gentlethanksgiving.org/recipes.htm
>
> There is no end to the delicious turkey-free alternatives
> you can prepare for your vegetarian Thanksgiving feast.
> Most of the wonderful foods that people enjoy at
> Thanksgiving are cruelty-free!
>
> Think lovely comfort foods like candied yams, seasoned
> bread stuffing, squash, vegan mashed potatoes and gravy!
> Fresh steamed vegetables and freshly baked breads! And
> all those wonderful vegan desserts! Even the carcass of
> the wretched bird can be replaced by an 'unturkey' (see
> below) or a beautiful baked squash filled with savory
> dressing.
>
> Here is a sample menu for you to try:
>
> MAIN COURSE:
>
> Tofurky or Unturkey, available by mail or from your
> natural foods store. (see below)
>
> SIDE DISHES:
>
> CANDIED SWEET POTATOES (from the International Vegetarian
> Union)
>
> 6 medium-size sweet potatoes, cooked and sliced
> Pan spray
> Salt
> 1/4 cup margarine
> 1/3 cup maple syrup
> 1/4 cup brown sugar
> 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
> 1 teaspoon orange juice
>
> Arrange cooked sweet potato slices in sprayed baking
> dish.
> Sprinkle lightly with salt.
> Melt margarine in saucepan over low heat.
> Add syrup, sugar, cinnamon, and orange juice.
> Simmer, stirring frequently, until slightly thickened.
> Pour sauce over sweet potatoes.
> Bake at 375 F for 20 minutes, basting frequently.
> NOTES: Can be served topped with the vegan whipped
> topping of your choice.
>
> HARVEST WILD RICE (from the International Vegetarian
> Union)
>
> 3 cups vegetable or imitation chicken broth
> 3 cups water
> 1/2 pound dried flageolets or Great Northern beans --
> picked over
> 3/4 cup wild rice (about 4 ounces)
> 2 large leeks -- white and pale green parts only
> 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
> 1/4 pound fresh shiitake mushrooms -- sliced thin
> 1/4 cup hazelnuts -- toasted and skinned and chopped
> coarse
> 1/4 cup dried cranberries
>
> In a large saucepan simmer broth, water, and beans,
> covered, 45 minutes.
> Stir in wild rice and simmer, covered, 45 minutes, or
> until beans and rice are tender.
> Drain rice mixture and return to pan.
> Cut leeks crosswise into 1/2-inch slices and in a bowl
> soak in water, agitating occasionally to dislodge any
> sand.
> Lift leeks out of water and drain in a colander.
> In a non-stick skillet saut\ufffd leeks in oil over moderately
> high heat, stirring occasionally, until almost tender.
> Add mushrooms with salt to taste and cook, stirring occasionally,
> 2 minutes, or until vegetables are tender.
> Stir leek mixture into rice mixture.
> Reheat mixture, adding water to prevent it from sticking
> to skillet, before proceeding.
> Stir hazelnuts and cranberries into rice mixture and
> serve warm.
>
> WINE-GLAZED BRUSSELS SPROUTS (from Nava Atlas)
>
> 2 pounds Brussels sprouts
> 1/2 cup dry red wine
> 3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup
> 1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari
> 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
>
> Trim the stems from the Brussels sprouts and cut an X
> into the base, about 1/4 inch deep.
> In a small bowl, combine the wine, honey, and soy sauce
> and stir together. Transfer to a 3-quart saucepan along
> with 1/2 cup water and the Brussels sprouts. Stir
> together, then cook, covered, at a gentle simmer for 15
> minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and cook, stirring occasionally, for
> another 10 minutes.
> Dissolve the cornstarch in a small amount of water. Stir
> into the saucepan quickly, then cook for another 5
> minutes. Remove from heat and transfer to a covered
> casserole dish to serve.
>
> VEGAN PUMPKIN OR SQUASH PIE (from Nava Atlas)
>
> 2 cups well-baked and mashed butternut squash or sugar
> pumpkin (see Notes)
> 3/4 cup silken tofu (about half of a 12.3-ounce aseptic
> package)
> 1/2 cup natural granulated sugar
> 1 teaspoon cinnamon
> 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (or 1/4 teaspoon each
> ground nutmeg and ginger)
> 9-inch good quality graham cracker or whole grain pie
> crust
>
> Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
> Combine the pumpkin or squash pulp in a food processor
> with the remaining ingredients (except the crust, of
> course). Process until velvety smooth.
> Pour the mixture into the crust. Bake for 40 to 45
> minutes, or until the mixture is set and the crust is
> golden. Let the pie cool to room temperature. cut into 6
> or 8 wedges to serve.
>
> NOTES: To bake butternut squash or sugar pumpkin, halve
> the squash or pumpkin (you need a really good knife to do
> so!) and scoop out the seeds and fibers. Place the the
> halves cut side up in a foil-lined, shallow baking dish
> and cover tightly with more foil. Bake for 40 to 50
> minutes, or until easily pierced with a knife. When cool
> enough to handle, scoop out the pulp and discard the
> skin. Use any leftover squash or pumpkin pulp for another
> purpose. If you want to make this in a hurry, you can use
> a 16-ounce can of pureed pumpkin.
>
> MUSHROOM GRAVY (from Sonya at vegweb.com)
>
> 1/2 cup dried mushrooms, chopped into small pieces
> 1 cup strong broth
> 1 small onion, diced
> 2 Tbs. flour
> 1 1/2 Tbs. margarine
>
> Hydrate your chopped mushrooms with about 1/2 cup boiling
> water.
> Cover and let sit for 10 minutes.
>
> Melt margarine in a small-medium saucepan over medium
> heat. Saut\ufffd the onion lightly. Don't brown too much. Add
> the flour, and stir constantly with a wooden spoon until
> frothy. Do not let it burn! Add the mushrooms and their
> liquid and your vegetable broth. Cook over medium heat to
> a boil, stirring constantly. After it comes to a boil,
> turn the heat down a bit and let thicken.
>
> Serves: 6 - Preparation time: 10-15 minutes
>
> For more recipes, please consult:
>
> http://www.ivu.org/recipes/holiday/
> http://www.vegetarian1.net/tgiving.html
> http://www.vegweb.com/misc/thanksgiving.shtml
> http://www.vegkitchen.com/thanksgiving.html
> http://www.peta.org/feat/canada/
> http://www.vegsource.com/thanks.htm
> http://www.vegetarian.about.com
> http://www.dietforthenewage.com/html/turkeyfree_thanksgiving_menu.html
>
> For delicious turkey-alternatives, please visit:
> http://www.tofurky.com
> http://www.freshtofu.com/tofu_turkey.html
> http://wwwwww.nowandzen.net/products.html
>
> End of forwarded message
>
> Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
> Om Shanti

A Hindu Thanksgiving prayer

By Aseem Shukla
Co-founder, Hindu American Foundation
On Faith
The Washington Post
Thursday, November 24, 2011

A historical rooting of Thanksgiving tradition in the
intersection of early European immigrants with erstwhile
"Indians" notwithstanding, the newest Indian Americans --
not those native to the Americas --embrace this weekend
with the same gusto. A time to give thanks for life's
bounties -- material and spiritual, and relish the bonds
of family and friends over shared meals, Thanksgivings is
a uniquely secular, non-sectarian and singularly American
holiday that will put my family and millions of other on
the road later today.

A Hindu American family, mine will share a vegetarian
meal rich with pastas, pumpkins and all of the
traditional fixings -- eschewing the gastronomically
bland -- much maligned tofurkey. Most of us will head out
to the gym -- weekend warriors trotting out to battle --
knowing that only a spirited basketball game will assuage
the coming guilt of over-indulgence and gluttony. There
will be pumpkin pie and pecan pies after all! Prayers of
thanks will be shared, children will bask in the
independent company of cousins on the "kid's table" and,
most of my Florida raised friends and family will take in
another Miami Dolphins football game -- no matter the
ludicrous futility of a team fallen so far...

Hindu Americans share, I am sure, in the collective gloom
of national economic doldrums. Unemployment is too high
and the news from Europe hardly portends soft landings.
There is universal disgust with a dysfunctional U.S.
Congress at ideological loggerheads that holds a nation's
future hostage. Not much there to celebrate.

But focus the view from a Hindu American perspective, and
there are many thanks to give. Hindus are a visible and
integral part of the American dialogue. Hindu
philosophical insights first became visible here in the
writings of Emerson and Thoreau, and as Phil Goldberg
writes in his fascinating new book, "American Veda," the
Hindu barrier was broken by a dashing, articulate monk,
Swami Vivekananda in 1893. After him, Hindu spirituality
inspired and was intertwined in the works of
intellectuals, authors and dreamers as diverse as
Salinger, Huxley, Ginsburg and George Harrison.

I will give thanks that yog, inspired by my Hindu
spiritual heritage, at least in its physical -- aasan --
form, is invariably practiced by a neighbor, co-worker
and, likely, the barista and bank teller. Millions of
boomers have rediscovered the wealth of benefits of the
meditation they learned from Hindu gurus and yogis in the
heady sixties, and now their grandchildren incorporate it
as an integral part of their daily yog practice.

Hindu American advocacy has placed Hindu festivals on the
national agenda. A congressional resolution recognizing
the festival of Diwali was passed a second time by the
U.S. Senate and President Obama, no less, celebrated the
festival of light in the White House, personally lighting
the Diwali lamp amidst chants from the Hindu scriptures,
the Vedas.

I am thankful that our president upholds the values of
American pluralism -- a nation that is inspired by the
divine, but gives no preference to any religion over
another or those without faith. And I am very thankful
that presidential contenders that openly endorse their
faith as the only true path -- that long to perpetuate
the divisive rhetoric of "Christian nation" -- continue
to flounder in polls. And when a gubernatorial candidate
from Kentucky attacked the incumbent Gov. Steven Beshear
for joining Hindus at a groundbreaking ceremony last
month, he was inundated by national opprobrium. For this
country's commitment to pluralism, I give thanks.

Advocacy has ensured that school textbooks better reflect
the Hinduism that two millions Americans practice, rather
than the biases of some academics and school board
members, and more and more, dharma religions are being
taught at colleges and universities by brilliant
academics that actually practice the faith they teach,
rather than revel in the exotic and erotic. The human
rights of Hindu minorities in Pakistan and Malaysia are
part of the international agenda of House subcommittees
and the State Department, and for those victories,
momentous as they are, I give thanks.

So Hindus will gather as all Americans and celebrate the
day of thanks. Give thanks for the successes of the Hindu
American journey, they must. But as always, the prayer
before dinner transcends the mundane struggles of
identity and personal aspirations, and we will recite
from the Holy Upanishads:

AUM saha navavatu, saha nau bhunaktu
Saha veeryam karvaavahai
Tejasvi naa vadhita mastu
maa vid vishaa va hai
AUM shaantih, shaantih, shaantih.

Let us together (-saha) be protected (-na vavatu) and let
us together be nourished (-bhunaktu) by God's blessings.
Let us together join our mental forces in strength (-
veeryam) for the benefit of humanity (-karvaa vahai). Let
our efforts at learning be luminous (-tejasvi) and filled
with joy, and endowed with the force of purpose (-vadhita
mastu). Let us never (-maa) be poisoned (-vishaa) with
the seeds of hatred for anyone. Let there be peace and
serenity (-shaantih) in all the three universes.

Aseem Shukla
Nov 24, 2011 8:39 am

More at:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-faith/post/a-hindu-thanksgiving-prayer/2011/11/24/gIQAI1JxrN_blog.html

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

George Plimpton
2012-11-22 01:17:52 EST
jyotishithead Jay Stevens - not a doctor, not a Hindoo - spewed a big
bucket of bullshit:

> Dr. Jai Maharaj posted:
>>>
>>>>> The First Vegetarian Thanksgiving

At the first Thanksgiving - THE first Thanksgiving, you fake fakir - the
Pilgrims ate meat. That's not in dispute.

Page: 1 2 3 4 5   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron