Vegetarian Discussion: Campbell's Soups.........

Campbell's Soups.........
Posts: 27

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2 3   Next  (First | Last)

Mr.Smartypants
2012-08-18 02:46:28 EST
.........has a steak and potatos, a prime rib and veggies, and a
sirloin tip soups on store shelves.

I wonder if the Gooberdoodle thinks he believes that this may be where
some of the choice cuts from the EXTRA livestock he thinks he believes
are being raised for pet food end up?

Maybe he could ask one of the Ruperts he thinks he believes he talks
to about it.

Rupert
2012-08-18 05:08:30 EST
On aug. 18, 08:46, "Mr.Smartypants" <bunghole-jon...@lycos.com> wrote:
> .........has a steak and potatos, a prime rib and veggies, and a
> sirloin tip soups on store shelves.
>
> I wonder if the Gooberdoodle thinks he believes that this may be where
> some of the choice cuts from the EXTRA livestock he thinks he believes
> are being raised for pet food end up?
>
> Maybe he could ask one of the Ruperts he thinks he believes he talks
> to about it.

I wrote to Bryan Caplan:

"I was wondering if I could possibly ask you a question. Suppose you
are
producing some good which can be made into many different products,
e.g.
suppose you are bringing beef cattle into existence, which can then be
made into beef but also into leather. How does one go about
determining
how the demand curves for these various products relate to the supply
curve for the production of beef cattle? Am I right in thinking that
one
should integrate them all into one demand curve?"

He wrote:

"I don't know off the top of my head, but it's all in Marshall, one of
the earliest people to address this."

I never got around to having a look at Marshall.


George Plimpton
2012-08-18 13:55:56 EST
On 8/18/2012 2:08 AM, Rupert wrote:
> On aug. 18, 08:46, "Mr.Smartypants" <bunghole-jon...@lycos.com> wrote:
>> .........has a steak and potatos, a prime rib and veggies, and a
>> sirloin tip soups on store shelves.
>>
>> I wonder if the Gooberdoodle thinks he believes that this may be where
>> some of the choice cuts from the EXTRA livestock he thinks he believes
>> are being raised for pet food end up?
>>
>> Maybe he could ask one of the Ruperts he thinks he believes he talks
>> to about it.
>
> I wrote to Bryan Caplan:
>
> "I was wondering if I could possibly ask you a question. Suppose you
> are
> producing some good which can be made into many different products,
> e.g.
> suppose you are bringing beef cattle into existence, which can then be
> made into beef but also into leather. How does one go about
> determining
> how the demand curves for these various products relate to the supply
> curve for the production of beef cattle? Am I right in thinking that
> one
> should integrate them all into one demand curve?"
>
> He wrote:
>
> "I don't know off the top of my head, but it's all in Marshall, one of
> the earliest people to address this."
>
> I never got around to having a look at Marshall.

This really is elementary stuff. One of the most basic axioms of price
theory is that firms - producers, suppliers, whatever you want to call
them - respond directly to changes in market price, while consumers -
the demand - respond inversely. So, if the market price rises, firms
will tend to produce more for sale. There isn't an economics text in
the world that says otherwise. So far, so good.

Now, suppose cattle are produced for beef only - no known use for any
other part of an animal exists. Suppose the market price of a beef
animal is $100. Assuming the cost of producing additional cattle rises
(marginal cost), ranchers will produce cattle up to the point where the
marginal revenue of producing an additional head ($100) is equal to the
marginal cost of producing them.

Now suppose that a use for leather is discovered or invented, and the
market price for the leather from one head of cattle is $100. The
market price for a head of cattle is now $200 - $100 paid by a beef
processor, and another $100 paid by a leather goods manufacturer. What
is going to happen to the supply of cattle? It is going to increase,
because at the old rate of supply, the rancher was only incurring costs
of $100 per head, but he is now getting revenue of $200 per head.
Producers increase production until the marginal revenue (now $200)
equals the marginal cost.

Due to the sudden appearance of demand for leather, there will now be
both more beef and more leather produced. Now, the consumer demand for
beef is assumed to be fixed, or at least invariant with respect to the
price of leather. The price of beef must fall if consumers are going to
purchase any more of it. Because the supply of beef is now greater - in
fact, double - the price *will* fall. As the price falls, consumers -
including pet food producers - who didn't used to buy any fresh beef now
will buy some.

Mr.Smartypants
2012-08-18 14:04:28 EST
On Aug 18, 11:55 am, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
> On 8/18/2012 2:08 AM, Rupert wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On aug. 18, 08:46, "Mr.Smartypants" <bunghole-jon...@lycos.com> wrote:
> >> .........has a steak and potatos, a prime rib and veggies, and a
> >> sirloin tip soups on store shelves.
>
> >> I wonder if the Gooberdoodle thinks he believes that this may be where
> >> some of the choice cuts from the EXTRA livestock he thinks he believes
> >> are being raised for pet food end up?
>
> >> Maybe he could ask one of the Ruperts he thinks he believes he talks
> >> to about it.
>
> > I wrote to Bryan Caplan:
>
> > "I was wondering if I could possibly ask you a question. Suppose you
> > are
> > producing some good which can be made into many different products,
> > e.g.
> > suppose you are bringing beef cattle into existence, which can then be
> > made into beef but also into leather. How does one go about
> > determining
> > how the demand curves for these various products relate to the supply
> > curve for the production of beef cattle? Am I right in thinking that
> > one
> > should integrate them all into one demand curve?"
>
> > He wrote:
>
> > "I don't know off the top of my head, but it's all in Marshall, one of
> > the earliest people to address this."
>
> > I never got around to having a look at Marshall.
>
> This really is elementary stuff.  One of the most basic axioms of price
> theory is that firms - producers, suppliers, whatever you want to call
> them - respond directly to changes in market price, while consumers -
> the demand - respond inversely.  So, if the market price rises, firms
> will tend to produce more for sale.  There isn't an economics text in
> the world that says otherwise.  So far, so good.
>
> Now, suppose cattle are produced for beef only - no known use for any
> other part of an animal exists.  Suppose the market price of a beef
> animal is $100.  Assuming the cost of producing additional cattle rises
> (marginal cost), ranchers will produce cattle up to the point where the
> marginal revenue of producing an additional head ($100) is equal to the
> marginal cost of producing them.
>
> Now suppose that a use for leather is discovered or invented, and the
> market price for the leather from one head of cattle is $100.  The
> market price for a head of cattle is now $200 - $100 paid by a beef
> processor, and another $100 paid by a leather goods manufacturer.  What
> is going to happen to the supply of cattle?  It is going to increase,
> because at the old rate of supply, the rancher was only incurring costs
> of $100 per head, but he is now getting revenue of $200 per head.
> Producers increase production until the marginal revenue (now $200)
> equals the marginal cost.
>
> Due to the sudden appearance of demand for leather, there will now be
> both more beef and more leather produced.  Now, the consumer demand for
> beef is assumed to be fixed, or at least invariant with respect to the
> price of leather.  The price of beef must fall if consumers are going to
> purchase any more of it.  Because the supply of beef is now greater - in
> fact, double - the price *will* fall.  As the price falls, consumers -
> including pet food producers - who didn't used to buy any fresh beef now
> will buy some.


and what were the pet food producers using when they weren't buying
"fresh beef", Goo?

Does the "fresh beef" they buy include choice cuts?

D*@.
2012-08-21 18:54:26 EST
On Sat, 18 Aug 2012 10:55:56 -0700, Goo wrote:

>Now suppose that a use for leather is discovered or invented, and the
>market price for the leather from one head of cattle is $100. The
>market price for a head of cattle is now $200 - $100 paid by a beef
>processor, and another $100 paid by a leather goods manufacturer. What
>is going to happen to the supply of cattle? It is going to increase,
>because at the old rate of supply

What happens to all the extra beef Goo? Do you think it has an influence on
your imaginary pet food herds? Do you think there are animals raised for no
other reason than to become leather, Goob?

D*@.
2012-08-21 18:55:11 EST
On Fri, 17 Aug 2012 23:46:28 -0700 (PDT), "Mr.Smartypants"
<bunghole-jonnie@lycos.com> wrote:

>.........has a steak and potatos, a prime rib and veggies, and a
>sirloin tip soups on store shelves.
>
>I wonder if the Gooberdoodle thinks he believes that this may be where
>some of the choice cuts from the EXTRA livestock he thinks he believes
>are being raised for pet food end up?

Goo's probably not able to consider it in that much detail. Now the Goober
has extra leather cattle at well as his extra pet food cattle. I wonder how many
more extra cattle Goo believes there are out there...

>Maybe he could ask one of the Ruperts he thinks he believes he talks
>to about it.

It's too bad the Goober couldn't try to explain what he thought he was
trying to talk about with that one. It probably would have been pretty amusing.
Extra cattle, and extra Ruperts.

George Plimpton
2012-08-22 22:21:36 EST
Fuckwit David Harrison, who has no consideration for the lives of
animals, lied:

>
>> Now suppose that a use for leather is discovered or invented, and the
>> market price for the leather from one head of cattle is $100. The
>> market price for a head of cattle is now $200 - $100 paid by a beef
>> processor, and another $100 paid by a leather goods manufacturer. What
>> is going to happen to the supply of cattle? It is going to increase,
>> because at the old rate of supply
>
> What happens to all the extra beef

It's sold and eaten.


Mr.Smartypants
2012-08-23 01:50:05 EST
On Aug 22, 8:21 pm, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
> Fuckwit David Harrison, who has no consideration for the lives of
> animals, lied:
>
>
>
> >> Now suppose that a use for leather is discovered or invented, and the
> >> market price for the leather from one head of cattle is $100.  The
> >> market price for a head of cattle is now $200 - $100 paid by a beef
> >> processor, and another $100 paid by a leather goods manufacturer.  What
> >> is going to happen to the supply of cattle?  It is going to increase,
> >> because at the old rate of supply
>
> >      What happens to all the extra beef
>
> It's sold and eaten.


So the EXTRA beef from EXTRA livestock over and above human
consumption demand is sold and eaten.

Sold to whom and eaten by whom, Goobs?


Rupert
2012-08-23 04:00:58 EST
On Aug 23, 7:50 am, "Mr.Smartypants" <bunghole-jon...@lycos.com>
wrote:
> On Aug 22, 8:21 pm, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
>
> > Fuckwit David Harrison, who has no consideration for the lives of
> > animals, lied:
>
> > >> Now suppose that a use for leather is discovered or invented, and the
> > >> market price for the leather from one head of cattle is $100.  The
> > >> market price for a head of cattle is now $200 - $100 paid by a beef
> > >> processor, and another $100 paid by a leather goods manufacturer.  What
> > >> is going to happen to the supply of cattle?  It is going to increase,
> > >> because at the old rate of supply
>
> > >      What happens to all the extra beef
>
> > It's sold and eaten.
>
> So the EXTRA beef from EXTRA livestock over and above human
> consumption demand is sold and eaten.
>
> Sold to whom and eaten by whom, Goobs?

Not over and above human consumption demand. The demand goes up
because the market price goes down.

Mr.Smartypants
2012-08-23 08:44:20 EST
On Aug 23, 2:00 am, Rupert <rupertmccal...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Aug 23, 7:50 am, "Mr.Smartypants" <bunghole-jon...@lycos.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Aug 22, 8:21 pm, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
>
> > > Fuckwit David Harrison, who has no consideration for the lives of
> > > animals, lied:
>
> > > >> Now suppose that a use for leather is discovered or invented, and the
> > > >> market price for the leather from one head of cattle is $100.  The
> > > >> market price for a head of cattle is now $200 - $100 paid by a beef
> > > >> processor, and another $100 paid by a leather goods manufacturer.  What
> > > >> is going to happen to the supply of cattle?  It is going to increase,
> > > >> because at the old rate of supply
>
> > > >      What happens to all the extra beef
>
> > > It's sold and eaten.
>
> > So the EXTRA beef from EXTRA livestock over and above human
> > consumption demand is sold and eaten.
>
> > Sold to whom and eaten by whom, Goobs?
>
> Not over and above human consumption demand. The demand goes up
> because the market price goes down.


You are missing the whole point of Goo's stupid contention that there
are herds of EXTRA livestock being raised.

EXTRA, meaning over and above the demand for HUMAN consumption. i.e.
pet food livestock.......although there is some confusion as to what
happens to the choice cuts from these animals.
Page: 1 2 3   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron