Vegetarian Discussion: Sheep Are Bred In Part For Pet Food

Sheep Are Bred In Part For Pet Food
Posts: 10

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1   (First | Last)

George Plimpton
2011-03-30 10:51:28 EST
According to the USDA:

The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
or are exported.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm


If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
be bred.

George Plimpton
2011-03-30 15:42:01 EST
On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
> On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<george@si.not> wrote:
>
>> According to the USDA:
>>
>> The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
>> decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
>> nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
>> declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
>> population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
>> poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
>> animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
>> often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
>> consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
>> the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
>> or are exported.
>>
>> http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>>
>>
>> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
>> be bred.
>
> LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!

Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit. Without the demand for meat for pets,
fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.

D*@.
2011-03-30 16:50:02 EST
On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton <george@si.not> wrote:

>According to the USDA:
>
> The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
> decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
> nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
> declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
> population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
> poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
> animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
> often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
> consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
> the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
> or are exported.
>
> http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>
>
>If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
>be bred.

LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep! LOL...this Goober will never
learn.

Mr.Smartypants
2011-03-31 11:29:10 EST
On Mar 30, 12:42 pm, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
> On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not>  wrote:
>
> >> According to the USDA:
>
> >>     The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
> >>     decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
> >>     nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
> >>     declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
> >>     population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
> >>     poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
> >>     animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
> >>     often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
> >>     consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
> >>     the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
> >>     or are exported.
>
> >>    http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>
> >> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
> >> be bred.
>
> >      LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!
>
> Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit.  Without the demand for meat for pets,
> fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.


are they all raised for 12 years like your mythical cow, Goobs?

George Plimpton
2011-03-31 11:33:48 EST
On 3/31/2011 8:29 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
> On Mar 30, 12:42 pm, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>> On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>>
>>>> According to the USDA:
>>
>>>> The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
>>>> decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
>>>> nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
>>>> declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
>>>> population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
>>>> poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
>>>> animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
>>>> often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
>>>> consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
>>>> the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
>>>> or are exported.
>>
>>>> http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>>
>>>> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
>>>> be bred.
>>
>>> LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!
>>
>> Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit. Without the demand for meat for pets,
>> fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.
>
>
> are they all raised for 12 years

I guess you'd have to attend some livestock auctions and ask around,
Douchebag.

Mr.Smartypants
2011-03-31 13:11:51 EST
On Mar 31, 8:33 am, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
> On 3/31/2011 8:29 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Mar 30, 12:42 pm, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not>  wrote:
> >> On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
>
> >>> On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not>    wrote:
>
> >>>> According to the USDA:
>
> >>>>      The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
> >>>>      decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
> >>>>      nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
> >>>>      declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
> >>>>      population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
> >>>>      poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
> >>>>      animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
> >>>>      often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
> >>>>      consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
> >>>>      the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
> >>>>      or are exported.
>
> >>>>    http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>
> >>>> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
> >>>> be bred.
>
> >>>       LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!
>
> >> Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit.  Without the demand for meat for pets,
> >> fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.
>
> > are they all raised for 12 years
>
> I guess you'd have to attend some livestock auctions and ask around,
> Douchebag.


So you're hanging out at livestock auctions now are you, Goobs?


George Plimpton
2011-03-31 13:27:44 EST
On 3/31/2011 10:11 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
> On Mar 31, 8:33 am, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>> On 3/31/2011 8:29 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Mar 30, 12:42 pm, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>>>> On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
>>
>>>>> On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>>
>>>>>> According to the USDA:
>>
>>>>>> The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
>>>>>> decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
>>>>>> nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
>>>>>> declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
>>>>>> population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
>>>>>> poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
>>>>>> animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
>>>>>> often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
>>>>>> consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
>>>>>> the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
>>>>>> or are exported.
>>
>>>>>> http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>>
>>>>>> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
>>>>>> be bred.
>>
>>>>> LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!
>>
>>>> Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit. Without the demand for meat for pets,
>>>> fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.
>>
>>> are they all raised for 12 years
>>
>> I guess you'd have to attend some livestock auctions and ask around,
>> Douchebag.
>
>
> So you're hanging out at livestock auctions now are you

No - never said or implied that I was.

Mr.Smartypants
2011-03-31 15:09:21 EST
On Mar 31, 10:27 am, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
> On 3/31/2011 10:11 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Mar 31, 8:33 am, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not>  wrote:
> >> On 3/31/2011 8:29 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
>
> >>> On Mar 30, 12:42 pm, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not>    wrote:
> >>>> On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
>
> >>>>> On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not>      wrote:
>
> >>>>>> According to the USDA:
>
> >>>>>>       The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
> >>>>>>       decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
> >>>>>>       nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
> >>>>>>       declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
> >>>>>>       population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
> >>>>>>       poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
> >>>>>>       animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
> >>>>>>       often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
> >>>>>>       consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
> >>>>>>       the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
> >>>>>>       or are exported.
>
> >>>>>>    http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>
> >>>>>> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
> >>>>>> be bred.
>
> >>>>>        LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!
>
> >>>> Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit.  Without the demand for meat for pets,
> >>>> fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.
>
> >>> are they all raised for 12 years
>
> >> I guess you'd have to attend some livestock auctions and ask around,
> >> Douchebag.
>
> > So you're hanging out at livestock auctions now are you
>
> No - never said or implied that I was.


So you just make up all your bullshit.


George Plimpton
2011-03-31 15:49:20 EST
On 3/31/2011 12:09 PM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
> On Mar 31, 10:27 am, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>> On 3/31/2011 10:11 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Mar 31, 8:33 am, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>>>> On 3/31/2011 8:29 AM, Mr.Smartypants wrote:
>>
>>>>> On Mar 30, 12:42 pm, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>>>>>> On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
>>
>>>>>>> On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not> wrote:
>>
>>>>>>>> According to the USDA:
>>
>>>>>>>> The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
>>>>>>>> decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
>>>>>>>> nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
>>>>>>>> declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
>>>>>>>> population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
>>>>>>>> poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
>>>>>>>> animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
>>>>>>>> often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
>>>>>>>> consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
>>>>>>>> the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
>>>>>>>> or are exported.
>>
>>>>>>>> http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>>
>>>>>>>> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
>>>>>>>> be bred.
>>
>>>>>>> LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!
>>
>>>>>> Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit. Without the demand for meat for pets,
>>>>>> fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.
>>
>>>>> are they all raised for 12 years
>>
>>>> I guess you'd have to attend some livestock auctions and ask around,
>>>> Douchebag.
>>
>>> So you're hanging out at livestock auctions now are you
>>
>> No - never said or implied that I was.
>
>
> So you just make up

I never said or imply that I hang out at livestock auctions. That's
just another absurd, fuckwitted and wrong inference you made.

D*@.
2011-03-31 21:30:26 EST
On Thu, 31 Mar 2011 08:29:10 -0700 (PDT), "Mr.Smartypants" <bcpg@canada.com>
wrote:

>On Mar 30, 12:42 pm, George Plimpton <geo...@si.not> wrote:
>> On 3/30/2011 1:50 PM, dh@. wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 07:51:28 -0700, George Plimpton<geo...@si.not>  wrote:
>>
>> >> According to the USDA:
>>
>> >>     The U.S. market for lamb and mutton has weakened throughout the
>> >>     decades. Since the 1960s, per capita consumption has dropped from
>> >>     nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound. This is due in part to
>> >>     declining acceptance of lamb from a growing segment of the
>> >>     population, as well as competition from other meats, such as
>> >>     poultry, pork, and beef. Most meat is sold as lamb and comes from
>> >>     animals under 14 months old. Mutton comes from older animals and is
>> >>     often less expensive but less desirable to consumers. U.S. lamb
>> >>     consumers prefer high-quality cuts such as legs and loins. Some of
>> >>     the lower quality, less desirable cuts go to the pet-food industry
>> >>     or are exported.
>>
>> >>    http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Sheep/background.htm
>>
>> >> If there were no pets and thus no pet food industry, fewer sheep would
>> >> be bred.
>>
>> >      LOL! First cattle, then chickens and now sheep!
>>
>> Yep - *all* of 'em, Fuckwit.  Without the demand for meat for pets,
>> fewer of all of them would exist - not in dispute.
>
>
>are they all raised for 12 years like your mythical cow, Goobs?

They're "all" raised for as long as his mythical cow which is zero time,
because "they" don't exist. There's more than enough by-product to feed pets,
which is why there are no cattle or chickens etc raised to be pet food, which is
why the Goobers have not been able to provide examples of any that are. The idea
is idiotic, and even Goo's prize "story" about a supposed pet food cow was a lie
because it said in the story they didn't know the cow's origin. Since this is
just a stupid idea about non-existent animals, Goo can't tell us how long the
supposed animals are raised because they don't exist. So the big question is:
Will the Goober ever figure out how stupid he's being THIS time, and if so how
long will it take him? How long did it take him for the pet food cow? He has
only recently figured it out within the past few weeks or maybe a month, so how
many years did it take him and his boys to finally figure that one out? They may
never figure this one out. LOL... but if they ever do it should be quite amusing
to see how they try to lie their way out of their own stupidity, again.
Page: 1   (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron