Vegetarian Discussion: Stone Soup Story

Stone Soup Story
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Immortalist
2010-10-14 17:01:10 EST
Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty
pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of
their food stores with the hungry travelers. The travelers fill the
pot with water, drop a large stone in it, and place it over a fire in
the village square. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what
they are doing. The travelers answer that they are making "stone
soup", which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of
garnish to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager
does not mind parting with just a little bit of carrot to help them
out, so it gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by,
inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone
soup which has not reached its full potential yet. The villager hands
them a little bit of seasoning to help them out. More and more
villagers walk by, each adding another ingredient. Finally, a
delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all.

Stone Soup is an old folk story in which hungry strangers trick the
people of a town into giving them some food. It is usually told as a
lesson in cooperation, especially amid scarcity. In varying
traditions, the stone has been replaced with other common inedible
objects, and therefore the fable is also known as button soup, wood
soup, nail soup, and axe soup.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_soup

Dr Yacub
2010-10-14 20:55:31 EST


Immortalist wrote:
> [yawn/flush]

Ever have an original thought in your whole pathetic life?

Immortalist
2010-10-14 22:00:58 EST
On Oct 14, 5:55 pm, dr yacub <doctor.ya...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Immortalist wrote:
> > [yawn/flush]
>
> Ever have an original thought

yes i have, how about you?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJPW93jMKzM

2010-10-14 22:31:25 EST
On Oct 15, 5:01 am, Immortalist <reanimater_2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty
> pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of
> their food stores with the hungry travelers. The travelers fill the
> pot with water, drop a large stone  in it, and place it over a fire in
> the village square. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what
> they are doing. The travelers answer that they are making "stone
> soup", which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of
> garnish  to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager
> does not mind parting with just a little bit of carrot to help them
> out, so it gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by,
> inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone
> soup which has not reached its full potential yet. The villager hands
> them a little bit of seasoning  to help them out. More and more
> villagers walk by, each adding another ingredient. Finally, a
> delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all.
>
> Stone Soup is an old folk story  in which hungry strangers trick the
> people of a town into giving them some food. It is usually told as a
> lesson in cooperation, especially amid scarcity. In varying
> traditions, the stone has been replaced with other common inedible
> objects, and therefore the fable is also known as button soup, wood
> soup, nail soup, and axe soup.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_soup

Most in 'our society' would likely settle for just being stoned.

BOfL

Roy Batty
2010-10-15 01:37:23 EST
On Oct 14, 5:01 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty
> pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of
> their food stores with the hungry travelers. The travelers fill the
> pot with water, drop a large stone  in it, and place it over a fire in
> the village square. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what
> they are doing. The travelers answer that they are making "stone
> soup", which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of
> garnish  to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager
> does not mind parting with just a little bit of carrot to help them
> out, so it gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by,
> inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone
> soup which has not reached its full potential yet. The villager hands
> them a little bit of seasoning  to help them out. More and more
> villagers walk by, each adding another ingredient. Finally, a
> delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all.
>
> Stone Soup is an old folk story  in which hungry strangers trick the
> people of a town into giving them some food. It is usually told as a
> lesson in cooperation, especially amid scarcity. In varying
> traditions, the stone has been replaced with other common inedible
> objects, and therefore the fable is also known as button soup, wood
> soup, nail soup, and axe soup.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_soup

Seems like a miserable story. Why would the hungry travelers need to
trick the villagers into giving them food? In my story the travelers
would tell a good trick and be happily fed by their newly found
friends.

Zerkon
2010-10-15 08:04:03 EST
On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 14:01:10 -0700, Immortalist wrote:

> Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty
> pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of
> their food stores with the hungry travelers. The travelers fill the pot
> with water, drop a large stone in it, and place it over a fire in the
> village square. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what they
> are doing. The travelers answer that they are making "stone soup", which
> tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of garnish to
> improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager does not mind
> parting with just a little bit of carrot to help them out, so it gets
> added to the soup. Another villager walks by, inquiring about the pot,
> and the travelers again mention their stone soup which has not reached
> its full potential yet. The villager hands them a little bit of
> seasoning to help them out. More and more villagers walk by, each
> adding another ingredient. Finally, a delicious and nourishing pot of
> soup is enjoyed by all.
>
> Stone Soup is an old folk story in which hungry strangers trick the
> people of a town into giving them some food. It is usually told as a
> lesson in cooperation, especially amid scarcity. In varying traditions,
> the stone has been replaced with other common inedible objects, and
> therefore the fable is also known as button soup, wood soup, nail soup,
> and axe soup.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_soup

The analysis of this story teller is wrong. If the people were tricked
then this is not a lesson of morality nor one which grounds cooperation.
The story can be viewed quite differently.

D*@.
2010-10-17 23:19:46 EST
On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 14:01:10 -0700 (PDT), Immortalist
<reanimater_2000@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty
>pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of
>their food stores with the hungry travelers. The travelers fill the
>pot with water, drop a large stone in it, and place it over a fire in
>the village square. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what
>they are doing. The travelers answer that they are making "stone
>soup", which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of
>garnish to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager
>does not mind parting with just a little bit of carrot to help them
>out, so it gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by,
>inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone
>soup which has not reached its full potential yet. The villager hands
>them a little bit of seasoning

· Vegans contribute to the deaths of animals by their use of
wood and paper products, electricity, roads and all types of
buildings, their own diet, etc... just as everyone else does.
What they try to avoid are products which provide life
(and death) for farm animals, but even then they would have
to avoid the following items containing animal by-products
in order to be successful:

tires, paper, upholstery, floor waxes, glass, water
filters, rubber, fertilizer, antifreeze, ceramics, insecticides,
insulation, linoleum, plastic, textiles, blood factors, collagen,
heparin, insulin, solvents, biodegradable detergents, herbicides,
gelatin capsules, adhesive tape, laminated wood products,
plywood, paneling, wallpaper and wallpaper paste, cellophane
wrap and tape, abrasives, steel ball bearings

The meat industry provides life for the animals that it
slaughters, and the animals live and die as a result of it
as animals do in other habitats. They also depend on it for
their lives as animals do in other habitats. If people consume
animal products from animals they think are raised in decent
ways, they will be promoting life for more such animals in the
future. People who want to contribute to decent lives for
livestock with their lifestyle must do it by being conscientious
consumers of animal products, because they can not do it by
being vegan.
From the life and death of a thousand pound grass raised
steer and whatever he happens to kill during his life, people
get over 500 pounds of human consumable meat...that's well
over 500 servings of meat. From a grass raised dairy cow people
get thousands of dairy servings. Due to the influence of farm
machinery, and *icides, and in the case of rice the flooding and
draining of fields, one serving of soy or rice based product is
likely to involve more animal deaths than hundreds of servings
derived from grass raised animals. Grass raised animal products
contribute to fewer wildlife deaths, better wildlife habitat, and
better lives for livestock than soy or rice products. ·

Tunderbar
2010-10-18 09:48:34 EST
On Oct 14, 4:01 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty
> pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of
> their food stores with the hungry travelers. The travelers fill the
> pot with water, drop a large stone  in it, and place it over a fire in
> the village square. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what
> they are doing. The travelers answer that they are making "stone
> soup", which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of
> garnish  to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager
> does not mind parting with just a little bit of carrot to help them
> out, so it gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by,
> inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone
> soup which has not reached its full potential yet. The villager hands
> them a little bit of seasoning  to help them out. More and more
> villagers walk by, each adding another ingredient. Finally, a
> delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all.
>
> Stone Soup is an old folk story  in which hungry strangers trick the
> people of a town into giving them some food. It is usually told as a
> lesson in cooperation, especially amid scarcity. In varying
> traditions, the stone has been replaced with other common inedible
> objects, and therefore the fable is also known as button soup, wood
> soup, nail soup, and axe soup.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_soup

Are you suggesting that 2 trillion dollars a year to the UN by 2030 is
a triffling?

Dutch
2010-10-19 13:03:26 EST
<*h@.> wrote
> The meat industry provides life for the animals that it
> slaughters

It does no such thing.

Patricia Aldoraz
2010-10-19 17:39:29 EST
On Oct 15, 11:55 am, dr yacub <doctor.ya...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Immortalist wrote:
> > [yawn/flush]
>
> Ever have an original thought in your whole pathetic life?

That's not very nice! In this case immortalist is simply socialising
and telling a nice story, he is not even trying to make any kind of
philosphical offering.Perhaps we need to cut him some slack here. We
all need resident trolls (that's my choice roll), and we need a
jester, someone that entertains with tales.
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