Vegetarian Discussion: Meat-based Diet Made Us Smarter

Meat-based Diet Made Us Smarter
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Dave U. Random
2010-08-09 11:35:20 EST
(NPR) - Our earliest ancestors ate their food raw \ufffd fruit, leaves,
maybe some nuts. When they ventured down onto land, they added
things like underground tubers, roots and berries.

It wasn't a very high-calorie diet, so to get the energy you
needed, you had to eat a lot and have a big gut to digest it all.
But having a big gut has its drawbacks.

"You can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time,"
explains Leslie Aiello, an anthropologist and director of the
Wenner-Gren Foundation in New York City, which funds research on
evolution. Digestion, she says, was the energy-hog of our primate
ancestor's body. The brain was the poor stepsister who got the
leftovers.

Until, that is, we discovered meat...

Continued: http://sn.im/EatMeat


D*@.
2010-08-09 22:07:38 EST
On Mon, 9 Aug 2010 17:35:20 +0200 (CEST), Dave U. Random
<*s@anonymitaet-im-inter.net> wrote:

>(NPR) - Our earliest ancestors ate their food raw — fruit, leaves,
>maybe some nuts. When they ventured down onto land, they added
>things like underground tubers, roots and berries.
>
>It wasn't a very high-calorie diet, so to get the energy you
>needed, you had to eat a lot and have a big gut to digest it all.
>But having a big gut has its drawbacks.
>
>"You can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time,"
>explains Leslie Aiello, an anthropologist and director of the
>Wenner-Gren Foundation in New York City, which funds research on
>evolution. Digestion, she says, was the energy-hog of our primate
>ancestor's body. The brain was the poor stepsister who got the
>leftovers.
>
>Until, that is, we discovered meat...
>
>Continued: http://sn.im/EatMeat

It also allowed humans to move into areas where there was not
enough good vegetation to support humans, and to cross seas and
oceans, etc... Hunting also taught humans to act as a group, and
probably was the reason humans learned to develop language.

Funkenstein
2010-08-16 03:00:45 EST
On Aug 10, 4:07 am, dh@. wrote:
> On Mon,  9 Aug 2010 17:35:20 +0200 (CEST), Dave U. Random
>
>
>
> <anonym...@anonymitaet-im-inter.net> wrote:
> >(NPR) - Our earliest ancestors ate their food raw — fruit, leaves,
> >maybe some nuts. When they ventured down onto land, they added
> >things like underground tubers, roots and berries.
>
> >It wasn't a very high-calorie diet, so to get the energy you
> >needed, you had to eat a lot and have a big gut to digest it all.
> >But having a big gut has its drawbacks.
>
> >"You can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time,"
> >explains Leslie Aiello, an anthropologist and director of the
> >Wenner-Gren Foundation in New York City, which funds research on
> >evolution. Digestion, she says, was the energy-hog of our primate
> >ancestor's body. The brain was the poor stepsister who got the
> >leftovers.

Lol.. can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time? Sounds
very scientific. Somebody should tell her what order homo sapiens
sapiens belong to.


>
> >Until, that is, we discovered meat...
>
> >Continued:http://sn.im/EatMeat
>
>     It also allowed humans to move into areas where there was not
> enough good vegetation to support humans, and to cross seas and
> oceans, etc...

Very good point.

> Hunting also taught humans to act as a group, and
> probably was the reason humans learned to develop language.

Debatable. Evidence from songbirds would say otherwise.. language
development has many facets.



Richard Leakey IV
2010-08-17 00:47:50 EST
On Aug 16, 12:00 am, funkenstein <luke.s...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Aug 10, 4:07 am, dh@. wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Mon,  9 Aug 2010 17:35:20 +0200 (CEST), Dave U. Random
>
> > <anonym...@anonymitaet-im-inter.net> wrote:
> > >(NPR) - Our earliest ancestors ate their food raw — fruit, leaves,
> > >maybe some nuts. When they ventured down onto land, they added
> > >things like underground tubers, roots and berries.
>
> > >It wasn't a very high-calorie diet, so to get the energy you
> > >needed, you had to eat a lot and have a big gut to digest it all.
> > >But having a big gut has its drawbacks.
>
> > >"You can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time,"
> > >explains Leslie Aiello, an anthropologist and director of the
> > >Wenner-Gren Foundation in New York City, which funds research on
> > >evolution. Digestion, she says, was the energy-hog of our primate
> > >ancestor's body. The brain was the poor stepsister who got the
> > >leftovers.
>
> Lol..  can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time?  Sounds
> very scientific.  Somebody should tell her what order homo sapiens
> sapiens belong to.

Someone should tell *you* that between order and species, there are
FOUR additional taxonomic classifications. We are far removed from
other primates.

Which other primates, specifically, do you think have large brains
along with big guts?


>
> > >Until, that is, we discovered meat...
>
> > >Continued:http://sn.im/EatMeat
>
> >     It also allowed humans to move into areas where there was not
> > enough good vegetation to support humans, and to cross seas and
> > oceans, etc...
>
> Very good point.
>
> > Hunting also taught humans to act as a group, and
> > probably was the reason humans learned to develop language.
>
> Debatable.  Evidence from songbirds would say otherwise.. language
> development has many facets.

Songbirds do not use language. Songbirds advertise sexual signals;
nothing more. Bees and ants probably engage in something closer to
language than songbirds do. Bees and ants communicate fairly precise
information about the location of food and threats.

Crisology
2010-08-17 06:31:32 EST
On Aug 10, 12:07 pm, dh@. wrote:


>
> Hunting also taught humans to act as a group

Humans taught hunting, hunting didn't teach humans. u have it all
backwards. Humans ADOPTED hunting and CREATED tools. Humans didn't
ADAPT to hunting and tools didn't create humans.

Humans still get sick consuming meat.

Chris


Crisology
2010-08-17 06:34:38 EST
On Aug 17, 2:47 pm, Richard Leakey IV <notgen...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>
> between order and species, there are
> FOUR additional taxonomic classifications.  We are far removed from
> other primates.

What far out reason do u believe humans are carnivores? ALL hominoidea
digest fruit best with opposing digestive processes to meat
consumption and fruit reverses meat diseases.

Chris

Funkenstein
2010-08-17 07:15:07 EST
On Aug 17, 6:47 am, Richard Leakey IV <notgen...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Aug 16, 12:00 am, funkenstein <luke.s...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Aug 10, 4:07 am, dh@. wrote:
>
> > > On Mon,  9 Aug 2010 17:35:20 +0200 (CEST), Dave U. Random
>
> > > <anonym...@anonymitaet-im-inter.net> wrote:
> > > >(NPR) - Our earliest ancestors ate their food raw — fruit, leaves,
> > > >maybe some nuts. When they ventured down onto land, they added
> > > >things like underground tubers, roots and berries.
>
> > > >It wasn't a very high-calorie diet, so to get the energy you
> > > >needed, you had to eat a lot and have a big gut to digest it all.
> > > >But having a big gut has its drawbacks.
>
> > > >"You can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time,"
> > > >explains Leslie Aiello, an anthropologist and director of the
> > > >Wenner-Gren Foundation in New York City, which funds research on
> > > >evolution. Digestion, she says, was the energy-hog of our primate
> > > >ancestor's body. The brain was the poor stepsister who got the
> > > >leftovers.
>
> > Lol..  can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time?  Sounds
> > very scientific.  Somebody should tell her what order homo sapiens
> > sapiens belong to.
>
> Someone should tell *you* that between order and species, there are
> FOUR additional taxonomic classifications.  We are far removed from
> other primates.
>

Well thanks for telling me :) What are the other two besides family
and genus?
Does that mean I'm far removed from the other primates who I share the
office with?

> Which other primates, specifically, do you think have large brains
> along with big guts?
>

I had one professor, who I won't mention by name, who fits that
description.


>
>
> > > >Until, that is, we discovered meat...
>
> > > >Continued:http://sn.im/EatMeat
>
> > >     It also allowed humans to move into areas where there was not
> > > enough good vegetation to support humans, and to cross seas and
> > > oceans, etc...
>
> > Very good point.
>
> > > Hunting also taught humans to act as a group, and
> > > probably was the reason humans learned to develop language.
>
> > Debatable.  Evidence from songbirds would say otherwise.. language
> > development has many facets.
>
> Songbirds do not use language.  Songbirds advertise sexual signals;
> nothing more.  Bees and ants probably engage in something closer to
> language than songbirds do.  Bees and ants communicate fairly precise
> information about the location of food and threats.


Good point, thank you. Bird songs do develop and are passed on to
next generations as language is but there is a difference you say.
I would have made my point better with bees and ants as you suggest.

Cheers -

Crisology
2010-08-17 07:17:50 EST
On Aug 10, 1:35 am, Dave U. Random <anonym...@anonymitaet-im-
inter.net> wrote:

> "You can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time,"

Non sequitor and fallacy of bifurcation. Guts and brains are not
mutually exclusive, nor do humans require large brains or guts to
digest fruit best.

But humans need large brains to develop medication and chemotherapy to
treat meat diseases.

Chris

D*@.
2010-08-19 10:03:04 EST
On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 00:00:45 -0700 (PDT), funkenstein
<*l@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Aug 10, 4:07 am, dh@. wrote:
>> On Mon,  9 Aug 2010 17:35:20 +0200 (CEST), Dave U. Random
>>
>>
>>
>> <anonym...@anonymitaet-im-inter.net> wrote:
>> >(NPR) - Our earliest ancestors ate their food raw — fruit, leaves,
>> >maybe some nuts. When they ventured down onto land, they added
>> >things like underground tubers, roots and berries.
>>
>> >It wasn't a very high-calorie diet, so to get the energy you
>> >needed, you had to eat a lot and have a big gut to digest it all.
>> >But having a big gut has its drawbacks.
>>
>> >"You can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time,"
>> >explains Leslie Aiello, an anthropologist and director of the
>> >Wenner-Gren Foundation in New York City, which funds research on
>> >evolution. Digestion, she says, was the energy-hog of our primate
>> >ancestor's body. The brain was the poor stepsister who got the
>> >leftovers.
>
>Lol.. can't have a large brain and big guts at the same time? Sounds
>very scientific. Somebody should tell her what order homo sapiens
>sapiens belong to.
>
>
>>
>> >Until, that is, we discovered meat...
>>
>> >Continued:http://sn.im/EatMeat
>>
>>     It also allowed humans to move into areas where there was not
>> enough good vegetation to support humans, and to cross seas and
>> oceans, etc...
>
>Very good point.
>
>> Hunting also taught humans to act as a group, and
>> probably was the reason humans learned to develop language.
>
>Debatable. Evidence from songbirds would say otherwise.. language
>development has many facets.

I don't believe any other species are known to naturally have
even a basic two word sentence. That suprised me. I thought
whales and dolphins had at least simple basic discussions, but I
guess they don't even have that. Lots of animals make signals
that mean one thing, but not "sentences" that convey a number of
ideas making them capable of actual language.
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