Vegetarian Discussion: Unilever Targeted In Orang-utan Protest

Unilever Targeted In Orang-utan Protest
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Old Codger
2008-04-22 03:24:25 EST
Unilever targeted in orang-utan protest
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/apr/21/wildlife
David Batty and agencies guardian.co.uk, Monday April 21 2008

Greenpeace protesters dressed as orangutans demonstrate outside
Unilever's central London headquarters. Photograph: John Melhuish/Rex
Features

Environmental protesters dressed as orang-utans today staged
demonstrations against the consumer goods giant Unilever to highlight
the destruction of the Indonesian rainforest.

More than 50 Greenpeace activists staged protests at two Unilever
sites – a factory in Port Sunlight, on Merseyside, and at the
Anglo-Dutch conglomerate's headquarters, Unilever House, on Victoria
Embankment, in London.

The protests coincided with the publication of a Greenpeace report
linking Unilever to the destruction of the endangered orang-utan's
habitat.

The report, called Burning Up Borneo, says companies that supply
Unilever with palm oil are destroying the Indonesian rainforest.

Greenpeace links the majority of the largest palm oil producers in
Indonesia to Unilever, which it says is probably the largest corporate
consumer of the oil in the world.

James Turner, a spokesman for Greenpeace at the Victoria Embankment
protest, said eight people dressed as orang-utans had climbed ladders
to reach a seven metre-high balcony above the entrance of Unilever
House at 7.35am.

"It is going fairly well," he added. "We have got a lot of staff to
talk to and a lot did not know about the destruction of the
rainforest.

"Companies supplying palm oil are destroying the habitats of
orang-utans and massively accelerating climate change."

Campaigners at the Merseyside protest claimed to have stopped
production of some of the company's products.

"This is the start of a really big campaign," Sarah Shoraka, an
activist, said. "We want Unilever to stop trading with companies that
destroy the rainforest to supply palm oil used to make cleaning
products.

"They buy from suppliers who are trashing rainforest areas and
habitats for orang-utans. These areas should really be protected.

"Some of the people here are chained to machinery and we have stopped
production for some brands. We will stay here as long as possible
before we are moved."

A spokeswoman for Merseyside police said officers had been called by
the company at 6.45am. "We are aware of the protest and we are
assessing the circumstances," she said.

Unilever said it was addressing many of the concerns Greenpeace had
voiced about the expansion of palm oil production.

The company heads the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil coalition of
organisations, which includes Oxfam, WWF, plantation owners,
manufacturers and retailers.

It has produced criteria for sustainable palm oil production.


Pearl
2008-05-11 05:14:11 EST
How to Keep Your Home Clean Naturally
February 26, 2008,
..
The cleaner your home is, the unhealthier it may be, because of toxic
cleaning products made from petroleum-based chemicals.

Many of these commercial cleaning products contain dangerous chemicals
that are not listed on the label. A manufacturer can omit any ingredient that
is considered a secret formula from its label, and many of these secret
ingredients are toxic and carcinogenic.

Beware that many cleaning products are now saying they are "Green" or
"Eco Friendly," and are now on the Green bandwagon. This is called Green
Wash, but make sure you read labels and research all product claims.

You can reduce your chemical exposure by eliminating chemicals in your
home, and using only natural cleaning products that are plant based.
There are many safe cleaning products like Ecover, Mrs. Meyers, Seventh
Generation, Sun & Earth, and Orange Plus. Even though they are more
expensive, they are more concentrated, and worth it because they are safe.

Another alternative is to make your own natural cleaning products. Using
homemade natural cleaning products makes "cents," because it is cheaper,
healthier and non-toxic, and it is fun.

The 2008 Building Biology Conference: Building the Way Nature Intended

Join the international movement of individuals who are rebuilding the built
environment into one that n urtures and restores human life.

Learn More...

To clean with natural products all you need is:

* Baking soda

* Vinegar

* Borax

* Hydrogen peroxide

* Liquid castile soap

* Organic essential oils (optional)

* Mixing bowls

* Spray bottles

* Micro fiber cloths

* Vodka (optional)

Baking Soda is great to scrub your bath and kitchen. Put it in a glass
grated cheese container with a stainless steel top that has holes in it, and
just sprinkle the baking soda on the surfaces and scrub. You may add a
few drops of your favorite essential oil to this. Lavender and tea tree oil
have anti-bacterial qualities.

Baking soda mixed with apple cider vinegar is a bubbly combination
that has many uses. As a drain cleaner, sprinkle baking soda down the
drain then add apple cider vinegar and let it bubble for 15 minutes, then
rinse with hot water. This is a safer alternative to dangerous drain cleaners.
Baking soda and apple cider make a wonderful spa-like bath for soaking
away aches and pains and detoxing. It also cleans the tub and the drain.

Baking soda can also be used as a fabric softener in your laundry.

To polish silver, instead of using toxic silver polish, fill your kitchen sink
with hot water, add a sheet of aluminum foil and baking soda, and let the
silver pieces soak until clean. It is an easy and fun way to clean silver.

Vinegar can clean almost anything in your house; you can add liquid
castile soap, essential oil (optional), and filtered water, then clean floors,
windows, bath, kitchen, etc. Vinegar can also be used as a fabric softener.
Never use dryer sheets -- they are toxic too. In the laundry, use vinegar in
the wash cycle to prevent fabrics from fading.

Commercial window cleaners contain butyl cellosolve -- a toxic ingredient
that is not listed on the labels, so vinegar and water is much safer. Use a
micro fabric cloth, not newspaper, which contains toxic dyes.

Borax is a good laundry booster and cleaner (it can even remove mold) --
and is safe and non-toxic.

Hydrogen peroxide is a disinfectant, and is safer to use than chlorine bleach
for disinfecting and whitening. Lemon juice is also a natural whitener.

Liquid Castile Soaps can be found in health food stores and are safer than
commercial liquid cleaning products.

Organic essential oils may be used in homemade cleaning products
depending on your personal preference and tolerance to these scents.
Never use synthetic fragrances or air cleaners.

Commercial fabric refreshers also contain dangerous chemicals, therefore,
use vodka in a spray bottle to freshen up chairs and upholstery. The vodka
is cheaper, non-toxic and the alcohol evaporates, and is not harmful. The
alcohol in hand sanitizers is harmful, however, and should not be used on
children since the alcohol absorbs into your body via your skin. Therefore,
use only hand sanitizers that are plant based from the health food store, or
just good old soap and water.

Making your own natural cleaning products is rewarding and fun, and you
can use the natural scents that you prefer while ensuring that your home is
safe from dangerous chemicals that are harmful to your, and your family\ufffds,
health.

http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_10596.cfm

__._,_.___


"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwherewilldo.com> wrote in message news:6f4r04pb02pur528rqqnmo1j9t6edbotvi@4ax.com...
> Unilever targeted in orang-utan protest
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/apr/21/wildlife
> David Batty and agencies guardian.co.uk, Monday April 21 2008
>
> Greenpeace protesters dressed as orangutans demonstrate outside
> Unilever's central London headquarters. Photograph: John Melhuish/Rex
> Features
>
> Environmental protesters dressed as orang-utans today staged
> demonstrations against the consumer goods giant Unilever to highlight
> the destruction of the Indonesian rainforest.
>
> More than 50 Greenpeace activists staged protests at two Unilever
> sites \ufffd a factory in Port Sunlight, on Merseyside, and at the
> Anglo-Dutch conglomerate's headquarters, Unilever House, on Victoria
> Embankment, in London.
>
> The protests coincided with the publication of a Greenpeace report
> linking Unilever to the destruction of the endangered orang-utan's
> habitat.
>
> The report, called Burning Up Borneo, says companies that supply
> Unilever with palm oil are destroying the Indonesian rainforest.
>
> Greenpeace links the majority of the largest palm oil producers in
> Indonesia to Unilever, which it says is probably the largest corporate
> consumer of the oil in the world.
>
> James Turner, a spokesman for Greenpeace at the Victoria Embankment
> protest, said eight people dressed as orang-utans had climbed ladders
> to reach a seven metre-high balcony above the entrance of Unilever
> House at 7.35am.
>
> "It is going fairly well," he added. "We have got a lot of staff to
> talk to and a lot did not know about the destruction of the
> rainforest.
>
> "Companies supplying palm oil are destroying the habitats of
> orang-utans and massively accelerating climate change."
>
> Campaigners at the Merseyside protest claimed to have stopped
> production of some of the company's products.
>
> "This is the start of a really big campaign," Sarah Shoraka, an
> activist, said. "We want Unilever to stop trading with companies that
> destroy the rainforest to supply palm oil used to make cleaning
> products.
>
> "They buy from suppliers who are trashing rainforest areas and
> habitats for orang-utans. These areas should really be protected.
>
> "Some of the people here are chained to machinery and we have stopped
> production for some brands. We will stay here as long as possible
> before we are moved."
>
> A spokeswoman for Merseyside police said officers had been called by
> the company at 6.45am. "We are aware of the protest and we are
> assessing the circumstances," she said.
>
> Unilever said it was addressing many of the concerns Greenpeace had
> voiced about the expansion of palm oil production.
>
> The company heads the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil coalition of
> organisations, which includes Oxfam, WWF, plantation owners,
> manufacturers and retailers.
>
> It has produced criteria for sustainable palm oil production.
>



Pearl
2008-05-11 05:23:00 EST
How to Keep Your Home Clean Naturally
February 26, 2008,
..
The cleaner your home is, the unhealthier it may be, because of toxic
cleaning products made from petroleum-based chemicals.

Many of these commercial cleaning products contain dangerous chemicals
that are not listed on the label. A manufacturer can omit any ingredient that
is considered a secret formula from its label, and many of these secret
ingredients are toxic and carcinogenic.

Beware that many cleaning products are now saying they are "Green" or
"Eco Friendly," and are now on the Green bandwagon. This is called Green
Wash, but make sure you read labels and research all product claims.

You can reduce your chemical exposure by eliminating chemicals in your
home, and using only natural cleaning products that are plant based.
There are many safe cleaning products like Ecover, Mrs. Meyers, Seventh
Generation, Sun & Earth, and Orange Plus. Even though they are more
expensive, they are more concentrated, and worth it because they are safe.

Another alternative is to make your own natural cleaning products. Using
homemade natural cleaning products makes "cents," because it is cheaper,
healthier and non-toxic, and it is fun.

The 2008 Building Biology Conference: Building the Way Nature Intended

Join the international movement of individuals who are rebuilding the built
environment into one that n urtures and restores human life.

Learn More...

To clean with natural products all you need is:

* Baking soda

* Vinegar

* Borax

* Hydrogen peroxide

* Liquid castile soap

* Organic essential oils (optional)

* Mixing bowls

* Spray bottles

* Micro fiber cloths

* Vodka (optional)

Baking Soda is great to scrub your bath and kitchen. Put it in a glass
grated cheese container with a stainless steel top that has holes in it, and
just sprinkle the baking soda on the surfaces and scrub. You may add a
few drops of your favorite essential oil to this. Lavender and tea tree oil
have anti-bacterial qualities.

Baking soda mixed with apple cider vinegar is a bubbly combination
that has many uses. As a drain cleaner, sprinkle baking soda down the
drain then add apple cider vinegar and let it bubble for 15 minutes, then
rinse with hot water. This is a safer alternative to dangerous drain cleaners.
Baking soda and apple cider make a wonderful spa-like bath for soaking
away aches and pains and detoxing. It also cleans the tub and the drain.

Baking soda can also be used as a fabric softener in your laundry.

To polish silver, instead of using toxic silver polish, fill your kitchen sink
with hot water, add a sheet of aluminum foil and baking soda, and let the
silver pieces soak until clean. It is an easy and fun way to clean silver.

Vinegar can clean almost anything in your house; you can add liquid
castile soap, essential oil (optional), and filtered water, then clean floors,
windows, bath, kitchen, etc. Vinegar can also be used as a fabric softener.
Never use dryer sheets -- they are toxic too. In the laundry, use vinegar in
the wash cycle to prevent fabrics from fading.

Commercial window cleaners contain butyl cellosolve -- a toxic ingredient
that is not listed on the labels, so vinegar and water is much safer. Use a
micro fabric cloth, not newspaper, which contains toxic dyes.

Borax is a good laundry booster and cleaner (it can even remove mold) --
and is safe and non-toxic.

Hydrogen peroxide is a disinfectant, and is safer to use than chlorine bleach
for disinfecting and whitening. Lemon juice is also a natural whitener.

Liquid Castile Soaps can be found in health food stores and are safer than
commercial liquid cleaning products.

Organic essential oils may be used in homemade cleaning products
depending on your personal preference and tolerance to these scents.
Never use synthetic fragrances or air cleaners.

Commercial fabric refreshers also contain dangerous chemicals, therefore,
use vodka in a spray bottle to freshen up chairs and upholstery. The vodka
is cheaper, non-toxic and the alcohol evaporates, and is not harmful. The
alcohol in hand sanitizers is harmful, however, and should not be used on
children since the alcohol absorbs into your body via your skin. Therefore,
use only hand sanitizers that are plant based from the health food store, or
just good old soap and water.

Making your own natural cleaning products is rewarding and fun, and you
can use the natural scents that you prefer while ensuring that your home is
safe from dangerous chemicals that are harmful to your, and your family's,
health.

http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_10596.cfm

__._,_.___


"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwherewilldo.com> wrote in message news:6f4r04pb02pur528rqqnmo1j9t6edbotvi@4ax.com...
> Unilever targeted in orang-utan protest
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/apr/21/wildlife
> David Batty and agencies guardian.co.uk, Monday April 21 2008
>
> Greenpeace protesters dressed as orangutans demonstrate outside
> Unilever's central London headquarters. Photograph: John Melhuish/Rex
> Features
>
> Environmental protesters dressed as orang-utans today staged
> demonstrations against the consumer goods giant Unilever to highlight
> the destruction of the Indonesian rainforest.
>
> More than 50 Greenpeace activists staged protests at two Unilever
> sites - a factory in Port Sunlight, on Merseyside, and at the
> Anglo-Dutch conglomerate's headquarters, Unilever House, on Victoria
> Embankment, in London.
>
> The protests coincided with the publication of a Greenpeace report
> linking Unilever to the destruction of the endangered orang-utan's
> habitat.
>
> The report, called Burning Up Borneo, says companies that supply
> Unilever with palm oil are destroying the Indonesian rainforest.
>
> Greenpeace links the majority of the largest palm oil producers in
> Indonesia to Unilever, which it says is probably the largest corporate
> consumer of the oil in the world.
>
> James Turner, a spokesman for Greenpeace at the Victoria Embankment
> protest, said eight people dressed as orang-utans had climbed ladders
> to reach a seven metre-high balcony above the entrance of Unilever
> House at 7.35am.
>
> "It is going fairly well," he added. "We have got a lot of staff to
> talk to and a lot did not know about the destruction of the
> rainforest.
>
> "Companies supplying palm oil are destroying the habitats of
> orang-utans and massively accelerating climate change."
>
> Campaigners at the Merseyside protest claimed to have stopped
> production of some of the company's products.
>
> "This is the start of a really big campaign," Sarah Shoraka, an
> activist, said. "We want Unilever to stop trading with companies that
> destroy the rainforest to supply palm oil used to make cleaning
> products.
>
> "They buy from suppliers who are trashing rainforest areas and
> habitats for orang-utans. These areas should really be protected.
>
> "Some of the people here are chained to machinery and we have stopped
> production for some brands. We will stay here as long as possible
> before we are moved."
>
> A spokeswoman for Merseyside police said officers had been called by
> the company at 6.45am. "We are aware of the protest and we are
> assessing the circumstances," she said.
>
> Unilever said it was addressing many of the concerns Greenpeace had
> voiced about the expansion of palm oil production.
>
> The company heads the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil coalition of
> organisations, which includes Oxfam, WWF, plantation owners,
> manufacturers and retailers.
>
> It has produced criteria for sustainable palm oil production.
>





Old Codger
2008-05-11 06:21:45 EST
On Sun, 11 May 2008 10:14:11 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
wrote:

>How to Keep Your Home Clean Naturally
>February 26, 2008,
>..
>The cleaner your home is, the unhealthier it may be, because of toxic
>cleaning products made from petroleum-based chemicals.
>
>Many of these commercial cleaning products contain dangerous chemicals
>that are not listed on the label. A manufacturer can omit any ingredient that
>is considered a secret formula from its label, and many of these secret
>ingredients are toxic and carcinogenic.
>
>Beware that many cleaning products are now saying they are "Green" or
>"Eco Friendly," and are now on the Green bandwagon. This is called Green
>Wash, but make sure you read labels and research all product claims.
>
>You can reduce your chemical exposure by eliminating chemicals in your
>home, and using only natural cleaning products that are plant based.
>There are many safe cleaning products like Ecover,

Though Ecover are NOT vegan despite their lies in the past and their
subsequent spluttering once exposed.

see http://tinyurl.com/3ogvs2

> Mrs. Meyers, Seventh
>Generation, Sun & Earth, and Orange Plus. Even though they are more
>expensive, they are more concentrated, and worth it because they are safe.
>
>Another alternative is to make your own natural cleaning products. Using
>homemade natural cleaning products makes "cents," because it is cheaper,
>healthier and non-toxic, and it is fun.
>
>The 2008 Building Biology Conference: Building the Way Nature Intended
>
>Join the international movement of individuals who are rebuilding the built
>environment into one that n urtures and restores human life.
>
>Learn More...
>
>To clean with natural products all you need is:
>
>* Baking soda
>
>* Vinegar
>
>* Borax
>
>* Hydrogen peroxide
>
>* Liquid castile soap
>
>* Organic essential oils (optional)
>
>* Mixing bowls
>
>* Spray bottles
>
>* Micro fiber cloths
>
>* Vodka (optional)
>
>Baking Soda is great to scrub your bath and kitchen. Put it in a glass
>grated cheese container with a stainless steel top that has holes in it, and
>just sprinkle the baking soda on the surfaces and scrub. You may add a
>few drops of your favorite essential oil to this. Lavender and tea tree oil
>have anti-bacterial qualities.
>
>Baking soda mixed with apple cider vinegar is a bubbly combination
>that has many uses. As a drain cleaner, sprinkle baking soda down the
>drain then add apple cider vinegar and let it bubble for 15 minutes, then
>rinse with hot water. This is a safer alternative to dangerous drain cleaners.
>Baking soda and apple cider make a wonderful spa-like bath for soaking
>away aches and pains and detoxing. It also cleans the tub and the drain.
>
>Baking soda can also be used as a fabric softener in your laundry.
>
>To polish silver, instead of using toxic silver polish, fill your kitchen sink
>with hot water, add a sheet of aluminum foil and baking soda, and let the
>silver pieces soak until clean. It is an easy and fun way to clean silver.
>
>Vinegar can clean almost anything in your house; you can add liquid
>castile soap, essential oil (optional), and filtered water, then clean floors,
>windows, bath, kitchen, etc. Vinegar can also be used as a fabric softener.
>Never use dryer sheets -- they are toxic too. In the laundry, use vinegar in
>the wash cycle to prevent fabrics from fading.
>
>Commercial window cleaners contain butyl cellosolve -- a toxic ingredient
>that is not listed on the labels, so vinegar and water is much safer. Use a
>micro fabric cloth, not newspaper, which contains toxic dyes.
>
>Borax is a good laundry booster and cleaner (it can even remove mold) --
>and is safe and non-toxic.
>
>Hydrogen peroxide is a disinfectant, and is safer to use than chlorine bleach
>for disinfecting and whitening. Lemon juice is also a natural whitener.
>
>Liquid Castile Soaps can be found in health food stores and are safer than
>commercial liquid cleaning products.
>
>Organic essential oils may be used in homemade cleaning products
>depending on your personal preference and tolerance to these scents.
>Never use synthetic fragrances or air cleaners.
>
>Commercial fabric refreshers also contain dangerous chemicals, therefore,
>use vodka in a spray bottle to freshen up chairs and upholstery. The vodka
>is cheaper, non-toxic and the alcohol evaporates, and is not harmful. The
>alcohol in hand sanitizers is harmful, however, and should not be used on
>children since the alcohol absorbs into your body via your skin. Therefore,
>use only hand sanitizers that are plant based from the health food store, or
>just good old soap and water.
>
>Making your own natural cleaning products is rewarding and fun, and you
>can use the natural scents that you prefer while ensuring that your home is
>safe from dangerous chemicals that are harmful to your, and your family’s,
>health.
>
>http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_10596.cfm
>
>__._,_.___
>
>
>"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwherewilldo.com> wrote in message news:6f4r04pb02pur528rqqnmo1j9t6edbotvi@4ax.com...
>> Unilever targeted in orang-utan protest
>> http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/apr/21/wildlife
>> David Batty and agencies guardian.co.uk, Monday April 21 2008
>>
>> Greenpeace protesters dressed as orangutans demonstrate outside
>> Unilever's central London headquarters. Photograph: John Melhuish/Rex
>> Features
>>
>> Environmental protesters dressed as orang-utans today staged
>> demonstrations against the consumer goods giant Unilever to highlight
>> the destruction of the Indonesian rainforest.
>>
>> More than 50 Greenpeace activists staged protests at two Unilever
>> sites – a factory in Port Sunlight, on Merseyside, and at the
>> Anglo-Dutch conglomerate's headquarters, Unilever House, on Victoria
>> Embankment, in London.
>>
>> The protests coincided with the publication of a Greenpeace report
>> linking Unilever to the destruction of the endangered orang-utan's
>> habitat.
>>
>> The report, called Burning Up Borneo, says companies that supply
>> Unilever with palm oil are destroying the Indonesian rainforest.
>>
>> Greenpeace links the majority of the largest palm oil producers in
>> Indonesia to Unilever, which it says is probably the largest corporate
>> consumer of the oil in the world.
>>
>> James Turner, a spokesman for Greenpeace at the Victoria Embankment
>> protest, said eight people dressed as orang-utans had climbed ladders
>> to reach a seven metre-high balcony above the entrance of Unilever
>> House at 7.35am.
>>
>> "It is going fairly well," he added. "We have got a lot of staff to
>> talk to and a lot did not know about the destruction of the
>> rainforest.
>>
>> "Companies supplying palm oil are destroying the habitats of
>> orang-utans and massively accelerating climate change."
>>
>> Campaigners at the Merseyside protest claimed to have stopped
>> production of some of the company's products.
>>
>> "This is the start of a really big campaign," Sarah Shoraka, an
>> activist, said. "We want Unilever to stop trading with companies that
>> destroy the rainforest to supply palm oil used to make cleaning
>> products.
>>
>> "They buy from suppliers who are trashing rainforest areas and
>> habitats for orang-utans. These areas should really be protected.
>>
>> "Some of the people here are chained to machinery and we have stopped
>> production for some brands. We will stay here as long as possible
>> before we are moved."
>>
>> A spokeswoman for Merseyside police said officers had been called by
>> the company at 6.45am. "We are aware of the protest and we are
>> assessing the circumstances," she said.
>>
>> Unilever said it was addressing many of the concerns Greenpeace had
>> voiced about the expansion of palm oil production.
>>
>> The company heads the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil coalition of
>> organisations, which includes Oxfam, WWF, plantation owners,
>> manufacturers and retailers.
>>
>> It has produced criteria for sustainable palm oil production.
>>
>


Some great eco friendly tips in a book called *Haley's cleaning hints*
by Graham and Rosemary Haley.
see http://tinyurl.com/52gj3r

Pearl
2008-05-11 07:12:36 EST
"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwhere.net> wrote in message news:athd2413drneinqqb2ul7nk29ni7ip4t9i@4ax.com...

<..>

> Some great eco friendly tips in a book called *Haley's cleaning hints*
> by Graham and Rosemary Haley.
> see http://tinyurl.com/52gj3r

Excellent, thanks. I suppose I'd better get on with it... :)



Old Codger
2008-05-11 07:18:01 EST
On Sun, 11 May 2008 12:12:36 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
wrote:

>"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwhere.net> wrote in message news:athd2413drneinqqb2ul7nk29ni7ip4t9i@4ax.com...
>
><..>
>
>> Some great eco friendly tips in a book called *Haley's cleaning hints*
>> by Graham and Rosemary Haley.
>> see http://tinyurl.com/52gj3r
>
>Excellent, thanks. I suppose I'd better get on with it... :)
>

You get the book first and you start at your leisure :)


Pearl
2008-05-11 07:42:15 EST
"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwhere.net> wrote in message news:aeld24tj1vhtkkfa6mhhqc3uf6g84dhhk8@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 11 May 2008 12:12:36 +0100, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
> wrote:
>
> >"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwhere.net> wrote in message news:athd2413drneinqqb2ul7nk29ni7ip4t9i@4ax.com...
> >
> ><..>
> >
> >> Some great eco friendly tips in a book called *Haley's cleaning hints*
> >> by Graham and Rosemary Haley.
> >> see http://tinyurl.com/52gj3r
> >
> >Excellent, thanks. I suppose I'd better get on with it... :)
> >
>
> You get the book first and you start at your leisure :)

I *will* get the book, but need a dust and dirt free zone "yesterday"
- some oil paintings to do mucho pronto for upcoming exhibitions.

Avanti!







Marika
2008-05-19 10:16:20 EST

"Old Codger" <oldcodger@anyoldwhere.net> wrote in message
news:athd2413drneinqqb2ul7nk29ni7ip4t9i@4ax.com...
>>>
>>
>
>
> Some great eco friendly tips in a book called *Haley's cleaning hints*
> by Graham and Rosemary Haley.
> see http://tinyurl.com/52gj3r

o well splash your water superiority in our faces :)

mk5000


"Anyone who would try a tick like this, must be a vegetarian."--dh_ld

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