Vegetarian Discussion: Eat Less Meat

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_ /
2008-03-11 04:24:02 EST
Eat less meat

Our microsite www.eatlessmeat.org is packed with further information

http://tinyurl.com/ys5gv6
Overview
Global meat production and consumption are soaring. Until the 1990s,
the vast majority of animal products were consumed in rich countries,
yet the last decade has seen many in developing nations also adopt the
“Western diet”. Together with the growth in meat consumption,
intensive factory farms are not just the norm in “the west”, but are
proliferating rapidly in countries like Brazil and China to meet the
demand for meat.

All indications are that this trend will continue apace for the
foreseeable future, encouraged by governments and international
agri-business.


The scale of expansion in meat production and consumption is
unsustainable. Rather than helping to tackle global hunger, the
increase in meat consumption threatens global food security, our
shared environment and our own health.

The main problems can be summarised as follows;

Human health: Alongside the increased consumption of animal fats are
disturbing rates of obesity, heart disease and adult-onset diabetes.
In order to reduce the risk from these diseases, all informed opinion
now stresses the desirability of reduced consumption of animal
products and increased intake of fresh fruit, vegetables and
fibre-rich carbohydrates

The welfare of farmed animals: The explosion in meat consumption is
paralleled by the global expansion of industrial “factory farming” of
animals, a system which by its very nature compromises basic welfare
standards. In factory farms, the animals suffer from confinement,
isolation or overcrowding and the frustration of their natural
behaviour.

Water scarcity: Lack of water is set to be the biggest threat to
global stability in coming decades. Producing meat uses up vast
amounts of water; each calorie of meat takes far more water to produce
than a calorie of grain or carbohydrate; for example, it takes only
500 litres of water to produce a kilo of potatoes, but 100,000 litres
to produce a kilo of beef.

Environmental impact: The unsustainably large livestock population is
having a devastating effect on our environment. A major contributor to
global warming, livestock herds account for 10% of all greenhouse
gases, including 25% of all methane emissions. In addition, the sheer
volume of waste generated by the farm animal population, together with
the excessive use of fertilisers to grow their feed, causes high
levels of ammonia and nitrate pollution of land, water and air.

Global food security: Much of the earth’s arable land is now being
used to grow feed crops for intensively farmed animals rather than for
people.
Placing animal products at the centre of food policy greatly
diminishes the possibility of feeding the world’s human population.
Rather than using vast areas of land to grow crops for animal feed,
more food can be obtained by using land to grow crops for direct human
consumption.

Brief history and future objectives
CIWF launched its Eat Less Meat campaign in March 2004 at an event in
London. Speakers included leading environmentalist Jonathon Porritt,
author Colin Tudge and food policy expert Professor Tim Lang.
CIWF has published a range of materials to support the campaign: a
report “The Global Benefits of Eating Less Meat” by Mark Gold, with
foreword by Jonathon Porritt and a video “Eat Less Meat – it’s costing
the Earth” narrated by Joanna Lumley.

Several organisations are supporting our campaign:
The Soil Association
http://www.soilassociation.org/
The Food Commission
http://www.foodcomm.org.uk/
The Gaia Foundation
http://freespace.virgin.net/s.rabin/html/mainmenu.html
The Biodynamic Agriculture Association
http://www.anth.org.uk/biodynamic/
The Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology (India)
http://www.vshiva.net/
The Women's Environmental Network (WEN)
http://www.wen.org.uk/

The campaign aims are:
To persuade consumers to eat less meat and eat only organic or free
range meat
To persuade western governments to set targets for a reduction in meat
consumption. We are aiming for a 15% reduction by 2020

Campaign actions
Set personal targets for eating less meat. How about meatless Mondays?
When you buy meat, always buy organic or free range.
When in restaurants, ask if the meat they serve is organic or free
range. If not, try the vegetarian option!
Visit the eatlessmeat.org microsite or order our report, video or
leaflets.
http://www.eatlessmeat.org/

Talk about the idea of eating less meat to family, friends and
colleagues or write to your local newspaper about the issue.
Get involved with CIWF

CIWF is the organisation that gets things done. To find out more on
how you can actively help CIWF with petitions, demonstrations and
community fundraising, visit the Get involved section of the website.





OM SHIVA!108
2008-03-11 16:34:17 EST
On Mar 11, 8:24 am, "( _ /)" <00...@derty.com> wrote:
> Eat less meat
>
> Our micrositewww.eatlessmeat.orgis packed with further information
>
> http://tinyurl.com/ys5gv6
> Overview
> Global meat production and consumption are soaring. Until the 1990s,
> the vast majority of animal products were consumed in rich countries,
> yet the last decade has seen many in developing nations also adopt the
> "Western diet". Together with the growth in meat consumption,
> intensive factory farms are not just the norm in "the west", but are
> proliferating rapidly in countries like Brazil and China to meet the
> demand for meat.
>
> All indications are that this trend will continue apace for the
> foreseeable future, encouraged by governments and international
> agri-business.
>
> The scale of expansion in meat production and consumption is
> unsustainable. Rather than helping to tackle global hunger, the
> increase in meat consumption threatens global food security, our
> shared environment and our own health.
>
> The main problems can be summarised as follows;
>
> Human health: Alongside the increased consumption of animal fats are
> disturbing rates of obesity, heart disease and adult-onset diabetes.
> In order to reduce the risk from these diseases, all informed opinion
> now stresses the desirability of reduced consumption of animal
> products and increased intake of fresh fruit, vegetables and
> fibre-rich carbohydrates
>
> The welfare of farmed animals: The explosion in meat consumption is
> paralleled by the global expansion of industrial "factory farming" of
> animals, a system which by its very nature compromises basic welfare
> standards. In factory farms, the animals suffer from confinement,
> isolation or overcrowding and the frustration of their natural
> behaviour.
>
> Water scarcity: Lack of water is set to be the biggest threat to
> global stability in coming decades. Producing meat uses up vast
> amounts of water; each calorie of meat takes far more water to produce
> than a calorie of grain or carbohydrate; for example, it takes only
> 500 litres of water to produce a kilo of potatoes, but 100,000 litres
> to produce a kilo of beef.
>
> Environmental impact: The unsustainably large livestock population is
> having a devastating effect on our environment. A major contributor to
> global warming, livestock herds account for 10% of all greenhouse
> gases, including 25% of all methane emissions. In addition, the sheer
> volume of waste generated by the farm animal population, together with
> the excessive use of fertilisers to grow their feed, causes high
> levels of ammonia and nitrate pollution of land, water and air.
>
> Global food security: Much of the earth's arable land is now being
> used to grow feed crops for intensively farmed animals rather than for
> people.
> Placing animal products at the centre of food policy greatly
> diminishes the possibility of feeding the world's human population.
> Rather than using vast areas of land to grow crops for animal feed,
> more food can be obtained by using land to grow crops for direct human
> consumption.
>
> Brief history and future objectives
> CIWF launched its Eat Less Meat campaign in March 2004 at an event in
> London. Speakers included leading environmentalist Jonathon Porritt,
> author Colin Tudge and food policy expert Professor Tim Lang.
> CIWF has published a range of materials to support the campaign: a
> report "The Global Benefits of Eating Less Meat" by Mark Gold, with
> foreword by Jonathon Porritt and a video "Eat Less Meat - it's costing
> the Earth" narrated by Joanna Lumley.
>
> Several organisations are supporting our campaign:
> The Soil Associationhttp://www.soilassociation.org/
> The Food Commissionhttp://www.foodcomm.org.uk/
> The Gaia Foundationhttp://freespace.virgin.net/s.rabin/html/mainmenu.html
> The Biodynamic Agriculture Associationhttp://www.anth.org.uk/biodynamic/
> The Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology (India)http://www.vshiva.net/
> The Women's Environmental Network (WEN)http://www.wen.org.uk/
>
> The campaign aims are:
> To persuade consumers to eat less meat and eat only organic or free
> range meat
> To persuade western governments to set targets for a reduction in meat
> consumption. We are aiming for a 15% reduction by 2020
>
> Campaign actions
> Set personal targets for eating less meat. How about meatless Mondays?
> When you buy meat, always buy organic or free range.
> When in restaurants, ask if the meat they serve is organic or free
> range. If not, try the vegetarian option!
> Visit the eatlessmeat.org microsite or order our report, video or
> leaflets.
> http://www.eatlessmeat.org/
>
> Talk about the idea of eating less meat to family, friends and
> colleagues or write to your local newspaper about the issue.
> Get involved with CIWF
>
> CIWF is the organisation that gets things done. To find out more on
> how you can actively help CIWF with petitions, demonstrations and
> community fundraising, visit the Get involved section of the website.

People do eat too much crappy meats..and other foods of course. Maybe
the quality outlets should be licenced and people could have a
tradable ration? This way places like the 'Hotshop' in Llanberis,
Gwynedd, North Wales, could carry on making the absolute best Shish
kebabs in the UK, whlist all that rubbish sold could be phased out,
and the rest of the time people could eat raw nuts and fruits and the
like. The land thus freed could be used for tree crops etc and also
native reafforestation of the empty wastes of the UK hill country. The
process could be speeded up by stopping all animal farming subsidy and
all other non organic subsidy. Hill farmers could take the Forestry
Commision shilling if they wanted government/public money....the FC
have gone very native tree orientated recently.

Jeßus?=
2008-03-11 18:36:18 EST
( _ /) wrote:
> Eat less meat

Why avoid the REAL problem?
You should be campaigning to stop people breeding like rats.
But of course, no one wants to touch that one with a barge pole...

--
http://fun.drno.de/pics/english/rooftops.jpg

Dutch
2008-03-12 02:39:06 EST
"( _ /)" <00000@derty.com> wrote
> Eat less meat
>

How about just eat less, consume less, PERIOD? Why pick on meat? You
wouldn't have an ummm hidden agenda, would you?



Osvald Hotz De Baar
2008-03-12 03:25:15 EST
On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 06:39:06 GMT, "Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote:

>"( _ /)" <00000@derty.com> wrote
>> Eat less meat
>>
>
>How about just eat less, consume less, PERIOD? Why pick on meat? You
>wouldn't have an ummm hidden agenda, would you?

Obesity is a serious problem due to animal products entirely. So
therefore Eat less meat

Our microsite www.eatlessmeat.org is packed with further information

http://tinyurl.com/ys5gv6
Overview
Global meat production and consumption are soaring. Until the 1990s,
the vast majority of animal products were consumed in rich countries,
yet the last decade has seen many in developing nations also adopt the
“Western diet”. Together with the growth in meat consumption,
intensive factory farms are not just the norm in “the west”, but are
proliferating rapidly in countries like Brazil and China to meet the
demand for meat.

All indications are that this trend will continue apace for the
foreseeable future, encouraged by governments and international
agri-business.


The scale of expansion in meat production and consumption is
unsustainable. Rather than helping to tackle global hunger, the
increase in meat consumption threatens global food security, our
shared environment and our own health.

The main problems can be summarised as follows;

Human health: Alongside the increased consumption of animal fats are
disturbing rates of obesity, heart disease and adult-onset diabetes.
In order to reduce the risk from these diseases, all informed opinion
now stresses the desirability of reduced consumption of animal
products and increased intake of fresh fruit, vegetables and
fibre-rich carbohydrates

The welfare of farmed animals: The explosion in meat consumption is
paralleled by the global expansion of industrial “factory farming” of
animals, a system which by its very nature compromises basic welfare
standards. In factory farms, the animals suffer from confinement,
isolation or overcrowding and the frustration of their natural
behaviour.

Water scarcity: Lack of water is set to be the biggest threat to
global stability in coming decades. Producing meat uses up vast
amounts of water; each calorie of meat takes far more water to produce
than a calorie of grain or carbohydrate; for example, it takes only
500 litres of water to produce a kilo of potatoes, but 100,000 litres
to produce a kilo of beef.

Environmental impact: The unsustainably large livestock population is
having a devastating effect on our environment. A major contributor to
global warming, livestock herds account for 10% of all greenhouse
gases, including 25% of all methane emissions. In addition, the sheer
volume of waste generated by the farm animal population, together with
the excessive use of fertilisers to grow their feed, causes high
levels of ammonia and nitrate pollution of land, water and air.

Global food security: Much of the earth’s arable land is now being
used to grow feed crops for intensively farmed animals rather than for
people.
Placing animal products at the centre of food policy greatly
diminishes the possibility of feeding the world’s human population.
Rather than using vast areas of land to grow crops for animal feed,
more food can be obtained by using land to grow crops for direct human
consumption.

Brief history and future objectives
CIWF launched its Eat Less Meat campaign in March 2004 at an event in
London. Speakers included leading environmentalist Jonathon Porritt,
author Colin Tudge and food policy expert Professor Tim Lang.
CIWF has published a range of materials to support the campaign: a
report “The Global Benefits of Eating Less Meat” by Mark Gold, with
foreword by Jonathon Porritt and a video “Eat Less Meat – it’s costing
the Earth” narrated by Joanna Lumley.

Several organisations are supporting our campaign:
The Soil Association
http://www.soilassociation.org/
The Food Commission
http://www.foodcomm.org.uk/
The Gaia Foundation
http://freespace.virgin.net/s.rabin/html/mainmenu.html
The Biodynamic Agriculture Association
http://www.anth.org.uk/biodynamic/
The Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology (India)
http://www.vshiva.net/
The Women's Environmental Network (WEN)
http://www.wen.org.uk/

The campaign aims are:
To persuade consumers to eat less meat and eat only organic or free
range meat
To persuade western governments to set targets for a reduction in meat
consumption. We are aiming for a 15% reduction by 2020

Campaign actions
Set personal targets for eating less meat. How about meatless Mondays?
When you buy meat, always buy organic or free range.
When in restaurants, ask if the meat they serve is organic or free
range. If not, try the vegetarian option!
Visit the eatlessmeat.org microsite or order our report, video or
leaflets.
http://www.eatlessmeat.org/

Talk about the idea of eating less meat to family, friends and
colleagues or write to your local newspaper about the issue.
Get involved with CIWF

CIWF is the organisation that gets things done. To find out more on
how you can actively help CIWF with petitions, demonstrations and
community fundraising, visit the Get involved section of the website.





Osvald Hotz De Baar
2008-03-12 03:30:02 EST
On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 09:36:18 +1100, Jeßus <power_sliding@yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

>( _ /) wrote:
>> Eat less meat
>
>Why avoid the REAL problem?
>You should be campaigning to stop people breeding like rats.
>But of course, no one wants to touch that one with a barge pole...

You are of course right. The UK is currently experiencing a free for
all when it comes to immigration. Not just for jobs, these people are
staying here and breeding in huge numbers.

Whilst on paper (after they have cooked the books) it would seem we
have the same amount of people as we always had, give or take, but in
reality almost everyone in the UK is starting to feel a foreigner in
their own country. Sadly it's probably too late to change anything
now, our society has been watered down to obscurity already.

In the meantime Eat less meat

Our microsite www.eatlessmeat.org is packed with further information

http://tinyurl.com/ys5gv6
Overview
Global meat production and consumption are soaring. Until the 1990s,
the vast majority of animal products were consumed in rich countries,
yet the last decade has seen many in developing nations also adopt the
“Western diet”. Together with the growth in meat consumption,
intensive factory farms are not just the norm in “the west”, but are
proliferating rapidly in countries like Brazil and China to meet the
demand for meat.

All indications are that this trend will continue apace for the
foreseeable future, encouraged by governments and international
agri-business.


The scale of expansion in meat production and consumption is
unsustainable. Rather than helping to tackle global hunger, the
increase in meat consumption threatens global food security, our
shared environment and our own health.

The main problems can be summarised as follows;

Human health: Alongside the increased consumption of animal fats are
disturbing rates of obesity, heart disease and adult-onset diabetes.
In order to reduce the risk from these diseases, all informed opinion
now stresses the desirability of reduced consumption of animal
products and increased intake of fresh fruit, vegetables and
fibre-rich carbohydrates

The welfare of farmed animals: The explosion in meat consumption is
paralleled by the global expansion of industrial “factory farming” of
animals, a system which by its very nature compromises basic welfare
standards. In factory farms, the animals suffer from confinement,
isolation or overcrowding and the frustration of their natural
behaviour.

Water scarcity: Lack of water is set to be the biggest threat to
global stability in coming decades. Producing meat uses up vast
amounts of water; each calorie of meat takes far more water to produce
than a calorie of grain or carbohydrate; for example, it takes only
500 litres of water to produce a kilo of potatoes, but 100,000 litres
to produce a kilo of beef.

Environmental impact: The unsustainably large livestock population is
having a devastating effect on our environment. A major contributor to
global warming, livestock herds account for 10% of all greenhouse
gases, including 25% of all methane emissions. In addition, the sheer
volume of waste generated by the farm animal population, together with
the excessive use of fertilisers to grow their feed, causes high
levels of ammonia and nitrate pollution of land, water and air.

Global food security: Much of the earth’s arable land is now being
used to grow feed crops for intensively farmed animals rather than for
people.
Placing animal products at the centre of food policy greatly
diminishes the possibility of feeding the world’s human population.
Rather than using vast areas of land to grow crops for animal feed,
more food can be obtained by using land to grow crops for direct human
consumption.

Brief history and future objectives
CIWF launched its Eat Less Meat campaign in March 2004 at an event in
London. Speakers included leading environmentalist Jonathon Porritt,
author Colin Tudge and food policy expert Professor Tim Lang.
CIWF has published a range of materials to support the campaign: a
report “The Global Benefits of Eating Less Meat” by Mark Gold, with
foreword by Jonathon Porritt and a video “Eat Less Meat – it’s costing
the Earth” narrated by Joanna Lumley.

Several organisations are supporting our campaign:
The Soil Association
http://www.soilassociation.org/
The Food Commission
http://www.foodcomm.org.uk/
The Gaia Foundation
http://freespace.virgin.net/s.rabin/html/mainmenu.html
The Biodynamic Agriculture Association
http://www.anth.org.uk/biodynamic/
The Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology (India)
http://www.vshiva.net/
The Women's Environmental Network (WEN)
http://www.wen.org.uk/

The campaign aims are:
To persuade consumers to eat less meat and eat only organic or free
range meat
To persuade western governments to set targets for a reduction in meat
consumption. We are aiming for a 15% reduction by 2020

Campaign actions
Set personal targets for eating less meat. How about meatless Mondays?
When you buy meat, always buy organic or free range.
When in restaurants, ask if the meat they serve is organic or free
range. If not, try the vegetarian option!
Visit the eatlessmeat.org microsite or order our report, video or
leaflets.
http://www.eatlessmeat.org/

Talk about the idea of eating less meat to family, friends and
colleagues or write to your local newspaper about the issue.
Get involved with CIWF

CIWF is the organisation that gets things done. To find out more on
how you can actively help CIWF with petitions, demonstrations and
community fundraising, visit the Get involved section of the website.





Dutch
2008-03-12 15:44:37 EST
"Osvald Hotz De Baar" <curtains4U@upthorpe.farm.com> wrote
> On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 06:39:06 GMT, "Dutch" <no@email.com> wrote:
>
>>"( _ /)" <00000@derty.com> wrote
>>> Eat less meat
>>>
>>
>>How about just eat less, consume less, PERIOD? Why pick on meat? You
>>wouldn't have an ummm hidden agenda, would you?
>
> Obesity is a serious problem due to animal products entirely. So
> therefore Eat less meat


That is inaccurate, obesity is a serious problem which is a direct result of
excessive consumption, measured in calories. Therefore consume fewer
calories.

Also reconsider the energy argument. Meat is frequently, as in my case,
raised a few miles from where it is sold, so the energy expended to
transport it to market, per calorie, is very small, whereas products like,
say, bananas, require a large expenditure of energy to transport them, say,
from Equador to New York. Therefore eat less bananas.


Jeßus?=
2008-03-13 02:33:37 EST
Osvald Hotz De Baar wrote:
> On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 09:36:18 +1100, Jeßus <power_sliding@yahoo.co.uk>
> wrote:
>
>> ( _ /) wrote:
>>> Eat less meat
>> Why avoid the REAL problem?
>> You should be campaigning to stop people breeding like rats.
>> But of course, no one wants to touch that one with a barge pole...
>
> You are of course right. The UK is currently experiencing a free for
> all when it comes to immigration. Not just for jobs, these people are
> staying here and breeding in huge numbers.
>
> Whilst on paper (after they have cooked the books) it would seem we
> have the same amount of people as we always had, give or take, but in
> reality almost everyone in the UK is starting to feel a foreigner in
> their own country. Sadly it's probably too late to change anything
> now, our society has been watered down to obscurity already.

Well, immigration is really a separate issue to overpopulation, which is
*the* #1 problem regardless of where they might be.

We could become 1000 times more efficient in food production overnight,
give *everyone* as much food as they need - all that will happen is an
even faster increase in population growth. Humans will breed to whatever
the breaking point is in their region.

> In the meantime Eat less meat

Probably particularly relevant to Westerners, but yes - 'we' tend to eat
too much meat, irrespective of personal views on whether to be Vegan or not.




--
http://fun.drno.de/pics/english/rooftops.jpg

Osvald Hotz De Baar
2008-03-13 03:21:54 EST
On Thu, 13 Mar 2008 17:33:37 +1100, Jeßus <power_sliding@yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

>Osvald Hotz De Baar wrote:
>> On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 09:36:18 +1100, Jeßus <power_sliding@yahoo.co.uk>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> ( _ /) wrote:
>>>> Eat less meat
>>> Why avoid the REAL problem?
>>> You should be campaigning to stop people breeding like rats.
>>> But of course, no one wants to touch that one with a barge pole...
>>
>> You are of course right. The UK is currently experiencing a free for
>> all when it comes to immigration. Not just for jobs, these people are
>> staying here and breeding in huge numbers.
>>
>> Whilst on paper (after they have cooked the books) it would seem we
>> have the same amount of people as we always had, give or take, but in
>> reality almost everyone in the UK is starting to feel a foreigner in
>> their own country. Sadly it's probably too late to change anything
>> now, our society has been watered down to obscurity already.
>
>Well, immigration is really a separate issue to overpopulation, which is
>*the* #1 problem regardless of where they might be.

It's the immigrants breeding that is causing the feeling of
overpopulation. I live in London and can see first hand the dilution
of Britain. Without doubt the largest increase in so few years is of
East Europeans.

Not their fault. If our politicians are stupid enough to open the
floodgates and keep them open then we can only blame them.

Politicians seem to have an aversion to seeing the long term picture.
Either that or their ivory towers are just too well insulated from the
rest of us.

>We could become 1000 times more efficient in food production overnight,
>give *everyone* as much food as they need - all that will happen is an
>even faster increase in population growth. Humans will breed to whatever
>the breaking point is in their region.

Same in wildlife really.

>> In the meantime Eat less meat
>
>Probably particularly relevant to Westerners, but yes - 'we' tend to eat
>too much meat, irrespective of personal views on whether to be Vegan or not.

Quite. Forget veggie or not, it's gone beyond that. We now need to
start thinking about saving our planet.

Rudy Canoza
2008-03-13 03:31:53 EST
pete the lying "ar" loon shitbag lied:
> On Thu, 13 Mar 2008 17:33:37 +1100, Jeßus <power_sliding@yahoo.co.uk>
> wrote:
> [...]

Just shut up and fuck off, pete, you stupid lying shitbag.
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