Vegetarian Discussion: Meet Your Meat. It's More Risky To Wash Filthy Then To Leave It Alone. Time To Go Veggie?

Meet Your Meat. It's More Risky To Wash Filthy Then To Leave It Alone. Time To Go Veggie?
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Malcolm
2007-12-12 08:42:50 EST
Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas

http://www.food.gov.uk:80/news/pressreleases/2007/dec/xmaspress

A total of 80% of people wash their turkeys before cooking them,
significantly increasing the risk of food poisoning, according to a
new survey by the Food Standards Agency.

The survey, which looked into the eating habits of UK consumers at
Christmas, found that women over the age of 45 were the most frequent
turkey-washing offenders and cooks in the north-east of England topped
the hazard chart, with 90% likely to run their raw turkeys under the
tap.

The Agency warns against washing meat because harmful bacteria can
easily splash from raw meat and poultry to worktops, chopping boards,
dishes and utensils. Germs that cause food poisoning can also linger
on surfaces for days.

Judith Hilton, Head of Microbiological Safety at the Agency, said:
'Most people think they know how to prepare the Christmas meal with
their eyes shut. But we've found that there are still a couple of
Christmas food safety clangers served up each year. Turkey washing
seems to be the most common blunder.

'Remember, it's not possible to wash off all the germs that cause food
poisoning with water. They're killed by heat. By washing your raw
turkey, you're actually more likely to spread the germs than get rid
of them.'

Results from the survey show that 17% of people aren’t sure how to
tell when their turkey is cooked and, although formal reported
incidents are fairly low, 2% of people think they have suffered from
festive food poisoning in the past five years.

To ensure that your turkey is cooked properly, make sure it is piping
hot all the way through, cut into the thickest part to check that none
of the meat is pink, and if juices run out they should be clear.

Celebrity chefs Gary Rhodes and Ainsley Harriott are featuring in the
Agency's radio adverts this year to help people avoid serving up food
poisoning at Christmas.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Ian
2007-12-12 14:53:25 EST
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:42:50 +0000, Malcolm <voipcre@tiscali.net>
wrote:

>Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas
>
>http://www.food.gov.uk:80/news/pressreleases/2007/dec/xmaspress
>
>A total of 80% of people wash their turkeys before cooking them,
>significantly increasing the risk of food poisoning, according to a
>new survey by the Food Standards Agency.
>
>The survey, which looked into the eating habits of UK consumers at
>Christmas, found that women over the age of 45 were the most frequent
>turkey-washing offenders and cooks in the north-east of England topped
>the hazard chart, with 90% likely to run their raw turkeys under the
>tap.
>
>The Agency warns against washing meat because harmful bacteria can
>easily splash from raw meat and poultry to worktops, chopping boards,
>dishes and utensils. Germs that cause food poisoning can also linger
>on surfaces for days.
>
>Judith Hilton, Head of Microbiological Safety at the Agency, said:
>'Most people think they know how to prepare the Christmas meal with
>their eyes shut. But we've found that there are still a couple of
>Christmas food safety clangers served up each year. Turkey washing
>seems to be the most common blunder.
>
>'Remember, it's not possible to wash off all the germs that cause food
>poisoning with water. They're killed by heat. By washing your raw
>turkey, you're actually more likely to spread the germs than get rid
>of them.'

An obvious but shocking realisation for many of us I'm sure.



The Nolalu Barn Owl
2007-12-12 20:06:10 EST
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:42:50 +0000, Malcolm wrote:

> Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas

Wasn't there a rash of poisonings caused by vegetables in the U.S. and
Canada this year? Spinach was one cuprit.

Doofy
2007-12-12 22:37:22 EST
The Nolalu Barn Owl wrote:
> On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:42:50 +0000, Malcolm wrote:
>
>
>>Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas
>
>
> Wasn't there a rash of poisonings caused by vegetables in the U.S. and
> Canada this year? Spinach was one cuprit.

To say nothing of the cereal killers.

Jim Webster
2007-12-13 02:12:12 EST

"doofy" <nope@notme.com> wrote in message
news:4760a915$0$36362$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
> The Nolalu Barn Owl wrote:
>> On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:42:50 +0000, Malcolm wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas
>>
>>
>> Wasn't there a rash of poisonings caused by vegetables in the U.S. and
>> Canada this year? Spinach was one cuprit.
>
> To say nothing of the cereal killers.

then there are the dangers of nut allergies

Jim Webster



Pearl
2007-12-13 07:34:52 EST
"The Nolalu Barn Owl" <gordie@nolalu.on.ca> wrote in message news:gc2dnTMO5eMfGP3anZ2dnUVZ_sbinZ2d@tbaytel.net...
> On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:42:50 +0000, Malcolm wrote:
>
> > Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas
>
> Wasn't there a rash of poisonings caused by vegetables in the U.S. and
> Canada this year? Spinach was one cuprit.

'Investigators with the Centers for Disease Control initially speculated
that the dangerous strain of bacteria, E. coli O157:H7, originated from
irrigation water contaminated with cattle feces[12] or from grazing deer.
[13]

A follow-up report by the CDC[14] and a joint report by the California
Department of Health Services (CDHS) and U.S. Food and Drug
Administration (FDA)[15][16] concluded that the probable source of the
outbreak was Paicines Ranch, an Angus cattle ranch that had leased land
to spinach grower Mission Organics. The report found 26 samples of
E. coli "indistinguishable from the outbreak strain" in water and cattle
manure on the San Benito County ranch, some within a mile from the
tainted spinach fields.[17] Although officials could not definitively say
how the spinach became contaminated, both reports named the presence
of wild pigs on the ranch and the proximity of surface waterways to
irrigation wells as "potential environmental risk factors."[18]
..'
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_United_States_E._coli_outbreak



Malcolm
2007-12-13 08:13:12 EST
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 12:34:52 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
wrote:

>"The Nolalu Barn Owl" <gordie@nolalu.on.ca> wrote in message news:gc2dnTMO5eMfGP3anZ2dnUVZ_sbinZ2d@tbaytel.net...
>> On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:42:50 +0000, Malcolm wrote:
>>
>> > Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas
>>
>> Wasn't there a rash of poisonings caused by vegetables in the U.S. and
>> Canada this year? Spinach was one cuprit.
>
>'Investigators with the Centers for Disease Control initially speculated
>that the dangerous strain of bacteria, E. coli O157:H7, originated from
>irrigation water contaminated with cattle feces[12] or from grazing deer.
>[13]
>
>A follow-up report by the CDC[14] and a joint report by the California
>Department of Health Services (CDHS) and U.S. Food and Drug
>Administration (FDA)[15][16] concluded that the probable source of the
>outbreak was Paicines Ranch, an Angus cattle ranch that had leased land
>to spinach grower Mission Organics. The report found 26 samples of
>E. coli "indistinguishable from the outbreak strain" in water and cattle
>manure on the San Benito County ranch, some within a mile from the
>tainted spinach fields.[17] Although officials could not definitively say
>how the spinach became contaminated, both reports named the presence
>of wild pigs on the ranch and the proximity of surface waterways to
>irrigation wells as "potential environmental risk factors."[18]
>..'
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_United_States_E._coli_outbreak
>

Isn't it the case for all, if not most vegetable contamination?

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Pearl
2007-12-15 10:17:12 EST
"Malcolm" <voipcre@tiscali.net> wrote in message news:dtb2m3pq2m6bq23btf9r9l91rpjcj6rm8t@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 12:34:52 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
> wrote:
>
> >"The Nolalu Barn Owl" <gordie@nolalu.on.ca> wrote in message news:gc2dnTMO5eMfGP3anZ2dnUVZ_sbinZ2d@tbaytel.net...
> >> On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:42:50 +0000, Malcolm wrote:
> >>
> >> > Don't serve up food poisoning this Christmas
> >>
> >> Wasn't there a rash of poisonings caused by vegetables in the U.S. and
> >> Canada this year? Spinach was one cuprit.
> >
> >'Investigators with the Centers for Disease Control initially speculated
> >that the dangerous strain of bacteria, E. coli O157:H7, originated from
> >irrigation water contaminated with cattle feces[12] or from grazing deer.
> >[13]
> >
> >A follow-up report by the CDC[14] and a joint report by the California
> >Department of Health Services (CDHS) and U.S. Food and Drug
> >Administration (FDA)[15][16] concluded that the probable source of the
> >outbreak was Paicines Ranch, an Angus cattle ranch that had leased land
> >to spinach grower Mission Organics. The report found 26 samples of
> >E. coli "indistinguishable from the outbreak strain" in water and cattle
> >manure on the San Benito County ranch, some within a mile from the
> >tainted spinach fields.[17] Although officials could not definitively say
> >how the spinach became contaminated, both reports named the presence
> >of wild pigs on the ranch and the proximity of surface waterways to
> >irrigation wells as "potential environmental risk factors."[18]
> >..'
> >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_United_States_E._coli_outbreak
> >
>
> Isn't it the case for all, if not most vegetable contamination?

Aye.

'Investigators are focusing on nine farms in the Salinas Valley, looking
for signs of past flooding or instances in which contaminated surface
areas had come into contact with crops. They also were looking for
potential sources of bacteria inside packing plants.
...
According to the CDC, E. coli lives in the intestines of cattle and other
animals and is linked to contamination by fecal material. It can be found
in undercooked meats and other foods, such as spinach, sprouts, lettuce,
unpasteurized milk and juice.
..'
http://www.forbes.com/forbeslife/health/feeds/hscout/2006/09/21/hscout535066.html


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