Vegetarian Discussion: Tesco And Asda Urged To Go Cage-free!

Tesco And Asda Urged To Go Cage-free!
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Gloria
2007-10-30 07:10:37 EST
Tesco and Asda urged to go cage-free!

http://www.ciwf.org.uk/
Compassion in World Farming has been calling on supermarkets and the
food industry to go cage-free. This means only using and selling eggs
from hens in free-range, organic or barn systems.

Despite the scientific evidence that the battery cage system is cruel
and increased public support for free-range farming, Tesco and Asda,
the two largest UK supermarkets continue to make no commitment to help
millions of hens and stop selling battery eggs.


Did you know?

Hens can travel up to 9mph. This is usually a combined effort of
running, jumping and flying.

Why battery cages must go!
Battery cages confine hens in wire cages so small that each hen has a
floor space no larger than an A4 piece of paper. The hens are unable
to stretch their wings or carry out any of their natural behaviours.



Legislation under threat?
In 1999, the EU voted to ban barren battery cages from 2012, this
legislation is now under serious threat. Compassion in World Farming
is stepping up the pressure on all aspects of the egg industry;
political, commercial and public to say that battery cages must go.

Why target Tesco & Asda?

Take action:

Why Tesco & Asda?
Find a demonstration
Letter template
Donate to help us


With sales in cage-free eggs continuing to rise across Europe, EU
consumers are clearly in support of cage-free egg production. Many
supermarkets have listened to their consumers and chosen to do the
right thing by going cage-free. All supermarkets in Austria and the
Netherlands are cage-free.

M&S and Waitrose have already moved away from eggs from caged hens.
Sainsbury's have committed to do so by 2012. The Co-op and Morrisons
have made cage-free commitments on their own-label eggs.

As the UK's largest supermarkets, Tesco and Asda must do the right
thing and show leadership by going cage-free – that means phasing out
eggs from barren and enriched cage systems.


Case Study

Last year Sainsbury's sold almost 580 million eggs, therefore their
commitment to go cage free will benefit 2.1 million hens per year.

Market share
Tesco has a 31% share of the grocery markets, so a cage-free pledge
from them would represent a huge market for farmers wishing to switch
to cage-free production. With over 3.5 million hens needed to lay the
eggs supplied by Tesco each year, it would really represent a huge
welfare benefit to millions of hens.

Together let's make a stand against eggs from caged hens and call on
both Tesco and Asda to "Go Cage-Free!":



King Bruno The Questionable
2007-10-30 09:00:53 EST
"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:2o3ei3tbjfjs8eto1b91493vbsf1qicm4n@4ax.com...
> Tesco and Asda urged to go cage-free!
>
> http://www.ciwf.org.uk/
> Compassion in World Farming has been calling on supermarkets and the
> food industry to go cage-free. This means only using and selling eggs
> from hens in free-range, organic or barn systems.
>
> Despite the scientific evidence that the battery cage system is cruel
> and increased public support for free-range farming, Tesco and Asda,
> the two largest UK supermarkets continue to make no commitment to help
> millions of hens and stop selling battery eggs.
>
>
No & fuck off, green coloured piece of shit.



Pearl
2007-10-30 15:29:43 EST
http://business.edp24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=BIZOnline&category=Business&tBrand=BIZOnline&tCategory=homepage&itemid=NOE
D27%20Oct%202007%2011%3A51%3A26%3A170
or
http://tinyurl.com/ypbfnu

Dire warnings of an end to UK pig farming
27 October 2007

MICHAEL POLLITT, RURAL AFFAIRS EDITOR

Soaring animal feed prices could spell the end of the country's
pig industry within 12 months as producers are forced to quit,
a national survey has warned.

Some 35pc of producers could quit the industry by Christmas
as grain prices have almost doubled, said Digby Scott, editor
of the Pig World magazine.

A pig industry website census showed more than 90pc of
the British pig breeding herd could disappear in the next year
unless prices rise sharply.

However, Mr Scott said because 48pc of producers have
long-term feed contracts, supplies of home-produced pork
and bacon will be immediately at risk.

Producers are under acute financial pressure, with 41pc paying
50pc more for their feed than last year, he added.

The National Pig Association (NPA) warned that producers
were being driven to the wall by spiralling feed prices which
are making rearing pigs "unsustainable."

It says that farmers are losing \ufffd26 per pig - the equivalent of
\ufffd6 a second or \ufffd3.6m a week across the 1,400 producers in
the industry - because of the high costs which are caused by
global wheat price rises.

As the EDP reveals in today's Farm & Country, the average
cost of feed wheat has soared from \ufffd72.15 per tonne to
more than \ufffd118.

Pig and poultry producers in the eastern counties are the
biggest consumers of feed grains including wheat last year.

While the outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease had added
to the industry's problems, the rising price of feed is seen
as the biggest threat to pork production in the UK.

Barney Kay, general manager of the NPA, said: "These
survey results show us just how precarious the industry is
as many farmers are seriously considering terminating
production permanently. If this were to happen the UK pig
herd will be decimated irrevocably. It's much worse even
than foot-and-mouth.

...'



Boo
2007-10-30 18:06:21 EST

"King Bruno the Questionable" <me1@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:5ooo8aFnu8utU1@mid.individual.net...
> "Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:2o3ei3tbjfjs8eto1b91493vbsf1qicm4n@4ax.com...
>> Tesco and Asda urged to go cage-free!
>>
>> http://www.ciwf.org.uk/
>> Compassion in World Farming has been calling on supermarkets and the
>> food industry to go cage-free. This means only using and selling eggs
>> from hens in free-range, organic or barn systems.
>>
>> Despite the scientific evidence that the battery cage system is cruel
>> and increased public support for free-range farming, Tesco and Asda,
>> the two largest UK supermarkets continue to make no commitment to help
>> millions of hens and stop selling battery eggs.
>>
>>
> No & fuck off, green coloured piece of shit.
>
>

Come on king get off the fence and tell us what you feel :)



Gloria
2007-10-31 03:42:32 EST
On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 19:29:43 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
wrote:

>http://business.edp24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=BIZOnline&category=Business&tBrand=BIZOnline&tCategory=homepage&itemid=NOE
>D27%20Oct%202007%2011%3A51%3A26%3A170
>or
>http://tinyurl.com/ypbfnu
>
>Dire warnings of an end to UK pig farming
>27 October 2007
>
>MICHAEL POLLITT, RURAL AFFAIRS EDITOR
>
>Soaring animal feed prices could spell the end of the country's
>pig industry within 12 months as producers are forced to quit,
>a national survey has warned.
>
>Some 35pc of producers could quit the industry by Christmas
>as grain prices have almost doubled, said Digby Scott, editor
>of the Pig World magazine.
>
>A pig industry website census showed more than 90pc of
>the British pig breeding herd could disappear in the next year
>unless prices rise sharply.
>
>However, Mr Scott said because 48pc of producers have
>long-term feed contracts, supplies of home-produced pork
>and bacon will be immediately at risk.
>
>Producers are under acute financial pressure, with 41pc paying
>50pc more for their feed than last year, he added.
>
>The National Pig Association (NPA) warned that producers
>were being driven to the wall by spiralling feed prices which
>are making rearing pigs "unsustainable."
>
>It says that farmers are losing £26 per pig - the equivalent of
>£6 a second or £3.6m a week across the 1,400 producers in
>the industry - because of the high costs which are caused by
>global wheat price rises.
>
>As the EDP reveals in today's Farm & Country, the average
>cost of feed wheat has soared from £72.15 per tonne to
>more than £118.
>
>Pig and poultry producers in the eastern counties are the
>biggest consumers of feed grains including wheat last year.
>
>While the outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease had added
>to the industry's problems, the rising price of feed is seen
>as the biggest threat to pork production in the UK.
>
>Barney Kay, general manager of the NPA, said: "These
>survey results show us just how precarious the industry is
>as many farmers are seriously considering terminating
>production permanently. If this were to happen the UK pig
>herd will be decimated irrevocably. It's much worse even
>than foot-and-mouth.

The demise of the meat industry would be good, not only for our
pockets, but our health and that of the planet too.

I doubt they could cut any more corners in factory farming of their
animals, or make the animals suffer any more.

Pearl
2007-10-31 09:01:48 EST
"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:iacgi394egtogut5g5nj4luf28mio0rf0a@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 19:29:43 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
> wrote:
>
>
>http://business.edp24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=BIZOnline&category=Business&tBrand=BIZOnline&tCategory=homepage&itemid=NO
E
> >D27%20Oct%202007%2011%3A51%3A26%3A170
> >or
> >http://tinyurl.com/ypbfnu
> >
> >Dire warnings of an end to UK pig farming
> >27 October 2007
> >
> >MICHAEL POLLITT, RURAL AFFAIRS EDITOR
> >
> >Soaring animal feed prices could spell the end of the country's
> >pig industry within 12 months as producers are forced to quit,
> >a national survey has warned.
> >
> >Some 35pc of producers could quit the industry by Christmas
> >as grain prices have almost doubled, said Digby Scott, editor
> >of the Pig World magazine.
> >
> >A pig industry website census showed more than 90pc of
> >the British pig breeding herd could disappear in the next year
> >unless prices rise sharply.
> >
> >However, Mr Scott said because 48pc of producers have
> >long-term feed contracts, supplies of home-produced pork
> >and bacon will be immediately at risk.
> >
> >Producers are under acute financial pressure, with 41pc paying
> >50pc more for their feed than last year, he added.
> >
> >The National Pig Association (NPA) warned that producers
> >were being driven to the wall by spiralling feed prices which
> >are making rearing pigs "unsustainable."
> >
> >It says that farmers are losing \ufffd26 per pig - the equivalent of
> >\ufffd6 a second or \ufffd3.6m a week across the 1,400 producers in
> >the industry - because of the high costs which are caused by
> >global wheat price rises.
> >
> >As the EDP reveals in today's Farm & Country, the average
> >cost of feed wheat has soared from \ufffd72.15 per tonne to
> >more than \ufffd118.
> >
> >Pig and poultry producers in the eastern counties are the
> >biggest consumers of feed grains including wheat last year.
> >
> >While the outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease had added
> >to the industry's problems, the rising price of feed is seen
> >as the biggest threat to pork production in the UK.
> >
> >Barney Kay, general manager of the NPA, said: "These
> >survey results show us just how precarious the industry is
> >as many farmers are seriously considering terminating
> >production permanently. If this were to happen the UK pig
> >herd will be decimated irrevocably. It's much worse even
> >than foot-and-mouth.
>
> The demise of the meat industry would be good, not only for our
> pockets, but our health and that of the planet too.

Absolutely!

BTW, -

'From his own amazing 1928 chronicle Propaganda, we learn
how Edward L. Bernays took the ideas of his famous uncle
Sigmund Freud, and applied them to the emerging science of
mass persuasion. The only difference was that instead of
using these principles to uncover hidden themes in the human
unconscious, the way Freudian psychology does, Bernays
studied these same ideas in order to learn how to mask
agendas and to create illusions that deceive and misrepresent,
for marketing purposes.
..
Bernays popularized the idea of bacon for breakfast.
..'
http://rense.com/general78/believe.htm

> I doubt they could cut any more corners in factory farming of their
> animals, or make the animals suffer any more.

Seems their damned god Mammon is not so almighty after all.
These price-hikes for grain are a global reality, and will without
doubt have a negative impact on the meat industry everywhere.





Gloria
2007-10-31 09:24:39 EST
On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 13:01:48 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
wrote:

>"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:iacgi394egtogut5g5nj4luf28mio0rf0a@4ax.com...
>> On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 19:29:43 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>>http://business.edp24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=BIZOnline&category=Business&tBrand=BIZOnline&tCategory=homepage&itemid=NO
>E
>> >D27%20Oct%202007%2011%3A51%3A26%3A170
>> >or
>> >http://tinyurl.com/ypbfnu
>> >
>> >Dire warnings of an end to UK pig farming
>> >27 October 2007
>> >
>> >MICHAEL POLLITT, RURAL AFFAIRS EDITOR
>> >
>> >Soaring animal feed prices could spell the end of the country's
>> >pig industry within 12 months as producers are forced to quit,
>> >a national survey has warned.
>> >
>> >Some 35pc of producers could quit the industry by Christmas
>> >as grain prices have almost doubled, said Digby Scott, editor
>> >of the Pig World magazine.
>> >
>> >A pig industry website census showed more than 90pc of
>> >the British pig breeding herd could disappear in the next year
>> >unless prices rise sharply.
>> >
>> >However, Mr Scott said because 48pc of producers have
>> >long-term feed contracts, supplies of home-produced pork
>> >and bacon will be immediately at risk.
>> >
>> >Producers are under acute financial pressure, with 41pc paying
>> >50pc more for their feed than last year, he added.
>> >
>> >The National Pig Association (NPA) warned that producers
>> >were being driven to the wall by spiralling feed prices which
>> >are making rearing pigs "unsustainable."
>> >
>> >It says that farmers are losing £26 per pig - the equivalent of
>> >£6 a second or £3.6m a week across the 1,400 producers in
>> >the industry - because of the high costs which are caused by
>> >global wheat price rises.
>> >
>> >As the EDP reveals in today's Farm & Country, the average
>> >cost of feed wheat has soared from £72.15 per tonne to
>> >more than £118.
>> >
>> >Pig and poultry producers in the eastern counties are the
>> >biggest consumers of feed grains including wheat last year.
>> >
>> >While the outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease had added
>> >to the industry's problems, the rising price of feed is seen
>> >as the biggest threat to pork production in the UK.
>> >
>> >Barney Kay, general manager of the NPA, said: "These
>> >survey results show us just how precarious the industry is
>> >as many farmers are seriously considering terminating
>> >production permanently. If this were to happen the UK pig
>> >herd will be decimated irrevocably. It's much worse even
>> >than foot-and-mouth.
>>
>> The demise of the meat industry would be good, not only for our
>> pockets, but our health and that of the planet too.
>
>Absolutely!
>
>BTW, -
>
>'From his own amazing 1928 chronicle Propaganda, we learn
>how Edward L. Bernays took the ideas of his famous uncle
>Sigmund Freud, and applied them to the emerging science of
>mass persuasion. The only difference was that instead of
>using these principles to uncover hidden themes in the human
>unconscious, the way Freudian psychology does, Bernays
>studied these same ideas in order to learn how to mask
>agendas and to create illusions that deceive and misrepresent,
>for marketing purposes.
>..
>Bernays popularized the idea of bacon for breakfast.
>..'
>http://rense.com/general78/believe.htm
>
>> I doubt they could cut any more corners in factory farming of their
>> animals, or make the animals suffer any more.
>
>Seems their damned god Mammon is not so almighty after all.
>These price-hikes for grain are a global reality, and will without
>doubt have a negative impact on the meat industry everywhere.
>

I'm all for the impending price increases globally if it will stop an
uncaring world of waste and neglect breeding a recipe for disaster for
the planet.

The price increases are being blamed on the need for bio fuels, which
is a myth. We are due a big crash anyway, and hopefully we'll take the
opportunity to rethink our priorities and strategy for feeding the
world instead of destroying it.

Pearl
2007-10-31 10:08:17 EST
"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:980hi3dn7dhpeh23n2f2qkt2q7e4d3ch1a@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 13:01:48 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
> wrote:
>
> >"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:iacgi394egtogut5g5nj4luf28mio0rf0a@4ax.com...
<..>
> >> I doubt they could cut any more corners in factory farming of their
> >> animals, or make the animals suffer any more.
> >
> >Seems their damned god Mammon is not so almighty after all.
> >These price-hikes for grain are a global reality, and will without
> >doubt have a negative impact on the meat industry everywhere.
> >
>
> I'm all for the impending price increases globally if it will stop an
> uncaring world of waste and neglect breeding a recipe for disaster for
> the planet.
>
> The price increases are being blamed on the need for bio fuels, which
> is a myth. We are due a big crash anyway, and hopefully we'll take the
> opportunity to rethink our priorities and strategy for feeding the
> world instead of destroying it.

Government & big business' war on human & nonhuman rights.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaL8I8_iZz8





Gloria
2007-10-31 15:06:59 EST
On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 14:08:17 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
wrote:

>"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:980hi3dn7dhpeh23n2f2qkt2q7e4d3ch1a@4ax.com...
>> On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 13:01:48 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:iacgi394egtogut5g5nj4luf28mio0rf0a@4ax.com...
><..>
>> >> I doubt they could cut any more corners in factory farming of their
>> >> animals, or make the animals suffer any more.
>> >
>> >Seems their damned god Mammon is not so almighty after all.
>> >These price-hikes for grain are a global reality, and will without
>> >doubt have a negative impact on the meat industry everywhere.
>> >
>>
>> I'm all for the impending price increases globally if it will stop an
>> uncaring world of waste and neglect breeding a recipe for disaster for
>> the planet.
>>
>> The price increases are being blamed on the need for bio fuels, which
>> is a myth. We are due a big crash anyway, and hopefully we'll take the
>> opportunity to rethink our priorities and strategy for feeding the
>> world instead of destroying it.
>
>Government & big business' war on human & nonhuman rights.
>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaL8I8_iZz8

Scary stuff. Just a shame the majority are too stupid, or ignorant to
care about their future.

Pearl
2007-11-03 14:22:51 EST
"Gloria" <letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:ogkhi39u70ofsiuco6nbef0fd46l6nlfp9@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 14:08:17 -0000, "pearl" <tea@signguestbook.ie>
> wrote:
<..>
> >Government & big business' war on human & nonhuman rights.
> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaL8I8_iZz8
>
> Scary stuff. Just a shame the majority are too stupid, or ignorant to
> care about their future.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances for
survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet."
- Albert Einstein
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

'Global food crisis looms as climate change and fuel shortages bite

Soaring crop prices and demand for biofuels raise fears of political
instability

* John Vidal, environment editor
* The Guardian
* Saturday November 3 2007

Algae stained mud carpets the drought ravaged Gayngaru wetlands
of Arnhem Land in Australia's Northern Territory. Photograph Torsten
Blackwood/AFP

Empty shelves in Caracas. Food riots in West Bengal and Mexico.
Warnings of hunger in Jamaica, Nepal, the Philippines and sub-Saharan
Africa. Soaring prices for basic foods are beginning to lead to political
instability, with governments being forced to step in to artificially control
the cost of bread, maize, rice and dairy products.

Record world prices for most staple foods have led to 18% food price
inflation in China, 13% in Indonesia and Pakistan, and 10% or more in
Latin America, Russia and India, according to the UN Food and
Agricultural Organisation (FAO). Wheat has doubled in price, maize is
nearly 50% higher than a year ago and rice is 20% more expensive,
says the UN. Next week the FAO is expected to say that global food
reserves are at their lowest in 25 years and that prices will remain high
for years.

Last week the Kremlin forced Russian companies to freeze the price
of milk, bread and other foods until January 31, for fear of a public
backlash with a parliamentary election looming. "The price of goods
has risen sharply and that has hit the poor particularly hard," said
Oleg Savelyev, of the Levada Centre polling institute.

India, Yemen, Mexico, Burkina Faso and several other countries have
had, or been close to, food riots in the last year, something not seen in
decades of low global food commodity prices. Meanwhile, there are
shortages of beef, chicken and milk in Venezuela and other countries
as governments try to keep a lid on food price inflation.

Boycotts have become commonplace. Argentinians shunned tomatoes
during the recent presidential election campaign when they became more
expensive than meat. Italians organised a one-day boycott of pasta in
protest at rising prices. German leftwing politicians have called for an
increase in welfare benefits so that people can cope with price rises.

"If you combine the increase of the oil prices and the increase of food
prices then you have the elements of a very serious [social] crisis in the
future," said Jacques Diouf, head of the FAO, in London last week.

The price rises are a result of record oil prices, US farmers switching
out of cereals to grow biofuel crops, extreme weather and growing
demand from countries India and China, the UN said yesterday.

"There is no one cause but a lot of things are coming together to lead to
this. It's hard to separate out the factors," said Ali Gurkan, head of the
FAO's Food Outlook programme, yesterday.

He said cereal stocks had been declining for more than a decade but now
stood at around 57 days, which made global food supplies vulnerable to
an international crisis or big natural disaster such as a drought or flood.

"Any unforeseen flood or crisis can make prices rise very quickly. I do
not think we should panic but we should be very careful about what
may happen," he warned.

Lester Brown, president of the Washington-based Worldwatch Institute
thinktank, said: "The competition for grain between the world's 800
million motorists, who want to maintain their mobility, and its 2 billion
poorest people, who are simply trying to survive, is emerging as an epic
issue."

Last year, he said, US farmers distorted the world market for cereals by
growing 14m tonnes, or 20% of the whole maize crop, for ethanol for
vehicles. This took millions of hectares of land out of food production
and nearly doubled the price of maize. Mr Bush this year called for steep
rises in ethanol production as part of plans to reduce petrol demand by
20% by 2017.

Maize is a staple food in many countries which import from the US,
including Japan, Egypt, and Mexico. US exports are 70% of the world
total, and are used widely for animal feed. The shortages have disrupted
livestock and poultry industries worldwide.

"The use of food as a source of fuel may have serious implications for
the demand for food if the expansion of biofuels continues," said a
spokesman for the International Monetary Fund last week.

The outlook is widely expected to worsen as agro-industries prepare to
switch to highly profitable biofuels. according to Grain, a Barcelona-
based food resources group. Its research suggests that the Indian
government is committed to planting 14m hectares (35m acres) of land
with jatropha, an exotic bush from which biodiesel can be manufactured.
Brazil intends to grow 120m hectares for biofuels, and Africa as much
as 400m hectares in the next few years. Much of the growth, the countries
say, would be on unproductive land, but many millions of people are
expected to be forced off the land.

This week Oxfam warned the EU that its policy of substituting 10%
of all car fuel with biofuels threatened to displace poor farmers.

The food crisis is being compounded by growing populations, extreme
weather and ecological stress, according to a number of recent reports.
This week the UN Environment Programme said the planet's water, land,
air, plants, animals and fish stocks were all in "inexorable decline".
According to the UN's World Food Programme (WFP) 57 countries,
including 29 in Africa, 19 in Asia and nine in Latin America, have been hit
by catastrophic floods. Harvests have been affected by drought and
heatwaves in south Asia, Europe, China, Sudan, Mozambique and Uruguay.

This week the Australian government said drought had slashed predictions
of winter harvests by nearly 40%, or 4m tonnes. "It is likely to be even
smaller than the disastrous drought-ravaged 2006-07 harvest and the worst
in more than a decade," said the Bureau of Agricultural and Resource
Economics.

According to Josette Sheeran, director of the WFP, "There are 854 million
hungry people in the world and 4 million more join their ranks every year.
We are facing the tightest food supplies in recent history. For the
world's most vulnerable, food is simply being priced out of their reach."

Food for thought Possible scenarios

Experts describe various scenarios for the precarious food supply balance
in coming years. An optimistic version would see markets automatically
readjust to shortages, as higher prices make it more profitable once again
to grow crops for people rather than cars.

There are hopes that new crop varieties and technologies will help crops
adapt to capricious climactic conditions. And if people move on to a path
of eating less meat, more land can be freed up for human food rather than
animal feed.

A slowdown in population growth would naturally ease pressures on the
food market, while the cultivation of hitherto unproductive land could also
help supply.

But fears for even tighter conditions revolve around deepening climate
change, which generates worsening floods and droughts, diminishing
food supplies. If the price of oil rises further it will make fertilisers and
transport more expensive, and at the same time make it more profitable
to grow biofuel crops.

Supply will be further restricted if fish stocks continue to decline due
to overfishing, and if soils become exhausted and erosion decreases the
arable area.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/nov/03/food.climatechange



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