Vegetarian Discussion: Re: Blue Tongue In Suffolk Meet Your Meat.......Look Whats In Your Dinner Today!

Re: Blue Tongue In Suffolk Meet Your Meat.......Look Whats In Your Dinner Today!
Posts: 13

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2   Next  (First | Last)

Old Codger
2007-09-23 05:11:28 EST
On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
<*l@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:

>Latest situation
>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>
>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>affected areas to the UK.
>
>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>
>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>
>Clinical signs
>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>local Animal Health Office.
>
>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>
>Clinical signs in sheep:
>
> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
> c.. High body temperature
> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
> e.. Lameness
> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>the coronary band
> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>wool production.
> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>
> k.. Nasal discharge
> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
> o.. Swollen teats
> p.. Tiredness
> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>
> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.

Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.

All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html

If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.

Sunday roast anyone?

Ingredients:

Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb

Lashings of Gravy

Antibiotics

sulphur drugs

Avian Influenza - 'Bird Flu'

Bovine Tuberculosis

Foot and mouth Disease

Streptococcus suis

Dioxin

Antimicrobial Drugs

Foodborne Zoonoses Infections

PRRS Virus

E. coli

Yersinia enterocolitica

Salmonella

Learn more about selected farm animals-related diseases below.

Bovine spongiform encephalopthy (BSE, mad cow disease): An infectious
disease associated with cattle.

Brucella Infection (brucellosis): A bacterial disease associated with
farm animals.

Campylobacter Infection (campylobacteriosis): A bacterial disease
associated with cats, dogs, and farm animals.

Cryptosporidium Infection (cryptosporidiosis): A parasitic disease s.

Escherichia coli O157:H7: A bacterial disease associated with cattle
(cows).

Q Fever (Coxiella burnetti) infection: A bacterial disease associated
with cattle, sheep, and goats.

Ringworm: A fungal disease associated with many farm animals,
including cattle, pigs, and horses.

Salmonella Infection (salmonellosis): A bacterial disease associated
with farm animals, especially poultry (chicken) and horses.

Yersinia enterocolitica (yersiniosis): A bacterial disease associated
with pigs.

Veg

Roast Potatoes/

Serve nice and hot and keep your fingers crossed.

Or if you don't want to play Russian Roulette with your family health,
go veggie.



Old Codger
2007-09-23 05:24:04 EST
On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:11:28 +0100, Old Codger
<*r@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:

>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
><mail@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:
>
>>Latest situation
>>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>>
>>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>>affected areas to the UK.
>>
>>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>>
>>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>>
>>Clinical signs
>>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>>local Animal Health Office.
>>
>>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>>
>>Clinical signs in sheep:
>>
>> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
>> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
>> c.. High body temperature
>> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
>> e.. Lameness
>> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
>> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>>the coronary band
>> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
>> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
>> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>>wool production.
>> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>>
>> k.. Nasal discharge
>> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
>> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
>> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
>> o.. Swollen teats
>> p.. Tiredness
>> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
>> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
>> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>>
>> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.
>
>Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
>of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.
>
>All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
>http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html
>
>If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.
>
>Sunday roast anyone?
>
>Ingredients:
>
>Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb
>
>Lashings of Gravy
>

Then there are the drugs used to treat the animals.

Liver Fluke (Fasciolosis)

Cattle can carry a significant liver fluke burden, with few obvious
signs of disease. However, fluke infestation in this ‘chronic’ form
leads to loss of performance and body condition, poor appetite and
lower feed conversion efficiency. The animals are also more likely to
pick up other, more harmful infections.

Chronic infection with adult and immature fluke occurs in early autumn
onwards and can be tackled by a number of products. Products such as
Triclabendazole and Closantel kill immature and adult fluke whereas
others, such as Clorsulon and Albendazole, are active against the
adult stages.

Combination fluke and worm products can be used at housing and again
in the spring, when the majority of the fluke are adult and
susceptible to the drug. This will limit the number of fluke eggs shed
on pasture at turnout.

Always consult the product label regarding meat and milk withholding
times. Many products are not suitable for dairy cattle producing milk
for human consumption, unless they are used at the start of the dry
period.

Gut Worm Scours (PGE)

Wormers are widely used to control the adult and larval gut roundworms
that cause ‘Parasitic Gastroenteritis’ (PGE), which usually manifests
itself in late summer.

Worms are active in the pasture from early spring onwards, favouring
temperatures above 10 degrees centigrade and high humidity levels.
Larval activity drops off during high summer, due to the intense
sunlight and drying out of the pasture and animal faeces; resuming
again with the autumn rain.

Products are grouped according to their chemical structures into three
main ‘broad spectrum’ categories:-

Group 1 – The Benzimidazoles (BZ) e.g. Albendazole

Group 2 – The Imidazothiazoles & Tetrahydropyrimidines (LM) e.g.
Levamisole

Group 3 – The Macrocyclic Lactones, Avermectins / Milbemycins (AV)
e.g. Ivermectin

Wormers in the above groups will be active against the major species
of gut worms and lung worms. Some will also be active against
tapeworms and liver fluke.

The products in group 3 - Avermectins / Milbemycins - offer varying
degrees of persistent activity against gut worms. They are also active
against some external parasites and are therefore termed
‘Endectocides’.

All the licensed anthelmintic products are very effective in
controlling adult and immature stages of the major gut worms that
cause PGE. Fortunately, there is currently little drug resistance
amongst the cattle worm population.

The Endectocide products, in either pour-on or injectable forms, offer
persistent activity and can be used at strategic times throughout the
grazing season to afford lasting protection from gut parasites.
Consult the product data sheet to determine the recommended dosing
interval for each product.

Long-acting injection and bolus products are also available, offering
sustained control of parasites over the grazing season. These are
suitable for growing young stock, but have long withdrawal periods, so
may not be suitable for finishing cattle.

The product selected for the autumn, as a housing dose, should have
efficacy against Ostertagia worm larvae that have ‘arrested’ and gone
into a dormant stage. Failure to control these arrested larvae can
mean a sudden flush of worms, causing severe diarrhoea and loss of
condition, when the larvae resume development in the late winter and
early spring period.

Parasitic Pneumonia

Most anthelmintics available on the market are highly effective
against both adult lung worms (Dictyocaulus viviparus) and developing
fourth-stage larvae.

An oral vaccine is also available for the prevention of lung worm in
calves.


Old Codger
2007-09-23 05:25:12 EST
On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:24:04 +0100, Old Codger
<*r@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:11:28 +0100, Old Codger
><OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:
>
>>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
>><mail@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>>Latest situation
>>>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>>>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>>>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>>>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>>>
>>>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>>>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>>>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>>>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>>>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>>>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>>>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>>>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>>>affected areas to the UK.
>>>
>>>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>>>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>>>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>>>
>>>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>>>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>>>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>>>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>>>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>>>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>>>
>>>Clinical signs
>>>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>>>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>>>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>>>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>>>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>>>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>>>local Animal Health Office.
>>>
>>>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>>>
>>>Clinical signs in sheep:
>>>
>>> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
>>> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
>>> c.. High body temperature
>>> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
>>> e.. Lameness
>>> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
>>> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>>>the coronary band
>>> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
>>> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
>>> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>>>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>>>wool production.
>>> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>>>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>>>
>>> k.. Nasal discharge
>>> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
>>> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
>>> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
>>> o.. Swollen teats
>>> p.. Tiredness
>>> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
>>> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
>>> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>>>
>>> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>>>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>>>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>>>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>>>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.
>>
>>Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
>>of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.
>>
>>All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
>>http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html
>>
>>If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.
>>
>>Sunday roast anyone?
>>
>>Ingredients:
>>
>>Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb
>>
>>Lashings of Gravy
>>
>
>Then there are the drugs used to treat the animals.
>
Headlines


National

Andrew Davies, of XLVets member practice the Southfield Veterinary
Group, Dorchester, comments: “We are investigating several reports of
coughing, reduced milk yields and loss of condition – there are a lot
more than 12 months ago. This tallies with the Parasitic Pneumonia
figures. Given the wet summer, we expect a big upsurge in fluke in a
month or two”. He advises farmers to avoid pastures with high fluke
potential, and to administer fluke treatments at drying off.

Fluke

Despite the anticipated autumn upsurge in fluke, the usual seasonal
decline of reported cases of Fluke (Fasciolosis) continued into August
- except in Scotland where cases rose. In Wales the level of
incidence remained steady, but at a higher rate than in 2006.

Gut Worm Scours

Reported cases of Gut Worm Scours reached their highest level since
2004 - nearly double that of 2006 – and may rise further yet. More
than half of the reported cases were in the South West region, and of
these the vast majority were of Nematodiriasis.

Pneumonia

Following the seasonal trend, reported incidences of parasitic
pneumonia continued to increase during August. Although there were
more than twice as many cases this year than August 2006, the figure
remains very close to that of the average for the 3 years from 2003.
The rise in pneumonia was driven by increases in Scotland, the South
West and Wales; all other regions reported a decline in reports




Old Codger
2007-09-23 05:26:16 EST
On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:24:04 +0100, Old Codger
<*r@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:11:28 +0100, Old Codger
><OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:
>
>>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
>><mail@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>>Latest situation
>>>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>>>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>>>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>>>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>>>
>>>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>>>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>>>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>>>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>>>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>>>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>>>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>>>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>>>affected areas to the UK.
>>>
>>>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>>>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>>>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>>>
>>>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>>>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>>>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>>>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>>>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>>>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>>>
>>>Clinical signs
>>>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>>>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>>>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>>>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>>>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>>>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>>>local Animal Health Office.
>>>
>>>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>>>
>>>Clinical signs in sheep:
>>>
>>> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
>>> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
>>> c.. High body temperature
>>> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
>>> e.. Lameness
>>> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
>>> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>>>the coronary band
>>> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
>>> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
>>> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>>>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>>>wool production.
>>> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>>>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>>>
>>> k.. Nasal discharge
>>> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
>>> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
>>> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
>>> o.. Swollen teats
>>> p.. Tiredness
>>> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
>>> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
>>> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>>>
>>> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>>>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>>>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>>>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>>>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.
>>
>>Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
>>of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.
>>
>>All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
>>http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html
>>
>>If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.
>>
>>Sunday roast anyone?
>>
>>Ingredients:
>>
>>Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb
>>
>>Lashings of Gravy
>>
>
>Then there are the drugs used to treat the animals.
>
Sheep Treatments

Liver Fluke (Fasciolosis)

Acute liver fluke disease, caused by large numbers of immature fluke,
can be fatal in sheep. In this scenario, a drug such as
Triclabendazole is recommended, as it controls many immature and adult
stages of the parasite.

In late winter and early spring, where adult fluke are present, these
can be controlled by higher doses of some Benzimidazole drugs and
specific fluke treatments such as Nitroxynil, Closantel and
Oxyclozanide. Mixed infections, found in autumn and early winter, are
also best treated with products that are licensed to control both
immature and adult fluke.

Seek advice from your vet or prescribing animal health merchant and
always read the product label.

Gut Worm Scours (PGE)

Wormers are widely used to control the adult and larval gut roundworms
that cause ‘Parasitic Gastroenteritis’ (PGE), which usually manifests
itself in late summer.

Worms are active in the pasture from early spring onwards, favouring
temperatures above 10 degrees centigrade and high humidity levels.
Larval activity drops off during high summer, due to the intense
sunlight and drying out of the pasture and animal faeces; resuming
again with the autumn rain.

Products are grouped according to their chemical structures into three
main ‘broad spectrum’ categories:-

Group 1 – The Benzimidazoles (BZ) e.g. Albendazole

Group 2 – The Imidazothiazoles & Tetrahydropyrimidines (LM) e.g.
Levamisole

Group 3 – The Macrocyclic Lactones, Avermectins / Milbemycins (AV)
e.g. Ivermectin

Wormers in the above groups will be active against the major species
of gut worms and lung worms. Some will also be active against
tapeworms and liver fluke.

The products in group 3 - Avermectins / Milbemycins - offer varying
degrees of persistent activity against gut worms. They are also active
against some external parasites and are therefore termed
‘Endectocides’.

In recent years, there has been increasing anthelmintic resistance in
the gut worms present in UK sheep. In Scotland and the North of
England, there is widespread reported resistance to the Group 1
Benzimidazole ‘white drenches’, and some flocks are also showing
resistance to other drugs.

The Benzimidazole products are recommended for use where Nematodiris
battus is a problem, as this particular worm is still largely
susceptible to the drug. Benzimidazoles are also effective against
tapeworm and, in higher doses, are used against adult liver fluke.

Group 2 products, such as levamisole are active against many of the
intestinal parasites, but have no activity against liver fluke or
tapeworms.

The Group 3 Macrocyclic lactones have persistent activity against the
majority of worm species and are used in strategic worming programmes
and as treatment for quarantined, replacement stock, before their
introduction to the flock.

Most of the wormers on the market will control the dormant stages of
gut worms that cause winter scours in sheep. Consult the product label
to ensure that these stages are covered, or repeat treatments may be
required.

The advisory booklet ‘Sustainable Control Of Parasites in Sheep’
(SCOPS) is available from the National Sheep Association. SCOPS
promotes effective worming strategies and treatment of newly purchased
stock, to limit the causes of worm resistance.

SCOPS also recommends that routine faecal egg counts are undertaken,
to determine whether worming is necessary and whether the wormers
selected are actually working correctly in individual flock
situations.

Parasitic Pneumonia

During the autumn months, outbreaks of coughing can be noted in the
sheep flock. This is due to damage inflicted by lungworm, Dictyocaulus
filaria. Adult worms can be present in the lungs one week after
ingestion of the larvae from the pasture. These invading larvae cause
bronchitis, which can then lead to pneumonia.

Most of the available wormers are active against the adult form of
lungworm.

Sheep Scab

Sheep scab mites are controlled by either plunge dipping with a
Diazinon dip, or by injecting the whole flock with a macrocyclic
lactone injection (e.g. Ivermectin, Doramectin or Moxidectin). Plunge
dipping will also control all the other major sheep ectoparasites,
whilst the macrocyclic lactone injection will also control gut worms.

When treating scab in the flock, the number of doses of injection and
the frequency between injections varies depending upon the product
selected. It is therefore recommended to consult your prescribing
animal health merchant or vet about dosing and to fully read the
product instructions..


Gloria
2007-09-24 04:41:56 EST
On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:11:28 +0100, Old Codger
<*r@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:

>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
><mail@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:
>
>>Latest situation
>>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>>
>>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>>affected areas to the UK.
>>
>>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>>
>>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>>
>>Clinical signs
>>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>>local Animal Health Office.
>>
>>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>>
>>Clinical signs in sheep:
>>
>> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
>> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
>> c.. High body temperature
>> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
>> e.. Lameness
>> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
>> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>>the coronary band
>> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
>> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
>> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>>wool production.
>> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>>
>> k.. Nasal discharge
>> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
>> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
>> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
>> o.. Swollen teats
>> p.. Tiredness
>> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
>> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
>> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>>
>> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.
>
>Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
>of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.
>
>All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
>http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html
>
>If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.
>
>Sunday roast anyone?
>
>Ingredients:
>
>Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb
>
>Lashings of Gravy
>
>Antibiotics
>
>sulphur drugs
>
>Avian Influenza - 'Bird Flu'
>
>Bovine Tuberculosis
>
>Foot and mouth Disease
>
>Streptococcus suis
>
>Dioxin
>
>Antimicrobial Drugs
>
>Foodborne Zoonoses Infections
>
>PRRS Virus
>
>E. coli
>
>Yersinia enterocolitica
>
>Salmonella
>
>Learn more about selected farm animals-related diseases below.
>
>Bovine spongiform encephalopthy (BSE, mad cow disease): An infectious
>disease associated with cattle.
>
>Brucella Infection (brucellosis): A bacterial disease associated with
>farm animals.
>
>Campylobacter Infection (campylobacteriosis): A bacterial disease
>associated with cats, dogs, and farm animals.
>
>Cryptosporidium Infection (cryptosporidiosis): A parasitic disease s.
>
>Escherichia coli O157:H7: A bacterial disease associated with cattle
>(cows).
>
>Q Fever (Coxiella burnetti) infection: A bacterial disease associated
>with cattle, sheep, and goats.
>
>Ringworm: A fungal disease associated with many farm animals,
>including cattle, pigs, and horses.
>
>Salmonella Infection (salmonellosis): A bacterial disease associated
>with farm animals, especially poultry (chicken) and horses.
>
>Yersinia enterocolitica (yersiniosis): A bacterial disease associated
>with pigs.

Yuk

>Veg
>
>Roast Potatoes/
>
>Serve nice and hot and keep your fingers crossed.
>
>Or if you don't want to play Russian Roulette with your family health,
>go veggie.
>


Gloria
2007-09-24 04:42:33 EST
On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:24:04 +0100, Old Codger
<*r@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:11:28 +0100, Old Codger
><OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:
>
>>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
>><mail@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>>Latest situation
>>>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>>>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>>>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>>>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>>>
>>>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>>>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>>>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>>>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>>>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>>>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>>>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>>>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>>>affected areas to the UK.
>>>
>>>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>>>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>>>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>>>
>>>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>>>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>>>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>>>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>>>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>>>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>>>
>>>Clinical signs
>>>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>>>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>>>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>>>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>>>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>>>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>>>local Animal Health Office.
>>>
>>>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>>>
>>>Clinical signs in sheep:
>>>
>>> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
>>> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
>>> c.. High body temperature
>>> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
>>> e.. Lameness
>>> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
>>> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>>>the coronary band
>>> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
>>> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
>>> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>>>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>>>wool production.
>>> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>>>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>>>
>>> k.. Nasal discharge
>>> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
>>> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
>>> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
>>> o.. Swollen teats
>>> p.. Tiredness
>>> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
>>> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
>>> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>>>
>>> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>>>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>>>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>>>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>>>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.
>>
>>Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
>>of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.
>>
>>All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
>>http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html
>>
>>If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.
>>
>>Sunday roast anyone?
>>
>>Ingredients:
>>
>>Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb
>>
>>Lashings of Gravy
>>
>
>Then there are the drugs used to treat the animals.
>
>Liver Fluke (Fasciolosis)
>
>Cattle can carry a significant liver fluke burden, with few obvious
>signs of disease. However, fluke infestation in this ‘chronic’ form
>leads to loss of performance and body condition, poor appetite and
>lower feed conversion efficiency. The animals are also more likely to
>pick up other, more harmful infections.
>
>Chronic infection with adult and immature fluke occurs in early autumn
>onwards and can be tackled by a number of products. Products such as
>Triclabendazole and Closantel kill immature and adult fluke whereas
>others, such as Clorsulon and Albendazole, are active against the
>adult stages.
>
>Combination fluke and worm products can be used at housing and again
>in the spring, when the majority of the fluke are adult and
>susceptible to the drug. This will limit the number of fluke eggs shed
>on pasture at turnout.
>
>Always consult the product label regarding meat and milk withholding
>times. Many products are not suitable for dairy cattle producing milk
>for human consumption, unless they are used at the start of the dry
>period.
>
>Gut Worm Scours (PGE)
>
>Wormers are widely used to control the adult and larval gut roundworms
>that cause ‘Parasitic Gastroenteritis’ (PGE), which usually manifests
>itself in late summer.
>
>Worms are active in the pasture from early spring onwards, favouring
>temperatures above 10 degrees centigrade and high humidity levels.
>Larval activity drops off during high summer, due to the intense
>sunlight and drying out of the pasture and animal faeces; resuming
>again with the autumn rain.
>
>Products are grouped according to their chemical structures into three
>main ‘broad spectrum’ categories:-
>
>Group 1 – The Benzimidazoles (BZ) e.g. Albendazole
>
>Group 2 – The Imidazothiazoles & Tetrahydropyrimidines (LM) e.g.
>Levamisole
>
>Group 3 – The Macrocyclic Lactones, Avermectins / Milbemycins (AV)
>e.g. Ivermectin
>
>Wormers in the above groups will be active against the major species
>of gut worms and lung worms. Some will also be active against
>tapeworms and liver fluke.
>
>The products in group 3 - Avermectins / Milbemycins - offer varying
>degrees of persistent activity against gut worms. They are also active
>against some external parasites and are therefore termed
>‘Endectocides’.
>
>All the licensed anthelmintic products are very effective in
>controlling adult and immature stages of the major gut worms that
>cause PGE. Fortunately, there is currently little drug resistance
>amongst the cattle worm population.
>
>The Endectocide products, in either pour-on or injectable forms, offer
>persistent activity and can be used at strategic times throughout the
>grazing season to afford lasting protection from gut parasites.
>Consult the product data sheet to determine the recommended dosing
>interval for each product.
>
>Long-acting injection and bolus products are also available, offering
>sustained control of parasites over the grazing season. These are
>suitable for growing young stock, but have long withdrawal periods, so
>may not be suitable for finishing cattle.
>
>The product selected for the autumn, as a housing dose, should have
>efficacy against Ostertagia worm larvae that have ‘arrested’ and gone
>into a dormant stage. Failure to control these arrested larvae can
>mean a sudden flush of worms, causing severe diarrhoea and loss of
>condition, when the larvae resume development in the late winter and
>early spring period.
>
>Parasitic Pneumonia
>
>Most anthelmintics available on the market are highly effective
>against both adult lung worms (Dictyocaulus viviparus) and developing
>fourth-stage larvae.
>
>An oral vaccine is also available for the prevention of lung worm in
>calves.

And we were concerned about a few E's!

Gloria
2007-09-24 04:43:12 EST
On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:25:12 +0100, Old Codger
<*r@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:24:04 +0100, Old Codger
><OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:11:28 +0100, Old Codger
>><OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:
>>
>>>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
>>><mail@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:
>>>
>>>>Latest situation
>>>>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>>>>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>>>>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>>>>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>>>>
>>>>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>>>>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>>>>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>>>>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>>>>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>>>>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>>>>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>>>>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>>>>affected areas to the UK.
>>>>
>>>>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>>>>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>>>>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>>>>
>>>>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>>>>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>>>>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>>>>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>>>>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>>>>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>>>>
>>>>Clinical signs
>>>>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>>>>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>>>>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>>>>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>>>>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>>>>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>>>>local Animal Health Office.
>>>>
>>>>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>>>>
>>>>Clinical signs in sheep:
>>>>
>>>> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
>>>> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
>>>> c.. High body temperature
>>>> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
>>>> e.. Lameness
>>>> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
>>>> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>>>>the coronary band
>>>> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
>>>> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
>>>> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>>>>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>>>>wool production.
>>>> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>>>>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>>>>
>>>> k.. Nasal discharge
>>>> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
>>>> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
>>>> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
>>>> o.. Swollen teats
>>>> p.. Tiredness
>>>> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
>>>> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
>>>> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>>>>
>>>> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>>>>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>>>>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>>>>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>>>>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.
>>>
>>>Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
>>>of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.
>>>
>>>All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
>>>http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html
>>>
>>>If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.
>>>
>>>Sunday roast anyone?
>>>
>>>Ingredients:
>>>
>>>Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb
>>>
>>>Lashings of Gravy
>>>
>>
>>Then there are the drugs used to treat the animals.
>>
>Headlines
>
>
> National
>
>Andrew Davies, of XLVets member practice the Southfield Veterinary
>Group, Dorchester, comments: “We are investigating several reports of
>coughing, reduced milk yields and loss of condition – there are a lot
>more than 12 months ago. This tallies with the Parasitic Pneumonia
>figures. Given the wet summer, we expect a big upsurge in fluke in a
>month or two”. He advises farmers to avoid pastures with high fluke
>potential, and to administer fluke treatments at drying off.
>
>Fluke
>
>Despite the anticipated autumn upsurge in fluke, the usual seasonal
>decline of reported cases of Fluke (Fasciolosis) continued into August
>- except in Scotland where cases rose. In Wales the level of
>incidence remained steady, but at a higher rate than in 2006.
>
>Gut Worm Scours
>
>Reported cases of Gut Worm Scours reached their highest level since
>2004 - nearly double that of 2006 – and may rise further yet. More
>than half of the reported cases were in the South West region, and of
>these the vast majority were of Nematodiriasis.
>
>Pneumonia
>
>Following the seasonal trend, reported incidences of parasitic
>pneumonia continued to increase during August. Although there were
>more than twice as many cases this year than August 2006, the figure
>remains very close to that of the average for the 3 years from 2003.
>The rise in pneumonia was driven by increases in Scotland, the South
>West and Wales; all other regions reported a decline in reports
>

I guess that explains why the hospitals are full!

Gloria
2007-09-24 04:43:44 EST
On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:26:16 +0100, Old Codger
<*r@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:24:04 +0100, Old Codger
><OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 10:11:28 +0100, Old Codger
>><OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote:
>>
>>>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 19:54:40 +0100, "Jill"
>>><mail@NOSPAMkintaline.co.uk> wrote:
>>>
>>>>Latest situation
>>>>Outbreaks of bluetongue (serotype 8) have now been confirmed in Germany,
>>>>Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 2007. All cases are
>>>>within the existing restriction zones of the affected countries. These
>>>>outbreaks indicate that bluetongue virus has 'overwintered' successfully.
>>>>
>>>>On the basis of these developments we consider that there is a low but
>>>>increased risk of spread to the UK from the affected areas of Northern
>>>>Europe. There is a low likelihood of virus introduction to the UK through
>>>>legal trade in susceptible livestock from known affected areas (imports from
>>>>bluetongue Restricted Zones are not permitted), or transiting restricted
>>>>zones. Imported livestock are tested post-import. The likelihood of
>>>>windborne infected insect vectors reaching the UK is difficult to predict,
>>>>however, this likelihood will increase if the wind direction is from the
>>>>affected areas to the UK.
>>>>
>>>>Animal keepers should remain vigilant for the clinical signs of the disease
>>>>in sheep and cattle, and as ever practice good biosecurity. Bluetongue is a
>>>>notifiable disease and must be reported to your Division Veterinary Manager.
>>>>
>>>>22 September 2007 - Laboratory tests have detected the presence of
>>>>Bluetongue in one cow on a premises near Ipswich, Suffolk. This is not a
>>>>confirmed outbreak unless further investigation demonstrates that disease is
>>>>circulating. The premises is under restrictions. The one infected animal
>>>>will be culled and epidemiological investigations are being carried out to
>>>>assess the situation. A news release has been issued.
>>>>
>>>>Clinical signs
>>>>Clinical signs can vary by species - although symptoms are generally more
>>>>severe in sheep, cattle can occasionally show signs of disease. Cattle are
>>>>important in epidemiology of the bluetongue as they act as an often silent
>>>>source of BTV - a reservoir for disease and keep the infection circulating.
>>>>It is important to be vigilant, especially in the case of sheep. If you
>>>>suspect any signs of the disease you must report this immediately to your
>>>>local Animal Health Office.
>>>>
>>>>Leaflet: Bluetongue - How to spot the disease (147 KB)
>>>>
>>>>Clinical signs in sheep:
>>>>
>>>> a.. Eye and nasal discharges
>>>> b.. Drooling as a result of ulcerations in the mouth
>>>> c.. High body temperature
>>>> d.. Swelling of the mouth, head and neck
>>>> e.. Lameness
>>>> f.. Haemorrhages into or under the skin
>>>> g.. Inflammation at the junction of the skin and the horn of the foot -
>>>>the coronary band
>>>> h.. Respiratory problems - difficulty with breathing and nasal discharge
>>>> i.. A blue tongue is rarely a clinical sign of infection
>>>> j.. Deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70 per cent. Animals
>>>>that survive the disease can lose condition with a reduction in meat and
>>>>wool production.
>>>> Clinical signs in cattle: It is possible that cattle will show no signs of
>>>>illness, however clinical signs have included:
>>>>
>>>> k.. Nasal discharge
>>>> l.. Swelling of the head and neck
>>>> m.. Conjunctivitis (runny eyes)
>>>> n.. Swelling in, and ulceration, of the mouth
>>>> o.. Swollen teats
>>>> p.. Tiredness
>>>> q.. Saliva drooling out of the mouth
>>>> r.. In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation.
>>>> s.. The disease can only be confirmed by laboratory tests.
>>>>
>>>> In cattle, the disease cannot be diagnosed on clinical grounds and
>>>>requires laboratory testing for confirmation. Photos of clinical signs...
>>>>Confirmation of Bluetongue disease
>>>>Under internationally agreed guidelines (OIE) Bluetongue is unusual in that
>>>>the disease is only confirmed when there is evidence that the virus is
>>>>circulating between animals and vectors in an area.
>>>
>>>Yet another disease in livestock. We only get to hear about it because
>>>of the recent FMD checks, usually no one would know.
>>>
>>>All borne from raising livestock in filthy, cruel conditions.
>>>http://www.animalethics.org.uk/aec-f-entries-factoryfarming.html
>>>
>>>If you value the life of your family it really is time to go veggie.
>>>
>>>Sunday roast anyone?
>>>
>>>Ingredients:
>>>
>>>Portion of Chicken/Pork/Beef/Lamb
>>>
>>>Lashings of Gravy
>>>
>>
>>Then there are the drugs used to treat the animals.
>>
>Sheep Treatments
>
>Liver Fluke (Fasciolosis)
>
>Acute liver fluke disease, caused by large numbers of immature fluke,
>can be fatal in sheep. In this scenario, a drug such as
>Triclabendazole is recommended, as it controls many immature and adult
>stages of the parasite.
>
>In late winter and early spring, where adult fluke are present, these
>can be controlled by higher doses of some Benzimidazole drugs and
>specific fluke treatments such as Nitroxynil, Closantel and
>Oxyclozanide. Mixed infections, found in autumn and early winter, are
>also best treated with products that are licensed to control both
>immature and adult fluke.
>
>Seek advice from your vet or prescribing animal health merchant and
>always read the product label.
>
>Gut Worm Scours (PGE)
>
>Wormers are widely used to control the adult and larval gut roundworms
>that cause ‘Parasitic Gastroenteritis’ (PGE), which usually manifests
>itself in late summer.
>
>Worms are active in the pasture from early spring onwards, favouring
>temperatures above 10 degrees centigrade and high humidity levels.
>Larval activity drops off during high summer, due to the intense
>sunlight and drying out of the pasture and animal faeces; resuming
>again with the autumn rain.
>
>Products are grouped according to their chemical structures into three
>main ‘broad spectrum’ categories:-
>
>Group 1 – The Benzimidazoles (BZ) e.g. Albendazole
>
>Group 2 – The Imidazothiazoles & Tetrahydropyrimidines (LM) e.g.
>Levamisole
>
>Group 3 – The Macrocyclic Lactones, Avermectins / Milbemycins (AV)
>e.g. Ivermectin
>
>Wormers in the above groups will be active against the major species
>of gut worms and lung worms. Some will also be active against
>tapeworms and liver fluke.
>
>The products in group 3 - Avermectins / Milbemycins - offer varying
>degrees of persistent activity against gut worms. They are also active
>against some external parasites and are therefore termed
>‘Endectocides’.
>
>In recent years, there has been increasing anthelmintic resistance in
>the gut worms present in UK sheep. In Scotland and the North of
>England, there is widespread reported resistance to the Group 1
>Benzimidazole ‘white drenches’, and some flocks are also showing
>resistance to other drugs.
>
>The Benzimidazole products are recommended for use where Nematodiris
>battus is a problem, as this particular worm is still largely
>susceptible to the drug. Benzimidazoles are also effective against
>tapeworm and, in higher doses, are used against adult liver fluke.
>
>Group 2 products, such as levamisole are active against many of the
>intestinal parasites, but have no activity against liver fluke or
>tapeworms.
>
>The Group 3 Macrocyclic lactones have persistent activity against the
>majority of worm species and are used in strategic worming programmes
>and as treatment for quarantined, replacement stock, before their
>introduction to the flock.
>
>Most of the wormers on the market will control the dormant stages of
>gut worms that cause winter scours in sheep. Consult the product label
>to ensure that these stages are covered, or repeat treatments may be
>required.
>
>The advisory booklet ‘Sustainable Control Of Parasites in Sheep’
>(SCOPS) is available from the National Sheep Association. SCOPS
>promotes effective worming strategies and treatment of newly purchased
>stock, to limit the causes of worm resistance.
>
>SCOPS also recommends that routine faecal egg counts are undertaken,
>to determine whether worming is necessary and whether the wormers
>selected are actually working correctly in individual flock
>situations.
>
>Parasitic Pneumonia
>
>During the autumn months, outbreaks of coughing can be noted in the
>sheep flock. This is due to damage inflicted by lungworm, Dictyocaulus
>filaria. Adult worms can be present in the lungs one week after
>ingestion of the larvae from the pasture. These invading larvae cause
>bronchitis, which can then lead to pneumonia.
>
>Most of the available wormers are active against the adult form of
>lungworm.
>
>Sheep Scab
>
>Sheep scab mites are controlled by either plunge dipping with a
>Diazinon dip, or by injecting the whole flock with a macrocyclic
>lactone injection (e.g. Ivermectin, Doramectin or Moxidectin). Plunge
>dipping will also control all the other major sheep ectoparasites,
>whilst the macrocyclic lactone injection will also control gut worms.
>
>When treating scab in the flock, the number of doses of injection and
>the frequency between injections varies depending upon the product
>selected. It is therefore recommended to consult your prescribing
>animal health merchant or vet about dosing and to fully read the
>product instructions..

We eat this crap? !

FACE
2007-09-24 06:16:33 EST
On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 09:43:12 +0100, in uk.politics.misc Gloria
<*s@yahoo.co.uk>, wrote

>I guess that explains why the hospitals are full!

That's right Gloria, if you go into the hospital as an inpatient, there's likely to
be a cow or sheep in the bed next to you...............


Gloria
2007-09-24 06:32:55 EST
On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 06:16:33 -0400, FACE <AFaceInTheCrowd@today.net>
wrote:

>On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 09:43:12 +0100, in uk.politics.misc Gloria
><letsstandup2bullies@yahoo.co.uk>, wrote
>
>>I guess that explains why the hospitals are full!
>
>That's right Gloria, if you go into the hospital as an inpatient, there's likely to
>be a cow or sheep in the bed next to you...............

Just like newsgroups then! A few mad ones too!
Page: 1 2   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron