Vegetarian Discussion: Appeal Court Victory For Animal Aid Campaigners

Appeal Court Victory For Animal Aid Campaigners
Posts: 11

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2   Next  (First | Last)

Old Codger
2007-09-10 04:11:56 EST
Appeal Court victory for Animal Aid campaigners
9 September 2007

http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/pr_experiments/ALL/1650//
Two Animal Aid supporters have won a landmark Appeal Court victory
over police attempts to criminalise them for running a high street
information stall, from where they sought public support for a ban on
primate research.

Miranda James and Tracey Rawlings set up their stall in Barnet, North
London as part of Animal Aid’s first Primate Action Day in November
last year. Police officers falsely accused them of obstructing the
public highway. When they came before magistrates in June, the charge
was upheld, even though they were granted an absolute discharge.

Amanda and Tracey were determined to clear their names. Animal Aid
shared that objective and we also wanted to defend the fundamental
right of other campaigners to engage in peaceful protest. We sought
the help of human rights organisation Liberty and, on Friday September
7, an appeal was heard at Harrow and Wealdstone Crown Court.

Judge Mole cleared the pair and, in a swipe at the police, said:

‘In granting an absolute discharge, the magistrates no doubt felt that
this was a prosecution through which no useful purpose was served, and
we share that view.’

He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a ‘lawful excuse’ for setting
up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
interruption had to be ‘unreasonable’ and ‘significant’ before an
offence was committed.

Animal Aid Director Andrew Tyler, who gave evidence at both the
magistrates and Appeal Court hearings, said in a statement:

‘We are very grateful to Liberty for securing this important victory.
Miranda and Tracey were not about to be criminalised for talking
peacefully to the public about the thousands of primates who are
subjected every year to horrific poisoning and brain injury
experiments. And Animal Aid wanted a message to go out to police
forces around the country that they will be met with a fight if they
try unlawfully to suppress legitimate campaigning activities. Miranda
and Tracey had been at the first of our four Primate Action Days,
which are aimed at achieving an EU-wide ban on all primate research.
Two days before the Appeal Court hearing, a giant step forward was
taken when a banning petition was closed after attracting the
signatures of more than half of all the European Parliament’s MEPs. It
is now that Parliament’s official policy to seek an end to all
research on apes and monkeys.’



'Mike'
2007-09-10 04:21:55 EST


"Old Codger" <drloh@meded.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:fuu9e3tr9dbv8gkb9lao4obl2b2gnp6u8p@4ax.com...

snip
>
> He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a 'lawful excuse' for setting
> up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
> communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
> important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
> users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
> message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
> interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
> interruption had to be 'unreasonable' and 'significant' before an
> offence was committed.
>
snip

THE SERVICEMAN

It is the Serviceman,
Not the reporter who has given
Us the freedom of the Press.

It is the Serviceman,
Not the poet who has given
Us the freedom of speech.

It is the serviceman,
Not the student activist who
Hs given the freedom to demonstrate.

It is the serviceman,
Not the lawyer who has given us the
Right to a fair trial.

It is the serviceman who salutes the flag,
Whose coffin is draped by the flag,
Who permits to protester to burn the flag.

Mike


--
www.rneba.org.uk for the latest pictures of the very first reunion and
Inaugural General Meeting. Nothing less than a fantastic success.
The Royal Naval Electrical Branch Association.
'THE' Association if you served in the Electrical Branch of the Royal Navy
www.rneba.org.uk to find your ex-Greenie mess mates
www.iowtours.com for all ex-Service Reunions. More being added regularly
"Navy Days" Portsmouth 25th - 27th July 2008. RN Shipmates will have a Stand




@@^>
2007-09-10 04:49:34 EST
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 09:21:55 +0100, "'Mike'" <3d&6d@woolies.com>
wrote:

>
>
>"Old Codger" <drloh@meded.ac.uk> wrote in message
>news:fuu9e3tr9dbv8gkb9lao4obl2b2gnp6u8p@4ax.com...
>
>snip
>>
>> He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a 'lawful excuse' for setting
>> up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
>> communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
>> important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
>> users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
>> message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
>> interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
>> interruption had to be 'unreasonable' and 'significant' before an
>> offence was committed.
>>
>snip
>
>THE SERVICEMAN
>
>It is the Serviceman,
>Not the reporter who has given
>Us the freedom of the Press.
>
>It is the Serviceman,
>Not the poet who has given
>Us the freedom of speech.
>
>It is the serviceman,
>Not the student activist who
>Hs given the freedom to demonstrate.
>
>It is the serviceman,
>Not the lawyer who has given us the
>Right to a fair trial.
>
>It is the serviceman who salutes the flag,
>Whose coffin is draped by the flag,
>Who permits to protester to burn the flag.
>
>Mike

And many a pro hunt pen pusher that would try to deprive us of that
freedom, even the old bill are at it now. They cant be arsed to come
round when someone is stealing our car, breaking into our house,
beating us up or mugging our children. Yet they find time to *capture*
animal right protestors in lawful pursuit!



--










Hansom <0>++<0>




Avoid the rush at the last judgement. Be converted now instead!


PRAYER FOR A NATION


When Pastor Joe Wright, of Central Christian Church, was asked
to open the new session of the Kansas Senate, everyone was expecting
the usual politically correct generalities.
But what they heard instead was this:

Heavenly Father, we come before You today to ask Your forgiveness
and seek your direction and guidance.
We know Your Word says,
‘Woe on those who call evil good,’ but that’s exactly what we have done.
We have lost our spiritual equilibrium and inverted our values.

We confess that:

We have ridiculed the absolute truth of Your Word and called it pluralism;

We have, worshipped other gods and called it multiculturalism;

We have endorsed perversion and called it an alternative lifestyle;

We have exploited the poor and called it the lottery;

We have neglected the needy and called it self-preservation;

We have killed our unborn and called it choice;

We have neglected to discipline our children and called it building self-esteem;

We have abused power and called it political savvy;

We have coveted our neighbour’s possessions and called it ambition;

We have polluted the air with profanity and pornography and called it freedom of expression;

We have ridiculed the time-honoured values of our forefathers and called it enlightenment.

Search us, 0 God, and know our hearts today; try us and see if there be some wicked way in us;
cleanse us from every sin and set us free. Guide and bless these men and women who have
been sent here by the people of Kansas, and who have been ordained by You, to govern this great state.

Grant them Your wisdom to rule and may their decisions direct us to the centre of Your will. I ask it in the name of Your Son, the Living Saviour, Jesus Christ. Amen.”


****************

'Mike'
2007-09-10 04:56:03 EST
>
> And many a pro hunt pen pusher that would try to deprive us of that
> freedom, even the old bill are at it now. They cant be arsed to come
> round when someone is stealing our car, breaking into our house,
> beating us up or mugging our children. Yet they find time to *capture*
> animal right protestors in lawful pursuit!
>
>
>

Or stand there with a Zap Gun 'waiting' for someone to break the law :-((

We had a case a few years back here on the Isle of Wight where 5, yes FIVE
plods were stationed round our most complex roundabout system, Coppins
Bridge, 'waiting' for people to ignore the Yellow Box system and then they
would pull them over :-((

I raised it on the Isle of Wight newsgroup and never saw it happen again ;-)
Not that I go that way tooooooooooooooo often now I have retired :-)

Mike


--
www.rneba.org.uk for the latest pictures of the very first reunion and
Inaugural General Meeting. Nothing less than a fantastic success.
The Royal Naval Electrical Branch Association.
'THE' Association if you served in the Electrical Branch of the Royal Navy
www.rneba.org.uk to find your ex-Greenie mess mates
www.iowtours.com for all ex-Service Reunions. More being added regularly
"Navy Days" Portsmouth 25th - 27th July 2008. RN Shipmates will have a Stand




Dirk Bruere At NeoPax
2007-09-10 15:59:11 EST
Old Codger wrote:
> Appeal Court victory for Animal Aid campaigners
> 9 September 2007
>
> http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/pr_experiments/ALL/1650//
> Two Animal Aid supporters have won a landmark Appeal Court victory
> over police attempts to criminalise them for running a high street
> information stall, from where they sought public support for a ban on
> primate research.
>
> Miranda James and Tracey Rawlings set up their stall in Barnet, North
> London as part of Animal Aid’s first Primate Action Day in November
> last year. Police officers falsely accused them of obstructing the
> public highway. When they came before magistrates in June, the charge
> was upheld, even though they were granted an absolute discharge.
>
> Amanda and Tracey were determined to clear their names. Animal Aid
> shared that objective and we also wanted to defend the fundamental
> right of other campaigners to engage in peaceful protest. We sought
> the help of human rights organisation Liberty and, on Friday September
> 7, an appeal was heard at Harrow and Wealdstone Crown Court.
>
> Judge Mole cleared the pair and, in a swipe at the police, said:
>
> ‘In granting an absolute discharge, the magistrates no doubt felt that
> this was a prosecution through which no useful purpose was served, and
> we share that view.’
>
> He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a ‘lawful excuse’ for setting
> up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
> communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
> important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
> users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
> message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
> interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
> interruption had to be ‘unreasonable’ and ‘significant’ before an
> offence was committed.
>
> Animal Aid Director Andrew Tyler, who gave evidence at both the
> magistrates and Appeal Court hearings, said in a statement:
>
> ‘We are very grateful to Liberty for securing this important victory.
> Miranda and Tracey were not about to be criminalised for talking
> peacefully to the public about the thousands of primates who are
> subjected every year to horrific poisoning and brain injury
> experiments. And Animal Aid wanted a message to go out to police
> forces around the country that they will be met with a fight if they
> try unlawfully to suppress legitimate campaigning activities. Miranda
> and Tracey had been at the first of our four Primate Action Days,
> which are aimed at achieving an EU-wide ban on all primate research.
> Two days before the Appeal Court hearing, a giant step forward was
> taken when a banning petition was closed after attracting the
> signatures of more than half of all the European Parliament’s MEPs. It
> is now that Parliament’s official policy to seek an end to all
> research on apes and monkeys.’
>

Congratulations!
http://theconsensus.org/uk/manifesto/index.html

--
Dirk

http://www.transcendence.me.uk/ - Transcendence UK
Remote Viewing classes in London

Old Codger
2007-09-10 16:11:28 EST
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 20:59:11 +0100, Dirk Bruere at NeoPax
<*e@gmail.com> wrote:

>Old Codger wrote:
>> Appeal Court victory for Animal Aid campaigners
>> 9 September 2007
>>
>> http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/pr_experiments/ALL/1650//
>> Two Animal Aid supporters have won a landmark Appeal Court victory
>> over police attempts to criminalise them for running a high street
>> information stall, from where they sought public support for a ban on
>> primate research.
>>
>> Miranda James and Tracey Rawlings set up their stall in Barnet, North
>> London as part of Animal Aid’s first Primate Action Day in November
>> last year. Police officers falsely accused them of obstructing the
>> public highway. When they came before magistrates in June, the charge
>> was upheld, even though they were granted an absolute discharge.
>>
>> Amanda and Tracey were determined to clear their names. Animal Aid
>> shared that objective and we also wanted to defend the fundamental
>> right of other campaigners to engage in peaceful protest. We sought
>> the help of human rights organisation Liberty and, on Friday September
>> 7, an appeal was heard at Harrow and Wealdstone Crown Court.
>>
>> Judge Mole cleared the pair and, in a swipe at the police, said:
>>
>> ‘In granting an absolute discharge, the magistrates no doubt felt that
>> this was a prosecution through which no useful purpose was served, and
>> we share that view.’
>>
>> He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a ‘lawful excuse’ for setting
>> up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
>> communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
>> important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
>> users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
>> message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
>> interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
>> interruption had to be ‘unreasonable’ and ‘significant’ before an
>> offence was committed.
>>
>> Animal Aid Director Andrew Tyler, who gave evidence at both the
>> magistrates and Appeal Court hearings, said in a statement:
>>
>> ‘We are very grateful to Liberty for securing this important victory.
>> Miranda and Tracey were not about to be criminalised for talking
>> peacefully to the public about the thousands of primates who are
>> subjected every year to horrific poisoning and brain injury
>> experiments. And Animal Aid wanted a message to go out to police
>> forces around the country that they will be met with a fight if they
>> try unlawfully to suppress legitimate campaigning activities. Miranda
>> and Tracey had been at the first of our four Primate Action Days,
>> which are aimed at achieving an EU-wide ban on all primate research.
>> Two days before the Appeal Court hearing, a giant step forward was
>> taken when a banning petition was closed after attracting the
>> signatures of more than half of all the European Parliament’s MEPs. It
>> is now that Parliament’s official policy to seek an end to all
>> research on apes and monkeys.’
>>
>
>Congratulations!

>http://theconsensus.org/uk/manifesto/index.html

I like it so much I'll publish:

The Consensus Manifesto

"The things that will destroy us are:
politics without principle;
pleasure without conscience;
wealth without work;
knowledge without character;
business without morality;
science without humanity;
and worship without sacrifice."
Mahatma Gandhi


Note that the rationale for all these policies can be found in various
essays on the website.
In general only major differences from existing government policies
are presented, in outline.

Political Reform

Any person elected to Parliament must permanently relinquish wealth in
excess of ten times the wealth of the average citizen.

No MP may take any other paid work while during their term in
Parliament.

Upon leaving Parliament an MP will continue to receive their salary
for five more years, during which they will be barred from taking paid
employment.

Upon leaving Parliament an MP will be barred from any work with
companies that involves them in government contracts, legislation, or
lobbying either directly or indirectly.

The above also applies to senior government ministers, but the period
is for life.

Those who are elected by the community to represent its interests must
not belong to exclusive or secretive organisations.

Political parties are to be funded solely by the state and/or
individual membership fees.

Promises made by a political party in order to get elected are to be
legally binding.

Proportional representation is to be instituted.

A wide ranging Freedom of Information Act is to replace the current
legislation, and the public to be given far greater access to all
aspects of government decision making and information.

Wherever possible all decisions will be made by one named individual,
supported (if necessary) by an advisory committee, who will bear sole
responsibility for such decisions. As far as possible the anonymity of
'collective responsibility' is to be abolished. Every decision will
have a name attached.

Power will be devolved to the lowest practical level in all instances.

Consensus members who are local councillors will have the freedom to
campaign on local issues as they see fit - with no doctrinaire
interference.

The Economy

While global free trade between equals is deemed desirable,
multinational companies are to be considered entities on a par with
foreign states. Their products to be taxed if their behaviour either
here or in the Third World is found to be unjust or exploitative. Not
'free trade – but 'fair trade'.

An interest free banking system is to be established for the benefit
of certain sections of the economy, particularly small high technology
companies, and also as part of a new Third World aid structure.

The national minimum wage to be raised to £8 per hour for service
industry workers in non-exportable jobs. A job not worth paying for is
not worth doing, nor should employers be subsidised (through top-up
welfare payments for the underpaid) in such industries.

Employment of illegal immigrants to be fined at the rate of £20,000
per instance, or 1% of turnover whichever is greater, with no limited
liabilities applying either to directors or shareholders of the
employer. Half of this money (up to a £10,000 limit) is to be provided
to the illegal immigrant upon deportation.

No work permits to be issued for unskilled migrants.

Work permits for skilled migrants to be issued only if there is no
significant unemployment in the sector of their employment, and if
their salary is higher than the median for the industry. Hitech
'sweatshop labour' is to be discouraged.

Small and medium sized high technology companies to be given major tax
breaks, as well as being exempted from much of the existing
bureaucracy.

Total taxation levels are not to be increased above current figures.

We believe in the government running a balanced budget.

There is to be a complete separation between state and private funding
of services. (No 'Private Finance and Investment' as presently exists
as a method of covert borrowing).

Natural monopolies, such as the water supply infrastructure,
electricity grid, rail infrastructure etc to be 'socialised'. That is,
they are to be redefined by legislation as non-profitmaking companies
ie all revenues are to be reinvested in the businesses and there will
be no payouts to shareholders.

The state pension, and retirement age, to be abolished. Those who
cannot work will instead be entitled to claim unemployment and welfare
benefits. This is a policy to be introduced over a fifteen year
timescale. It should be born in mind that we expect to see a drastic
increase in life expectancy in the next 30 years. Age discrimination,
and compulsory retirement solely on grounds of age are to be made
illegal.

Law and Order

Anti-discrimination laws to cover all characteristics that are not the
result of choice. Note that this does not include the prevention of
discrimination on grounds of religion or politics. However, unless
relevent to the job in question such discrimination in public
employment will not be legal.

Existing legislation (including anti-terrorist) will be rolled back to
ensure:
Presumption of innocence in all cases;
Full Right to silence
No double jeopardy;
No appeal by the prosecution after sentencing;
Trial by jury will remain a Right of every citizen;
Freedom of movement and assembly;
No detention for more than 24 hours without charge, and no denial of
access to a legal counsel;
No indefinite detention without trial will be permitted.

This means undoing major elements of British legislation of the past
fifteen years and restoring freedoms lost, especially to the various
anti-terrorist acts and the Criminal Justice Bill.

Freedom of speech, with the exception of speech that:
Constitutes a direct incitement to violence;
Is libellous (libel laws to be revised to limit damages to equal
prominence right of reply, corporations may only use libel laws
against other corporate entities - not individuals);
Is the product of a crime designed to acquire or create the
information – trading in it will make one an accessory (eg some
pornography, state secrets etc)

Laws to be introduced severing 'free speech' from monetary gain in
specific cases eg limitations on advertising, with consequent fines,
taxes or confiscations.

The abolition of 'special treatment crime' e.g. 'hate crimes' and the
introduction of mandatory 'zero tolerance policing'.

The police are to be placed once again under local control rather than
Home Office control as part of a decentralisation program.

Modification of the legal system - there are to be no Rights without
corresponding Duties, both of which must be legally enforceable to the
same extent. Where a corresponding Duty cannot be defined in law no
Right will exist.

UK law, where it pertains to purely internal matters, will not be
subject to any external jurisdiction eg the European Union.

Home occupiers will be allowed to defend themselves and their property
using 'necessary force' rather than 'minimal force'. The Rights of the
criminal will be subordinate to the Rights of the victim in all cases.

Individual justice shall always take precedence over 'social justice'.

Elimination of all existing drug laws, and the supply of any
recreational drug by state monopoly through local pharmacies to any
adult who can supply identification and proof of age. Unless the drug
in question is taxed (e.g. tobacco) medical treatment for short or
long-term effects will not be on the NHS. Supply to minors will result
in mandatory and lengthy incarceration.

Prison to be abolished in its present form, and replaced by two major
alternatives.
The first is secure long-term accommodation for violent offenders,
with full medical and psychiatric treatments.
The second is the establishment of an 'internal exile' scheme whereby
non-violent offenders can be removed to isolated communities to serve
out their sentence. Full education and vocational training would be
provided in such places, as well as extended family visits.

All acts between consenting adults are to be legal. Prostitution, for
example, to be legalised and regulated as any other entertainment
business. Assisted suicide to be permitted (but not euthenasia).

Environment

No more countryside to be despoiled by roads or new town building.

A major reforestation program to be instituted.

Targeted year on year reduction in the use of pesticides and
herbicides, and support for organic farming techniques.

Routine use of antibiotics in animal feed will be banned.

Support for small farmers.

The ethics outlined by Peter Singer (Princeton University, USA) will
be one of the guiding principles of our global life policies.

Fatal experiments on all animals with a nervous system more complex
than a mouse to be made illegal.

All genetic modifications of creatures more complex than a mouse to be
banned, unless such modifications do not result in any diminution of
the animal's ability to survive in its natural habitat.

Factory farming of animals to be made illegal.

Research into tissue culture as a replacement source for meat to be
prioritised.

Massive investment in ultra-high bandwidth communications and full
immersion virtual reality in order to minimise travel requirements of
many businesses.

Major development of offshore wind and wave power, with the aim of
replacing the bulk of electricity currently supplied by fossil fuels.

Research into load levelling and energy storage/conversion systems on
a national scale.

Support for photovoltaic roofing on new buildings - depending on the
cost and efficiency of the technology, which is advancing rapidly.

Domestic power usage reduction programs through insulation and energy
efficient lighting, taxation assisted.

Overall aim of population reduction for Britain - the falling
birth-rate will not be compensated by importing migrants.

Naturally occurring DNA sequences to be ruled as non-patentable and
non-copyrightable.

In conjunction with the EU or UN a world-wide life survey to be
carried out over a period of decades in order to map the genomes of
every species on the planet.

Public Services

In all affairs substantial control will be devolved to the lowest
practical level. No discrimination will be permitted, other than on
grounds of ability, in any sector that receives any state funding.

Transport

There is to be no more substantial road building. How individual towns
and cities cope with traffic flows and transportation is to be left to
them.

Where the decision is made to invest massively in public transport
systems there must be no-strike agreements with the workers in these
services. No nation should be held to ransom by a tiny minority of its
workforce.

Education

A nationally agreed funding formula will allocate money to schools on
a per student basis.

Schools will be allowed full autonomy.

The local education authorities will become purely service providers
and quality monitors.

Only governors and parents committees will have the power to remove
the head teacher, should the school be failing. The head teacher will
have the power to negotiate pay on a per school basis.

No culturally divisive education is to be supported by the taxpayer.
This includes schools charging fees as well as those selecting by
class, race or religion.

Discipline will be restored in classrooms and disruption and violence
will not be tolerated. In the worst cases CCTV may be installed to
provide objective evidence. Those pupils who engage in such will be
removed to special schools, which, at the discretion of the local
education authority, may be boarding schools. Such an option will be
compulsory if the parents cannot or will not rectify the situation.

Physical education will be given a high priority, bearing in mind the
deteriorating health of modern children.

Education, especially at university level, is to be targeted towards
socially useful subjects such as the sciences, medicine, engineering
etc and away from the 'softer' options such as media studies,
management, sociology etc. This will be done by providing full grants
to students undertaking the former, and removing subsidies from the
latter subjects. Those receiving full grants will be liable to repay
them if they emigrate within a ten-year period after graduation.

Health

Concerning the National Health Service, autonomy at the lowest
practical level will be the key.

Percentage of GDP spent on the NHS will be brought up to European
levels, and micro-management by civil servants and government in
general will be greatly reduced.

Ultimately the 'patient as customer' will act as quality control.

Reducing NHS reliance on imported medical labour, especially from the
Third World, will be a major aim of the education system.

Far more attention will be paid to preventive medicine.

Life extension and anti-ageing treatments to be introduced as they
become available and practical.

Housing

The old 'council housing schemes' to be revived especially for inner
city areas in order to provide cheap, safe and superior accommodation
for local people. The emphasis will be on high density, but instead of
the 'concrete jungle' estates or tower blocks of the past one should
think more of the Georgian architecture of Regents Park in London, or
of the better parts of Paris.

Disruptive and anti-social elements will be quickly removed.

One explicit aim of the new council housing will be to reverse any
ghettoisation trends in our cities and integrate ethnic minorities
fully into the mainstream of housing.

Given that an overall aim of the Consensus is population reduction in
Britain, in time we would expect to see a slow decline, in real terms,
of housing costs.

Defence

Withdrawal from NATO and the establishment of an EU force whose only
remit is within its own borders, or on the periphery, if it wishes to
act autonomously. Otherwise it is the force that will be made
available for UN peacekeeping missions in place of national forces.

The standardisation and integration of military equipment and national
forces across the EU.

An immediate halt to the selling of arms to nations that are not
democracies, or are debtor nations in the international community.

No government credit to be extended to defence industries, nor will
risk be underwritten by the taxpayer.

Retention of both tactical and strategic nuclear weapons and forces,
with next generation development integrated with the French.

Britain's military forces to be geared primarily towards defence of
these Islands, and secondarily defence of EU states.

The global role of our military to be scaled back.

Social

The state will not legislate personal morality.

Social engineering experiments will be supported by the state in areas
of housing, communal living (eg kibbutzim), co-operative housing
communities targetted at needy minorities, 'coming of age' ceremonies
encompassing legal social contracts modelled on, but extending beyond,
the German Jugendfeier of the Humanistic Association.

Marriage and cohabitation contracts to be introduced, severing this
institution from historical religious domination.

It will be made explicit that our society is only 'multicultural'
within the limits of the secular Western Liberal model. Within these
(wide) limits we will strive to create an integrated harmonious
society.

The European Union

In principle we believe a certain level of unification is both
desirable and necessary if Europe is to have a voice in the world.
However there are elements of the current EU structure and policies
that need massive revision, at least from the point of view of
Britain. In particular:

The European Parliament, and the directly elected MEPs, should be the
primary legislative body.

The Council of Ministers should be reduced to that of 'second chamber'
with power of veto.

The Commission should be de-politicised and become a purely executive
civil service.

The Court of Justice would preside over disputes involving members
states, EU institutions and businesses - but not individuals.

The European Economic and Social Committee would largely be scrapped
as there would no pan-European social policy at all; this being a
matter for individual states. In no case would the EU or any of its
institutions have a remit extending into the purely internal workings
of the member states.

The EU constitution should be a statement of the limitations of EU
power with respect to its member nations and citizens.

EU Legislation

Our internal legal system should not be dirtectly subject to European
legislation or any external Human Rights Act including that of the
United Nations. What laws our citizens choose to live under via their
democratically elected representatives are not the business of any
body external to our society.

We intend to withdraw or renegotiate all treaties that limit the
internal law making ability of Parliament or attempts to permanently
remove such powers from Parliament to any external body.

We note that our Head of State is the monarch and that all law
officers, the judiciary and military are sworn to obey lawful
authority as defined by legislation signed by the monarch after being
passed by Parliament. They are not sworn to a written constitution
neither internal nor external. This means that there still exists a
mechanism whereby our judiciary can be made to obey the will of
Parliament over any foreign legislation or treaty commitment.

Areas of Common Interest

The only legitimate areas of co-operation within the EU concern issues
that cannot, or should not, be resolved on an internal national basis.
These include, but are not limited to, defence, environment, foreign
policy, foreign aid, international economics, aerospace and
co-ordinated scientific research.

The Euro

There are both pros and cons with respect to adopting a continent wide
currency. At present we are not in favour of joining, however that may
well change as the situation develops over the next few years. If we
do join it should only be under two conditions.

That Britain retains is own gold and foreign currency reserves.

That there exists a viable plan to enable a smooth and swift
withdrawal as a fallback position.

International

Asylum

'Asylum seekers', the bulk of whom are economic migrants, will not be
provided with automatic access to Britain. Any arriving via a safe
third country in which they could have claimed asylum will be returned
there immediately with no judicial review. Others will be resettled
outside of Britain in nations culturally and economically compatible
with their nations of origin. The British government will pay one
year's worth of average income per refugee (at host nation rates)
towards their resettlement, plus a fee to the host nation for
accepting them.

Aid

Third World Aid will be in the following forms:

Abolition of interest on current debt

The establishment of an interest free banking system for aid.

No cash loans will be extended to governments.

Aid to be delivered primarily by expanding the role of private sector
aid agencies such as Oxfam, ActionAid etc

Free university education in Britain for the brightest students– and
compulsory return home.

Policy

There will be no 'realpolitik' – we will deal fairly and openly with
other nations, and pass laws to ensure this.

© The Consensus 2004


@@^>
2007-09-10 16:13:55 EST
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 20:59:11 +0100, Dirk Bruere at NeoPax
<*e@gmail.com> wrote:

>Old Codger wrote:
>> Appeal Court victory for Animal Aid campaigners
>> 9 September 2007
>>
>> http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/pr_experiments/ALL/1650//
>> Two Animal Aid supporters have won a landmark Appeal Court victory
>> over police attempts to criminalise them for running a high street
>> information stall, from where they sought public support for a ban on
>> primate research.
>>
>> Miranda James and Tracey Rawlings set up their stall in Barnet, North
>> London as part of Animal Aid’s first Primate Action Day in November
>> last year. Police officers falsely accused them of obstructing the
>> public highway. When they came before magistrates in June, the charge
>> was upheld, even though they were granted an absolute discharge.
>>
>> Amanda and Tracey were determined to clear their names. Animal Aid
>> shared that objective and we also wanted to defend the fundamental
>> right of other campaigners to engage in peaceful protest. We sought
>> the help of human rights organisation Liberty and, on Friday September
>> 7, an appeal was heard at Harrow and Wealdstone Crown Court.
>>
>> Judge Mole cleared the pair and, in a swipe at the police, said:
>>
>> ‘In granting an absolute discharge, the magistrates no doubt felt that
>> this was a prosecution through which no useful purpose was served, and
>> we share that view.’
>>
>> He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a ‘lawful excuse’ for setting
>> up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
>> communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
>> important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
>> users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
>> message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
>> interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
>> interruption had to be ‘unreasonable’ and ‘significant’ before an
>> offence was committed.
>>
>> Animal Aid Director Andrew Tyler, who gave evidence at both the
>> magistrates and Appeal Court hearings, said in a statement:
>>
>> ‘We are very grateful to Liberty for securing this important victory.
>> Miranda and Tracey were not about to be criminalised for talking
>> peacefully to the public about the thousands of primates who are
>> subjected every year to horrific poisoning and brain injury
>> experiments. And Animal Aid wanted a message to go out to police
>> forces around the country that they will be met with a fight if they
>> try unlawfully to suppress legitimate campaigning activities. Miranda
>> and Tracey had been at the first of our four Primate Action Days,
>> which are aimed at achieving an EU-wide ban on all primate research.
>> Two days before the Appeal Court hearing, a giant step forward was
>> taken when a banning petition was closed after attracting the
>> signatures of more than half of all the European Parliament’s MEPs. It
>> is now that Parliament’s official policy to seek an end to all
>> research on apes and monkeys.’
>>
>
>Congratulations!

>http://theconsensus.org/uk/manifesto/index.html

Where there's a will...



--










Hansom <0>++<0>




Avoid the rush at the last judgement. Be converted now instead!


PRAYER FOR A NATION


When Pastor Joe Wright, of Central Christian Church, was asked
to open the new session of the Kansas Senate, everyone was expecting
the usual politically correct generalities.
But what they heard instead was this:

Heavenly Father, we come before You today to ask Your forgiveness
and seek your direction and guidance.
We know Your Word says,
‘Woe on those who call evil good,’ but that’s exactly what we have done.
We have lost our spiritual equilibrium and inverted our values.

We confess that:

We have ridiculed the absolute truth of Your Word and called it pluralism;

We have, worshipped other gods and called it multiculturalism;

We have endorsed perversion and called it an alternative lifestyle;

We have exploited the poor and called it the lottery;

We have neglected the needy and called it self-preservation;

We have killed our unborn and called it choice;

We have neglected to discipline our children and called it building self-esteem;

We have abused power and called it political savvy;

We have coveted our neighbour’s possessions and called it ambition;

We have polluted the air with profanity and pornography and called it freedom of expression;

We have ridiculed the time-honoured values of our forefathers and called it enlightenment.

Search us, 0 God, and know our hearts today; try us and see if there be some wicked way in us;
cleanse us from every sin and set us free. Guide and bless these men and women who have
been sent here by the people of Kansas, and who have been ordained by You, to govern this great state.

Grant them Your wisdom to rule and may their decisions direct us to the centre of Your will. I ask it in the name of Your Son, the Living Saviour, Jesus Christ. Amen.”


****************

A*@aol.com
2007-09-10 16:32:17 EST
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 09:11:56 +0100, Old Codger <drloh@meded.ac.uk>
wrote:

>Appeal Court victory for Animal Aid campaigners
>9 September 2007
>
>http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/pr_experiments/ALL/1650//
>Two Animal Aid supporters have won a landmark Appeal Court victory
>over police attempts to criminalise them for running a high street
>information stall, from where they sought public support for a ban on
>primate research.
>
>Miranda James and Tracey Rawlings set up their stall in Barnet, North
>London as part of Animal Aid’s first Primate Action Day in November
>last year. Police officers falsely accused them of obstructing the
>public highway. When they came before magistrates in June, the charge
>was upheld, even though they were granted an absolute discharge.
>
>Amanda and Tracey were determined to clear their names. Animal Aid
>shared that objective and we also wanted to defend the fundamental
>right of other campaigners to engage in peaceful protest. We sought
>the help of human rights organisation Liberty and, on Friday September
>7, an appeal was heard at Harrow and Wealdstone Crown Court.
>
>Judge Mole cleared the pair and, in a swipe at the police, said:
>
>‘In granting an absolute discharge, the magistrates no doubt felt that
>this was a prosecution through which no useful purpose was served, and
>we share that view.’
>
>He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a ‘lawful excuse’ for setting
>up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
>communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
>important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
>users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
>message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
>interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
>interruption had to be ‘unreasonable’ and ‘significant’ before an
>offence was committed.
>
>Animal Aid Director Andrew Tyler, who gave evidence at both the
>magistrates and Appeal Court hearings, said in a statement:
>
>‘We are very grateful to Liberty for securing this important victory.
>Miranda and Tracey were not about to be criminalised for talking
>peacefully to the public about the thousands of primates who are
>subjected every year to horrific poisoning and brain injury
>experiments. And Animal Aid wanted a message to go out to police
>forces around the country that they will be met with a fight if they
>try unlawfully to suppress legitimate campaigning activities. Miranda
>and Tracey had been at the first of our four Primate Action Days,
>which are aimed at achieving an EU-wide ban on all primate research.
>Two days before the Appeal Court hearing, a giant step forward was
>taken when a banning petition was closed after attracting the
>signatures of more than half of all the European Parliament’s MEPs. It
>is now that Parliament’s official policy to seek an end to all
>research on apes and monkeys.’
>


Good for Animal Aid!

Angus Macmillan
www.roots-of-blood.org.uk
www.killhunting.org
www.con-servation.org.uk

All truth passes through three stages:
First, it is ridiculed;
Second, it is violently opposed; and
Third, it is accepted as self-evident.
-- Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)

Buddenbrooks
2007-09-11 03:22:04 EST

"Old Codger" <OldTodger@EuroSeptic.Con> wrote in message
news:n59be35osb6dn2cfv29op31naq6sunup6l@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 20:59:11 +0100, Dirk Bruere at NeoPax


Since you use someone elses name we can assume yours has no credibility,
that your "quotes" are doctored and deviate from the original in all
important areas. Best ignored and the sender added to the kill file.



@@^>
2007-09-11 03:35:45 EST
On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 08:22:04 +0100, "buddenbrooks"
<*s@aol.de> wrote:

>Old Codger wrote:
>> Appeal Court victory for Animal Aid campaigners
>> 9 September 2007
>>
>> http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/pr_experiments/ALL/1650//
>> Two Animal Aid supporters have won a landmark Appeal Court victory
>> over police attempts to criminalise them for running a high street
>> information stall, from where they sought public support for a ban on
>> primate research.
>>
>> Miranda James and Tracey Rawlings set up their stall in Barnet, North
>> London as part of Animal Aid’s first Primate Action Day in November
>> last year. Police officers falsely accused them of obstructing the
>> public highway. When they came before magistrates in June, the charge
>> was upheld, even though they were granted an absolute discharge.
>>
>> Amanda and Tracey were determined to clear their names. Animal Aid
>> shared that objective and we also wanted to defend the fundamental
>> right of other campaigners to engage in peaceful protest. We sought
>> the help of human rights organisation Liberty and, on Friday September
>> 7, an appeal was heard at Harrow and Wealdstone Crown Court.
>>
>> Judge Mole cleared the pair and, in a swipe at the police, said:
>>
>> ‘In granting an absolute discharge, the magistrates no doubt felt that
>> this was a prosecution through which no useful purpose was served, and
>> we share that view.’
>>
>> He declared that Miranda and Tracey had a ‘lawful excuse’ for setting
>> up their table - namely, they were exercising their right to
>> communicate with the public on a matter that they regarded as
>> important. They had made reasonable efforts to avoid interrupting
>> users of the highway, despite seeking maximum exposure for their
>> message. The prosecution had failed to demonstrate that there was an
>> interruption of highway users and even if they had done so, an
>> interruption had to be ‘unreasonable’ and ‘significant’ before an
>> offence was committed.
>>
>> Animal Aid Director Andrew Tyler, who gave evidence at both the
>> magistrates and Appeal Court hearings, said in a statement:
>>
>> ‘We are very grateful to Liberty for securing this important victory.
>> Miranda and Tracey were not about to be criminalised for talking
>> peacefully to the public about the thousands of primates who are
>> subjected every year to horrific poisoning and brain injury
>> experiments. And Animal Aid wanted a message to go out to police
>> forces around the country that they will be met with a fight if they
>> try unlawfully to suppress legitimate campaigning activities. Miranda
>> and Tracey had been at the first of our four Primate Action Days,
>> which are aimed at achieving an EU-wide ban on all primate research.
>> Two days before the Appeal Court hearing, a giant step forward was
>> taken when a banning petition was closed after attracting the
>> signatures of more than half of all the European Parliament’s MEPs. It
>> is now that Parliament’s official policy to seek an end to all
>> research on apes and monkeys.’
>>
>
>Congratulations!
>http://theconsensus.org/uk/manifesto/index.html
>
>--
>Dirk
>
>http://www.transcendence.me.uk/ - Transcendence UK
>Remote Viewing classes in London

> Since you use someone elses name we can assume yours has no credibility,

Bit like you then. Only a few months ago you were Hamish, then Pete,
the Lili's wearingem... weird huh?

>that your "quotes" are doctored and deviate from the original in all
>important areas. Best ignored and the sender added to the kill file.

Now, now. No need to get all shirty at Old Codger he's only doing his
best. We know he's probably pete the troll but who cares, who cares?
His information is good this time.

I propose we judge people on what they poast from now on. That makes
you a real wanker Hamish!



--










Hansom <0>++<0>




Avoid the rush at the last judgement. Be converted now instead!


PRAYER FOR A NATION


When Pastor Joe Wright, of Central Christian Church, was asked
to open the new session of the Kansas Senate, everyone was expecting
the usual politically correct generalities.
But what they heard instead was this:

Heavenly Father, we come before You today to ask Your forgiveness
and seek your direction and guidance.
We know Your Word says,
‘Woe on those who call evil good,’ but that’s exactly what we have done.
We have lost our spiritual equilibrium and inverted our values.

We confess that:

We have ridiculed the absolute truth of Your Word and called it pluralism;

We have, worshipped other gods and called it multiculturalism;

We have endorsed perversion and called it an alternative lifestyle;

We have exploited the poor and called it the lottery;

We have neglected the needy and called it self-preservation;

We have killed our unborn and called it choice;

We have neglected to discipline our children and called it building self-esteem;

We have abused power and called it political savvy;

We have coveted our neighbour’s possessions and called it ambition;

We have polluted the air with profanity and pornography and called it freedom of expression;

We have ridiculed the time-honoured values of our forefathers and called it enlightenment.

Search us, 0 God, and know our hearts today; try us and see if there be some wicked way in us;
cleanse us from every sin and set us free. Guide and bless these men and women who have
been sent here by the people of Kansas, and who have been ordained by You, to govern this great state.

Grant them Your wisdom to rule and may their decisions direct us to the centre of Your will. I ask it in the name of Your Son, the Living Saviour, Jesus Christ. Amen.”


****************
Page: 1 2   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron