Vegetarian Discussion: RSPB / SNH Led Slaughter Of Hedgehogs Was A Serious Mistake. Hedgehogs Now On Endangered List.

RSPB / SNH Led Slaughter Of Hedgehogs Was A Serious Mistake. Hedgehogs Now On Endangered List.
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Dr L Oh
2007-08-29 07:20:23 EST
CONservation hooligans RSPB and it's blood soaked quango friends
thought long and hard to force through the wholesale slaughter of UK
hedgehogs. Based on Nazi principles they sought to exterminate an
entire species. SNH adviser Malcolm Ogilvie was quoted as saying

"Hurrah! High time that these Nazi hedgehog invaders which have been
killing off the local birds are got rid of."

When the rest of the country was fighting to save and relocate them,
despite huge nationwide protests the RSPB/SNH et al chose to slaughter
them.

http://tinyurl.com/3bvnfr

RSPB have also led the call for the total eradication of the brown and
rare, black rats. Ruddy ducks throughout Europe. In fact the
CONservation hooligans have presided over the greatest decline in
species and habitats the world has known, so just where is our money
and donations going? The fats cats are feathering their own nests.

*********************************


New protection for UK's great and small

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/aug/28/conservation.greenpolitics/print

· Biodiversity Action Plan list doubles in size
· House sparrow, cuckoo and hedgehog added

Martin Wainwright The Guardian Tuesday August 28 2007

Some of the most familiar animals in Britain, including the hedgehog
and the cuckoo, have been added to the UK Biodiversity Action Plan,
the government's early warning system for species in serious decline.

The house sparrow, harvest mouse and other creatures central to
English literature, music and nursery rhymes will receive extra
protection, along with an increased number of wild habitats and
plants.

The action plan, reviewed every 10 years, has doubled the number of
species on the priority protection list, to 1,149 from 577 in 1997.
This is in spite of the all clear given to more than 100 species which
have flourished or stabilised in the period and have been taken off
special measures.

Concern about the hedgehog stems from an estimated fall in population
which, if continued, would lead to extinction by 2025. Familiar mostly
as a squashed victim on the roads, the spiny mammal is up against
traffic, pollution, pesticides, and garden chemicals.

The house sparrow has seen an estimated decline of 50% in the last 25
years, along with the once ubiquitous starling. Although public
buildings in many cities are still draped with mesh to deter
starlings, the huge flocks which used to wheel overhead are no longer
a common sight.

Announcing the list, the minister with special responsibility for
biodiversity, Joan Ruddock, remained optimistic that species and
habitat loss would be halted within three years. She highlighted
success stories in the last 10 years and said the increase in the list
was in part due to more rigorous scientific analysis.

"Through the Biodiversity Action Plan, we have shown that we can be
very successful when we target our resources at conserving particular
species and habitats," she said. "We have increased the population of
the rare cirl bunting and also areas of lowland heathland.

"We have even been able to remove some species from the list such as
the Killarney fern and the prickly sedge, because we have already met
all our action plan objectives for them. But our climate is changing
and it is more important than ever that we help wildlife habitats to
adapt."

The removal of some species from the list, whose "at risk" habitats
have also increased from 49 in 1997 to 65, is not all good news.
Several have become extinct, including the large copper butterfly, a
reintroduction after extinction by Victorian collectors, which has now
succumbed a second time.

Newcomers to the list include the grass snake, the garden tiger moth
and two seahorse varieties. The burgeoning list was welcomed by
naturalists, including Mark Avery, conservation director of the Royal
Society for the Protection of Birds.

He said: "It is to the plan's credit that we have seen dramatic
increases in key species such as the bittern, corncrake, and woodlark.
But the fact that the bird list now includes more than a fifth of all
of the UK's regularly occurring birds is a cause of alarm. Before we
can celebrate the widespread removal of species from the list, we need
further reforms of agriculture, a faster rate of habitat creation, and
action on climate change if we are really to halt biodiversity loss by
2010."


Crazyhorse
2007-08-29 08:19:39 EST
On 29 Aug, 12:20, Dr L Oh <dr...@meded.ac.uk> wrote:
> CONservation hooligans RSPB and it's blood soaked quango friends
> thought long and hard to force through the wholesale slaughter of UK
> hedgehogs. Based on Nazi principles they sought to exterminate an
> entire species. SNH adviser Malcolm Ogilvie was quoted as saying
>
> "Hurrah! High time that these Nazi hedgehog invaders which have been
> killing off the local birds are got rid of."
>
> When the rest of the country was fighting to save and relocate them,
> despite huge nationwide protests the RSPB/SNH et al chose to slaughter
> them.
>
> http://tinyurl.com/3bvnfr
>
> RSPB have also led the call for the total eradication of the brown and
> rare, black rats. Ruddy ducks throughout Europe. In fact the
> CONservation hooligans have presided over the greatest decline in
> species and habitats the world has known, so just where is our money
> and donations going? The fats cats are feathering their own nests.
>
> *********************************
>
> New protection for UK's great and small
>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/aug/28/conservation.greenp...
>
> · Biodiversity Action Plan list doubles in size
> · House sparrow, cuckoo and hedgehog added
>
> Martin Wainwright The Guardian Tuesday August 28 2007
>
> Some of the most familiar animals in Britain, including the hedgehog
> and the cuckoo, have been added to the UK Biodiversity Action Plan,
> the government's early warning system for species in serious decline.
>
> The house sparrow, harvest mouse and other creatures central to
> English literature, music and nursery rhymes will receive extra
> protection, along with an increased number of wild habitats and
> plants.
>
> The action plan, reviewed every 10 years, has doubled the number of
> species on the priority protection list, to 1,149 from 577 in 1997.
> This is in spite of the all clear given to more than 100 species which
> have flourished or stabilised in the period and have been taken off
> special measures.
>
> Concern about the hedgehog stems from an estimated fall in population
> which, if continued, would lead to extinction by 2025. Familiar mostly
> as a squashed victim on the roads, the spiny mammal is up against
> traffic, pollution, pesticides, and garden chemicals.
>
> The house sparrow has seen an estimated decline of 50% in the last 25
> years, along with the once ubiquitous starling. Although public
> buildings in many cities are still draped with mesh to deter
> starlings, the huge flocks which used to wheel overhead are no longer
> a common sight.
>
> Announcing the list, the minister with special responsibility for
> biodiversity, Joan Ruddock, remained optimistic that species and
> habitat loss would be halted within three years. She highlighted
> success stories in the last 10 years and said the increase in the list
> was in part due to more rigorous scientific analysis.
>
> "Through the Biodiversity Action Plan, we have shown that we can be
> very successful when we target our resources at conserving particular
> species and habitats," she said. "We have increased the population of
> the rare cirl bunting and also areas of lowland heathland.
>
> "We have even been able to remove some species from the list such as
> the Killarney fern and the prickly sedge, because we have already met
> all our action plan objectives for them. But our climate is changing
> and it is more important than ever that we help wildlife habitats to
> adapt."
>
> The removal of some species from the list, whose "at risk" habitats
> have also increased from 49 in 1997 to 65, is not all good news.
> Several have become extinct, including the large copper butterfly, a
> reintroduction after extinction by Victorian collectors, which has now
> succumbed a second time.
>
> Newcomers to the list include the grass snake, the garden tiger moth
> and two seahorse varieties. The burgeoning list was welcomed by
> naturalists, including Mark Avery, conservation director of the Royal
> Society for the Protection of Birds.
>
> He said: "It is to the plan's credit that we have seen dramatic
> increases in key species such as the bittern, corncrake, and woodlark.
> But the fact that the bird list now includes more than a fifth of all
> of the UK's regularly occurring birds is a cause of alarm. Before we
> can celebrate the widespread removal of species from the list, we need
> further reforms of agriculture, a faster rate of habitat creation, and
> action on climate change if we are really to halt biodiversity loss by
> 2010."

I thought the cull of hedgehogs was on the Outer Hebrides and was an
attempt to stop them decimating the numbers of ground nesting birds
because the hedgehogs feasted on the eggs?

I doubt this has anything to do with the decline of hedgehogs on the
mainland. I would suggest that the liberal use of slug pellets by
gerdeners may be more relevant.


Amethyst Deceiver
2007-08-29 08:35:50 EST
Dr L Oh wrote:
> CONservation hooligans RSPB and it's blood soaked quango friends

Oh dear me. If you're going to vomit this crap across totally unrelated
newsgroups, could you at least /attempt/ to look literate?
--
You're a lot smarter than you look.
Of course, you look like a retard.



Gloria
2007-08-29 08:49:55 EST
On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 05:19:39 -0700, crazyhorse
<crazy_horse_12002@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

>On 29 Aug, 12:20, Dr L Oh <dr...@meded.ac.uk> wrote:
>> CONservation hooligans RSPB and it's blood soaked quango friends
>> thought long and hard to force through the wholesale slaughter of UK
>> hedgehogs. Based on Nazi principles they sought to exterminate an
>> entire species. SNH adviser Malcolm Ogilvie was quoted as saying
>>
>> "Hurrah! High time that these Nazi hedgehog invaders which have been
>> killing off the local birds are got rid of."
>>
>> When the rest of the country was fighting to save and relocate them,
>> despite huge nationwide protests the RSPB/SNH et al chose to slaughter
>> them.
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/3bvnfr
>>
>> RSPB have also led the call for the total eradication of the brown and
>> rare, black rats. Ruddy ducks throughout Europe. In fact the
>> CONservation hooligans have presided over the greatest decline in
>> species and habitats the world has known, so just where is our money
>> and donations going? The fats cats are feathering their own nests.
>>
>> *********************************
>>
>> New protection for UK's great and small
>>
>> http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/aug/28/conservation.greenp...
>>
>> · Biodiversity Action Plan list doubles in size
>> · House sparrow, cuckoo and hedgehog added
>>
>> Martin Wainwright The Guardian Tuesday August 28 2007
>>
>> Some of the most familiar animals in Britain, including the hedgehog
>> and the cuckoo, have been added to the UK Biodiversity Action Plan,
>> the government's early warning system for species in serious decline.
>>
>> The house sparrow, harvest mouse and other creatures central to
>> English literature, music and nursery rhymes will receive extra
>> protection, along with an increased number of wild habitats and
>> plants.
>>
>> The action plan, reviewed every 10 years, has doubled the number of
>> species on the priority protection list, to 1,149 from 577 in 1997.
>> This is in spite of the all clear given to more than 100 species which
>> have flourished or stabilised in the period and have been taken off
>> special measures.
>>
>> Concern about the hedgehog stems from an estimated fall in population
>> which, if continued, would lead to extinction by 2025. Familiar mostly
>> as a squashed victim on the roads, the spiny mammal is up against
>> traffic, pollution, pesticides, and garden chemicals.
>>
>> The house sparrow has seen an estimated decline of 50% in the last 25
>> years, along with the once ubiquitous starling. Although public
>> buildings in many cities are still draped with mesh to deter
>> starlings, the huge flocks which used to wheel overhead are no longer
>> a common sight.
>>
>> Announcing the list, the minister with special responsibility for
>> biodiversity, Joan Ruddock, remained optimistic that species and
>> habitat loss would be halted within three years. She highlighted
>> success stories in the last 10 years and said the increase in the list
>> was in part due to more rigorous scientific analysis.
>>
>> "Through the Biodiversity Action Plan, we have shown that we can be
>> very successful when we target our resources at conserving particular
>> species and habitats," she said. "We have increased the population of
>> the rare cirl bunting and also areas of lowland heathland.
>>
>> "We have even been able to remove some species from the list such as
>> the Killarney fern and the prickly sedge, because we have already met
>> all our action plan objectives for them. But our climate is changing
>> and it is more important than ever that we help wildlife habitats to
>> adapt."
>>
>> The removal of some species from the list, whose "at risk" habitats
>> have also increased from 49 in 1997 to 65, is not all good news.
>> Several have become extinct, including the large copper butterfly, a
>> reintroduction after extinction by Victorian collectors, which has now
>> succumbed a second time.
>>
>> Newcomers to the list include the grass snake, the garden tiger moth
>> and two seahorse varieties. The burgeoning list was welcomed by
>> naturalists, including Mark Avery, conservation director of the Royal
>> Society for the Protection of Birds.
>>
>> He said: "It is to the plan's credit that we have seen dramatic
>> increases in key species such as the bittern, corncrake, and woodlark.
>> But the fact that the bird list now includes more than a fifth of all
>> of the UK's regularly occurring birds is a cause of alarm. Before we
>> can celebrate the widespread removal of species from the list, we need
>> further reforms of agriculture, a faster rate of habitat creation, and
>> action on climate change if we are really to halt biodiversity loss by
>> 2010."
>
>I thought the cull of hedgehogs was on the Outer Hebrides and was an
>attempt to stop them decimating the numbers of ground nesting birds
>because the hedgehogs feasted on the eggs?

That was a lie by the CONservation hooligans to scapegoat the alien
species
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/CAMPAIGNS/wildlife/ALL/322/

>I doubt this has anything to do with the decline of hedgehogs on the
>mainland.

It certainly does when the bad example encouraged others to kill
hedgehogs to supposedly protect birds eggs, and when the animals on
the islands were killed rather than relocated to the mainland where
they are now endangered.

> I would suggest that the liberal use of slug pellets by
>gerdeners may be more relevant.

It's been known for years to gardeners that the pellets kill the
hedgehogs and other wildlife, including food sources like snails etc.
They don't seem to care!

Gloria
2007-08-29 08:51:50 EST
On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 13:35:50 +0100, "Amethyst Deceiver"
<*m@lindsayendell.co.uk> wrote:

>CONservation hooligans RSPB and it's blood soaked quango friends
>thought long and hard to force through the wholesale slaughter of UK
>hedgehogs. Based on Nazi principles they sought to exterminate an
>entire species. SNH adviser Malcolm Ogilvie was quoted as saying
>
>"Hurrah! High time that these Nazi hedgehog invaders which have been
>killing off the local birds are got rid of."
>
>When the rest of the country was fighting to save and relocate them,
>despite huge nationwide protests the RSPB/SNH et al chose to slaughter
>them.
>
>http://tinyurl.com/3bvnfr
>
>RSPB have also led the call for the total eradication of the brown and
>rare, black rats. Ruddy ducks throughout Europe. In fact the
>CONservation hooligans have presided over the greatest decline in
>species and habitats the world has known, so just where is our money
>and donations going? The fats cats are feathering their own nests.
>
> *********************************
>
>
>New protection for UK's great and small
>
>http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/aug/28/conservation.greenpolitics/print
>
>· Biodiversity Action Plan list doubles in size
>· House sparrow, cuckoo and hedgehog added
>
>Martin Wainwright The Guardian Tuesday August 28 2007
>
>Some of the most familiar animals in Britain, including the hedgehog
>and the cuckoo, have been added to the UK Biodiversity Action Plan,
>the government's early warning system for species in serious decline.
>
>The house sparrow, harvest mouse and other creatures central to
>English literature, music and nursery rhymes will receive extra
>protection, along with an increased number of wild habitats and
>plants.
>
>The action plan, reviewed every 10 years, has doubled the number of
>species on the priority protection list, to 1,149 from 577 in 1997.
>This is in spite of the all clear given to more than 100 species which
>have flourished or stabilised in the period and have been taken off
>special measures.
>
>Concern about the hedgehog stems from an estimated fall in population
>which, if continued, would lead to extinction by 2025. Familiar mostly
>as a squashed victim on the roads, the spiny mammal is up against
>traffic, pollution, pesticides, and garden chemicals.
>
>The house sparrow has seen an estimated decline of 50% in the last 25
>years, along with the once ubiquitous starling. Although public
>buildings in many cities are still draped with mesh to deter
>starlings, the huge flocks which used to wheel overhead are no longer
>a common sight.
>
>Announcing the list, the minister with special responsibility for
>biodiversity, Joan Ruddock, remained optimistic that species and
>habitat loss would be halted within three years. She highlighted
>success stories in the last 10 years and said the increase in the list
>was in part due to more rigorous scientific analysis.
>
>"Through the Biodiversity Action Plan, we have shown that we can be
>very successful when we target our resources at conserving particular
>species and habitats," she said. "We have increased the population of
>the rare cirl bunting and also areas of lowland heathland.
>
>"We have even been able to remove some species from the list such as
>the Killarney fern and the prickly sedge, because we have already met
>all our action plan objectives for them. But our climate is changing
>and it is more important than ever that we help wildlife habitats to
>adapt."
>
>The removal of some species from the list, whose "at risk" habitats
>have also increased from 49 in 1997 to 65, is not all good news.
>Several have become extinct, including the large copper butterfly, a
>reintroduction after extinction by Victorian collectors, which has now
>succumbed a second time.
>
>Newcomers to the list include the grass snake, the garden tiger moth
>and two seahorse varieties. The burgeoning list was welcomed by
>naturalists, including Mark Avery, conservation director of the Royal
>Society for the Protection of Birds.
>
>He said: "It is to the plan's credit that we have seen dramatic
>increases in key species such as the bittern, corncrake, and woodlark.
>But the fact that the bird list now includes more than a fifth of all
>of the UK's regularly occurring birds is a cause of alarm. Before we
>can celebrate the widespread removal of species from the list, we need
>further reforms of agriculture, a faster rate of habitat creation, and
>action on climate change if we are really to halt biodiversity loss by
>2010."

>Oh dear me. I wont be supporting them any more.

Nor me.

Gary
2007-08-29 14:20:57 EST
On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 12:20:23 +0100, Dr L Oh <drloh@meded.ac.uk> wrote:

>CONservation hooligans RSPB and it's blood soaked quango friends
>thought long and hard to force through the wholesale slaughter of UK
>hedgehogs. Based on Nazi principles they sought to exterminate an
>entire species. SNH adviser Malcolm Ogilvie was quoted as saying
>
>"Hurrah! High time that these Nazi hedgehog invaders which have been
>killing off the local birds are got rid of."
>
>When the rest of the country was fighting to save and relocate them,
>despite huge nationwide protests the RSPB/SNH et al chose to slaughter
>them.
>
>http://tinyurl.com/3bvnfr
>
>RSPB have also led the call for the total eradication of the brown and
>rare, black rats. Ruddy ducks throughout Europe. In fact the
>CONservation hooligans have presided over the greatest decline in
>species and habitats the world has known, so just where is our money
>and donations going? The fats cats are feathering their own nests.
>
> *********************************
>
>
>New protection for UK's great and small
>
>http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/aug/28/conservation.greenpolitics/print
>
>· Biodiversity Action Plan list doubles in size
>· House sparrow, cuckoo and hedgehog added
>
>Martin Wainwright The Guardian Tuesday August 28 2007
>
>Some of the most familiar animals in Britain, including the hedgehog
>and the cuckoo, have been added to the UK Biodiversity Action Plan,
>the government's early warning system for species in serious decline.
>
>The house sparrow, harvest mouse and other creatures central to
>English literature, music and nursery rhymes will receive extra
>protection, along with an increased number of wild habitats and
>plants.
>
>The action plan, reviewed every 10 years, has doubled the number of
>species on the priority protection list, to 1,149 from 577 in 1997.
>This is in spite of the all clear given to more than 100 species which
>have flourished or stabilised in the period and have been taken off
>special measures.
>
>Concern about the hedgehog stems from an estimated fall in population
>which, if continued, would lead to extinction by 2025. Familiar mostly
>as a squashed victim on the roads, the spiny mammal is up against
>traffic, pollution, pesticides, and garden chemicals.
>
>The house sparrow has seen an estimated decline of 50% in the last 25
>years, along with the once ubiquitous starling. Although public
>buildings in many cities are still draped with mesh to deter
>starlings, the huge flocks which used to wheel overhead are no longer
>a common sight.
>
>Announcing the list, the minister with special responsibility for
>biodiversity, Joan Ruddock, remained optimistic that species and
>habitat loss would be halted within three years. She highlighted
>success stories in the last 10 years and said the increase in the list
>was in part due to more rigorous scientific analysis.
>
>"Through the Biodiversity Action Plan, we have shown that we can be
>very successful when we target our resources at conserving particular
>species and habitats," she said. "We have increased the population of
>the rare cirl bunting and also areas of lowland heathland.
>
>"We have even been able to remove some species from the list such as
>the Killarney fern and the prickly sedge, because we have already met
>all our action plan objectives for them. But our climate is changing
>and it is more important than ever that we help wildlife habitats to
>adapt."
>
>The removal of some species from the list, whose "at risk" habitats
>have also increased from 49 in 1997 to 65, is not all good news.
>Several have become extinct, including the large copper butterfly, a
>reintroduction after extinction by Victorian collectors, which has now
>succumbed a second time.
>
>Newcomers to the list include the grass snake, the garden tiger moth
>and two seahorse varieties. The burgeoning list was welcomed by
>naturalists, including Mark Avery, conservation director of the Royal
>Society for the Protection of Birds.
>
>He said: "It is to the plan's credit that we have seen dramatic
>increases in key species such as the bittern, corncrake, and woodlark.
>But the fact that the bird list now includes more than a fifth of all
>of the UK's regularly occurring birds is a cause of alarm. Before we
>can celebrate the widespread removal of species from the list, we need
>further reforms of agriculture, a faster rate of habitat creation, and
>action on climate change if we are really to halt biodiversity loss by
>2010."

Maybe it's about time they stopped the headline grabbing and
concentrated on the common species as well?


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