Dog Discussion: Training Question

Training Question
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Bill Schowengerdt
2004-05-09 14:05:38 EST
Hi,

New dog and she has a habit of passing me when going down stairs. She is
a big dog and "brushes" past me is such a way that it is only a matter of
time before she causes me to fall.

Does anyone have a neat trick to stop this behavior?

Thanks
--
Bill

I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook Pegler --

Kilikini
2004-05-09 14:35:31 EST
"Bill Schowengerdt" <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in message
news:bgss905t1pj73bugs102gk9n9cvgmuvdqk@4ax.com...
> Hi,
>
> New dog and she has a habit of passing me when going down stairs. She is
> a big dog and "brushes" past me is such a way that it is only a matter of
> time before she causes me to fall.
>
> Does anyone have a neat trick to stop this behavior?
>
> Thanks
> --
> Bill
>
> I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook Pegler --


This is an excellent question! I don't have stairs, but I have narrow
hallways and my dog is always racing past me at a full gallop, throwing me
against the wall as he passes. Or he'll force himself right in between my
legs (and he's 55 pounds) as I walk, in order to "beat" me to the next room.
He does the same thing with doorways. Even when I ask him sit and stay,
just as I'm opening a door, he bolts up and lunges at the door, ripping the
knob right from my hands in his effort to be first. I think it's a
dominance issue. (He who gets there first, rules.) When he nearly knocks
me over, I exclaim "Hey!" loudly in surprise and he will turn around, but he
just looks at me, tail wagging and literally grinning. It seems like he
knows what he's going and does it on purpose!

Any suggestions for Bill and me?

kili
--
"Beer, the cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems." - - Homer
Simpson



Diddy
2004-05-09 14:39:19 EST
"kilikini" <kilikini1@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote in
news:TRunc.6725$q_1.2467@twister.socal.rr.com:

> "Bill Schowengerdt" <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in message
> news:bgss905t1pj73bugs102gk9n9cvgmuvdqk@4ax.com...
>> Hi,
>>
>> New dog and she has a habit of passing me when going down stairs. She
>> is a big dog and "brushes" past me is such a way that it is only a
>> matter of time before she causes me to fall.
>>
>> Does anyone have a neat trick to stop this behavior?
>>
>> Thanks
>> --
>> Bill
>>
>> I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook Pegler --
>
>
> This is an excellent question! I don't have stairs, but I have narrow
> hallways and my dog is always racing past me at a full gallop,
> throwing me against the wall as he passes. Or he'll force himself
> right in between my legs (and he's 55 pounds) as I walk, in order to
> "beat" me to the next room. He does the same thing with doorways.
> Even when I ask him sit and stay, just as I'm opening a door, he bolts
> up and lunges at the door, ripping the knob right from my hands in his
> effort to be first. I think it's a dominance issue. (He who gets
> there first, rules.) When he nearly knocks me over, I exclaim "Hey!"
> loudly in surprise and he will turn around, but he just looks at me,
> tail wagging and literally grinning. It seems like he knows what he's
> going and does it on purpose!
>
> Any suggestions for Bill and me?
>
> kili
> --
> "Beer, the cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems." - -
> Homer Simpson
>
>
>

Teach him to STAY at the top of the steps until you get to the bottom, then
call him. Always remember to call, or he willo feel betrayed.
Teaching basic stay, then increasing the distance as you move down the
stairs should improve success.

Bill Schowengerdt
2004-05-09 15:09:03 EST
On Sun, 09 May 2004 13:39:19 -0500, In the heat of the moment, diddy
<*y@nospam.diddy.net> posted:
.
>"kilikini" <kilikini1@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote in
>news:TRunc.6725$q_1.2467@twister.socal.rr.com:
>
>> "Bill Schowengerdt" <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in message
>> news:bgss905t1pj73bugs102gk9n9cvgmuvdqk@4ax.com...
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> New dog and she has a habit of passing me when going down stairs. She
>>> is a big dog and "brushes" past me is such a way that it is only a
>>> matter of time before she causes me to fall.
>>>
>>> Does anyone have a neat trick to stop this behavior?
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> --
>>> Bill
>>>
>>> I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook Pegler --
>>
>>
>> This is an excellent question! I don't have stairs, but I have narrow
>> hallways and my dog is always racing past me at a full gallop,
>> throwing me against the wall as he passes. Or he'll force himself
>> right in between my legs (and he's 55 pounds) as I walk, in order to
>> "beat" me to the next room. He does the same thing with doorways.
>> Even when I ask him sit and stay, just as I'm opening a door, he bolts
>> up and lunges at the door, ripping the knob right from my hands in his
>> effort to be first. I think it's a dominance issue. (He who gets
>> there first, rules.) When he nearly knocks me over, I exclaim "Hey!"
>> loudly in surprise and he will turn around, but he just looks at me,
>> tail wagging and literally grinning. It seems like he knows what he's
>> going and does it on purpose!
>>
>> Any suggestions for Bill and me?
>>
>> kili
>> --
>> "Beer, the cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems." - -
>> Homer Simpson
>>
>>
>>
>
>Teach him to STAY at the top of the steps until you get to the bottom, then
>call him. Always remember to call, or he willo feel betrayed.
>Teaching basic stay, then increasing the distance as you move down the
>stairs should improve success.


Perhaps you are correct, but I was hopeing for a simpler way since in the
case of stairs, I think Kili was correct. She seems to have something
else going on because the stay command does not work

But perhaps that is the only solution is to somehow strenghten the stay
order.

--
Bill

I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook Pegler --

The Puppy Wizard
2004-05-09 22:20:02 EST
BWEEEEEAAHHAHAHAHHAAA!!!

"kilikini" <kilikini1@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote in message
news:TRunc.6725$q_1.2467@twister.socal.rr.com...
> "Bill Schowengerdt" <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in message
> news:bgss905t1pj73bugs102gk9n9cvgmuvdqk@4ax.com...
> > Hi,
> >
> > New dog and she has a habit of passing me when going down
stairs. She is
> > a big dog and "brushes" past me is such a way that it is only
a matter of
> > time before she causes me to fall.
> >
> > Does anyone have a neat trick to stop this behavior?
> >
> > Thanks
> > --
> > Bill
> >
> > I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook
Pegler --
>
>
> This is an excellent question! I don't have stairs, but I have
narrow
> hallways and my dog is always racing past me at a full gallop,
throwing me
> against the wall as he passes. Or he'll force himself right in
between my
> legs (and he's 55 pounds) as I walk, in order to "beat" me to
the next room.
> He does the same thing with doorways. Even when I ask him sit
and stay,
> just as I'm opening a door, he bolts up and lunges at the door,
ripping the
> knob right from my hands in his effort to be first. I think
it's a
> dominance issue. (He who gets there first, rules.) When he
nearly knocks
> me over, I exclaim "Hey!" loudly in surprise and he will turn
around, but he
> just looks at me, tail wagging and literally grinning. It seems
like he
> knows what he's going and does it on purpose!
>
> Any suggestions for Bill and me?
>
> kili
> --
> "Beer, the cause of, and solution to, all of life's
roblems." - - Homer
> Simpson
>
>



The Puppy Wizard
2004-05-09 22:22:03 EST
Try some tastey yummies.

"Bill Schowengerdt" <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in message
news:o70t90h5v5jmhbkato9bs6ghbft2sd3h0l@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 09 May 2004 13:39:19 -0500, In the heat of the moment,
diddy
> <diddy@nospam.diddy.net> posted:
> .
> >"kilikini" <kilikini1@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote in
> >news:TRunc.6725$q_1.2467@twister.socal.rr.com:
> >
> >> "Bill Schowengerdt" <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in
message
> >> news:bgss905t1pj73bugs102gk9n9cvgmuvdqk@4ax.com...
> >>> Hi,
> >>>
> >>> New dog and she has a habit of passing me when going down
stairs. She
> >>> is a big dog and "brushes" past me is such a way that it is
only a
> >>> matter of time before she causes me to fall.
> >>>
> >>> Does anyone have a neat trick to stop this behavior?
> >>>
> >>> Thanks
> >>> --
> >>> Bill
> >>>
> >>> I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook
Pegler --
> >>
> >>
> >> This is an excellent question! I don't have stairs, but I
have narrow
> >> hallways and my dog is always racing past me at a full
gallop,
> >> throwing me against the wall as he passes. Or he'll force
himself
> >> right in between my legs (and he's 55 pounds) as I walk, in
order to
> >> "beat" me to the next room. He does the same thing with
doorways.
> >> Even when I ask him sit and stay, just as I'm opening a door,
he bolts
> >> up and lunges at the door, ripping the knob right from my
hands in his
> >> effort to be first. I think it's a dominance issue. (He who
gets
> >> there first, rules.) When he nearly knocks me over, I
exclaim "Hey!"
> >> loudly in surprise and he will turn around, but he just looks
at me,
> >> tail wagging and literally grinning. It seems like he knows
what he's
> >> going and does it on purpose!
> >>
> >> Any suggestions for Bill and me?
> >>
> >> kili
> >> --
> >> "Beer, the cause of, and solution to, all of life's
problems." - -
> >> Homer Simpson
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >Teach him to STAY at the top of the steps until you get to the
bottom, then
> >call him. Always remember to call, or he willo feel betrayed.
> >Teaching basic stay, then increasing the distance as you move
down the
> >stairs should improve success.
>
>
> Perhaps you are correct, but I was hopeing for a simpler way
since in the
> case of stairs, I think Kili was correct. She seems to have
something
> else going on because the stay command does not work
>
> But perhaps that is the only solution is to somehow strenghten
the stay
> order.
>
> --
> Bill
>
> I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook
Pegler --



Ngumba Zuleke
2004-05-09 22:47:53 EST

Bill Schowengerdt <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in message
news:bgss905t1pj73bugs102gk9n9cvgmuvdqk@4ax.com...
> Hi,
>
> New dog and she has a habit of passing me when going down stairs. She
is
> a big dog and "brushes" past me is such a way that it is only a matter
of
> time before she causes me to fall.
>
> Does anyone have a neat trick to stop this behavior?

yep, it's called 'obedience' !

teach her to stay.

problem solved.

seriously, it's *that* simple.

>
> Thanks
> --
> Bill
>
> I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook Pegler --



Diana
2004-05-10 05:21:22 EST

"Ngumba Zuleke" <zuleke@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:409eed9a@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
[..]

>
> teach her to stay.
>
> problem solved.
>
> seriously, it's *that* simple.
>
> >

That's what I do - and the same for my pup's wanting to 'help' me with my
coat, shoes, socks - whatever. If she's in a sit stay, she's not in my way.
Once I am ready for her, then we can have fun together on my terms (in
theory, anyhow ;))

I also do this on walks when we reach a muddy bank and I am worried about
being pulled over - a simple sit stay (using a flexi lead if its near a
road), then calling her when I am ready solves all worries :D

You could consider if you want your dog upstairs at all though - Cin comes
up cos I work from my office upstairs, but stairs are not good for young
dogs joints and if you are worried about being knocked over on the stairs,
the easiest way in the world is not to let your dog on them in the first
place.

Diana



Bill Hanna
2004-05-11 12:18:11 EST
On Mon, 10 May 2004 10:21:22 +0100, In the heat of the moment, "Diana"
<*a@dogstuffagain.fslife.co.uk> posted:
.
>
>"Ngumba Zuleke" <zuleke@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:409eed9a@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
>[..]
>
>>
>> teach her to stay.
>>
>> problem solved.
>>
>> seriously, it's *that* simple.
>>
>> >
>
>That's what I do - and the same for my pup's wanting to 'help' me with my
>coat, shoes, socks - whatever. If she's in a sit stay, she's not in my way.
>Once I am ready for her, then we can have fun together on my terms (in
>theory, anyhow ;))
>
>I also do this on walks when we reach a muddy bank and I am worried about
>being pulled over - a simple sit stay (using a flexi lead if its near a
>road), then calling her when I am ready solves all worries :D
>
>You could consider if you want your dog upstairs at all though - Cin comes
>up cos I work from my office upstairs, but stairs are not good for young
>dogs joints and if you are worried about being knocked over on the stairs,
>the easiest way in the world is not to let your dog on them in the first
>place.


Thank you for your reply. From your answer and others, it looks like stay
is the only solution. So far... I am having real problems getting her to
stay whenever she is excited, and times when her "velcro dog" habits take
over, when I go up stairs, it is a big velcro dog situation.

BTW What is a flexi lead? Is that one that rolls up into a spring loaded
handle?

Thanks again
--
Bill

I am a member of the rabble in good standing. -- Westbrook Pegler --

Diana
2004-05-12 04:08:38 EST

"Bill Hanna" <Billhanna@boggletech.com> wrote in message
news:btu1a05h18gpma223ipm85ievj2t5kvn5c@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 10 May 2004 10:21:22 +0100, In the heat of the moment, "Diana"
> <diana@dogstuffagain.fslife.co.uk> posted:
[..]
>
> Thank you for your reply. From your answer and others, it looks like stay
> is the only solution. So far... I am having real problems getting her to
> stay whenever she is excited, and times when her "velcro dog" habits take
> over, when I go up stairs, it is a big velcro dog situation.

join the club, but practice & persistance will win you through. Practice sit
/ stays at any time and place throughout the day and ensure they are well
rewared on release.

>
> BTW What is a flexi lead? Is that one that rolls up into a spring loaded
> handle?
>

Yup - very useful if used sensibly, a pita when used fully extended in
places where it isn't practical.

Diana


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