Dog Discussion: Behavior

Behavior
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Memememe
2003-08-07 20:54:32 EST
My gfs dog has got some small personality issues. He is a very sweet dog,
very lovin, etc, towards us, however when he sees new people he barks like a
mad dog, takes him 10 minutes to come down then he is sweet to those people
as well. He barks usually at every noise he hears, from sudden noises on tv
to people walking outside.
He is also extremely attached to my gf and me. If we leave the apartment he
scratches the door, unless we leave him crated. We usually dont like to put
him in his crate while we are out cause we would love for him to be free
running around the apartment. He never used to scratch the door until my gf
moved apartments and thats he started scratching the door. He usually doesnt
cry inside the crate or at least doesnt cry more than a minute or so. He
gets extremely anxious when he sees one of us moving away from him, he
cries, tries to run, etc.
The dog is a 2 year old (his bday was about 2 weeks ago) american cocker
spaniel, his best friend is actually a 2 yr old siamese cat, and he loves to
swim.
We absolutely love this dog but we are unable to take him everywhere we want
to because of his behavior (he was banned from playtime at petsmart).
Please tell us how we can start working on fixing at least one of his
issues, we are sure he can act like a littel perfect dog, we just dont know
how to get him to do it.



Krishur
2003-08-09 06:37:24 EST
Barking: Take a spray bottle w/water in it. Everytime he bark say SHHH! and
then give him a squirt of water. They do this at the training club I belong
to when new dogs bark in their crates while their handler is working with
another dog and the dogs quickly learn what SHHH means and to be quiet. I
don't know if the Shh command will carry over to new people outside the
house though.

Scratching at the door: When you leave do you make any kind of fuss or pet
him? If so, don't do that just leave w/out saying a word. When you come home
do you make a fuss and pet him? If so, don't. Wait 5 minutes or so before
acknowledging him. By making a fuss when you leave or enter you create
anxiety.

my .02

--
Kristen &
Kali CD, CGC, TDI, TT
http://www.kristenandkali.com



"memememe" <[rem]casolorz[rem]@hot[rem]mail.com> wrote in message
news:cxCYa.259974$o86.32847@news1.central.cox.net...
> My gfs dog has got some small personality issues. He is a very sweet dog,
> very lovin, etc, towards us, however when he sees new people he barks like
a
> mad dog, takes him 10 minutes to come down then he is sweet to those
people
> as well. He barks usually at every noise he hears, from sudden noises on
tv
> to people walking outside.
> He is also extremely attached to my gf and me. If we leave the apartment
he
> scratches the door, unless we leave him crated. We usually dont like to
put
> him in his crate while we are out cause we would love for him to be free
> running around the apartment. He never used to scratch the door until my
gf
> moved apartments and thats he started scratching the door. He usually
doesnt
> cry inside the crate or at least doesnt cry more than a minute or so. He
> gets extremely anxious when he sees one of us moving away from him, he
> cries, tries to run, etc.
> The dog is a 2 year old (his bday was about 2 weeks ago) american cocker
> spaniel, his best friend is actually a 2 yr old siamese cat, and he loves
to
> swim.
> We absolutely love this dog but we are unable to take him everywhere we
want
> to because of his behavior (he was banned from playtime at petsmart).
> Please tell us how we can start working on fixing at least one of his
> issues, we are sure he can act like a littel perfect dog, we just dont
know
> how to get him to do it.
>
>



Memememe
2003-08-09 12:50:33 EST
> Scratching at the door: When you leave do you make any kind of fuss or pet
> him? If so, don't do that just leave w/out saying a word. When you come
home
> do you make a fuss and pet him? If so, don't. Wait 5 minutes or so before
> acknowledging him. By making a fuss when you leave or enter you create
> anxiety.


we try not to make a fuzz when we leave or come back, mainly cause a trainer
told us that when he was like 2 months old. Whats wierd is that he never
scratched the door on the first apartment he lived on, but I think that
somehow when he moved apartmnets we screwed up at introducing him to the new
apartment cuase the first time we left him alone in there he started
scratching and crying. If we would leave him on the crate that he had always
had since he was little, then he wouldnt cry, so thats what we have to do
now everyday, which is horrible cause he spends hours on the crate.




Pat
2003-09-01 11:28:49 EST

"memememe" <[rem]casolorz[rem]@hot[rem]mail.com> wrote in message
news:tD9Za.298417$o86.199822@news1.central.cox.net...
> > Scratching at the door: When you leave do you make any kind of fuss or
pet
> > him? If so, don't do that just leave w/out saying a word. When you come
> home
> > do you make a fuss and pet him? If so, don't. Wait 5 minutes or so
before
> > acknowledging him. By making a fuss when you leave or enter you create
> > anxiety.
>
>
> we try not to make a fuzz when we leave or come back, mainly cause a
trainer
> told us that when he was like 2 months old. Whats wierd is that he never
> scratched the door on the first apartment he lived on, but I think that
> somehow when he moved apartmnets we screwed up at introducing him to the
new
> apartment cuase the first time we left him alone in there he started
> scratching and crying. If we would leave him on the crate that he had
always
> had since he was little, then he wouldnt cry, so thats what we have to do
> now everyday, which is horrible cause he spends hours on the crate.
>
>
>
Have you tried using the cage/crate...without shuting the door.
Dogs feel safe....when you moved you took his safe place away.;
Try giving him his safe place...I think that will work.
Pat



The Puppy Wizard
2003-09-01 12:03:06 EST
HOWEDY pat,

"Pat" <Pat@bonniepml.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bivojh$d3e$1@titan.btinternet.com...
>
> "memememe" <[rem]casolorz[rem]@hot[rem]mail.com> wrote in
message
> news:tD9Za.298417$o86.199822@news1.central.cox.net...
>
> > > Scratching at the door:

Scratching at the door takes MINUTES to break.

> > > When you leave do you make any kind of fuss or
> > > pet him? If so, don't do that just leave w/out saying
> > > a word.

That's sheer idiocy. Do you leave your HOWES withHOWET
sayin goodbye to the other members of the family?

> > > When you come home> do you make a fuss and pet him?

Do you return to your HOWES withHOWET sayin HULLO to
your family???

> > > If so, don't.

That's sheer idiocy.

> > > Wait 5 minutes or so before acknowledging him.

That doesn't work... does it.

> > > By making a fuss when you leave or enter you create anxiety.

No. The PROBLEM is not makin a fuss, the PROBLEM for separation
anxiety is the CONTROLLER is not there to FORCE CONTROL,
INTIMIDATE, PUNISH, and AVOID behaviors you don't have the
intellect to HOWEtwit.

> > we try not to make a fuzz when we leave or come back, mainly
cause a
> > trainer told us that when he was like 2 months old.

Oh. So the PROBLEM is CURED?

> > Whats wierd is that he never scratched the door on the first
> > apartment he lived on,

That's on accHOWENT of it takes TIME to CAUSE the ANXIETY
that makes dogs and children AFRAID when left withHOWET their
CONTROLLER.

> > but I think that somehow when he moved apartmnets we screwed
> > up at introducing him to the new apartment

No. It should be EZier in a new environment to break the dog
or child's FEARS.

> > cuase the first time we left him alone in there he started
> > scratching and crying. If we would leave him on the crate
> > that he had always had since he was little, then he wouldnt
> > cry, so thats what we have to do now everyday, which is
> > horrible cause he spends hours on the crate.

HOWER DOG LOVERS LOCK THEIR DOGS IN A BOX
for sixteen to twenty HOWERS a day, on the average.

> Have you tried using the cage/crate...without shuting the door.

The crate REINFORCES phobias.

> Dogs feel safe....

They go to their crates when they're AFRAID. The entire time
they're in the crate their FEARS INCREASE.

> when you moved you took his safe place away.;

That would be the REMEDY...

> Try giving him his safe place...

To REINFORCE his PHOBIAS?

> I think that will work.

INDEEDY.

> Pat

Subject: letter about crate
Starrey's Scary Night

Anyone reading this letter is familiar with my white
shepherd Starr and her problems with fear and anxiety.
Starr has made a lot of progress since my last letter
and continues to make progress almost daily.

For a while Starr was going through a transition
period where she was expecting me to go back to the old
ways of training and discipline. She would refuse to
perform the commands right and just not want to work.

With a ton of self-control I kept the exercises simple
during this time, spending most of our training session
doing the "hot and cold exercise."

Starr soon bounced out of her unsure sliding-back-
and-forth stage and is stable now. The reason for this
letter is to talk about crates and the emotional state
they can put a dog in.

Only after I dealt with the crate situation I'll be
explaining was Starr able to make real progress. After
that the back sliding mentioned above was only a matter
of time, patients and being consistent.

First let me just say that I'm not saying that you
shouldn't use a crate. Only that you make sure to use
it right for the emotional state of your dog.

Ever since Starr was a pup whenever I left her alone
I put her in her crate. If we had company Starr went in
her crate because she was not friendly and would bark and
hide. Nights she also spent in her crate which seemed like
a retreat to her, a comfort zone. But that false sense of
security made the world outside her crate seem all the
more scary.

Starr was unintentionally "taught" that whenever
something was unusual in the house that she was to go to
her "safe place" and then everything would be all right.

The problem became evident when we got Starr home
afterher training in FL. Starr was so much more confident
in herself. But her fear was triggered by all her past
feelings associated with her familiar surroundings.

Mr. Howe told me to expect Starr might back-slide and
to simply keep working her until she came around.

I worked with my dog but at night I put her in her
crate. The next morning all the work I had been through
the day before, and whatever progress she had made seemed
to have disappeared.

I spoke to Mr. Howe about what was going on and he
explained that the false sense of security Starr got from
the crate was making her fear the outside world. When she
got in the crate she felt safe, after all that was where
I put her whenever something was unstable [if I left, company
etc..] When she came out she was leaving behind that security.

At first I was going to try to recondition her to being
in the crate but I was so afraid of all the training and
confidence she got in FL being lost that I decided to just
stop using the crate. So I left her in my bed room instead.

She was not comfortable with this at first. It seemed
like she felt she didn't know where she belonged and that
made her anxious. But using the "surrogate toy" technique
and sound distraction and praise cured her of this anxiety
in less then a half hour.

Now Starr is comfortable and content to hang out alone
in my room. She's not emotionally confined to just my bed
or to her doggy bed and she is not at all destructive. I
am lucky that Starr's separation anxiety was never expressed
in messing or chewing, though once she took my violin shoulder
rest from my closet and kept it with her on my bed. She did,
however tip over my waste basket twice. Both times I addressed
the expression as it says in Jerry's manual and that's no
longer a problem.

Crystal Arcidy


====================================



The Puppy Wizard
2003-09-01 12:23:12 EST
HOWEDY krisHURT,

"Krishur" <kris_brock@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:vj9jn0dicicp1b@corp.supernews.com...
>
> Barking: Take a spray bottle w/water in it. Everytime he bark
say SHHH! and
> then give him a squirt of water.

Oh. That'll make IT feel very safe, happy, comfortable, and
trusting.

> They do this at the training club I belong to

Yeah. You're a dog abuser, and so are your cronies.

> when new dogs bark in their crates while their handler is
working with
> another dog and the dogs quickly learn what SHHH means and to be
quiet.

That so? HOWER pal lying "I LOVE KOEHLER" lynn likes to leave
a long line on ITS pronged spiked pinch choke collar to jerk and
choke new foster care dogs to make them feel comfey in their
new foster HOWESES.

> I don't know if the Shh command will carry over to new people
> outside the house though.

Oh? You mean, your TRAINING isn't EFFECTIVE???

> Scratching at the door: When you leave do you make any kind of
fuss or pet
> him? If so, don't do that just leave w/out saying a word. When
you come home
> do you make a fuss and pet him? If so, don't. Wait 5 minutes or
so before
> acknowledging him. By making a fuss when you leave or enter you
create
> anxiety.

That so? You mean, instead of CURING separation anxiety,
INSTANTLY?:

"Just Want To Second Jerry's Method For Dealing With
This (Destructive Separation Anxiety). I've Suggested It
To Quite A Few Clients Now And It's Worked 'EVERY
TIME The Very First Time' - marilyn, Trainer, 33 Years Experience.

> my .02

KERCHING! Thank you. Here's your change.

> --
> Kristen &
> Kali CD, CGC, TDI, TT
> http://www.kristenandkali.com

Subject: Re: Bark collar
View: Complete Thread (64 articles)
Original Format
Newsgroups: rec.pets.dogs.behavior, alt.animals.dog,
rec.pets.dogs.rescue, rec.pets.dogs.breeds, rec.pets.dogs.misc
Date: 2002-11-09 11:30:51 PST


HOWEDY queenie,

"queenmother" <jrussell@epix.net> wrote in message
news:xzcz9.484$q5.98640@news1.epix.net...
> "Jim Simas" <jim@technolith.com> wrote in message
> news:3DCD49FD.1000009@technolith.com...
> > Alison,

alison is a idiot.

> > She lives outside. But is in the house part of the day.
> > She usually barks in the morning. I think to tell us she
> > wants in or some attention. I tell her to stop but it usually
> > doesn't do any good.
> This is easy then.

That so?

> Bring the dog inside where she belongs.

BWWWAHAHAHAHAHAAA!!!! Avoiding the problem isn't
the solution, it's not training, and doesn't HELP.

> Why does she live outside?

That's none of your business. You got any SOLUTION
besides AVOID the problems and declare there's no problem?

> She's barking because she's separated from her pack.

That's BULLSHIT, queenie. That's your EXCUSE. If that
was TRUE, the dog would bark every time IT is alone.
Perhaps YOU expect and tolerate that cause you got
NO METHOD to TRAIN THE DOG, queenie. You're
a liar and a dog abuser, queenie.

> This is what dogs do to draw attention to themselves

So, you avoid the problem?

> so they can be reunited with their pack.

No. That's bullshit.

> Your answer isn't a collar to train the dog.

IMAGINE?

> Your answer is give the dog the respect and treatment she
deserves.

Don't start talkin to us about RESPECT, you maggot.

> If one of your kids were outside

This is a DOG, not a KID, you maggot.

> and pounded on the door or yelled to be let in,
> would you think the proper response is to tell
> them to be quiet?

Naaah. That'd require a BEATIN.

> Why oh why do people insist on getting a dog
> and then don't want the dog to be a real part of their life?

The BARKING problem, queenie? The dog LIVES outside
when his owner wants him outside. The QUESTION IS, the
barking. You got a METHOD to break the barking, queenie?

You gave us some MISTAKEN instructions in your last post,
queenie. You're nuthin but a MAGGOT, queenie. You're a
liar and a dog abuser, queenie.

> Do they really expect that the dog will be a
> little stuffed toy they can bring in to the house
> and play with when they feel like having a dog?

If that's HOWE they train him, YES, queenie.

NOW, you got INSTRUCTIONS to train the dog NOT
to bark when he's SUPPOSED to be outside?

> ~~Judy
> Never underestimate the warmth of a cold nose.

Unless it's a DEAD cold nose...

HOWEDY krisHURT,

"KrisHur" <nospam@notme.com> wrote in message
news:usm5i6pkehedfe@corp.supernews.com...

> Dave, my Labrador grew up in an apt in the middle of
> NYC and she got tons of exercise!

Yeah. You NEED to exercise your dogs to control their
hyperactivity...

> I think city dogs owned by the average owner actually
> have it better!

Yeah? You jerk and choke and shock your dogs when
they're not locked in a box.

> After all, most dogs don't get any exercise when
> indoors no matter how big the house

You mean they get less exercise than me? They
don't walk around and enjoy playing?

> and most home owners I've seen don't walk their dogs,

So?

> they just put them out in the yard.

To enjoy the yard?

> I know that lots of houses on my street have dogs,
> yet I only see 2 people who regularly walk their dogs

Perhaps that's on account of they don't want to jerk
and choke them on pronged spiked pinch choke collars
and shock them, like you do, krisHURT?

> and that's only once a day.

So long as they're consistent...

> In an apartment, the dog HAS to be walked *several* times a day.

Unless they're litter box trained, like a kat.

> Furthermore, city dogs get lots more socialization.

You mean the ones that are jerked and choked on
pronged spiked pinch choke collars and shocked?

> They meet other dogs when on their walks; every
> single dog I know in the country (except mine and
> my neighbor's) has one or two playmates that they
> see once in a while but no regular play-dates.

That's TERRIBLE! Everyone should jerk and choke
and shock their dogs to make them enjoy PLAYING.

> Nickolas, you have to ignore your little Pom.

That's IDIOCY, krisHURT. That's HOWE COME
the dog is crying and barking.

> Any attention at all,

Will satisfy the puppy's call for companionship.

> even yelling shut up,

NO, we don't do THAT. Dogs don't enjoy being intimidated
and ignored, krisHURT.

> is rewarding the barking.

Barking is EZ to break, krisHURT. It's SO EZ, I can break
barking AUTOMATICALLY.

> Once he realizes that the barking will not work to get your
attention

Then the dog KNOWS you don't care about IT. A mom
dog wouldn't let her puppy cry or bark for one minute.

> he'll stop trying.

BECAUSE THEY GIVE UP HOPE THAT YOU CARE, krisHURT.

> Only let him out when he is quiet-

That's IDOCY, krisHURT. You CANNOT allow a dog to
bark and cry and expect it to be calm and responsive to you.

> -never when he is barking.

That's HOWE COME you got to HURT dogs to train them, krisHURT.

> If you are really strict about ignoring him

The dog will come down with OCD behaivors like most
of our expert's dogs here...

> it shouldn't take more than a few days.

Takes MINUTES to break barking using PRAISE.

> In the meantime,

In the meantime, you got NO advice, except HURT the dog.

> it's going to be hard for your neighbors-

That's cruel and unusual punishment for all concerned,
krisHURT. The entire problem is compeletely UNNECESSARY.

Your so called TRAINING METHOD is what causes ALL
dog behavior problems.

> -send a note to the apartments above,

I'd slap the beejeesus outta you for botherin me
with your excuses.

> below and to the sides;

You wouldn't be botherin the other neighbors
if you apologized to ME first.

> they'll appreciate it

You think they'd appreciate waitin for you to HURT
your dog enough to make it QUIET when he's locked up?

> and may not complain to the landlord

BWWWHAHAHAHAHAHAA!!!

O.K. krisHURT. What's a real dog trainer gonna do
to FIX the situation IF the landlord sez you got to
get the dog outta the building cause the other tennants
HAVE RIGHTS to peace and quiet?

> if you let them know what's going on,

If anybody knew what was goin on, you'd be ARRESTED
for ANIMAL ABUSE, krisHURT.

> they'll see you are making an effort to acknowledge the
situation.

Is that so? I wouldn't give you a break. I'd have the police
arrest
your Thug ass in a heartbeat.

> If he keeps it up you could try a no-bark collar,

Right, HURT the dog, krisHURT.

> the kind that spray citronella.

Oh? The gentle aversive that dogs LOVE?

> I've never used one

But you do rely on the shock collar.

> but have heard from people at the dog run varying levels of
success.

You mean you've heard from other incompetent Thugs like yourself?

> Kristen &

Yet you call my 100% nearly INSTANTLY successful FREE
Wits' End Dog Training Method manual students LIARS when
they report they CURE anxiety barking in a couple minutes,
often INSTANTLY.

BARKING, WHINING, HOWLING, YODELING, SCREAMING, AND WAILING

The fact that you realize you have such a problem makes it certain
you
have "reproved" the dog often enough to let him know you were
against
his sound effects, even though your reproving didn't quiet them,
so
we'll bypass the loudly clapped hands, the cup of water in his
face,
and the "shame-shames" and start with something more emphatic.

We'll begin with the easiest kind of vocalist to correct: the one
that
charges gates, fences, doors, and windows, barking furiously at
familiar or imaginary people and objects.

A few clusters of BBs from a good slingshot, in conjunction with
the
light line and plenty of temptations, will cause such a dog to use
his
mind rather than his mouth. But you won't make the permanent
impression
unless you supply dozens of opportunities for him to exercise the
control he thus acquires.

Make sure these opportunities don't always come at the same time
of the
day, else he may learn to observe the "quiet hour" and pursue his
old
routines at other times. With the help of the light line, it will
be
easy to follow the BBs with a long down to make sure he gets the
most from
his lesson. As was mentioned before, eliminating the senseless
barking will
not lessen the dog's value as a watchdog but rather, as he grows
more
discriminating, increase it.

The dog who vocalizes in bratty protest or lonesomeness because
you're
gone constitutes a different problem. If it is impractical for
someone
to stay with him constantly (there are owners who cater to
neurosis by
employing dog sitters), you'll have to heed the neighbors and the
law
and quiet the dog.

This calls for a little ingenuity as well as a heavy hand.

Attach a line to your dog's collar, so your corrective effort
doesn't
turn into a footrace around the house until you reach a stalemate
under the bed. This use of the line in the correction will also
serve
to establish it as a reminder to be quiet as the dog drags it
around
when you're not present. Next, equip yourself with a man's leather
belt or a strap heavy enough to give your particular dog a good
tanning. Yup-we're going to strike him. Real hard.

Remember, you're dealing with a dog who KNOWS he should be quiet
and
neighbors who have legal rights to see that he does.

Now leave, and let your fading footsteps tell the dog of your
going.
When you've walked to a point where he'll think you're gone but
where
you could hear any noises he might make, stop and listen. If you
find
a comfortable waiting place on a nearby porch, be careful not to
talk
or laugh. Tests show a dog's hearing to be many times as sharp as
yours.

When the noise comes, instead of trying to sneak up to the door so
you
can barge in while he's still barking, which is generally
impossible,
respond to his first sound with an emphatic bellow of "out," and
keep
on bellowing as you charge back to his area. Thunder through the
door
or gate, snatch up the belt that you've conveniently placed, and
descend on him.

He'll have no chance to dodge if you grab the line and reel him in
until his front feet are raised off the floor or, if he's a big
dog,
until you've snubbed him up with a hitch on something. (A ceiling
hook,
tree limb, door, etc. j.h.)

While he's held in close, lay the strap vigorously against his
thighs.
Keep pouring it on him until he thinks it's the bitter end. A real
whaling now may cut down somewhat on the number of repeat
performances
that will be necessary. When you're finished and the dog is
convinced
that he is, put him on a long down to think things over while you
catch your breath. After fifteen or twenty minutes, release him
from
the stay and leave the area again. (So you can repeat the BEATING
again. j.h.)

So that you won't feel remorseful, reflect on the truth that a
great
percentage of the barkers who are given away to "good homes" end
up in
the kindly black box with the sweet smell. Personally, I've always
felt that it's even better to spank children, even if they "cry
out,"
than to "put them to sleep."

You might have a long wait on that comfortable porch before your
dog
starts broadcasting again. When he does, let your long range
bellow
tie the consequent correction to his first sound and repeat the
spanking, if anything emphasizing it a bit more. (Makse me feel
all
warm and fuzzy. HOWE ABOUT YOU??? j.h.)

It might be necessary to spend a Saturday or another day off so
that
you'll have time to follow through sufficiently. When you have a
full
day, you will be able to convince him each yelp will have a bad
consequence, and the consistency will make your job easier. If he
gets
away with his concert part of the time, he'll be apt to gamble on
your
inconsistency.

After a half dozen corrections, "the reason and the correction"
will
be tied in close enough association so that you can move in on him
without the preliminary bellowing of "out." From then on, it's
just a
case of laying for the dog and supplying enough bad consequences
of
his noise so he'll no longer feel like gambling.

Occasionally, there is a dog who seems to sense that you're hiding

nearby and will utter no sound. He also seems to sense when you
have
really gone away, at least according to the neighbors. Maybe his
sensing actually amounts to close observation. He could be
watching
and listening for the signs of your actual going.

Make a convincing operation of leaving, even if it requires
changing
clothes and being unusually noisy as you slam the doors on the
family
car and drive away. Arrange with a friend to trade cars a block or
two
from your house so you can come back and park within earshot
without a
single familiar sound to tell the dog you've returned. A few of
these
car changes are generally enough to fool the most alert dog.

Whether your dog believes you are gone anytime you step out of the
house or requires the production of changing clothes and driving
off,
keep working until even your neighbors admit the dog has reformed.
If
there has been a long history of barking and whining, it sometimes
requires a lot of work to make a dog be quiet when you're not
around,
so give the above method an honest try before you presume your dog
requires a more severe correction. (INDEED. j.h.)


"The Koehler Method of Dog Training (1962). New York:
Howell Book Book House(p. 52-53)."

Hanging

"First, the trainer makes certain that the collar and leash
are more than adequate for any jerk or strain that the
dog's most frantic actions could cause. Then he starts
to work the dog deliberately and fairly to the point where
the dog makes his grab. Before the teeth have reached
their target, the dog, weight permitting, is jerked from
the ground.

As in coping with some of the afore-mentioned problems
the dog is suspended in mid-air.

However, to let the biting dog recover his footing while
he still had the strength to renew the attack would be
cruelty. The only justifiable course is to hold him
suspended until he has neither the strength nor
inclination to renew the fight. When finally it is obvious
that he is physically incapable of expressing his
resentment and is lowered to the ground, he will
probably stagger loop-legged for a few steps,
vomit once or twice, and roll over on his side.

The sight of a dog lying, thick-tongued, on his side,
is not pleasant, but do not let it alarm you

THE REAL "HOOD"

"If your dog is a real "hood" who would regard the
foregoing types of protest as "kid stuff" and would
express his resentment of your efforts by biting,
your problem is difficult -- and pressing.

"Professional trainers often get these extreme problems.
Nearly always the "protest biter" is the handiwork of a
person who, by avoiding situations that the dog might
resent, has nurtured the seeds of rebellion and then
cultivated the resultant growth with under correction.

When these people reap their inevitable and oftentimes
painful harvest, they are ready to avail themselves of "the
cruel trainer" whose advice they may have once rejected
because it was incompatible with the sugary droolings of
mealy-mouthed columnists, breed-ring biddies, and dog
psychologists who, by the broken skins and broken hearts
their misinformation causes, can be proven guilty of the
greatest act of cruelty to animals since the dawn of time.

"With more genuine compassion for the biting dog than
would ever be demonstrated by those who are "too kind"
to make a correction and certainly with more disregard for
his safety, the professional trainer morally feels obligated
to perform a "major operation."

"Since we are presently concerned with the dog that bites
in resentment of the demands of training, we will set our
example in that situation. (In a later chapter we will deal
with the with the much easier problem of the dog that bites
someone other than his master."

Most of our dog lovers here ARE koehler trainers. koehler
trainers are BORN COWARDS. Only cowards LIE.

FIGGER IT OUT.






The Puppy Wizard
2003-09-01 12:48:38 EST
HOWEDY memememe,

"memememe" <[rem]casolorz[rem]@hot[rem]mail.com> wrote in message
news:cxCYa.259974$o86.32847@news1.central.cox.net...
>
> My gfs dog has got some small personality issues.

No. Your dog has some small mishandling issues.

> He is a very sweet dog, very lovin, etc, towards us, however
when he
> sees new people he barks like a mad dog,

That's probably because he's afraid and being restrained.

> takes him 10 minutes to come down then he is sweet to those
people
> as well. He barks usually at every noise he hears, from sudden
noises
> on tv to people walking outside.

Right. He's generally afraid or being restrained.

> He is also extremely attached to my gf and me. If we leave the
apartment he
> scratches the door, unless we leave him crated.

That's caused by the same same mishandling that makes
him afraid and bark at sHOWENDS.

> We usually dont like to put him in his crate

The crate reinforces his fears like hiding under the blanket from
the boogeyman.

> while we are out cause we would love for him to be free
> running around the apartment. He never used to scratch
> the door until my gf moved apartments and thats he started
> scratching the door. He usually doesnt cry inside the crate
> or at least doesnt cry more than a minute or so.

That's unaccpetable.

> He gets extremely anxious when he sees one of us moving away
> from him, he cries, tries to run, etc.

Separation anxiety is caused by the controller not being there
to control the environment.

> The dog is a 2 year old (his bday was about 2 weeks ago)
american cocker
> spaniel, his best friend is actually a 2 yr old siamese cat, and
he loves to
> swim.

> We absolutely love this dog but we are unable to take him
everywhere we want
> to because of his behavior (he was banned from playtime at
petsmart).

Probably should stay far away from the "experts" at pest mart,
they're
incomptent doubletalking dog abusing thugs, for the most part.

> Please tell us how we can start working on fixing at least one
of his
> issues, we are sure he can act like a littel perfect dog, we
just dont know
> how to get him to do it.

That's EZ, FAST, and FREE if you follow all the instructions
in your FREE copy of The Puppy Wizard's FREE WWW Wits'
End Dog Training Method Manual.

Subject: Re: Attention-Seeking Barking
Date: 2003-03-26 10:10:37 PST

HOWEDY tara o,

"Tara O." <nospam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:b5sik0$2diefm$1@ID-92443.news.dfncis.de...

> Here's a question for you guys.

You got a lot of nerve posting to HOWER dog lovers forum...
You hurt and kill dogs, tara o.

> My newest foster boy is a sweetheart.

Yeah... think you'll KILL IT???

> Dumped by owners because "he is uncontrollable."

So you'll treat IT like you did Summer, and KILL IT, to be fair,
cause she TRUSTED you, despite that she didn't have no
problems that YOU didn't cause, and The Puppy Wizzzard
offered her a FREE SAFE HOWES, forever.


> I've yet to see anything but a 15mo boy who is laid back,
> well-mannered and super-sweet.


That won't last long, you'll drive IT crazy like you did Summer
and the other dogs you've been kindly enough to KILL for
"Boxer Rescue."


> The horns may yet come out


All dog behavior problems are caused by mishandling.


> since I've only had him for 4 days but I don't see anything
> uncontrollable overall..not a reason to dump him anyway.


Yeah...


> One thing he does is bark, non-stop for attention.


IMAGINE?


> He barks outside but that's normally in response to other
> barking dogs or strange noises. I'm not looking to curb that.


Because you don't know HOWE.


> I just call him inside when he starts barking


Dogs bark because something's WRONG. Dogs bark when
they're SCARED. Calling IT inside does not relieve his ANXIETY,
does not make the situation right, it just AVOIDS and REINFORCES
the FEAR ANXIETY PROBLEM.


> (with the weather so nice I've been leaving my back door open
> so the dogs can come and go into the fenced backyard). When
> he's excited he also barks but here again I'm not really looking
to
> rid him of this behavior.


Right. His fear and anxiety mean NUTHIN to you... so long
as he's HOWETside and your neighbors don't complain.


> I'm working on teaching him "hush".


Try givin IT some CHEDDAR like you did Summer when you KILLED her.


> Alot of dogs get vocal when excited


Yeah. That's HOWE COME they GO NUTS, like Summer did.


> so this isn't uncommon.


RIGHT. That's HOWE COME you hurt and kill them.


> The problem I'm having is that he barks inside when he
> wants something, normally attention.

Better not give in, he'll think he's alphalphal..

> He'll get right up in front of you and start barking, loudly and
non-stop.


Like marie's dog Macula and a few others here. You got
a crate to lock IT in?


> Here's what I've tried so far:


BWWWAWHAHAHAHAAAA!!! Thanks for sharing what didn't work.


> 1. Since he understands "NO"


You're a idiot, tara o. Dogs do not understand being rejected and
intimidated.


> I tried using the cue in a stern voice


Then you'll wonder HOWE COME the dog GOT NUTS???


> then withdrawing attention,


Yeah... GOOD LUCK.


> ready to pet him when he quieted down.


Oh, that'll be a real treat.


> He didnt' quiet down.


Of curse not. You'll intimidate punish hurt and crate this dog
till you make it NUTS and MURDER IT like you did Summer.


> 2. I've used no verbal commands and just withdrew eye
> contact and moved away.


To REJECT the dogs friendly overtures...


> This didn't work as he'll just follow-me and keep going around
> me if my back is turned..continuing the barking.


Yeah. Don't tell IT he's a GOOD BOY. That'd make you seem
inferior to IT and teach the dog that you're not in control.


> 3. I've tried doing #2 but walking to a room and closing the
door,
> shutting him out.

You mean, to cure his BONDING activity...


> This didn't work either.


Right. That'll just make him FRANTICK.


> The barking will literally go on until he either gets distracted
> by something/someone else or I give in and pet him.


Yeah. Better be careful about that, the dog might become
alphalphal.


> Its my suspicion


IMAGINE?


> that his former owners either neglected him


Like you've been INTENTIONALLY doin.


> to the extent that he learned that barking gets him attention


IMAGINE? You've tried scolding and locking him in a other
room and ignoring IT... and nuthin's worked. Try CHEDDAR.


> and he's perfectly willing to accept negative attention.


Yeah. He's trying to become alphalpha.


> Or that it was a cute puppy behavior


Dogs bark because there's SUMPTHIN WRONG.


> that was reinforced and turned into an adolescent nuisance
behavior.


Yeah... blame the other handler, blame the dog...


> Either way he is definitely of the assumption that barking will
bring
> attention, no matter the kind of attention.


Yeah. That's HOWE COME dogs bark. Ain't it.


> On two occasions withdrawing attention did work


Did it really?


> because he was distracted.


You're a half wit tara o, like your pals diddler and professor
SCRUFF SHAKE, tara.green2, melanie, melinda, shelly,
lugNUT, and Master Of Deception blankman, to name a
few of like minded lying dog abusing Punk Thug Cowards.


> I then went to him and gave him praise and petted him.


BWAAAAHAHAHAHAAA!!!


> He's not looking so much for verbal recognition as he is for
> being touched. Petting him lightly while he's barking will make
> him stop because he's being petted.


No. That'll reinforce his ANXIETY and make IT MOORE dependent
on you... to quiet his FEARS.


> I don't want to teach a new behavior of bark-bark-bark-silence


You already have.


> in order to get attention but am not sure how to proceed with
> stopping this behavior.


You've got to praise him in advance, and do some TRAINING.
Takes The Puppy Wizzzard's FREE WWW Wits' End Dog
Training Method Manual Students only a few minutes, maybe
LESS, to break this behavior...


> Normally the withdrawal of eye contact and moving away does the
trick


You mean, rejecting the dog's BONDING attempts, like it did for
Summer.


> but not with him.


Right. Keep it up, he'll be DEAD in a few weeks. Like Summer.

> --
> Tara


Dave Cohen <cohen1@total.net writes:
Re: Barking Deterrants Needed...

Hi.

Please understand that I do not know Jerry and have
spoken with him briefly once by email.

I have no stake or interest in the success of his business.
I simply want to thank him publicly for one of his tips, with
regards to separation anxiety.

I thought it seemed far fetched to praise a stuffed animal
and then say good bye to my own dog, but I am usually a
very open minded person, so I tried it. Well, lo and behold-
the damn trick worked!

I think Jerry has some intriguing techniques, and
personally I think everyone who constantly criticizes
him is not understanding his logic.

Thank you Jerry!

********************************************************


"melisande" <melisande55@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:rLo08.751$0H.535937@paloalto-snr1.gtei.net...

> I haven't quite finished reading the free chapter on
> your website,

It's moore than a chapter, it's a comprehensive,
total, complete, gestalt method to train all animals
to any level you desire.

> but it already worked miracles with our three dogs.

Excellent.

> The barking at the door has diminished so much
> that, well, frankly, we're stunned.

My methods work faster than any others, anywhere at
any price, including the thirty five level of medical grade
static like stimulation devices and pronged spiked pinch
choke collars our "experts" here love so much.

> We were sort of on the same page with you to begin
> with (no crates, no choke chains).

Good. Crates aren't inherently bad, only the way they're
misused.

> A lot of what you say reminds of my dad's techniques
> (he's an 84 year old dog lover,one of those about whom
> people say, "dogs really like him." He's
> never had a badly behaved dog.

Good. I've got a lot in common with folks who are gentle
and treat animals kindly.

> We'd never heard of the noise emphasis,

You mean the sound distraction and praise techniques.

> but the overall plan makes great sense.

Yes, one of my students Paul B wrote an excellent post
recently I'll include it at the bottom. It'll explain HOWE the
distraction and praise process works from his POV as an
experience handler using my methods.

> I did have a question. The hardest part for us to
> implement is the verbal praise only.

Why? That should be spontaneous and in association
with every glance towards you and every thought.

> It's so hard not to pet and stroke the dog (especially
> our seven month old).

Oh. Patting is O.K., only not in conjunction with a
thought or command, as it will interrupt the thought
process and may lock the dog's thoughts on an
inappropriate idea.

> Can you give me the rationale behind that?

It's called positive thigmotaxis, the opposition reflex.
Like if we're walking our dog and want to prevent him
from interacting with another dog, and we pull back
on the collar, that often triggers the dog to go out of
control.

As long as there's contact on the collar, the dog will
continue his original thoughts about interacting with
the passerby. Then because the dog is out of control,
the handler needs to further force restraint, making
communication with the dog's MIND, impossible.

> It will help me modify my own behavior.

Any time your dog is close enough to be patted is
fine to pat him, as long as we're not working with a
command or thought we want him to process.

> Anyway, your approach is amazing.

Yes, it's caused quite a stir here. If my methods are as
effective and fast and safe as I claim and my students
confirm, that pretty much means that all of my critics
are DEAD WRONG, and all's that's left for me to
do is shovel some dirt over them over and let 'em push
up daisies.

> Melisande

==========================================






Pat
2003-09-04 10:47:59 EST
The only bit I posted was.

"Have you tried using the cage/crate...without shuting the door.
Dogs feel safe....when you moved you took his safe place away.;
Try giving him his safe place...I think that will work.
Pat"

I did not say shut the dog in the cage.
If this dog was used to a cage.
It should be given back its cage...but to leave the door open.
Just a safe haven ...most dogs like to feel safe.
As do lots of people also like feeling safe.

"The Puppy Wizard" <ThePuppyWizard@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:_4K4b.17466$Om1.14390@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> HOWEDY pat,
>
> "Pat" <Pat@bonniepml.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:bivojh$d3e$1@titan.btinternet.com...
> >
> > "memememe" <[rem]casolorz[rem]@hot[rem]mail.com> wrote in
> message
> > news:tD9Za.298417$o86.199822@news1.central.cox.net...
> >
> > > > Scratching at the door:
>
> Scratching at the door takes MINUTES to break.
>
> > > > When you leave do you make any kind of fuss or
> > > > pet him? If so, don't do that just leave w/out saying
> > > > a word.
>
> That's sheer idiocy. Do you leave your HOWES withHOWET
> sayin goodbye to the other members of the family?
>
> > > > When you come home> do you make a fuss and pet him?
>
> Do you return to your HOWES withHOWET sayin HULLO to
> your family???
>
> > > > If so, don't.
>
> That's sheer idiocy.
>
> > > > Wait 5 minutes or so before acknowledging him.
>
> That doesn't work... does it.
>
> > > > By making a fuss when you leave or enter you create anxiety.
>
> No. The PROBLEM is not makin a fuss, the PROBLEM for separation
> anxiety is the CONTROLLER is not there to FORCE CONTROL,
> INTIMIDATE, PUNISH, and AVOID behaviors you don't have the
> intellect to HOWEtwit.
>
> > > we try not to make a fuzz when we leave or come back, mainly
> cause a
> > > trainer told us that when he was like 2 months old.
>
> Oh. So the PROBLEM is CURED?
>
> > > Whats wierd is that he never scratched the door on the first
> > > apartment he lived on,
>
> That's on accHOWENT of it takes TIME to CAUSE the ANXIETY
> that makes dogs and children AFRAID when left withHOWET their
> CONTROLLER.
>
> > > but I think that somehow when he moved apartmnets we screwed
> > > up at introducing him to the new apartment
>
> No. It should be EZier in a new environment to break the dog
> or child's FEARS.
>
> > > cuase the first time we left him alone in there he started
> > > scratching and crying. If we would leave him on the crate
> > > that he had always had since he was little, then he wouldnt
> > > cry, so thats what we have to do now everyday, which is
> > > horrible cause he spends hours on the crate.
>
> HOWER DOG LOVERS LOCK THEIR DOGS IN A BOX
> for sixteen to twenty HOWERS a day, on the average.
>
> > Have you tried using the cage/crate...without shuting the door.
>
> The crate REINFORCES phobias.
>
> > Dogs feel safe....
>
> They go to their crates when they're AFRAID. The entire time
> they're in the crate their FEARS INCREASE.
>
> > when you moved you took his safe place away.;
>
> That would be the REMEDY...
>
> > Try giving him his safe place...
>
> To REINFORCE his PHOBIAS?
>
> > I think that will work.
>
> INDEEDY.
>
> > Pat
>
> Subject: letter about crate
> Starrey's Scary Night
>
> Anyone reading this letter is familiar with my white
> shepherd Starr and her problems with fear and anxiety.
> Starr has made a lot of progress since my last letter
> and continues to make progress almost daily.
>
> For a while Starr was going through a transition
> period where she was expecting me to go back to the old
> ways of training and discipline. She would refuse to
> perform the commands right and just not want to work.
>
> With a ton of self-control I kept the exercises simple
> during this time, spending most of our training session
> doing the "hot and cold exercise."
>
> Starr soon bounced out of her unsure sliding-back-
> and-forth stage and is stable now. The reason for this
> letter is to talk about crates and the emotional state
> they can put a dog in.
>
> Only after I dealt with the crate situation I'll be
> explaining was Starr able to make real progress. After
> that the back sliding mentioned above was only a matter
> of time, patients and being consistent.
>
> First let me just say that I'm not saying that you
> shouldn't use a crate. Only that you make sure to use
> it right for the emotional state of your dog.
>
> Ever since Starr was a pup whenever I left her alone
> I put her in her crate. If we had company Starr went in
> her crate because she was not friendly and would bark and
> hide. Nights she also spent in her crate which seemed like
> a retreat to her, a comfort zone. But that false sense of
> security made the world outside her crate seem all the
> more scary.
>
> Starr was unintentionally "taught" that whenever
> something was unusual in the house that she was to go to
> her "safe place" and then everything would be all right.
>
> The problem became evident when we got Starr home
> afterher training in FL. Starr was so much more confident
> in herself. But her fear was triggered by all her past
> feelings associated with her familiar surroundings.
>
> Mr. Howe told me to expect Starr might back-slide and
> to simply keep working her until she came around.
>
> I worked with my dog but at night I put her in her
> crate. The next morning all the work I had been through
> the day before, and whatever progress she had made seemed
> to have disappeared.
>
> I spoke to Mr. Howe about what was going on and he
> explained that the false sense of security Starr got from
> the crate was making her fear the outside world. When she
> got in the crate she felt safe, after all that was where
> I put her whenever something was unstable [if I left, company
> etc..] When she came out she was leaving behind that security.
>
> At first I was going to try to recondition her to being
> in the crate but I was so afraid of all the training and
> confidence she got in FL being lost that I decided to just
> stop using the crate. So I left her in my bed room instead.
>
> She was not comfortable with this at first. It seemed
> like she felt she didn't know where she belonged and that
> made her anxious. But using the "surrogate toy" technique
> and sound distraction and praise cured her of this anxiety
> in less then a half hour.
>
> Now Starr is comfortable and content to hang out alone
> in my room. She's not emotionally confined to just my bed
> or to her doggy bed and she is not at all destructive. I
> am lucky that Starr's separation anxiety was never expressed
> in messing or chewing, though once she took my violin shoulder
> rest from my closet and kept it with her on my bed. She did,
> however tip over my waste basket twice. Both times I addressed
> the expression as it says in Jerry's manual and that's no
> longer a problem.
>
> Crystal Arcidy
>
>
> ====================================
>
>



The Puppy Wizard
2003-09-06 04:00:25 EST
HOWEDY Pat,

"Pat" <Pat@bonniepml.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bj7jau$c8j$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
>
> The only bit I posted was.

Bad information.

> "Have you tried using the cage/crate...without shuting the door.

That's irrelevant.

> Dogs feel safe....

RIGHT! THEY HIDE FROM THEIR FEARS IN THE CRATE.

> when you moved you took his safe place away.;

EXCELLENT. The dog will have to learn to COPE.

> Try giving him his safe place...

No, cause the FEAR INCREASES every time they
go to the crate.

> I think that will work.

Yeah, but the behavior change to other, seemingly
unrelated, probably worse behavior problems.

> Pat"
>
> I did not say shut the dog in the cage.

Right. The "safe haven" INCREASES FEARS.

> If this dog was used to a cage.

That's HOWE COME he got separation anxiety to begin with.

> It should be given back its cage...

No, cause he'll become MOORE phobic.

> but to leave the door open.

Doesn't matter.

> Just a safe haven ...

It's an ESCAPE from REALITY and makes some
dogs become MOORE FEARFUL.

> most dogs like to feel safe.

RIGHT. That's what the HOWES is for.

> As do lots of people also like feeling safe.

Like settin in their own HOWES, not hidin
under the blanket from the BOOGEYMAN.

Here's a DEAD DOG on accHOWENT of crating:

Subject: "Crate Training" JERRYIZED
Date: 2002-06-05 22:49:33 PST


Hello People,

Here's HOWE COME tara o killed her dog Summer:

August 9, 01
Hello tara,

"Tara O." <tara29401@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9nbor5$6kvir$1@ID-92443.news.dfncis.de...

> I used to have a rottie as well and she did the same exact thing

No doubt. Your present dog has had a lot of behavior problems too.
Remember a couple months ago when you wanted to go visit
grandma's? You
were in quite a jam, what with you not allowed to take your out of
control dog over there, and not being able to leave her behind
with your
ex and your daughter, because of her separation anxiety panic.
Remember?
It didn't actually begin till your ex couldn't get Summer into her
crate? You had to return to kennel her up for the nite. And when
you
returned, Summer was seemingly sick enough that you were
considering
taking her to the vet a couple of days later.

I told you that was all going to happen, and why. And it did, just
as
Jerry said it would, cause Jerry knows dog behavior and what makes
these
little behavior problems happen. That's HOWE COME these sorts of
behavior
problems and others, do not happen to Jerry's student's dogs,
because
Jerry's students don't confront or punish or scold or conflict
with
their dogs, because what happens in these sorts of behavior
problems, is
usually caused entirely by our handler's ERRORS and are
PREDICTABLE and
PREVENTABLE and TRAINABLE if they should surface.

> starting around age 1 and stopping around age 2.5.

An excellent point! Chewing in an adult dog (after teething) is an
ANXIETY relief mechanism, not functional or recreational chewing,
but a
BEHAVIOR PROBLEM caused directly by the hander's ineffective and
inappropriate efforts to control dog behaviors....

> There could be a number of reasons behind her chewing.

Mishandling, arguments in the family, corrections of any kind,
crating,
yes, crating can be major cause of or exacerbate compulsive
anxiety
chewing, hyperactivity, obsessive barking, digging, whining,
pacing,
shyness, aggression, self mutilation, intestinal and digestive
disorders, and seizure activity.

> She could be anxious like someone else said,

No. Could be the punishment she gets for chewing which she doesn't
have
the intellectual capacity or innate ability to understand?

> she could be bored,

No. Bored dogs SLEEP. That's why they call it boredom, instead of
hyperactivity... If the dog gets bored and wants something to do
besides
sleep, the normal dog will perhaps engage in normal chewing
behavior,
not attack your goddamned couch and put holes through your drapes
trying
to escape.

> she could be a combination of both

Could be that they're both mutually incompatible behaviors.

> or it could just be adolesent misbehavior.

Oh yes! Another EXCELLENT point. That predictable adolescent
rebellious
stage is not normal, is not mandatory, but is caused by the
handler or
pack members challenging the pup. As the puppy dog begins to
mature,
Nature tells the pup it's time to leave home and the control of
mommy,
to avoid inbreeding, because that's Natural Law. At that stage,
the
puppy dog is not reliant on mommy, and seeks to find a pack of his
own.
Being held captive and being driven by Mother Nature to establish
his
own pack, the puppy dog challenges the authority of his youth.

Fighting will provoke the young to leave home, if perpetuating the
species does not inspire him. Either way, the rebellious dog is
looking
to be self reliant and lead his own pack. That's why Jerry does
not
challenge dogs for "authority," because the outcome is
PREDICTABLE, it's
Natural Law, and we lose when we challenge SURVIVAL INSTINCT, and
call
Mother Nature a LIAR.

> My rottie had the irritating habit of getting into the trash can
and
> shredding everything inside when we went to work.

Wasn't irritating to him. Trash bin raiding is FUN, and
fortunately,
it's usually pretty EZ to break, using distraction and praise
techniques.

> My husband used to hit her as well

And you recognized that problem and dealt with it.

> although not punching

That's subjective. ANY physical or emotional confrontation is
PROBLEMATICAL, COUNTER PRODUCTIVE, IRRESPONSIBLE,
UNNECESSARY, and WRONG.

> (he has since learned the error of those ways).

Good for him. A lot of folks don't think that KIND of behavior
problem
can be reconditioned or rehabilitated, but I've seen successful
results
with some hard core cases. It's just a little matter of education
and
conditioning.

> She was an angel when we were home but a demon when we were
> gone.

That's not unusual. It usually takes my students a couple of days
to
expiate separation anxiety using the techniques taught in the FREE
Wits'
End Dog Training Method manual, in particular the Surrogate Toy
Separation Anxiety Technique. Were you posting when THAT was being
discussed here? Your friends cindymooreon and professor lying doc
"scruff shake" dermer were having a grand time making fun of
saying good
bye to a stuffed toy, asking if saying good bye to a Barbie doll
or a
telephone book would suffice in stead of a stuffed chew toy or
whatever...

Boy! You shoulda seen 'em clam up when Marilyn wrote in and told
us my
Surrogate Toy Separation Anxiety Technique worked the first time
it was
tried on a seriously destructive S/A dog belonging to her student.
Then
she really twisted the knife, by saying her students were so
GRATEFUL
they were in TEARS of JOY knowing they would never again need to
worry
about having to give up their formerly extremely destructive
little
chewer.

> She had toys,

I recommend one per room or section of the house.

> she was allowed on all the furniture,

Some experts would say that's being overly permissive and demeans
you in
your dog's eyes, but I don't buy into that, and besides, I'm not
an
expert. Heel, I can't even use most of the TOOLS our experts rely
on to
make their dogs work.

> she had views to all sides of the house from inside,

Our experts would tell you to block the dog's view, and I would
agree,
not being familiar with avoiding behavior problems myself because
I
usually just immediately train the behavior problem away in a
couple of
minutes once I've detected potential problem behaviors.

> she had music,

Yeah, well music is good. My dogs love reggae. But I turn the
radio on
to a talk station so's to cover up human voices from outside, and
throw
on the old Doggy Do Right (And Kitty Will And A Rooster Did Too)
machine, and the pups are content just like grammar was baby
sitting
them, but without having to drive her home.

> tv, you name it,

Just a little talk radio and DDR is what works. The radio is
optional.

> she probably had it at one time or another.

Yes, overindulged, spoiled, just like my dogs. But HOWE COME you
got a
heap of behavior problems, and my dogs seldom do anything they're
not
supposed to do, and most certainly not just because the Kat is
away...

> Luckily

INDEED! Another excellent choice of dog training TOOLS. That's
what our
"experts" here rely upon most, sheer LUCK.

> we didn't own anything nice at the time so we dealt with the
> behavior until it ran its course.

Yeah, that wouldn't serve my students well at all... I'd STARVE.

> Looking back,

Cringe?

> I would've crated her

Yes, like you've done to Summer.

> if I'd thought of it.

INDEED. Thinking, rationalizing, and problem solving are learned
qualities. It says so in the FREE Wits' End Dog Training Method
manual.

> Back then, crate training wasn't big in my area so it wasn't
> considered an option.

No kiddin? Back when I started training, nobody crated dogs until
they
were about to go on the airplane, with just a few minutes of
introduction to the crate. The reason crating a dog is THAT EZ, is
because properly handled and trained dogs do not object to being
crated.
UNTRAINED dogs object to being crated. THAT'S the problem for
"crate
training." Crate training is an oxymoron. There are NO ordinary
training
problems the crate can be a benefit or a solution for.

Locking dogs in crates isolates and worries them. The react from
fear,
not from being "spoiled." That fear anxiety is real, and is
destructive
to the temperament and disposition of the dog.

Crating untrained dogs makes them anxious, hyperactive, shy,
aggressive,
bark, dig, chew, self mutilate, and LITERALLY eat their guts out,
like
the dog throwing up thread of this week, the dog who pukes every
time
they put him in his crate to leave the house. Your pals told them
to
IGNORE the puking, and "crate train" the dog and he'd get over it.
Well
good buddy, dogs DON'T get over extreme anxiety any easier than
our Gang
Of Thugs gets over a case of JERRYIZING.

> You may want to consider this for the times you leave.

And the behavior could be reinforced or change to other, often
worse,
seemingly non related behavior problems as transfer or replacement
behaviors.

> Oh, a poster named Jerry will probably come in and

Give you the very best advice available anywhere in the world, for
FREE.

> maliciously attack any of us

No tara. I couldn't care less about you and your lying dog abusing
Thug
pal. I don't attack you pukes. I don't make personal confrontation
with
you Thugs. No. I don't have any personal animosity towards our
"experts"
who hurt and kill dogs because they don't have the intellect to
outwit a
puppy dog. No, this is nothing PERSONAL, like when janet boss
overlooked
two shock containment devices that made the little dog in
"interested in
hearing" become hand/collar shy and aggressive to strangers. She
killed
that do a sure as if she'd dropped the hammer on him herself.

No tara. This isn't nothing personal. This is strictly
professional.
Your pals are hurting and killing dogs inappropriately and
unnecessarily, and telling folks not to believe ME and Marilyn and
Canis55 and Paul and Misty and Robert Crim, you remember Robert
Crim and
his DEAD dog Fritz? Do you remember steve walker and his DEAD dog
Sampson? We knew and told him that confronting Sampson would make
him
aggressive towards the children. Your pals convinced him to
confront his
dog, and that's what made Sampson "fear aggressive" towards SMALL
children and got him DEAD.

That was PREDICTABLE. Just as Fritz buyin the farm, was
PREDICTABLE. And
Cubbe. Did you read the thread "1 step forward" where Cubbe
snapped at a
child because she'd got shocked the previous day? She'll have
another
incident and get DEAD just like Fritz and Sampson did. The first
thing
lia did was run out to replace her shock collar batteries and ask
us if
we thought she should go back to more forceful training to break
Cubbe
of running away and aggression problems...

> who suggest crating their dogs.

Nah. I don't have any problem for crating TRAINED dogs. Untrained
dogs
become severely distressed when crated inappropriately.

> Just a heads-up.

INDEED. Heads up. Like that day the guy wrote in with an
aggressive
golden he was going to destroy, so I offered to adopt him because
he was
dangerous. Your pal ed w of pet loss dot CON told him lies about
me, and
scared the guy into KILLING his dog instead of giving me a chance
to
help him. I'll see if I can find the thread and post it for you to
see
what your pals are really doing to HELP here.

Your "expert" rpdb pals are mostly koehler and/or shock collar
trainers.
They're self appointed "experts" because they know HOWE to jerk
and
choke dogs PROPERLY on pronged spiked pinch choke collars, shock
collars, and ear and toe and testicle pinching and twisting and
beating
dogs with sticks to motivate them and chin cuff and scruff shake
and
that's the extent of their dog training expertise.

That's why I came in here, to identify, expose, discredit, and
dispense
with, your lying, dog abusing Thugs who've conspired for years to
repress non force training methods to defend their alleged right
to hurt
dogs, based on their "expertise." They're AFRAID that if non force
methods are proven to be as fast, safe, and effective as they are,
our
Thugs won't be able to justify and rationalize HURTING dogs
noMOORE.

Well, it's game time, folks. You've been proven not to have
expertise,
not to have tools, not to have advice to train a dog without
hurting
him, not to suffer the trapping of morals, ethics, principles,
human
decency or integrity.

Certainly our "experts" wouldn't hurt a dog to train him if they
had the
intellect to outwit a puppy dog, would they?

Answer THAT, and I rest my case. Otherwise, I'll keep at it till
everyone else answers that for you, and laws are passed to protect
our
people and their dogs from scum like you and your pals who hurt
and kill
dogs because you're AFRAID of their behaviors, like biting their
"trainers" for jerking and choking them.

> Tara O.

misty" <Momisty@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:6946-3B6337A1-329@storefull-233.iap.bryant.webtv.net...

> We just installed a PetSafe brand fence this Spring. Two dogs,
> two collars We now have one dog and no collars.
> Peach and Zelda would run thru the fence, not want to come back
> in the yard and would run for days. The last time, Peach didn't
> come back home.
> I used the Wit's End Training Manual to learn how to train my
dog.
> She is now border trained. A few minutes each day reinforces
> her desire to stay in the yard. She no longer runs out into the
> road, I can stop her from chasing cats and she no longer cringes
> when we walk around the yard.
> I can not say loud or long enough how much I hate the e-fence
and
> its collars. If you can't get a regular fence then you need to
> train your dog. I will never rely on an electronic collar to
keep my
> dog in our yard again. The price was too high:-(
> ~misty

<"Terri"@cyberhighway

> Hey, do like me, and killfile Jerry.
> He has millions of people aleady reading his posts and
> watching him extract his soggy foot out of his mouth!
> Out of these MILLIONS, I've only seen 2 naive childs
> come forward and actually believe in his training manual.

Robert Crim writes:

I assume that I and my wife are those two naive childs since
I freely admit to having read and, I hope, understood enough
of the manual and it's counterparts by John Fisher and the
posts of Marilyn Rammell to believe and use it. This naive
child would like to say thank you to both Jerry and Marilyn for
putting up with a constant barrage of really infantile crap at
the hands of supposedly adult dog lovers.

The other naive child (LSW) has to put up with the nagging
idea that if people like them had been posting earlier, maybe
we would not have had to hold the head of a really
magnificent animal in our arms while he was given the
needle and having to hug him and wait until he gasped
his last gasp.

To my mind, "naive" is believing you can terrorize a dog into
good behavior. Naive is believing that people that hide
behind fake names are more honest than people that use
their real names. Naive is thinking that dilettante dog
breeders and amateur "trainers" like Joey (lyingdogDUMMY,
j.h.) are the equal or better than those that have studied and
lived by their craft for decades.

"Stupid" is believing that people do not see kindergarten
level insults for what they are. Really stupid is believing that
people like Jerry Howe and Marilyn Rammell are going to
just go away because you people act like fools. Why do you
act like fools? I really have no idea, and I don't really care.

> And, to date: I've not seen ONE come forward and actually
> admit to buying and having success with his little black
> box.

I think I'm going to get one myself for Father's day and take
it down to the Animal Shelter for their use and testing. You
would never believe the results, so you'll never know.

> Anyone by now that doesn't see a scam man coming by
> Jerry's posts deserves to get what is sure to be coming to
> him! LOL!

I don't see a "scam man", so I guess I and Longsuffering
Wife and Rollei will just have to get what we deserve, eh?
As Joey (Dogman) says, "poor Rollei.".......right.

>Terri

Yes it was, and that is sad.

Robert, Longsuffering Wife and Rollei (do I get to listen to the
box
first?)

Hello People,

Robert Crim was a former Gang Of Thugs Member, and
hated me a much as the rest of our Thugs do. Robert was a
long time friend and prominent contributor to rpdb, till Jerry
came along and smartened him up. He learned the hard
way, and no longer posts to his former pals, because it is
just too painful knowing his pals would rather HURT and
KILL their dogs than to admit that JERRY is RIGHT.

Margaret Hoffman
Message 1 of 19

Doggy Do Right and Jerry Howe

I just recently looked at this newsgroup and I found it
incredible. I do have a Doggy Do Right and have had it for
about one year. It truly does work - at least on my Dobe,
Chelsea. Chelsea was the unhappy recipient of several failed
attempts at obedience training, both in a "class" environment
and with a personal trainer. She is very high spirited and
strong and, unfortunately, spoiled, since we are an older
couple who doted on our dog. We were lucky enough to find Jerry
Howe and to not only buy a Doggy Do Right, but to also have him
personally work with Chelsea.

His methods are wonderful and effective. Chelsea is not a dog
that you will bully, and I wouldn't dream of hurting her. After
Jerry spent time with her, she no longer jumped on furniture,
ate food off the counter, pulled me incessantly on the leash.
She is calmer and we are all happier. Well, it is a very long
story and I won't bore you with all the details, but suffice it
to say that Jerry Howe saved the day for our dog and for us.

Marge Hoffman. (REWARD PAID BY DW.)

P.S. You can send me the reward money, but I won't sell you my
DDR!

Hi Jerry,

I received email from Mark Shaw on 10/6 which I just read today.
Sorry I didn't have time to get to it sooner. We have had a lot
going on in our area concerning animals. We formed a new Task
Force to address spay/neuter, pet overpopulation and animal
abuse. I needed to do a lot of research before the first meeting
and
time was just not available for anything else.

Anyway the letter went on to say that we are in collusion, I tried
to defraud him, and have sent none of the materials that he has
asked for although he has yet to furnish the P.O. Box number that
he wanted them sent to in the first place. He goes on to state
that
I am no longer eligible for the "fictions reward." All of this is
in
answer to postings that prove I was "sharing" his email with you
which in his opinion was a breach of good manners. His email only
had terms and conditions of the reward which I would consider
"public information."

Be that as it may, I would like to state that you had my
permission
to post any email I have sent you regarding DDR including this
email.

I'm very sorry that you have to put up with this type of situation
from someone that obviously never intended to make good on his
reward offer in the first place.

I had a call from a friend of mine with a very aggressive cat. I
have loaned her my DDR for a few weeks to see if it will calm JR
down. I will let you know the results. She goes to the same
holistic
vet that I go to and he is also interested.

In case Mark does post to the list again I would like to say that
I
do very much believe that DDR will help JR as I know it has helped
my dogs and cats. I have entirely too much to do, to worry about
his
opinions or reward.

The only reason I was willing to apply for the reward was on your
behalf as I do think your product is a valuable tool in helping
with
aggression and other behavior problems.

I am in Feral Cat Network (we spay and neuter approximately 100
feral cats a month), I am also a member of a local AKC dog
obedience club, member of a local AKC agility club, president of
Pet Rescue, board member of the Alliance for Care and Welfare of
Animals (on the board are: county commissioner, vet. rep., rep.
from
AKC dog club, CFA cat club, assistant County manager, head of
animal control, director of two different shelters, etc.).

I listed these not to be on an ego trip but to let Mark know that
I
am involved with animals and have very little time to play games
with him also I would not recommend your product if I did not
believe in it.

Please feel free to post this email as it has no copyright on it
as
did Mark Shaw's last email to me.

Take care Jerry and don't let the Mark's of the world get you
down.

Elaine

Thank you, Elaine. I have been trying to educate the mark's of
this
world, with some occasional successes. I guess that's variable
reinforcement?

Yours, Jerry.

Elaine McClung, President of Pet Rescue writes: Sep 9,
2000

"I ordered from Jerry a long time ago.. He was helpful and
the order was filled promptly. Yes, Doggie Do Right does
indeed exist.

I "had" a very aggressive female Pit.. She was showing
aggression not only towards Dok, Rhodesian Ridgeback,
but our cats and even us.

She now plays with Dok, even to the point of allowing him
to take a toy or bone from her. She no longer shows any
aggression towards us. She is showing some aggression
towards the cats but that is down to a warning growl.

It is not just my opinion that all this aggression existed
before Doggie Do Right as we were advised by three vets
to euthanize her.

I do very much believe that DDR will help JR as I know it
has helped my dogs and cats. I do think your product is a
valuable tool in helping with aggression and other behavior
problems.

I am in Feral CatNetwork (we spay and neuter approximately
100 feral cats a month), I am also a member of a local AKC
dog obedience club, member of a local AKC agility club,
president of Pet Rescue, board member of the Alliance for
Care and Welfare of Animals (on the board are: county
commissioner, vet. rep., rep. from AKC dog club, CFA cat
club, assistant County manager, head of animal control,
director of two different shelters, etc.).

Thanks, Elaine.

"Hoku Beltz" <hoku@rsphawaii.com> wrote in message
news:SN2k9.45447$V7.10868114@twister.socal.rr.com...

> Aloha Sunny,
> Just follow the training program to the
> letter, no matter how insignificant some
> of the step seem to be and your pupy will
> be a very well behaved dog in a few days.
>
> I would seriously consider backing out of
> the training classes as they will conflict
> with the Wit's End principles.
>
> I went the training route first, and still
> had problems until I found Wits' End.
>
> Now I have two "new and improved" dogs.
> You won't be disappointed if you follow
> the program.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Hoku

==================

----- Original Message -----
From: Hoku Beltz
To: The Puppy Wizard
Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2002 6:12 PM
Subject: Mahalo

Aloha Jerry,

Just wanted to let you know that the surrogate toy
technique is working wonders. I have not had a
shredded sheet for over a week now. It is nice
to be able to leave the bed made and come home
to a made bed.

Your program is awesome, but you already know
that. Keep up the good work!

Hoku

==================



"Charlie Wilkes" <charlie_wilkes@easynews.com wrote
in message
news: pjaootcg8dgrptuu96383933eqk2jjp7b2@4ax.com...

I read up on rotties, pitbulls, etc., and quite a
bit of the literature suggested I needed to assert
my dominance and "make the dog earn everything it
gets."

I tried this once or twice, just by taking a stern
tone of voice, and the results were terrible.
The pup got scared and just wanted to stay away from
me.

That's why I support Jerry Howe and his FREE
Wits' End Dog Training manual -- that and the fact
that Jerry is an all-around great guy.

The core takeaway I got from Jerry's manual is this:
make yourself the center of your puppy's world -
- his personal Lord Jesus. Never give him a reason
to fear you or think you're angry. Love the heck
out of him, and you'll end up with a great dog.

This has truly worked with my puppy. She'll do
anything I want her to, if she understands, because
she trusts me 100 percent, and nothing is more
important in her world than her relationship
with me. http://www.geocities.com/viscouspuppy
Charlie

=========================



<"Terri"@cyberhighway

> Hey, do like me, and killfile Jerry.
> He has millions of people aleady reading his posts and
> watching him extract his soggy foot out of his mouth!
> Out of these MILLIONS, I've only seen 2 naive childs
> come forward and actually believe in his training manual.

Robert Crim writes:

I assume that I and my wife are those two naive childs since
I freely admit to having read and, I hope, understood enough
of the manual and it's counterparts by John Fisher and the
posts of Marylin Rammell to believe and use it. This naive
child would like to say thank you to both Jerry and Marylin for
putting up with a constant barrage of really infantile crap at
the hands of supposedly adult dog lovers.

The other naive child (LSW) has to put up with the nagging
idea that if people like them had been posting earlier, maybe
we would not have had to hold the head of a really
magnificent animal in our arms while he was given the
needle and having to hug him and wait until he gasped
his last gasp.

To my mind, "naive" is believing you can terrorize a dog into
good behavior. Naive is believing that people that hide
behind fake names are more honest than people that use
their real names. Naive is thinking that dilettante dog
breeders and amateur "trainers" like Joey (lyingdogDUMMY,
j.h.) are the equal or better than those that have studied and
lived by their craft for decades.

"Stupid" is believing that people do not see kindergarten
level insults for what they are. Really stupid is believing that
people like Jerry Howe and Marylin Rammell are going to
just go away because you people act like fools. Why do you
act like fools? I really have no idea, and I don't really care.

> And, to date: I've not seen ONE come forward and actually
> admit to buying and having success with his little black
> box.

I think I'm going to get one myself for Father's day and take
it down to the Animal Shelter for their use and testing. You
would never believe the results, so you'll never know.

> Anyone by now that doesn't see a scam man coming by
> Jerry's posts deserves to get what is sure to be coming to
> him! LOL!

I don't see a "scam man", so I guess I and Longsuffering
Wife and Rollei will just have to get what we deserve, eh?
As Joey (Dogman) says, "poor Rollei.".......right.

>Terri

Yes it was, and that is sad.

Robert, Longsuffering Wife and Rollei (do I get to listen to the
box first?)

Hello People,

Robert Crim was a former Gang Of Thugs Member, and
hated me a much as the rest of our Thugs do. Robert was a
long time friend and prominent contributor to rpdb, till Jerry
came along and smartened him up. He learned the hard
way, and no longer posts to his former pals, because it is
just too painful knowing his pals would rather HURT and
KILL their dogs than to admit that JERRY is RIGHT.

----------------------------------------------

"I know that most men, including those at ease with
problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept
even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would
oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they
have delighted in explaining to colleagues, proudly
taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by
thread, into the fabric of their lives."
-Leo Tolstoy-

Is it any wonder that the following sig file has generated
more complaints to my personal email than any other
controversial post I have made to date, bar none?:

CAVEAT
If you have to do things to your dog to train him that you
would rather not have to do, then you shouldn't be doing
them. If you have a dog trainer who tells you to jerk your
dog around, choke him, pinch his ears, or twist his toes,
shock, shake, slap, scold, hit, chin cuff, scruff shake or
punish your dog in any manner, that corrections
are appropriate, that the dog won't think of you as the
punisher, or that corrections are not harmful, or if they
can't train your dog to do what you want, look for a
trainer that knows HOWE.

Thank you,
Jerry Howe,
Director of Research,
BIOSOUND Scientific
Director of Training,
Wits' End Dog Training
1611 24th St
Orlando, FL 32805
Phone: 1-407-425-5092
Phone: 1-888-BIOSOUND (1-888-246-7686)
Phone: 1-888-WITSEND (1-888-948-7363)
http://www.doggydoright.com

Nature, to be mastered, must be obeyed.
-Francis Bacon-

There are terrible people who, instead of solving a
problem, bungle it and make it more difficult for all who
come after. Who ever can't hit the nail on the head
should, please, not hit at all.
-Nietzsche-

The abilities to think, rationalize and solve problems are
learned qualities.

The Wits' End Dog Training Method challenges the learning
centers in the dogs brain. These centers, once challenged,
develop and continue to grow to make him smarter.

The Wits' End Dog Training method capitalizes on
praising split seconds of canine thought, strategy, and
timing, not mindless hours of forced repetition, constant
corrections, and scolding.
-Jerry Howe-

The Puppy Wizard. <}TPW ; ~ ) >

ANY QUESTIONS, DUMMIES?
,-._,-,
V)"(V
(_o_) Have a great day!
/ V)
(l l l) Your Puppy Wizzzard. <}YPW ; ~ } >
oo-oo


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