Dog Discussion: Housebreaking

Housebreaking
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Linda
2004-04-19 11:40:08 EST
We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of course started
housebreaking it immediately when we got home with her. We are using the
crate and since I do not work--well not outside of home anyways--lol I
follow her constantly. Taking her out about every 45 mins or so and of
course there's been a few accidents in the house and I just say no outside
and then take her out. I don't believe in the rubbing the nose or screaming
etc. Didn't do that with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?

Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take before they go
to the door etc and you can really trust them?

Thanks,

Linda



L Alpert
2004-04-19 21:18:01 EST
Linda wrote:
> We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of course
> started housebreaking it immediately when we got home with her. We
> are using the crate and since I do not work--well not outside of home
> anyways--lol I follow her constantly. Taking her out about every 45
> mins or so and of course there's been a few accidents in the house
> and I just say no outside and then take her out. I don't believe in
> the rubbing the nose or screaming etc. Didn't do that with my kids
> so why should a dog tolerate it?
>
> Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take before
> they go to the door etc and you can really trust them?

You don't have to rub their nose in it, but you can point it close enough to
it to know what it is and let it know in no uncertain terms your displeasure
and then take it outside.

Other than that, you seem to be on the right track.

I never had a dog that went in the house more than twice.

>
> Thanks,
>
> Linda



KrisHur
2004-04-20 08:12:59 EST
Unlike the other poster, I would not direct any attention to accidents at
all. All you are teaching the dog when you punish them for accidents is that
you do not like pee/poo and then the pup will find out of the way places to
go like behind the furniture.

I didn't attempt to trust my girl until she was 5-6 months old. Since every
accident works against you there is no benefit to rushing to trust them in
the house. Furthermore, the longer you wait to give them the run of the
house the less likely the puppy is to learn other bad habits like garbage
digging, counter surfing and furniture chewing.
--
Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com




"Linda" <whoknows@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:tpSgc.10951$c%3.10825@okepread02...
> We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of course started
> housebreaking it immediately when we got home with her. We are using the
> crate and since I do not work--well not outside of home anyways--lol I
> follow her constantly. Taking her out about every 45 mins or so and of
> course there's been a few accidents in the house and I just say no outside
> and then take her out. I don't believe in the rubbing the nose or
screaming
> etc. Didn't do that with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?
>
> Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take before they
go
> to the door etc and you can really trust them?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Linda
>
>



The Puppy Wizard
2004-04-20 10:45:35 EST
HOWEDY L Alpert,

"L Alpert" <alpertl@xxcomcast.net> wrote in message
news:dT_gc.1499$GR.198129@attbi_s01...
>
> Linda wrote:
> > We just got a female cavalier spaniel one
> > week ago and of course started housebreaking
> > it immediately when we got home with her. We
> > are using the crate and since I do not work--well
> > not outside of home anyways--lol I follow her
> > constantly. Taking her out about every 45
> > mins or so and of course there's been a few
> > accidents in the house and I just say no outside
> > and then take her out. I don't believe in the
> > rubbing the nose or screaming etc. Didn't do
> > that with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?
> >
> > Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does
> > it usually take before they go to the door etc and
> > you can really trust them?
>
> You don't have to rub their nose in it,

Right. Cause paying any attention to a HOWEsbreaking
mistake will reinforce the behavior or make the dog afraid
to relieve hisself in front of you.

> but you can point it close enough to
> it to know what it is and let it know in
> no uncertain terms your displeasure

Yeah. THAT'S HOWE COME dogs develop
temperament and behavior problems.

> and then take it outside.

And THAT'S like locking the barn door after
the horse has run HOWET on you.

> Other than that, you seem to be on the right track.

INDEED?

> I never had a dog that went in the house more than twice.

HOWEsbreaking is INSTINCTIVE.

> > Thanks,

Scolding and punishment are not.

> > Linda


HOWEsbreaking is taught in your FREE copy of
The Puppy Wizard's FREE WWW Wits' End Dog
Training Method Manual.

"The Methods, Principles, And Philosophy Of Behavior
Never Change, Or They'd Not Be Scientific And Would
Not Obtain Consistent, Reliable, Fast, Effective Results
For All Handler's And All Dogs, As Taught In Your FREE
Copy Of The Puppy Wizard's FREE WWW Wits' End Dog
Training Method Manual," The Puppy Wizard. <{} ; ~ ) >

"His Amazing Progress Almost Makes Me Cry.
Your Method Takes Positive Training To The
Next Level And Should Really Be Used By All
Trainers Who Call Themselves Trainers. Thank
You For Helping Me Save His Life," Kay Pierce,
Professional Trainer, 30 Years Experience.


"Just Want To Second Jerry's Method For
Dealing With This (Destructive Separation
Anxiety). I've Suggested It To Quite A Few
Clients Now And It's Worked 'EVERY TIME
The Very First Time' - marilyn, Trainer, 33
Years Experience.

Here's an 8 month old pup:

From: AIMEE (countrygirl0334@yahoo.com)
Subject: House training and such...
Date: 2003-10-08 16:18:56 PST

I've been having a problem with my dog, Axel,
relieving himself in the house while I'm away
from home.

I've used TPW method's, and yesterday I was out
for 12 hours, and Axel didn't have one single "accident".

Today, I had hoped that the results would be just as
good - and they were (I was out for 11 hours).

The problem began when, as a puppy, Axel would
relieve himself in the house and I would point at the
mess and tell him "NO" or "Bad Dog".

That made him afraid to relieve himself in the house
or infront of me.

After I got TPW's training manual, I corrected my
mishandling of these instances.

When I came home to an "accident", I would simply
drop a can near the area and ask Axel "What's that?"
Then I would clean it up - with out showing him I was
the least bit upset about the mess, and when he looked
at the spot I would tell him "Good boy, you're a good dog".

This has been an ongoing problem, and thanks to the
Puppy Wizard, we've finally got it taken care of...

Also, Axel LOVES the cat's litter box...He enjoys the
"snacks" he can find in there...I followed TPW's methods
by alternating sounds and praising him while or before
he sticks his nose in it, and today, he's been going into
the room with the cat box and barking. That's because
he's thinking about getting into the box, but he knows he
shouldn't.

Thank you, Jerry, for all you help. You've been a
blessing to all of us.

AIMEE

===================

From: AIMEE (countrygirl0334@yahoo.com):

I own a black an tan coonhound. We got him
as a puppy, and due to constant mishandling
(pulling on his lead, negative corrections, and
the occasional use of a bark collar) I ended
up with a very anxious dog.

I couldn't leave him home alone, I couldn't
crate him, I couldn't even take my dog for
walks because he feared EVERYTHING.

I was going to have to get rid of him if things
didn't turn around.

My husband and I searched the internet for
answers - AND WE FOUND THE PUPPY WIZARD.

For all of you disbeliveers out there HIS METHODS WORK!

I've followed his manual, and we now have a
dog that can be left home alone, that heels
on command, that can go outside and NOT
be afraid of everything he sees.

Not only have his methods helped our dog, but
our marriage has gotten better. We had fallen
into a rut - constant bickering and tension, we
never laughed or had FUN together - but now,
with the same mindset used in THE PUPPY
WIZARDS dog training, our communications
channels have opened, and we now work
together instead of against one another.

For all the "Literalists" out there, NO WE DID
NOT TEACH EACH OTHER TO SIT, STAY,
OR HEEL.

We simply eliminated the nagging and the acting out to get
NEGATIVE attention from one another since we weren't getting
the POSITIVE attention we wanted.

So, it's been proven - THE PUPPY WIZARDS
METHODS WORK.

It's up to you to accept them. Yes, there's alot of blame that we
have to accept, but once we realize that we've caused these
problems to arise, we can strive to make things better.

AIMEE

=================


From: Jerome Bigge (jbigge@novagate.net)
Subject: "Wit's End Dog Training Manual"
Date: 2001-11-08 20:04:13 PST

(copy of email to Jerry Howe)

Dear Jerry:

Thanks for the FREE "Wit's End Dog Training Manual". I
learned what I was doing WRONG and things are going
much better now with Patty Pugs, my 11 week old Boston
Terrier. I stopped "hurting her" and started "loving her"!
Made a major change in her in only 24 hours as to how
she now behaves. She is coming along nicely thanks to
your manual, which is certainly worth MORE than the $0.00
that you charge for it!

Don't let the "thugs" get you down. You are right. Hurting
dogs is counterproductive to any hope of training them...
"Been there, done that, learned that it DIDN"T WORK"!

Jerome Bigge
NRA Life Member
Supporter of National Health Insurance
CompTIA A Certified Computer Technician
Author of the "Warlady" & "Wartime" series.
Download at "http://members.tripod.com/~jbigge"



"Hoku Beltz" <hoku@rsphawaii.com> wrote in message
news:SN2k9.45447$V7.10868114@twister.socal.rr.com...

> Aloha Sunny,
>
> Just follow the training program to the letter, no matter how
> insignificant some of the step seem to be and your pupy will
> be a very well behaved dog in a few days.
>
> I would seriously consider backing out of the training classes
> as they will conflict with the Wit's End principles.
>
> I went the training route first, and still had problems until I
> found Wits' End. Now I have two "new and improved" dogs.
> You won't be dissapointed if you follow the program.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Hoku

==================

----- Original Message -----
From: Hoku Beltz
To: The Puppy Wizard
Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2002 6:12 PM
Subject: Mahalo

Aloha Jerry,

Just wanted to let you know that the surrogate toy
technique is working wonders. I have not had a
shredded sheet for over a week now. It is nice
to be able to leave the bed made and come home
to a made bed.

Your program is awesome, but you already know
that. Keep up the good work!

Hoku

=================

"Nevyn" <greatdane@badmama.com.au> wrote in message
news:1061695905.896739@grimiore.conceptual.net.au...

HOWEDY Group,

Here some SUCCESS STORIES ive had using JERRY'S MANUAL

1) My dogz, two bitches - Vicious, barking, aggressive, pulled
on leash, wanted to kill any dogs they saw, fought between
each other. TWO WEEKS using Jerry's manual, they were calm,
friends, my companions.

2) ADDED A BEAGLE PUPPY (male) to my "PACK", the
girls had -NO PROBLEMS- with him from the moment I
dropped him by their noses.

3) My FRIENDS dogs 2 MALES barking and jumping
at the fence all night 3 DAYS TRAINING WITH JERRY'S
MANUAL they were CALMED AND HAVEN'T BARKED ONCE!

Added a NEW MALE DOG (2 yrs old) AND
WELCOMED HIM WITH NO WUCKAS !

4) POODLE that ATE food from the KITCHEN BENCH -
lock him in a box? NO! USE JERRYS MANUAL! 4 DAYS
AND HES NEVER DONE IT SINCE!

5) ABUSED DOGS AT THE SHELTER I WORK AT -
HAD TO BE FED WITH A BUCKET ON A STICK -
ONE WEEK ON JERRYS MANUAL, THE SUPERVISOR
TOLD ME TO PUT THEM IN THE PUBLIC KENNELS
FOR SALE !

Quite amazing to - I thought they were just dull coloured
dogs, but after I had removed the fear and anxiety their
hairs coloured up amazingly.

6) STAFFY FEMALE who would NOT DROP HER
BALL! She carried it around all day and night - 3
DAYS on jerrys MANUAL and she now DROPS
it when u ASK her to!

BWHWHAHAHAHAAHA !!!!

Nevyn


----- Original Message -----
From: Eric
To: ThePuppyWizard@EarthLink.Net
Sent: Friday, November 29, 2002 7:54 AM
Subject: just checking in..

Jerry!

You helped me with my pal Dundee about a year ago
regarding submissive peeing. Just wanted to let you
know he's doing great- he was "cured" in about 2 days
using your techniques!

He has since become the "smartest dog in the world"!
Once I stopped thinking like a human and got inside his
head, I can teach him ANYTHING, usually in a matter
of minutes. Makes me look like an expert dog-trainer.

I rescued two strays last week, cleaned 'em up, wormed
'em, and am getting them their shots. Time to get inside
their heads and teach them to teach themselves how to
be good dogs!

Instead of feeling like "training" is a chore, I look forward
to working with these guys a couple times a day...

Although I don't follow your instructions "to a T", I learned
from you to "think like a dog" and stimulate their brain rather
than beating ass or pinching, or any of that nonsense.

I know damn well I would NOT be loyal to someone who
beat MY ass lol!

Well, just wanted to thank you for rattling the bushes
out there and teaching folks the RIGHT way to "train" dogs.

A horseman friend of mine uses very similar techniques in
training his horses- he calls it "natural horsemanship". He
is hated by nearly all the local "trainers" yet somehow he
repeatedly wins at every show he attends. He rarely shows
any more, but goes now and then to rub their noses in it
(pun intended)... Too cool....

Have a great holiday season and keep up the good work!

Eric , Dundee, Sammy, and Maynard

==========================



The Puppy Wizard
2004-04-20 10:56:06 EST
HOWEDY krisHURT,

"KrisHur" <kris_brock@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:108a5223j7flp03@corp.supernews.com...
>
> Unlike the other poster,

Unlike the other poster who is NOT a dog
abuser liar or mental case, like yourself.

> I would not direct any attention to accidents at all.

Right. You'd lock IT in a box and take IT HOWET
for a walk every HOWER.

> All you are teaching the dog when you punish
> them for accidents is that you do not like pee/poo
> and then the pup will find out of the way places to
> go like behind the furniture.

Yeah. Besides, HOWEsbreaking is INSTINCTIVE
at five weeks, maybe less.

> I didn't attempt to trust my girl until she was 5-6 months old.

Right. Cause you're a dog abuser a liar and a mental case.

> Since every accident works against you

That's INSANE. Dogs INSTINCTIVELY want to be clean.

> there is no benefit to rushing to trust them in the house.

CAUSE YOU GOT NO METHOD.

> Furthermore, the longer you wait to give them
> the run of the house

You mean, by locking IT in a crate an tryin
to get HOWET callin THAT, trainin.

> the less likely the puppy is to learn other bad habits

Locking the dog in a box to AVOID behaviors of the
cunning domestic puppy dog you ain't got the INTELLECT
to HOWEtwit does not TRAIN them not to do the behaviors
you don't have the INTELLECT to train them not to do...

> like garbage digging,

Takes MINUTES to train a dog not to eat garbage
or steal from the C-HOWENTER or to break
indiscriminate chewing.

> counter surfing and furniture chewing.

That's INSANE. You CANNOT train a dog by
by AVOIDING behaviors you do not have the
intellect to HOWEtwit.

> Kristen and
> Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
> www.kristenandkali.com

You're a dog abuser a liar and a mental case.

The Amazing Puppy Wizard. <{} ; ~ ) >



L Alpert
2004-04-20 21:26:31 EST
KrisHur wrote:
> Unlike the other poster, I would not direct any attention to
> accidents at all. All you are teaching the dog when you punish them
> for accidents is that you do not like pee/poo and then the pup will
> find out of the way places to go like behind the furniture.
>
> I didn't attempt to trust my girl until she was 5-6 months old. Since
> every accident works against you there is no benefit to rushing to
> trust them in the house. Furthermore, the longer you wait to give
> them the run of the house the less likely the puppy is to learn other
> bad habits like garbage digging, counter surfing and furniture
> chewing.

You can argue against the method if you like, but I have had 8 dogs all told
(3 currently), and I have been successful with each one.
The method works. Just like children, they need to know when something is
wrong, and your displeasure with it. Ignoring it is the same as acceptance.

>
> "Linda" <whoknows@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:tpSgc.10951$c%3.10825@okepread02...
>> We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of course
>> started housebreaking it immediately when we got home with her. We
>> are using the crate and since I do not work--well not outside of
>> home anyways--lol I follow her constantly. Taking her out about
>> every 45 mins or so and of course there's been a few accidents in
>> the house and I just say no outside and then take her out. I don't
>> believe in the rubbing the nose or screaming etc. Didn't do that
>> with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?
>>
>> Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take before
>> they go to the door etc and you can really trust them?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Linda



The Puppy Wizard
2004-04-21 02:52:27 EST
You been LUCKY.

"L Alpert" <alpertl@xxcomcast.net> wrote in message
news:b5khc.36897$yD1.106314@attbi_s54...
> KrisHur wrote:
> > Unlike the other poster, I would not direct any attention to
> > accidents at all. All you are teaching the dog when you punish
them
> > for accidents is that you do not like pee/poo and then the pup
will
> > find out of the way places to go like behind the furniture.
> >
> > I didn't attempt to trust my girl until she was 5-6 months
old. Since
> > every accident works against you there is no benefit to
rushing to
> > trust them in the house. Furthermore, the longer you wait to
give
> > them the run of the house the less likely the puppy is to
learn other
> > bad habits like garbage digging, counter surfing and furniture
> > chewing.
>
> You can argue against the method if you like, but I have had 8
dogs all told
> (3 currently), and I have been successful with each one.
> The method works. Just like children, they need to know when
something is
> wrong, and your displeasure with it. Ignoring it is the same as
acceptance.
>
> >
> > "Linda" <whoknows@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:tpSgc.10951$c%3.10825@okepread02...
> >> We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of
course
> >> started housebreaking it immediately when we got home with
her. We
> >> are using the crate and since I do not work--well not outside
of
> >> home anyways--lol I follow her constantly. Taking her out
about
> >> every 45 mins or so and of course there's been a few
accidents in
> >> the house and I just say no outside and then take her out. I
don't
> >> believe in the rubbing the nose or screaming etc. Didn't do
that
> >> with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?
> >>
> >> Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take
before
> >> they go to the door etc and you can really trust them?
> >>
> >> Thanks,
> >>
> >> Linda
>
>



KrisHur
2004-04-21 10:31:54 EST
"L Alpert" <alpertl@xxcomcast.net> wrote in message
news:b5khc.36897$yD1.106314@attbi_s54...
> Ignoring it is the same as acceptance.

The dog is not capbable of making the thought, "she ignored the poop on the
floor so it must be ok to go there." And ignoring it is not what I'm
advocating. I would greet poop/pee by in a disappointed tone talking to
*it*--"Oh boy this stinks".

Until a dog understands a behavior they cannot grap being punished for
non-compliance. And the way you describe handling accidents doesn't *teach*
the dog anything other than you do not like bowel/bladder movements. For
example, every time your husband comes home, he sees your shoe on the floor.
He gets mad and drags you over to the shoe yelling no, no, no and holding
you so that you have to look at it. He then puts you and the shoe in the
closet. Can you grasp that he's trying to teach you to put your shoes in the
closet and not leave them out? Couldn't he have handled it in a gentler
manner?

A dog can get it by being scolded, that's not the question here. This is a
quality of training issue. Kohler and the Monk's methods also work but
kinder/gentler ways are just as effective. Different strokes...

--
Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com




> > "Linda" <whoknows@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:tpSgc.10951$c%3.10825@okepread02...
> >> We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of course
> >> started housebreaking it immediately when we got home with her. We
> >> are using the crate and since I do not work--well not outside of
> >> home anyways--lol I follow her constantly. Taking her out about
> >> every 45 mins or so and of course there's been a few accidents in
> >> the house and I just say no outside and then take her out. I don't
> >> believe in the rubbing the nose or screaming etc. Didn't do that
> >> with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?
> >>
> >> Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take before
> >> they go to the door etc and you can really trust them?
> >>
> >> Thanks,
> >>
> >> Linda
>
>



L Alpert
2004-04-21 19:44:54 EST
The Puppy Wizard wrote:
> You been LUCKY.

No, I have been good. Big difference.


>
> "L Alpert" <alpertl@xxcomcast.net> wrote in message
> news:b5khc.36897$yD1.106314@attbi_s54...
>> KrisHur wrote:
>>> Unlike the other poster, I would not direct any attention to
>>> accidents at all. All you are teaching the dog when you punish them
>>> for accidents is that you do not like pee/poo and then the pup will
>>> find out of the way places to go like behind the furniture.
>>>
>>> I didn't attempt to trust my girl until she was 5-6 months old.
>>> Since every accident works against you there is no benefit to
>>> rushing to trust them in the house. Furthermore, the longer you
>>> wait to give them the run of the house the less likely the puppy is
>>> to learn other bad habits like garbage digging, counter surfing and
>>> furniture chewing.
>>
>> You can argue against the method if you like, but I have had 8 dogs
>> all told (3 currently), and I have been successful with each one.
>> The method works. Just like children, they need to know when
>> something is wrong, and your displeasure with it. Ignoring it is
>> the same as acceptance.
>>
>>>
>>> "Linda" <whoknows@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:tpSgc.10951$c%3.10825@okepread02...
>>>> We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of course
>>>> started housebreaking it immediately when we got home with her. We
>>>> are using the crate and since I do not work--well not outside of
>>>> home anyways--lol I follow her constantly. Taking her out about
>>>> every 45 mins or so and of course there's been a few accidents in
>>>> the house and I just say no outside and then take her out. I don't
>>>> believe in the rubbing the nose or screaming etc. Didn't do that
>>>> with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?
>>>>
>>>> Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take before
>>>> they go to the door etc and you can really trust them?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>>
>>>> Linda



L Alpert
2004-04-21 20:07:27 EST
KrisHur wrote:
> "L Alpert" <alpertl@xxcomcast.net> wrote in message
> news:b5khc.36897$yD1.106314@attbi_s54...
>> Ignoring it is the same as acceptance.
>
> The dog is not capbable of making the thought, "she ignored the poop
> on the floor so it must be ok to go there."

No, but showing unhappiness with it associates the dung in the house with
you being unhappy.

> And ignoring it is not
> what I'm advocating. I would greet poop/pee by in a disappointed tone
> talking to *it*--"Oh boy this stinks".
>
> Until a dog understands a behavior they cannot grap being punished for
> non-compliance. And the way you describe handling accidents doesn't
> *teach* the dog anything other than you do not like bowel/bladder
> movements.

It teaches them that crap on my carpet makes me mad. And by placing them
outside after they know that, the can correlate the actions quite nicely.
My success at doing this tells me that it works.

>For example, every time your husband comes home, he sees
> your shoe on the floor. He gets mad and drags you over to the shoe
> yelling no, no, no and holding you so that you have to look at it. He
> then puts you and the shoe in the closet. Can you grasp that he's
> trying to teach you to put your shoes in the closet and not leave
> them out? Couldn't he have handled it in a gentler manner?

So you pick up the dog and say good boy, nice crap on the floor? Why would
positive re-enforcement be understood by a dog and not negative
re-enforcement? If they can understand one, they sure can understand the
other.
Who says that the negative re-enforcement has to be truamatic? I'm not
saying to abuse the animal. One can be stern without being abusive and
still get the message across. It works well with animals and kids.

>
> A dog can get it by being scolded, that's not the question here. This
> is a quality of training issue. Kohler and the Monk's methods also
> work but kinder/gentler ways are just as effective. Different
> strokes...
>

Since all my past and current animals all seem to be well rounded and well
behaved, I would have to keep going with what works.

There is no quality of training issue with what is effective. If you are
worried that it would be trumatic for the animal, well, then let him piss on
the floor and tell him what a good boy (or girl) he/she is.

I currently have over 200 pounds of well behaved and well loved dogs in my
home (actually, it seems in my home, I am only #5 or 6 in the pecking
order!). They all know what they are allowed to play with and even where in
the yard they can go to the bathroom. I can leave the room with food on the
table or counter, and I know that neither of them will will make a move for
it, as tables and counters are off limits. Period. And they know this.

I walk all three of them together everyday without them pulling me down the
street. The do not chew, nor destroy anything in the house. They have
their own cache of playtoys in a box that they pull out from time to time
and chew on nothing else. The only problem with them is shedding, which
nothing other than daily brushing can really be done (The Newfoundland is
hairy, as well as Collie mix). Even the Pit Bull, which everyone said I
would have problems with training, listens well and is non destructive.

>
>>> "Linda" <whoknows@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:tpSgc.10951$c%3.10825@okepread02...
>>>> We just got a female cavalier spaniel one week ago and of course
>>>> started housebreaking it immediately when we got home with her. We
>>>> are using the crate and since I do not work--well not outside of
>>>> home anyways--lol I follow her constantly. Taking her out about
>>>> every 45 mins or so and of course there's been a few accidents in
>>>> the house and I just say no outside and then take her out. I don't
>>>> believe in the rubbing the nose or screaming etc. Didn't do that
>>>> with my kids so why should a dog tolerate it?
>>>>
>>>> Anyways, she is 12 weeks old. How long does it usually take before
>>>> they go to the door etc and you can really trust them?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>>
>>>> Linda


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