Dog Discussion: When Do Bones Turn Brittle?

When Do Bones Turn Brittle?
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=22Rosa_Palm=E9n=22_=3Crosa=40no-s-p-am=2Elocomail=2Ecom=3E?=
2004-02-19 12:24:55 EST
Hi!

Sorry about the crossposting, but I wasn't sure which group would be most
appropriate for my question.

My question concerns bones, I know that if you cook bones they become hard
and may splinter. I have always been told that especially chicken and other
bones from birds are the most dangerous cooked bones.

If I would want to feed my dogs baked/dried chicken or turkey necks, what
would be an appropriate temperature to bake/dry them in? And how about beef
bones? Heating them a bit to get the meat to dry and some of the marrow
drained out would mean less mess and more bones for my dogs =)

So how much would you have to heat a bone to change it's structure so it
becomes hard and brittle? I'm mainly interested in bird and beef, but
information on any other bones, (pork, lamb etc) would be very much
appreciated too.

Rosa

ps.
I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but I don't want to have
raw bones on my rugs.



ZPL
2004-02-19 12:29:01 EST
If you really want to "cook" them, try boiling. This method is a little
better for keeping the bones pliable.

"Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
news:aj6Zb.713$hm7.522@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> Hi!
>
> Sorry about the crossposting, but I wasn't sure which group would be most
> appropriate for my question.
>
> My question concerns bones, I know that if you cook bones they become hard
> and may splinter. I have always been told that especially chicken and
other
> bones from birds are the most dangerous cooked bones.
>
> If I would want to feed my dogs baked/dried chicken or turkey necks, what
> would be an appropriate temperature to bake/dry them in? And how about
beef
> bones? Heating them a bit to get the meat to dry and some of the marrow
> drained out would mean less mess and more bones for my dogs =)
>
> So how much would you have to heat a bone to change it's structure so it
> becomes hard and brittle? I'm mainly interested in bird and beef, but
> information on any other bones, (pork, lamb etc) would be very much
> appreciated too.
>
> Rosa
>
> ps.
> I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but I don't want to
have
> raw bones on my rugs.
>
>



=22Rosa_Palm=E9n=22_=3Crosa=40no-s-p-am=2Elocomail=2Ecom=3E?=
2004-02-19 12:34:05 EST
I do NOT want to give my dogs cooked chickenbones. I beleive that is a
recipe for disaster. I have given them some cooked beef bones, but because
of the risk involved with those too, I feel I have to sit next to them and
look out for splinters. It gets boring after a while. =)

"ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote in message news:El6Zb.871$nI1.682@okepread05...
> If you really want to "cook" them, try boiling. This method is a little
> better for keeping the bones pliable.
>
> "Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
> news:aj6Zb.713$hm7.522@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> > Hi!
> >
> > Sorry about the crossposting, but I wasn't sure which group would be
most
> > appropriate for my question.
> >
> > My question concerns bones, I know that if you cook bones they become
hard
> > and may splinter. I have always been told that especially chicken and
> other
> > bones from birds are the most dangerous cooked bones.
> >
> > If I would want to feed my dogs baked/dried chicken or turkey necks,
what
> > would be an appropriate temperature to bake/dry them in? And how about
> beef
> > bones? Heating them a bit to get the meat to dry and some of the marrow
> > drained out would mean less mess and more bones for my dogs =)
> >
> > So how much would you have to heat a bone to change it's structure so it
> > becomes hard and brittle? I'm mainly interested in bird and beef, but
> > information on any other bones, (pork, lamb etc) would be very much
> > appreciated too.
> >
> > Rosa
> >
> > ps.
> > I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but I don't want to
> have
> > raw bones on my rugs.
> >
> >
>
>



Suja
2004-02-19 13:13:53 EST
Rosa Palmén wrote:

> I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but I don't want to have
> raw bones on my rugs.

My dogs have a designated spot on which they'll eat all their food. I
use a beach towel large enough for two people. When it gets dirty, I
toss it in the wash.

Suja


=22Rosa_Palm=E9n=22_=3Crosa=40no-s-p-am=2Elocomail=2Ecom=3E?=
2004-02-19 13:20:40 EST

"Suja" <spanaval@scs.gmu.edu> wrote in message
news:X17Zb.12404$Dc2.10821@lakeread01...
> Rosa Palm\ufffdn wrote:
>
> > I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but I don't want to
have
> > raw bones on my rugs.
>
> My dogs have a designated spot on which they'll eat all their food. I
> use a beach towel large enough for two people. When it gets dirty, I
> toss it in the wash.
>
> Suja
>

Unfortunately there isn't enough space for both dogs to chew in the kitchen
at once =( So I've accepted their choice of chewingplace... It seems like
the woolrug is the perfect surface, it provides good traction and is also
perfect for wiping their face on afterwards, thank god it is a pretty dark
rug =)

Rosa



ZPL
2004-02-19 13:32:12 EST
Then boiling is better than baking.

"Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
news:Nr6Zb.715$4y7.543@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> I do NOT want to give my dogs cooked chickenbones. I beleive that is a
> recipe for disaster. I have given them some cooked beef bones, but because
> of the risk involved with those too, I feel I have to sit next to them and
> look out for splinters. It gets boring after a while. =)
>
> "ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote in message news:El6Zb.871$nI1.682@okepread05...
> > If you really want to "cook" them, try boiling. This method is a little
> > better for keeping the bones pliable.
> >
> > "Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
> > news:aj6Zb.713$hm7.522@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> > > Hi!
> > >
> > > Sorry about the crossposting, but I wasn't sure which group would be
> most
> > > appropriate for my question.
> > >
> > > My question concerns bones, I know that if you cook bones they become
> hard
> > > and may splinter. I have always been told that especially chicken and
> > other
> > > bones from birds are the most dangerous cooked bones.
> > >
> > > If I would want to feed my dogs baked/dried chicken or turkey necks,
> what
> > > would be an appropriate temperature to bake/dry them in? And how about
> > beef
> > > bones? Heating them a bit to get the meat to dry and some of the
marrow
> > > drained out would mean less mess and more bones for my dogs =)
> > >
> > > So how much would you have to heat a bone to change it's structure so
it
> > > becomes hard and brittle? I'm mainly interested in bird and beef, but
> > > information on any other bones, (pork, lamb etc) would be very much
> > > appreciated too.
> > >
> > > Rosa
> > >
> > > ps.
> > > I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but I don't want
to
> > have
> > > raw bones on my rugs.
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>



Suja
2004-02-19 14:31:20 EST
Rosa Palmén wrote:

> Unfortunately there isn't enough space for both dogs to chew in the kitchen
> at once =( So I've accepted their choice of chewingplace... It seems like
> the woolrug is the perfect surface, it provides good traction and is also
> perfect for wiping their face on afterwards, thank god it is a pretty dark
> rug =)

Mine eat in the family room, not in the kitchen. I suppose I would have
enough room there for them, but I want them to be on carpet, where they
have traction while they go through their commands. That's why I ended
up using the beach towel. I don't want to clean the carpet any more
than is necessary.

Suja


=22Rosa_Palm=E9n=22_=3Crosa=40no-s-p-am=2Elocomail=2Ecom=3E?=
2004-02-19 17:05:47 EST
Boiling means heating to 100 degrees celsius. This changes the structure of
the bone and makes it harder and more prone to splintering. What I am
looking for is information regarding what temperature would be low enough
NOT to make the bones brittle.

"ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote in message news:Mh7Zb.1004$nI1.771@okepread05...
> Then boiling is better than baking.
>
> "Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
> news:Nr6Zb.715$4y7.543@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> > I do NOT want to give my dogs cooked chickenbones. I beleive that is a
> > recipe for disaster. I have given them some cooked beef bones, but
because
> > of the risk involved with those too, I feel I have to sit next to them
and
> > look out for splinters. It gets boring after a while. =)
> >
> > "ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote in message
news:El6Zb.871$nI1.682@okepread05...
> > > If you really want to "cook" them, try boiling. This method is a
little
> > > better for keeping the bones pliable.
> > >
> > > "Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
> > > news:aj6Zb.713$hm7.522@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> > > > Hi!
> > > >
> > > > Sorry about the crossposting, but I wasn't sure which group would be
> > most
> > > > appropriate for my question.
> > > >
> > > > My question concerns bones, I know that if you cook bones they
become
> > hard
> > > > and may splinter. I have always been told that especially chicken
and
> > > other
> > > > bones from birds are the most dangerous cooked bones.
> > > >
> > > > If I would want to feed my dogs baked/dried chicken or turkey necks,
> > what
> > > > would be an appropriate temperature to bake/dry them in? And how
about
> > > beef
> > > > bones? Heating them a bit to get the meat to dry and some of the
> marrow
> > > > drained out would mean less mess and more bones for my dogs =)
> > > >
> > > > So how much would you have to heat a bone to change it's structure
so
> it
> > > > becomes hard and brittle? I'm mainly interested in bird and beef,
but
> > > > information on any other bones, (pork, lamb etc) would be very much
> > > > appreciated too.
> > > >
> > > > Rosa
> > > >
> > > > ps.
> > > > I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but I don't want
> to
> > > have
> > > > raw bones on my rugs.
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>



The Puppy Wizard
2004-02-19 19:37:46 EST
The Puppy Wizard sez NO BONES, NO ABUSE.

"Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
news:uqaZb.802$f%4.388@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> Boiling means heating to 100 degrees celsius. This changes the
structure of
> the bone and makes it harder and more prone to splintering. What
I am
> looking for is information regarding what temperature would be
low enough
> NOT to make the bones brittle.
>
> "ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote in message
news:Mh7Zb.1004$nI1.771@okepread05...
> > Then boiling is better than baking.
> >
> > "Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in message
> > news:Nr6Zb.715$4y7.543@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> > > I do NOT want to give my dogs cooked chickenbones. I beleive
that is a
> > > recipe for disaster. I have given them some cooked beef
bones, but
> because
> > > of the risk involved with those too, I feel I have to sit
next to them
> and
> > > look out for splinters. It gets boring after a while. =)
> > >
> > > "ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:El6Zb.871$nI1.682@okepread05...
> > > > If you really want to "cook" them, try boiling. This
method is a
> little
> > > > better for keeping the bones pliable.
> > > >
> > > > "Rosa Palm\ufffdn" <rosa@no-s-p-am.locomail.com> wrote in
message
> > > > news:aj6Zb.713$hm7.522@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> > > > > Hi!
> > > > >
> > > > > Sorry about the crossposting, but I wasn't sure which
group would be
> > > most
> > > > > appropriate for my question.
> > > > >
> > > > > My question concerns bones, I know that if you cook
bones they
> become
> > > hard
> > > > > and may splinter. I have always been told that
especially chicken
> and
> > > > other
> > > > > bones from birds are the most dangerous cooked bones.
> > > > >
> > > > > If I would want to feed my dogs baked/dried chicken or
turkey necks,
> > > what
> > > > > would be an appropriate temperature to bake/dry them in?
And how
> about
> > > > beef
> > > > > bones? Heating them a bit to get the meat to dry and
some of the
> > marrow
> > > > > drained out would mean less mess and more bones for my
dogs =)
> > > > >
> > > > > So how much would you have to heat a bone to change it's
structure
> so
> > it
> > > > > becomes hard and brittle? I'm mainly interested in bird
and beef,
> but
> > > > > information on any other bones, (pork, lamb etc) would
be very much
> > > > > appreciated too.
> > > > >
> > > > > Rosa
> > > > >
> > > > > ps.
> > > > > I know the safest thing would be to feed them raw - but
I don't want
> > to
> > > > have
> > > > > raw bones on my rugs.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>


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