Dog Discussion: Usefulness Of Cancer Insurance For GSD?

Usefulness Of Cancer Insurance For GSD?
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LC
2004-01-06 09:56:33 EST
I'm about to get insurance for my GSD, who is 15 months old. Arguing
against it is that she's at very low risk, now. Arguing for it is that
once I get it they insurance company has to continue providing it as
long as I maintain my policy. It costs an extra $30/year. Any advice.
Tia, Lee

ZPL
2004-01-06 10:08:32 EST
You probably need to sit down and decide just how far you would take the
cancer treatment.

I do fork out the extra money for routine care coverage - and you do get
your money back on that one.

"LC" <lbclarke@removethishotmail.com> wrote in message
news:p2jlvvg09feandq6irq45cedqqa0lehfh6@4ax.com...
> I'm about to get insurance for my GSD, who is 15 months old. Arguing
> against it is that she's at very low risk, now. Arguing for it is that
> once I get it they insurance company has to continue providing it as
> long as I maintain my policy. It costs an extra $30/year. Any advice.
> Tia, Lee



LC
2004-01-06 10:13:28 EST
By "routine care" do you mean vaccinations? You actually recover
enough to make that one worthwhile?

Good point about the cancer treatment. I'm quite ignorant of how
cancer works itself out in dogs. In humans I know we get a lot of
trivial cancers, which nonetheless must be treated. If it's like that
for dogs too, then probably for a lot of cancers I'd be willing to
take the treatment. Lung cancer and such is clear, but do they get
little skin cancers and the like?

On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:08:32 -0600, "ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote:

>You probably need to sit down and decide just how far you would take the
>cancer treatment.
>
>I do fork out the extra money for routine care coverage - and you do get
>your money back on that one.
>
>"LC" <lbclarke@removethishotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:p2jlvvg09feandq6irq45cedqqa0lehfh6@4ax.com...
>> I'm about to get insurance for my GSD, who is 15 months old. Arguing
>> against it is that she's at very low risk, now. Arguing for it is that
>> once I get it they insurance company has to continue providing it as
>> long as I maintain my policy. It costs an extra $30/year. Any advice.
>> Tia, Lee
>


Diddy
2004-01-06 10:15:56 EST
Arguing for it is that
>> once I get it they insurance company has to continue providing it as
>> long as I maintain my policy. It costs an extra $30/year. Any advice.
>> Tia, Lee
>
>
>
My experience with insurance is.. once you have a claim, on renewal, your
claim is then a pre-existing condition.
For instance, I had a dog turning 10 in 2 weeks. My policy renewal was
already sent in.
Two weeks before his birthday, it was apparent he was in trouble, and we
started diagnostics. The insurance policy paid $200 of the diagnostics
(minus deductable and allowed percentages)
When the diagnostics came back and it was determined he needed additional
testing, his current policy had lapsed, and I assumed he was on the renewed
policy.
When I sent in the claim, they cancelled him, because his condition (as of
two weeks ago) was a pre-existing condition to 'that' policy.
His vet bill that year ran more than $28,000
All of which was paid out of my pocket, and insurance paid $200 (nore or
less)

ZPL
2004-01-06 10:48:13 EST
I do recover enough on the routine care - in fact, if my vet charged more,
I'd actually make a "profit". We did a spay the first year, hip x-rays the
next year, and may do a teeth cleaning this year.

In all honesty, the cancer coverage is only $30 a year. Say that dog lives
10 years - that's $300 for a peace of mind, at least. Don't forget, alot of
the "little" cancers people pick up is because of the testing - they really
don't do alot of mammograms or colonoscopys on dogs...


"LC" <lbclarke@removethishotmail.com> wrote in message
news:01klvv87n8qpgl925p4m52mv3quqttpq25@4ax.com...
> By "routine care" do you mean vaccinations? You actually recover
> enough to make that one worthwhile?
>
> Good point about the cancer treatment. I'm quite ignorant of how
> cancer works itself out in dogs. In humans I know we get a lot of
> trivial cancers, which nonetheless must be treated. If it's like that
> for dogs too, then probably for a lot of cancers I'd be willing to
> take the treatment. Lung cancer and such is clear, but do they get
> little skin cancers and the like?
>
> On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:08:32 -0600, "ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> wrote:
>
> >You probably need to sit down and decide just how far you would take the
> >cancer treatment.
> >
> >I do fork out the extra money for routine care coverage - and you do get
> >your money back on that one.
> >
> >"LC" <lbclarke@removethishotmail.com> wrote in message
> >news:p2jlvvg09feandq6irq45cedqqa0lehfh6@4ax.com...
> >> I'm about to get insurance for my GSD, who is 15 months old. Arguing
> >> against it is that she's at very low risk, now. Arguing for it is that
> >> once I get it they insurance company has to continue providing it as
> >> long as I maintain my policy. It costs an extra $30/year. Any advice.
> >> Tia, Lee
> >
>



Kyler Laird
2004-01-06 12:12:11 EST
"ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> writes:

>I do recover enough on the routine care - in fact, if my vet charged more,
>I'd actually make a "profit".

This certainly doesn't sound like "insurance" to me. Something has
to give.

--kyler

ZPL
2004-01-06 12:40:24 EST
The Routine Care is $99 a year - on top of the regular coverage premium. It
is basically set up to make sure that the animal is seen every year and
receives care for things like vaccinations, flea/hw preventative, and a good
exam or procedure a year to catch a disease process before it becomes a
problem. So, they pay some monies back on the vaccinations, parasite
preventative, and $65 towards an invasive exam - including spay, etc.

"Profit" is probably the wrong word. Let's call it a "perk". I live in a
financially depressed rural area. My vet charges $6 for a rabies shot.
But, the insurance company reimburses up to $10. If my vet charged the $10,
it would be completely covered. If my vet charged me up to the total
reimbursed amount for physicals and such, I would end up being reimbursed
more than the $99 I paid for the Routine Care Coverage.

Flea/Tick preventatives are covered twice a year - with $15 each 6 months.
($30 back). HW preventative is covered once a year ($15 back). Up to $10
of the office exam is reimbursed. $65 dollars toward a more invasive exam
(spay/neuter, teeth cleaning, or in depth screens such as blood panels and
EKGs). Add in reimbursements for yearly vaccinations (DHL-P $10, rabies
$10, parvo $9, heartworm test $15, fecal exam $10 etc.) and you are well
over the $99 you spent.

Those little reimbursements add up. I have a dog that weighs 110 pounds, so
it is worth it to me. I have not yet had to file anything on the regular
coverage - thank goodness. That is now up to $120 a year.

"Kyler Laird" <Kyler@news.Lairds.org> wrote in message
news:0o4rc1-q97.ln1@jowls.lairds.org...
> "ZPL" <ZPL@cox.net> writes:
>
> >I do recover enough on the routine care - in fact, if my vet charged
more,
> >I'd actually make a "profit".
>
> This certainly doesn't sound like "insurance" to me. Something has
> to give.
>
> --kyler


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