Dog Discussion: CAININE CONTRACEPTION?

CAININE CONTRACEPTION?
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KONCHOK.PENDAY
2007-08-31 00:30:17 EST
My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
It causes multiple social problems and
takes a HUGE amount of my time.

Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
rapidly develops multiple health problems.
I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.

On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.

What about birth control? When I notice
her bleeding or humping, she's probably
already pregnant? What pill/medicine
can I give her then that will terminate
a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?

What works for a "morning after"
or "week after" pill with dogs?

Is there an easy safe solution
that leaves my dog unharmed?


O
--- )
\

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Livia
2007-09-02 22:12:27 EST
"KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:

> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
> It causes multiple social problems and
> takes a HUGE amount of my time.
>
> Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
> doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
> rapidly develops multiple health problems.
> I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
> done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.
>
> On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
> as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.
>
> What about birth control? When I notice
> her bleeding or humping, she's probably
> already pregnant? What pill/medicine
> can I give her then that will terminate
> a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?
>
> What works for a "morning after"
> or "week after" pill with dogs?
>
> Is there an easy safe solution
> that leaves my dog unharmed?
>
> O
> --- )
> \
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Maybe she could have surgery to tie her fallopian tubes, the way women
do.



Livia
2007-09-02 22:13:29 EST
"KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:

> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
> It causes multiple social problems and
> takes a HUGE amount of my time.
>
> Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
> doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
> rapidly develops multiple health problems.
> I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
> done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.
>
> On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
> as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.
>
> What about birth control? When I notice
> her bleeding or humping, she's probably
> already pregnant? What pill/medicine
> can I give her then that will terminate
> a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?
>
> What works for a "morning after"
> or "week after" pill with dogs?
>
> Is there an easy safe solution
> that leaves my dog unharmed?
>
> O
> --- )
> \
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Maybe she could have surgery to tie her fallopian tubes, the way women
do.



KONCHOK.PENDAY
2007-09-06 22:56:46 EST
livia wrote:
> "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
>
>> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
>> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
>> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
>> It causes multiple social problems and
>> takes a HUGE amount of my time.
>>
>> Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
>> doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
>> rapidly develops multiple health problems.
>> I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
>> done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.
>>
>> On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
>> as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.
>>
>> What about birth control? When I notice
>> her bleeding or humping, she's probably
>> already pregnant? What pill/medicine
>> can I give her then that will terminate
>> a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?
>>
>> What works for a "morning after"
>> or "week after" pill with dogs?
>>
>> Is there an easy safe solution
>> that leaves my dog unharmed?
>>
>> O
>> --- )
>> \
>>


livia wrote:
> Maybe she could have surgery to tie her fallopian tubes, the way women
> do.


Dear Livia:

Thanks for replying.

I've wondered about
that too. Spaying
is major surgery,
but you ought to
be able to tie
tubes through a
couple of small
incisions? No?

Maybe even a
local anaesthetic?

Haven't seen anything on
pros or cons in dogs so far.


O
--- )
\

s

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Livia
2007-09-07 11:33:05 EST
"KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:

> livia wrote:
> > "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
> >
> >> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
> >> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
> >> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
> >> It causes multiple social problems and
> >> takes a HUGE amount of my time.
> >>
> >> Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
> >> doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
> >> rapidly develops multiple health problems.
> >> I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
> >> done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.
> >>
> >> On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
> >> as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.
> >>
> >> What about birth control? When I notice
> >> her bleeding or humping, she's probably
> >> already pregnant? What pill/medicine
> >> can I give her then that will terminate
> >> a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?
> >>
> >> What works for a "morning after"
> >> or "week after" pill with dogs?
> >>
> >> Is there an easy safe solution
> >> that leaves my dog unharmed?
> >>
> >> O
> >> --- )
> >> \
> >>
>
> livia wrote:
> > Maybe she could have surgery to tie her fallopian tubes, the way women
> > do.
>
> Dear Livia:
>
> Thanks for replying.
>
> I've wondered about
> that too. Spaying
> is major surgery,
> but you ought to
> be able to tie
> tubes through a
> couple of small
> incisions? No?
>
> Maybe even a
> local anaesthetic?
>
> Haven't seen anything on
> pros or cons in dogs so far.
>
> O
> --- )
> \
>
> s
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

You could ask your vet if he/she does laparoscopic surgery or if he/she
could refer you to someone who does. I think it would require general
anesthesia, not local. Although the incisions are small, the surgeon is
entering the abdomen, an area of vital organs and some risk. You could also
ask if there is a pill for dog birth control.

My female chihuahua was spayed as a pup and she has not doubled in size,
become a couch potato or developed health problems. She is on a reduced
calorie dog food, reduced cal treats and gets lots of exercise. She does
not even like puppies and soon puts them in their place but I think this is
more due to her very dominant nature than to the fact that she has been
spayed.

Livia



Livia
2007-09-08 00:41:49 EST
Livia wrote:

> "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
>
> > livia wrote:
> > > "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
> > >
> > >> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
> > >> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
> > >> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
> > >> It causes multiple social problems and
> > >> takes a HUGE amount of my time.
> > >>
> > >> Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
> > >> doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
> > >> rapidly develops multiple health problems.
> > >> I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
> > >> done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.
> > >>
> > >> On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
> > >> as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.
> > >>
> > >> What about birth control? When I notice
> > >> her bleeding or humping, she's probably
> > >> already pregnant? What pill/medicine
> > >> can I give her then that will terminate
> > >> a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?
> > >>
> > >> What works for a "morning after"
> > >> or "week after" pill with dogs?
> > >>
> > >> Is there an easy safe solution
> > >> that leaves my dog unharmed?
> > >>
> > >> O
> > >> --- )
> > >> \
> > >>
> >
> > livia wrote:
> > > Maybe she could have surgery to tie her fallopian tubes, the way women
> > > do.
> >
> > Dear Livia:
> >
> > Thanks for replying.
> >
> > I've wondered about
> > that too. Spaying
> > is major surgery,
> > but you ought to
> > be able to tie
> > tubes through a
> > couple of small
> > incisions? No?
> >
> > Maybe even a
> > local anaesthetic?
> >
> > Haven't seen anything on
> > pros or cons in dogs so far.
> >
> > O
> > --- )
> > \
> >
> > s
> >
> > --
> > Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>
> You could ask your vet if he/she does laparoscopic surgery or if he/she
> could refer you to someone who does. I think it would require general
> anesthesia, not local. Although the incisions are small, the surgeon is
> entering the abdomen, an area of vital organs and some risk. You could also
> ask if there is a pill for dog birth control.
>
> My female chihuahua was spayed as a pup and she has not doubled in size,
> become a couch potato or developed health problems. She is on a reduced
> calorie dog food, reduced cal treats and gets lots of exercise. She does
> not even like puppies and soon puts them in their place but I think this is
> more due to her very dominant nature than to the fact that she has been
> spayed.
>
> Livia

All things considered, I still think spaying is the best option. You don't
forget to give your dog her pill, it eliminates the bleeding and restlessness
associated with estrus (which tying tubes won't do), it greatly reduces the risk
of developing cancerous mammary tumors (which tying tubes won't do) and male
dogs leave her alone (which they won't do if she just has her tubes tied). As
for the weight issue, a spayed female is prone to gain so it's *your*
responsibility to see that she doesn't. Feed her properly and exercise her
properly and you shouldn't have any problem.

When I had my own tubes tied it was done under general anesthesia and I'm glad
it was. I felt very wobbly for about 2 days afterward even though the incisions
were small. Any time the body is opened it's a shock to the system and you sure
feel it. I don't think any vet would do abdominal surgery, even laparoscopic
surgery, under local anesthesia, it would be just too risky. And since general
anesthesia is called for anyway, you might as well go ahead and do a spay for
the reasons mentioned above.

Hope this helps.

Livia



KONCHOK.PENDAY
2007-09-10 13:10:17 EST
Livia wrote:
> Livia wrote:
>
>> "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
>>
>>> livia wrote:
>>>> "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
>>>>> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
>>>>> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
>>>>> It causes multiple social problems and
>>>>> takes a HUGE amount of my time.
>>>>>
>>>>> Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
>>>>> doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
>>>>> rapidly develops multiple health problems.
>>>>> I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
>>>>> done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.
>>>>>
>>>>> On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
>>>>> as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.
>>>>>
>>>>> What about birth control? When I notice
>>>>> her bleeding or humping, she's probably
>>>>> already pregnant? What pill/medicine
>>>>> can I give her then that will terminate
>>>>> a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?
>>>>>
>>>>> What works for a "morning after"
>>>>> or "week after" pill with dogs?
>>>>>
>>>>> Is there an easy safe solution
>>>>> that leaves my dog unharmed?
>>>>>
>>>>> O
>>>>> --- )
>>>>> \
>>>>>
>>> livia wrote:
>>>> Maybe she could have surgery to tie her fallopian tubes, the way women
>>>> do.
>>> Dear Livia:
>>>
>>> Thanks for replying.
>>>
>>> I've wondered about
>>> that too. Spaying
>>> is major surgery,
>>> but you ought to
>>> be able to tie
>>> tubes through a
>>> couple of small
>>> incisions? No?
>>>
>>> Maybe even a
>>> local anaesthetic?
>>>
>>> Haven't seen anything on
>>> pros or cons in dogs so far.

>>>
>>> O
>>> --- )
>>> \


>> You could ask your vet if he/she does laparoscopic surgery or if he/she
>> could refer you to someone who does. I think it would require general
>> anesthesia, not local. Although the incisions are small, the surgeon is
>> entering the abdomen, an area of vital organs and some risk. You could also
>> ask if there is a pill for dog birth control.
>>
>> My female chihuahua was spayed as a pup and she has not doubled in size,
>> become a couch potato or developed health problems. She is on a reduced
>> calorie dog food, reduced cal treats and gets lots of exercise. She does
>> not even like puppies and soon puts them in their place but I think this is
>> more due to her very dominant nature than to the fact that she has been
>> spayed.
>>
>> Livia


Livia again:
> All things considered, I still think spaying is the best option. You don't
> forget to give your dog her pill, it eliminates the bleeding and restlessness
> associated with estrus (which tying tubes won't do), it greatly reduces the risk
> of developing cancerous mammary tumors (which tying tubes won't do) and male
> dogs leave her alone (which they won't do if she just has her tubes tied).

If I could NOT spay her,
that would avoid creating
unnecessary weight problems.

>As for the weight issue, a spayed female is prone to gain so it's *your*
> responsibility to see that she doesn't.

Starving her for the rest of
her life does not appeal to me.
I doubt it would make her love
me more, or enjoy her day more.

>Feed her properly and exercise her
> properly and you shouldn't have any problem.

I've seen really good owners try
to keep their spayed bitches thin.
They got fat anyway, and developed
degenerative health problems too.

OOOOOOOPS!

The politically incorrect "myth"
that spayed bitches tend to get
fat and lazy is based on foolishly
LOOKING ... AT WHAT ACTUALLY HAPPENS.
That's the big "kiss of death" for PC!

Some spayed bitches stay thin and active.
Some menopausal women stay thin and active
too, but lots of them bloat up and become
couch potatoes. It happens to bitches too!

I'm trying to avoid ANY unnecessary
damage to my loved ones / family.

I haven't gotten laid in a couple of years myself.
At my age, it's very unlikely I will have kids.
I'm sure someone out there wants to save me from
testicular cancer ... for my own good ... whether
I like the idea or not, because "society" needs it.

Nevertheless, I would react quite negatively to
any politically correct attempt to castrate me!

My dog can't protect herself,
so *I* have to protect her!

> When I had my own tubes tied it was done under general anesthesia and I'm glad
> it was. I felt very wobbly for about 2 days afterward even though the incisions
> were small. Any time the body is opened it's a shock to the system and you sure
> feel it. I don't think any vet would do abdominal surgery, even laparoscopic
> surgery, under local anesthesia, it would be just too risky.

OK. That makes sense. General either way.

>And since general
> anesthesia is called for anyway, you might as well go ahead and do a spay for
> the reasons mentioned above.

But then you didn't do a spay on yourself:
you just had your tubes tied. WHY is that
good for you ... but not for a female dog?

Apparently, the discomfort and bleeding
were not awful enough to choose spaying,
even though you had general anaesthesia.

I love her. I want the best life for her that
I can give her. She's been very loyal to me.
I'd like to show her the very same courtesy.
I want to help her. Surgically de-sexing/
aging/ menopausing her at an early age seems
like *extreme* cruelty to me. I wouldn't want
to do that to you, my wife, my daughter, OR
my bitch. You didn't want to do that to you
either! You didn't! Good for you! I don't mind
her having boyfriends and good sex. Neither
her nor her boy friend objects! I just don't
want the strain of finding homes for the
resultant puppies. It's really hard on me
and causes damaging social consequences.

A safe end-of-estrus abortion pill would
probably be my preferred option if one
was available, but I have not found it
yet, if it actually does exist at all.

A couple of pills a year is not a burden.
Instant old age and no sex forever is *GRIM!*
I don't want that burden on MY conscience!

Is there a people-pill that precludes puppies?

> Hope this helps.
>
> Livia

Thanks much for replying.
I appreciate your concern,
and a woman's viewpoint.


O
--- )
\

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Livia
2007-09-11 01:05:36 EST
"KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:

> Livia wrote:
> > Livia wrote:
> >
> >> "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
> >>
> >>> livia wrote:
> >>>> "KONCHOK.PENDAY" wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
> >>>>> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
> >>>>> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
> >>>>> It causes multiple social problems and
> >>>>> takes a HUGE amount of my time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Every bitch I've seen spayed immediately
> >>>>> doubles in size, becomes a couch potatoe, and
> >>>>> rapidly develops multiple health problems.
> >>>>> I don't want to do that to her: she hasn't
> >>>>> done anything at all to deserve it. I love her.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> On the other hand, I'm a certified failure
> >>>>> as a dog chaperone. I need a better method.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> What about birth control? When I notice
> >>>>> her bleeding or humping, she's probably
> >>>>> already pregnant? What pill/medicine
> >>>>> can I give her then that will terminate
> >>>>> a possible pregnancy, and/or prevent one?
> >>>>>
> >>>>> What works for a "morning after"
> >>>>> or "week after" pill with dogs?
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Is there an easy safe solution
> >>>>> that leaves my dog unharmed?
> >>>>>
> >>>>> O
> >>>>> --- )
> >>>>> \
> >>>>>
> >>> livia wrote:
> >>>> Maybe she could have surgery to tie her fallopian tubes, the way women
> >>>> do.
> >>> Dear Livia:
> >>>
> >>> Thanks for replying.
> >>>
> >>> I've wondered about
> >>> that too. Spaying
> >>> is major surgery,
> >>> but you ought to
> >>> be able to tie
> >>> tubes through a
> >>> couple of small
> >>> incisions? No?
> >>>
> >>> Maybe even a
> >>> local anaesthetic?
> >>>
> >>> Haven't seen anything on
> >>> pros or cons in dogs so far.
>
> >>>
> >>> O
> >>> --- )
> >>> \
>
> >> You could ask your vet if he/she does laparoscopic surgery or if he/she
> >> could refer you to someone who does. I think it would require general
> >> anesthesia, not local. Although the incisions are small, the surgeon is
> >> entering the abdomen, an area of vital organs and some risk. You could also
> >> ask if there is a pill for dog birth control.
> >>
> >> My female chihuahua was spayed as a pup and she has not doubled in size,
> >> become a couch potato or developed health problems. She is on a reduced
> >> calorie dog food, reduced cal treats and gets lots of exercise. She does
> >> not even like puppies and soon puts them in their place but I think this is
> >> more due to her very dominant nature than to the fact that she has been
> >> spayed.
> >>
> >> Livia
>
> Livia again:
> > All things considered, I still think spaying is the best option. You don't
> > forget to give your dog her pill, it eliminates the bleeding and restlessness
> > associated with estrus (which tying tubes won't do), it greatly reduces the risk
> > of developing cancerous mammary tumors (which tying tubes won't do) and male
> > dogs leave her alone (which they won't do if she just has her tubes tied).
>
> If I could NOT spay her,
> that would avoid creating
> unnecessary weight problems.
>
> >As for the weight issue, a spayed female is prone to gain so it's *your*
> > responsibility to see that she doesn't.
>
> Starving her for the rest of
> her life does not appeal to me.
> I doubt it would make her love
> me more, or enjoy her day more.
>
> >Feed her properly and exercise her
> > properly and you shouldn't have any problem.
>
> I've seen really good owners try
> to keep their spayed bitches thin.
> They got fat anyway, and developed
> degenerative health problems too.
>
> OOOOOOOPS!
>
> The politically incorrect "myth"
> that spayed bitches tend to get
> fat and lazy is based on foolishly
> LOOKING ... AT WHAT ACTUALLY HAPPENS.
> That's the big "kiss of death" for PC!
>
> Some spayed bitches stay thin and active.
> Some menopausal women stay thin and active
> too, but lots of them bloat up and become
> couch potatoes. It happens to bitches too!
>
> I'm trying to avoid ANY unnecessary
> damage to my loved ones / family.
>
> I haven't gotten laid in a couple of years myself.
> At my age, it's very unlikely I will have kids.
> I'm sure someone out there wants to save me from
> testicular cancer ... for my own good ... whether
> I like the idea or not, because "society" needs it.
>
> Nevertheless, I would react quite negatively to
> any politically correct attempt to castrate me!
>
> My dog can't protect herself,
> so *I* have to protect her!
>
> > When I had my own tubes tied it was done under general anesthesia and I'm glad
> > it was. I felt very wobbly for about 2 days afterward even though the incisions
> > were small. Any time the body is opened it's a shock to the system and you sure
> > feel it. I don't think any vet would do abdominal surgery, even laparoscopic
> > surgery, under local anesthesia, it would be just too risky.
>
> OK. That makes sense. General either way.
>
> >And since general
> > anesthesia is called for anyway, you might as well go ahead and do a spay for
> > the reasons mentioned above.
>
> But then you didn't do a spay on yourself:
> you just had your tubes tied. WHY is that
> good for you ... but not for a female dog?
>
> Apparently, the discomfort and bleeding
> were not awful enough to choose spaying,
> even though you had general anaesthesia.
>
> I love her. I want the best life for her that
> I can give her. She's been very loyal to me.
> I'd like to show her the very same courtesy.
> I want to help her. Surgically de-sexing/
> aging/ menopausing her at an early age seems
> like *extreme* cruelty to me. I wouldn't want
> to do that to you, my wife, my daughter, OR
> my bitch. You didn't want to do that to you
> either! You didn't! Good for you! I don't mind
> her having boyfriends and good sex. Neither
> her nor her boy friend objects! I just don't
> want the strain of finding homes for the
> resultant puppies. It's really hard on me
> and causes damaging social consequences.
>
> A safe end-of-estrus abortion pill would
> probably be my preferred option if one
> was available, but I have not found it
> yet, if it actually does exist at all.
>
> A couple of pills a year is not a burden.
> Instant old age and no sex forever is *GRIM!*
> I don't want that burden on MY conscience!
>
> Is there a people-pill that precludes puppies?
>
> > Hope this helps.
> >
> > Livia
>
> Thanks much for replying.
> I appreciate your concern,
> and a woman's viewpoint.
>
> O
> --- )
> \
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Then it seems like the only option for you and your bitch is a birth control pill
which would prevent conception and eliminate the need for an abortion which would be
stressful for her and you. Talk to your vet. Maybe there is such a pill. Another
option is to *make absolutely sure* she does not come into contact with any male dogs
when she is in heat.



Cj
2007-10-18 17:57:58 EST

"KONCHOK.PENDAY" <KP@net-prophet.net> wrote in message
news:46d78d63$0$24432$88260bb3@free.teranews.com...
> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.
> It causes multiple social problems and
> takes a HUGE amount of my time.

There is a "morning after" treatment for dogs that restarts the heat all
over again. The problem is that it often leads to endometriosis with
debilitating or fatal consequences for the bitch so most ethical vets will
not use it. Spaying under general anesthesia is a much better solution.
For physiological reasons neutered dogs require approximately 15% fewer
calories for maintenance, obesity is the owner's fault for maintaining the
pre-spaying food levels. Spaying also markedly reduces the dog's chances
for cancer as she ages.
Cj


TheSincerelyIncrediblyFreakinInsanelySimplyAmazingGrandPuppyChildPussyBirdyGoatFerettAndHorseyWizard
2007-10-19 22:51:52 EST
HOWEDY Cj,

"Cj" <cwalt@gwi.net> wrote in message
news:X7WdnSNodLNoS4ranZ2dnUVZ_sCtnZ2d@gwi.net...
>
> "KONCHOK.PENDAY" <KP@net-prophet.net> wrote in message
> news:46d78d63$0$24432$88260bb3@free.teranews.com...
>> My bitch has had two litters in the last year.
>> She's got a nice boyfriend and makes great
>> puppies, but I do NOT want more puppies.

Then she should CONfine her dog to her own pupperty,
wouldn't you agree, Cj? Perimeter trainin is EZ and takes
only a few minutes if you know HOWE, wouldn't you
agree, Cj?

>> It causes multiple social problems and
>> takes a HUGE amount of my time.

And wear an tear on the mom dog, to boot.

> There is a "morning after" treatment for dogs that restarts the heat all
> over again.

Yes, but wouldn't it be WIZE to CONfine the bitch while in season?

> The problem is that it often leads to endometriosis with debilitating or
> fatal consequences

That's curiHOWES, Cj... the DATA SEZ the
risk of mortality is "NEGLIGIBLE" <{}: ~ ( >

> for the bitch so most ethical vets will not use it.

Not to be a nitpicker, Cj, but CITES PLEASE?

> Spaying under general anesthesia is a much better solution.

Sez WHO, Cj? The veterinary malpracticioners who SELL
unnecessary, inapupriate, risky, SPAY an NEUTER SURGERY?

> For physiological reasons neutered dogs require approximately 15% fewer
> calories for maintenance, obesity is the owner's fault
> for maintaining the pre-spaying food levels.

That's a FAERIE TAIL, Cj <{}: ~ ( >

> Spaying also markedly reduces the dog's chances for cancer as she ages.

And THAT'S a blatant FALSEHOOD, Cj <{}: ~ ( >

Surgical sexual mutilation for non medical puporses serves
NO puporse other than to illicitly enhance the veterinary
malpracticioner and IN FACT, is the #1 cause of fear
aggression and life long life threatening degenerative /
stress induced auto immune DIS-EASES and INCREASES
the risk of cancers and degenerative DIS-EASES <{}: ~ ( >


There's TONS of research substantiating the falsity of the
"benefits" of surgical sexual mutilations. The veterinary
community will DO an SAY ANY THING to REPRESS this
information so's they can FLEECE you like spring lambs.

You'll NOTICE the veterinary malpracticioners, like yourself,
WON'T DEFEND THEMSELVES, on accHOWENTA THEY
CAN'T, otherWIZE, they WOULD, wouldn't they, Cj??:

From: MikeEisenf...@yahoo.com Date: 29 Mar 2007

Subject: Re: The Long-term Heath Impacts of S/N in Dogs


On Mar 28, 1:48 pm,


Human_And_Animal_Behaviour_Forensic_Sciences_
Research_Laboratory wrote:



> HOWEDY Mike, On Mar 28, 10:18 am, MikeEisenf...@yahoo.com wrote:
> > Unlike what you will find in Spay/Neuter Fact Sheets, the health impacts
> > of spay/neuter that are discussed in this paper are all backed up with
> > citations to the veterinary medical literature. You can find the paper
> > here: http://escregistry.kattare.com/healthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf
> > http://www.neutering.org
> Thank you for the EXXXPOSE on surgical sexual mutilations in veterinary
> malpractice.


Always good to have more food for thought!

Material that includes research data from 2006, 2005
was presented at ACC&D's Third International Symposium,
and part of the slideshows presentedare available here:
http://www.acc-d.org/2006%20Symposium%20Docs/Session%20I.pdf


Issues regarding previous assumptions on what neutering
does as a 'benefit' are pretty well challenged in this data above.


Alliance for Contraception in Cats and Dogs (ACC&D) is a
nonprofit 501C(3) group involved in attempting to study, define
and resolve some of the problems that currently exist
internationally as they regard issues of animal population control.


"More than 120 representatives from universities, animal welfare
organizations, foundations, companies, and government agencies
from 11 countries gathered to share information and plan for the
future". Main site: http://www.acc-d.org/


"On the negative side, neutering male dogs if done before maturity,
increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer) by a factor of 3.8;
this is a common ancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a
poor prognosis.


increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6;
this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds


triples the risk of hypothyroidism


increases the risk of geriatric cognitive impairment


triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with
it the many associated health problems associated with obesity


\ufffd quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer


\ufffd doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers


\ufffd increases the risk of orthopedic disorders


\ufffd increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations


Hemangiosarcoma is a common cancer in dogs. It is a major
cause of death in some breeds, such as Salukis, French Bulldogs,
Irish Water Spaniels, Flat Coated Retrievers, Golden Retrievers,
Boxers, Afghan Hounds, English Setter, Scottish Terrier, Boston
Terrier, Bulldogs, and German Shepherd Dogs24.


In an aged-matched case controlled study, spayed females were
found to have a 2.2 times higher risk of splenic hemangiosarcoma
compared to intact females24.


A retrospective study of cardiac hemangiosarcoma risk factors
found a >5 times greater risk in spayed female dogs compared
to intact female dogs and a 1.6 times higher risk in neutered male
dogs compared to intact male dogs.25


The authors suggest a protective effect of sex hormones against
hemangiosarcoma, especially in females.


In breeds where hermangiosarcoma is an important cause of
death, the increased risk associated with spay/neuter is likely
one that should factor into decisions on whether or when to
sterilize a dog.


Hypothyroidism


Spay/neuter in dogs was found to be correlated with a three fold
increased risk of hypothyroidism compared to intact dogs. The
researchers suggest a cause-and-effect relationship26.



They wrote: "More important [than the mild direct impact on thyroid


function] in the association between [spaying and] neutering and
hypothyroidism may be the effect of sex hormones on the immune
system.

Castration increases the severity of autoimmune thyroiditis in mice"
which may explain the link between spay/neuter and hypothyroidism
in dogs.


"Dr. Spain, who has been recently involved in many studies assessing
the long-term risks and benefits of early-age neutering, presented
convincing data about the effects of spay/neuter on hip dysplasia,
cranial cruciate ligament rupture, long bone development, body
weight,
diabetes, urinary tract infections, mammary cancer, and several other
conditions."


CONCLUSIONS


An objective reading of the veterinary medical literature reveals
a complex situation with respect to the longterm health impacts
of spay/neuter in dogs.


The evidence shows that spay/neuter correlates with both positive
AND adverse health effects in dogs. It also suggests how much we
really do not yet understand about this subject.


On balance, it appears that no compelling case can be made for
neutering most male dogs to prevent future health problems,
especially immature male dogs. The number of health problems
associated with neutering may exceed the associated health
benefits in most cases.


----------------------------


Early Ovarian Surgery Linked to Dementia
Wednesday, August 29, 2007


By MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer


NEW YORK - Women who have their ovaries removed before menopause run
a heightened risk of developing dementia or other mental problems
later in life _ unless they take estrogen until age 50, a new study
suggests.


Experts said the research needs to be confirmed by further study, but
the findings suggest another issue for premenopausal women and their
doctors to discuss as they consider ovary removal.


And if they decide to go ahead with surgery, they need to consider the
risks and benefits of taking estrogen to age 50, said Dr. Walter
Rocca, a Mayo Clinic neurologist and lead study author.


Hormone therapy has been linked to a greater risk of dementia and
heart attacks when given to women after age 65. But recent research
indicates that when given before menopause or just afterward, it
doesn't raise heart attack risk and may protect against dementia.


The study did not include women who had ovaries removed as part of
cancer treatment, and Rocca said the results do not apply to such
women. The work was published Wednesday in the online edition of the
journal Neurology.


Ovaries produce estrogen. Rocca said the likeliest explanation of the
study results is that removing ovaries causes a sudden deficiency of
that hormone, which in turn affects the brain.


Hundreds of thousands of women have their ovaries removed each year in
the United States. In women around age 45, approaching menopause,
ovaries are often removed during hysterectomies as a precaution
against developing ovarian cancer. In addition, some women at
unusually high risk of developing ovarian cancer have ovaries removed
without hysterectomies, as do others who have ovarian problems like
endometriosis.


Women younger than 45 often take estrogen after ovary removal because
of symptoms like hot flashes and concerns about developing
osteoporosis, noted Dr. Nancy Chescheir of Vanderbilt University. But
older women who have the surgery are less likely to start estrogen
therapy, said Chescheir, who didn't participate in the new research.


The new study found the risk of later mental impairment
was higher when the surgery was done at younger ages.


The research examined the fates of women who had one or both ovaries
removed from 1950-87, and compared them to other women. Interviewers
spoke with either the women themselves or somebody who knew them,
asking about signs of memory impairment and any diagnosis of dementia
or Alzheimer's disease.


Overall, the study found impairment or dementia in 150 of 1,489 women
who'd had ovaries removed, versus 98 of 1,472 women who hadn't. That
indicates nearly a 50 percent increase in risk.


A second study, which included about 2,300 women who'd had the surgery
and about 2,400 who hadn't, found about a 70 percent increased risk
for Parkinson's disease symptoms like tremors.


Still, that outcome was far less common than mental impairment, and
experts said the evidence behind it was weaker than that provided in
the mental-impairment paper. The Parkinson paper finding is "not quite
ready for prime time" in terms of affecting patient care, said Dr.
JoAnn Manson, chief of preventive medicine at Harvard's Brigham and
Women's Hospital. She was not involved with either study.


The mental-impairment paper suggests that a premenopausal woman
without a family history of ovarian cancer who has to decide on
whether to have her ovaries removed should ask her doctor whether that
step is really necessary, she said.


"It's very reasonable and important to have that conversation with her
doctor," Manson said.


Chescheir noted that estrogen therapy carries its own risks, such as a
higher rate of blood clots and breast cancer, but that ovary-removal
patients younger than 50 may want to have a serious discussion of that
option after surgery.

Neurology journal: http://www.neurology.org
Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This
material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

------------------------


Q. My pet was spayed, but now looks as if she is in heat. How can this
be?



>From Janet Tobiassen Crosby, DVM,


She is now 1-1/2 years old and bleeding; our male dog keeps trying to
mate with her. The vet told my husband that sometimes this happens and
that the way the dogs uterus is sometimes they miss an ovary and have
to go back in. I cannot see that this is possible if they removed the
uterus. Does anyone know if this is possible?"


A. In short, yes, it is possible for a dog or cat who has been spayed
to show signs of heat (bleeding, attracting males, behavioral changes)
on rare occasion after the spay surgery. How can this happen? The
female dog and cat anatomy and the spay surgical procedure must be
discussed first to understand how a pet can seem to be in heat after a
surgery to prevent pregnancy and heat cycles.
In the dog and cat, the uterus is shaped like a very long "Y". The
common stem (base of Y) is very short relative to the long "arms" or
horns of the uterus. The horns are where the puppies and kittens are
formed, attached, and grow during gestation. The ovaries, while
separate from the uterus, are attached via ligaments and blood vessels
to both the uterine horns and body. The veterinarian must separate the
ovaries from the attachments in the body by clamping and tying off
(ligating) the blood vessels. The uterus is then removed at the body
(base of the "Y"), usually above the cervix so that the cervix remains
in the body.


Each ovary is in a sac. The sac is often filled with fat -- more so in
older or overweight animals. Sometimes the ovarian tissue is diffuse,
sometimes it is very small or not well formed at the time of the spay.
It may also be ectopic, meaning it isn't where it should be in the
body (a congenital problem). In these abnormal situations, when the
veterinarian clamps the tissue to ligate the blood vessels, very small
bits of ovarian tissue may remain in the body after the surgery. This
tissue can then grow and respond to chemical signals from the brain to
produce the hormones that cause the heat cycle (estrus).


How then can the pet actually bleed if the uterus and ovaries have
been removed? Well, the lining tissue of the remaining vagina can
swell and bleed in response to the hormones, simulating a heat cycle.
Unless the uterus was not removed, your pet will not get pregnant.
Other possible situations that could simulate a heat cycle could be a
vaginal or bladder infection, so your veterinarian will need to
examine your pet to be sure.


----------------------


"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich
Schiller.
"Against stupidity the Gods themselves contend in vain."


INDEEDY.


AND THAT'S HOWE COME THEY GOT ME NHOWE!:


Abuse / fear / aggression / hyperactivity / shyness / suicide
attempts AIN'T a chemical imbalance or genetic problem,
it's a SPIRITUAL problem,
passed on
from WON generatiHOWEN of abuser
to the next,
like the 100th monkey washin fruit in the stream;
After a while it's not just NORMAL, it's OBLIGATORY.


To do otherWIZE would be DISRESPECTFUL
of your parental teachins.


The Puppy Wizard's SYNDROME
Is the Perfect Synergy Of
Love, Pride, Desire, Shame, Greed, Ego, Fear,
Hate, Reflex, Self Will,
Arrogance, Ignorance, Predjudice, Cowardice,
Disbelief, Jealousy, Embarrassment, Embellishment,
Guilt, Anger, Hopelessness, Helplesness, Aversion,
Attraction, Inhibition, Revulsion, Repulsion, Change,
Permanence, Enlightenment, Insult, Attrition,
And
Parental / ReligiHOWES / Societal Conditioning.


YOU ARE THE CRITTER YOU WAS TRAINED.


It Is The Perfect Fusion Of The Word..., In The Physical.
The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin Insanely Simply
A-M-A-Z-I-N-G
G-R-A-N-D
Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy, Goat, Ferett, Monkey
SpHOWES And Horsey Wizard <{) ; ~ ) >


"Only the unenlightened speak of wisdom
and right action
as separate, not the wise.


If any man knows one, he enjoys the fruit of both.


The level which is reached by wisdom
is attained
through right action as well.


He who perceives that the two are one
knows the truth."


"Even the wise man acts in character with his nature,
indeed all creatures act according to their natures.


What is the use of compulsion then?


The love and hate which are aroused
by the objects of sense arise from Nature,
do not yield to them.


They only obstruct the path," -
- Bhagavad Gita,
adapted by Krishna with permission
from His OWN FREE copy of The Simply
Amazing Puppy Wizard's FREE Wits' End
Dog Training Method manual <{) ; ~ ) >


--------------------------


The Methods, Principles And Philosophy Of Behavior
Never Change,
Or They'd Not Be Scientific
And Could Not Obtain
Consistent, Reliable, Fast, Effective, Safe Results
For All Handler's And All Critters,
And ALL Behaviors
In ALL FIELDS And ALL UTILITIES,
ALL OVER The Whole Wild World,
NEARLY INSTANTLY,
As Taught In Your Own FREE Copy Of
The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin Insanely Simply
A-M-A-Z-I-N-G
G-R-A-N-D
Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy, Goat, Ferret, Monkey
SpHOWES And Horsey Wizard's
100% CONSISTENTLY NEARLY
INSTANTLY SUCCESSFUL
***FREE***
WWW Wits' End Dog, Child, Kat, Goat, Ferret, Monkey
SpHOWES And Horsey Training Method Manual<{) ; ~ )>


----------------


ANY QUESTIONS, People?


Sincerely,
Jerry Howe,
Director of Research,
Human And Animal Behavior
Forensic Sciences Research Laboratory,
BIOSOUND Scientific,
Director of Training,
Wits' End Dog Training
1611 24th St
Orlando, FL 32805
Phone: 1-407-425-5092 (CALL ANY TIME)
http://www.freewebs.com/thesimplyamazingpuppywizard

Email:
The_Insanely_Freakin_Simply_Amazing_Grand_Puppy_Wizard_ @HotMail.Com

In Love And Light,
I Remain Respectfully, Humbly Yours,
Jerry Howe,
The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin Insanely Simply
A-M-A-Z-I-N-G
G-R-A-N-D
Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy, Ferret, Goat, Monkey
SpHOWES And Horsey Wizard <{) ; ~ ) >


HOWE MAY I SERVE YOU <{}; ~ ) >








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