Dog Discussion: Pomeranian - 11 Mo - Flea Problem

Pomeranian - 11 Mo - Flea Problem
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Paul J. Dudley
2007-07-24 14:18:50 EST
Hello,

We have an 11 month old female Pom (Sandy). The poor dog has
fleas galore. I bathe her every 4 days with Pet Select flea and
tick shampoo which kills the fleas. Of course they are back
within days. I use Heartz 2 in 1 powder in between.

A little about Sandys habits. Where we live is rural. Sandy is allowed
to roam our yard in our company and she loves it. We also have a
cat that pretty much lives outside and trying to control her fleas
is just about impossible ( therefore she stays out ). She will
play with Sandy at times. As for the cleanliness of our living
quarters, we keep it clean and vacuum constantly to hopefully
suck up fleas that might be in the carpet. So as you see, eliminating
all sources of flea contact is impossible. And I do not want to
have to bomb the house. I hate the idea of fumigation.

My question is this. Would I fare better with a flea collar ?
We've tried Frontline drops ( the stuff you apply from the top
of the head across the back to the tail ). It seemed to work
but the dog grew greasy as heck over the ensuing days.

What are the Pro's and Cons of flea collar verses Frontline drops ?

advTHANKSance

Paul

Michael A. Ball
2007-07-26 09:44:23 EST
On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 18:18:50 GMT, "Paul J. Dudley"
<*y@earthlink.net> wrote:

> My question is this. Would I fare better with a flea collar ?
> We've tried Frontline drops ( the stuff you apply from the top
> of the head across the back to the tail ). It seemed to work
> but the dog grew greasy as heck over the ensuing days.
>
> What are the Pro's and Cons of flea collar verses Frontline drops ?

You leave a Pomeranian outside? Wow, imagine that.

My Chow Chow, Tang, develops a "greasy as heck" area on his back, too!
But he doesn't have a flea problem!

You bathe your dog a lot. Washing away so much of its body oil is not
conducive to the action of Frontline, or other oil-transported
insecticides.

Tang lives insides, but goes into grassy areas and weeds three times
every day. We can't have fleas because I'm the resident manager of a
guest house--with much carpet. I never use an insecticide other than
Frontline.

I'd don't like the greasy area on Tang, but you know, he has many other
areas to pet, until the Frontline is absorbed. I consider it a small
price to pay.

I don't consider a flea collar to have any pros--period. Cons:
ineffective, traps more heat, contact complications, added choking risk.

I appreciate that you're trying to do the right thing. I recommend you
treat your yard with a granulated insecticide for yards, and resume use
of Frontline. A dose of CapStar will give you a clean slate to begin
with. Do your homework online, and consult your vet.

Unsolicited opinion: dogs belong inside with their family.



________________________
Whatever it takes.

Paul J. Dudley
2007-07-26 23:35:08 EST
On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 09:44:23 -0400, Michael A. Ball wrote:

> On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 18:18:50 GMT, "Paul J. Dudley"
> <pauljdudley@earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>> My question is this. Would I fare better with a flea collar ?
>> We've tried Frontline drops ( the stuff you apply from the top
>> of the head across the back to the tail ). It seemed to work
>> but the dog grew greasy as heck over the ensuing days.
>>
>> What are the Pro's and Cons of flea collar verses Frontline drops ?
>
> You leave a Pomeranian outside? Wow, imagine that.

Thanks for your reply. Actually, no. I don't leave Sandy outside.
"Sandy is allowed to roam our yard in our company" means just that I take
her outside to play ( Gen won't let us throw the ball inside and
tug-o-war is much easier to play where there is no furniture in the
way), and to do her thing..

I said, in our company - yes Sandy goes outside at times. I would never
own an animal with the intent of keeping it indoors at all times.

>
> You bathe your dog a lot. Washing away so much of its body oil is not
> conducive to the action of Frontline, or other oil-transported
> insecticides.
>
I've been bathing her often with 2 & 1 to rid the numerous fleas. I
assure you, it is not in conjunction with using frontline. As I said, we
tried frontline and it seemed to work some, but Gen seemed upset about
how greasy Sandy grew over time. We stopped using it and started using
the 2 & 1 shampoo which killed all fleas. I was hoping that the residue
would help keep them away until I found something that would work. The
poor girl needed a break real quick and bathing provided such. You
should have seen how many dead fleas there were in the rinse.


> I don't consider a flea collar to have any pros--period. Cons:
> ineffective, traps more heat, contact complications, added choking risk.
>
Thanks for your vote. I'm not too crazy about flea collars. I once had a
cat who developed one heck of a rash from a flea collar. Took it off
- rash go byebye.

> I appreciate that you're trying to do the right thing. I recommend you
> treat your yard with a granulated insecticide for yards, and resume use
> of Frontline. A dose of CapStar will give you a clean slate to begin
> with. Do your homework online, and consult your vet.

I will look into treating the yard. Sandy do love the outdoors and it
would be cruel to ever have to deny her such.

> Unsolicited opinion: dogs belong inside with their family.
>
Well ... My family don't stay inside either. We do quite a lot outside.
So does Sandy, in our/my company... and she do love it... She even
tried to help me pick hot peppers the other day. Yow! She learned a
valuable lesson. Leave the peppers to PaPa.

Thanks again

= Paul =


Michael A. Ball
2007-07-27 10:22:56 EST
On Fri, 27 Jul 2007 03:35:08 GMT, "Paul J. Dudley"
<*y@earthlink.net> wrote:

It sounds like Sandy has a great life, except for the fleas.

Please, consider posting your original message on rec.pets.dogs.health.
Few of the people I rely on post in alt.animals.dog. And you can be
assured of much support in opposing flea collars.

Regarding the greasy film left by Frontline, one way to reduce the mess
is to apply one half dose of Frontline every two weeks. If the product
works well, you might even go to one half dose every three weeks.

The granular insecticide seems to do a great job here. Maybe others will
give alternate ideas.

I hope you'll report which solution actually worked for you and Sandy,
because others are sure to have similar challenges.



________________________
Whatever it takes.

P*@MuchoMail.Com
2007-07-28 12:25:29 EST
HOWEDY Paul J. Dudley,

"Paul J. Dudley" <pauljdudley@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:pan.
2*1@earthlink.net...
> Hello,
>
> We have an 11 month old female Pom (Sandy).

You've been reading and posting here for several
months. EVERY aspect of dog behavior and health
care has been discussed. Evidently you've IGNORED
the INFORMATION or, you're a S-L-O-W learner.

> The poor dog has fleas galore.

Here's LOTS of information about NATURAL
NON-TOXIC flea preventatives and treatments:

http://relinkz.com/GoodHealthAIN'TGOODLUCK777

> I bathe her every 4 days with Pet Select flea
> and tick shampoo which kills the fleas.

You DON'T NEED toxic flea soap.

> Of course they are back within days.
> I use Heartz 2 in 1 powder in between.

You DON'T NEED toxic powders.

> A little about Sandys habits.

You don't NEED to tell us your dog's habits.

> Where we live is rural.

You don't NEED to tell us where you live.

> Sandy is allowed to roam our yard in our
> company and she loves it. We also have a
> cat that pretty much lives outside and trying
> to control her fleas is just about impossible

But you DO NEED to study the INFORMATION.

> ( therefore she stays out ). She will play with Sandy
> at times. As for the cleanliness of our living quarters,
> we keep it clean and vacuum constantly to hopefully
> suck up fleas that might be in the carpet.
> So as you see, eliminating all sources of flea contact
> is impossible. And I do not want to have to bomb the
> house. I hate the idea of fumigation.

Yet you don't hesitate to put systemic neuro toxins
directly on your dog? That's ABSURD. AIN'T IT.

> My question is this.

You don't NEED to ask QUESTIONS. ALL
the INFORMATION you NEED has been
provided.

AND you don't even NEED to say "THANK
YOU The Simply Amazing Puppy Wizard".

Just take it an RUN.

> Would I fare better with a flea collar ?

You're askin liars dog abusers cowards and
active accute chronic life long incurable mental
cases who jerk choke shock bribe crate intimidate
mutilate toxify and MURDER innocent defenseless
dumb critters and WILL DO an SAY ANY THING
defend their sick malicious behaviors to compensate
for their own fragile defective egos, weak fearful
minds and colossal inferiority complexes.

> We've tried Frontline drops ( the stuff you apply
> from the top of the head across the back to the tail ).
> It seemed to work but the dog grew greasy as heck
> over the ensuing days.

IT KILLS DOGS.

> What are the Pro's and Cons of
> flea collar verses Frontline drops ?

THEY'RE BOTH TOXIC and may
cause great harm to your dog and kat.

Go to: http://relinkz.com/GoodHealthAIN'TGOODLUCK777

and scroll down to:
Fleas & Ticks And Veterinary PARASITES

> advTHANKSance

Thank you, Paul.

> Paul

"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter
selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller.

"Against stupidity the Gods themselves
contend in vain."

INDEEDY.

AND THAT'S HOWE COME THEY GOT ME NHOWE!

Sincerely,
Jerry Howe,
Director of Research,
Human And Animal Behavior
Forensic Sciences Research Laboratory,
BIOSOUND Scientific,
Director of Training,
Wits' End Dog Training
1611 24th St
Orlando, FL 32805
Phone: 1-407-425-5092
(Call ANY TIME)
E-mail:

Human_And_Animal_Behavior_Forensic_Sciences_Research_Laboratory@HotMail.Com

Human_And_Animal_Behaviour_Forensic_Sciences_Research_Laboratory@HotMail.Com

T*d@Mail.Com

In Love And Light,
I Remain Respectfully, Humbly Yours,
Jerry Howe,
The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin Insanely
Simply
A-M-A-Z-I-N-G
G-R-A-N-D
Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy, Ferret, Goat,
Monkey SpHOWES And Horsey Wizard
<{) ;~ ) >

HOWE MAY I SERVE YOU <{}; ~ ) >


P*@MuchoMail.Com
2007-07-28 13:20:39 EST
HOWEDY Paul J. Dudley,

On Jul 26, 11:35 pm, "Paul J. Dudley" <pauljdud...@earthlink.net>
wrote:
> On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 09:44:23 -0400, Michael A. Ball wrote:
> > On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 18:18:50 GMT, "Paul J. Dudley"
> > <pauljdud...@earthlink.net> wrote:
>
> >> My question is this. Would I fare better with a flea collar ?
> >> We've tried Frontline drops ( the stuff you apply from the top
> >> of the head across the back to the tail ). It seemed to work
> >> but the dog grew greasy as heck over the ensuing days.
>
> >> What are the Pro's and Cons of flea collar verses Frontline drops ?
>
> > You leave a Pomeranian outside? Wow, imagine that.

michael doesn't believe in "HOWEtside dogs".

michael would PREFER to MURDER dogs in his SHELTER.
michael is chronically unemployable and collects
disability social security and volunteers at the
local KILL SHELTER to earn dog food for the dogs
he keeps when he doesn't murder them. michael enjoys
murderin innocent defenseless kitty kats when he's
not murderin dogs at the shelter.

michael is a life long incurable mental case, a pre
operative TRAINsexual who HATES hisself as "man" and
THINKS he'll LIKE hisself better as "andrea beck".
michael is a "SECRET CUTTER" and sucicial manic
depressive, as are most of the posters you'll find
on these forums:

Subject: "Secret Cutting"
Groups: alt.support.depression
From: Michael Ball
Date: Tues, May 30 2000 12:00 am
Email: "Michael Ball" <Guard...@wireco.net>

The movie, "Secret Cutting" airs tonight at
9:00 p.m. eastern, on USA Network.

-----------

Groups: alt.support.depression
From: Michael Ball
Date: Mon, Dec 27 1999 12:00 am

Howard Hong wrote,

> "If I wanted more of this feeling, then
> it would probably be a pleasure, no?"

I almost replied, "WRONG!," and offered this explanation:
I sometimes makes little cuts under my watchband, with a
razor blade.

Although there is some physical pain, I feel triumphant
because Michael Ball is getting a little dose of what he
deserves. So, it is a pleasure.

How odd; even sensations that most people would rate as
bad, sick, horrible, etc., can be and are pleasures--if
we want them. I never thought of those insignificant
little cuts specifically as pleasures, but they are!

I love it when little streams of blood trickle down my arm.
And I like the reminder pain over the following couple of
days, during the healing process.

------------

Subject: Prozac
Groups: alt.support.depression
From: Michael Ball - view profile
Date: Mon, Aug 14 2000 12:00 am

Prozac affects everyone differently. Please, don't allow
other's Prozac experiences to influence you too much.

I take another medicine that makes me tired; so, I can't
attribute fatigue to Prozac. FWIW, fatigue is a common
complaint. I don't believe Prozac has any effect on one's
immune system. In my humble opinion, Tabasco Sauce and
jalapeno peppers are far more effective than any flu shot!
:-) I haven't had a cold in years. :-)

Wait a minute! A cat lover!? Oh,
well, I suppose someone has to...

(((K))) I hope you're doing well today.

Michael

-------------

Groups: alt.support.depression
From: Michael Ball
Date: Mon, Mar 13 2000 12:00 am

"Rage"? "Again"? I wonder if a lot of folks get angry
at their therapists, and why? My therapist used to try
to convince me that Michael Ball is not so bad. That
annoyed me so much! I'm not sure what bothered me most:
the fact that I couldn't seem to convince him of the truth;
or the thought that he was trying to trick me; or something
entirely different.

He was a nice guy, but I just couldn't get him to see the
real me. Ha! If I had, he might have stopped wasting his
effort! We eventually began working on his problems. :-)

Misplaced aggression? Is that why we tend to attack
some of those who want to "help" us?

----------

Groups: alt.support.depression
From: Michael A. Ball
Date: Sun, Mar 14 2004 6:25 pm

On 14 Mar 2004 13:48:35 -0800, crysal...@yahoo.com (crysalis) wrote:

> [...]Tomorrow I see the Dr. I hope they tell me
> something good. [...]

I hope he tells you "something good" too! If you were
asked to list the top three good things you'd like for
him to tell you, what would they be?

I put myself in your shoes for a minute and discovered
that question is not as simple as it sounds. We don't
always know how to heal the pain or even what is causing
the pain: we only know that we hurt.

Maybe your doctor will tell you that it is not your skin
that you want to escape, but everything inside of that
skin" your..."self"!

I'm reminded of a time in my life when I applied to enter
a sex reassignment program. Fortunately, during the initial
evaluation process, it was determined that I wasn't transsexual, and
didn't want to be a woman: I just didn't
want to be Michael Ball.

That was a day of considerable relief, but also one of great
sadness and hopelessness. There would be no Andrea Beck, and for the
time being, no escape from MB.

Best wishes tomorrow. I hope you'll tell us how things went.

Michael
A day without recoil is like a day without sunshine!

-------------

From: "Michael A. Ball" <Guard...@wireco.net>
Date: Tue, 18 Dec 2001 22:35:20 -0500

Subject: Re: Ethical Dilemma (Son bitten by dog
in schoolyard) (long)

"AussieResc" <aussier...@aol.com> wrote>

> I find this amazing that someone who posts on a
> board for rescue would have this attitude.
> Pat

This NG is specifically for dog rescue. I hate cats
and never give a cat an even break--unless they just
happen to break in the middle.

When I started to work at the animal shelter, cleaning
kennels, I was asked if I liked cats. I replied
enthusiastically, "Yes, if they are cooked right!"

I've never had to work with the cats! :-)

We're all different.

Michael

From: Michael A. Ball
Date: Sat, Apr 8 2006 3:51 pm

>"Andrew A. Nanton" <a.nan...@gmail.com> wrote
>> What is the best way to perform home euthanasia
>> on a dog? I want to put down the family pet but I
>> don't have a lot of money and if there is a way to
>> do it humanely and cheaply, I will.
>
>> All replies appreciated.
>> Andrew Nanton

That's a lot of wisdom--for a "top poster".

$50.00 for euthanasia and cremation is a real bargain.
The same service would be about $120.00 for a 40# dog,
in this area.

You know, I don't believe in beating around the bush
much.

I believe we ought to say what's on our mind. I see you
hold a similar view. Of course, having a small mind
complicates things. That was quite a generalization you
made: "Anybody that can't afford that ($50.00 to have
their pet killed) shouldn't have a pet in the first place!"

Andrew Nanton didn't mention that the family pet was
sick or aged. So, for all we know, the family is saying
good bye to their pet because they can't afford $50.00
to keep it alive!

If that is the case, they probably don't have $50.00 to
kill their pet! Either way, they are trying to do the
right thing.

Because of money, my pet ownership days are running
out. I hope you are never faced with that situation.

Whatever it takes.

----------

From: "Jerry Howe" <jho...@bellsouth.net> -
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 18:52:06 -0400
Subject: Re: Symphony rests in Peace.

Hello michael,

"Michael A. Ball" <Guard...@wireco.net> wrote in message
news:tp01k9kg212nfe@corp.supernews.com...

> As expected, Symphony, the 12 week old puppy,
> bite case, was euthanized today.

No she wasn't euthanized, she was MURDERED, because
you do that stuff to dogs for a living for yourself.
You're part of the problem, michael.

> He won't be startled, terrified or confused anymore.

That IS reassuring, michael. Is that what your 'boss' told you?

> I like to believe he has perfect hearing now.

I'd prefer you'd take his place.

> Thanks to everyone who made recommendations,
> and offered insight, prayers and encouragement.

BWWWAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!

YOU KILL DOGS FOR A LIVING, michael.

> I understood the liability issue long before meeting
> Symphony, but Lynn K.'s experience

Your pal lying "I LOVE KOEHLER" lynn is a
pathological liar and notorious dog abuser, you puke.

> with a $30K settlement was a sobering thought.

What would be sobering would be to
THINK about what you're doing.

> Still, if there was anyway to nullify that liability
> and have this puppy adopted, I wanted to find it.

Sorry mikey, you just don't have the knowHOWE.

------------

> Thanks for your reply.

"You're JUDGED BY the company you keep. When
you lie with PIGS you'll awaken STINKIN LIKE
'Em," The Puppy Wizard's DADDY <{}: ~ ( >

> Actually, no. I don't leave Sandy outside.

That's IRRELEVENT, Paul.

> "Sandy is allowed to roam our yard in our company"
> means just that I take her outside to play ( Gen
> won't let us throw the ball inside and tug-o-war
> is much easier to play where there is no furniture
> in the way), and to do her thing..
>
> I said, in our company - yes Sandy goes outside at times. I would never
> own an animal with the intent of keeping it indoors at all times.

You're WASTING your time chit chattin with a
miserable stinkin lyin animal murderin pathetic
active accute chronic life long incurable
malignant mental case.

> > You bathe your dog a lot. Washing away so much of
> > its body oil is not conducive to the action of
> > Frontline, or other oil-transported insecticides.

Those TOXINS are not "oil-transported insecticides".
They TOXIFY the entire system, as the following
information will prove beyond a shadow of a doubt.

<snip>

> > I don't consider a flea collar to have any pros-
> > -period. Cons: ineffective, traps more heat,
> > contact complications, added choking risk.

BWEEEAAAAHAAAAA!!

> Thanks for your vote.

Thank you for enterTRAINING michael / andrea.

> I'm not too crazy about flea collars. I once had
> a cat who developed one heck of a rash from a flea
> collar. Took it off - rash go byebye.
>
> > I appreciate that you're trying to do the right
> > thing. I recommend you treat your yard with a
> > granulated insecticide for yards,

INSTEAD of using EFFECTIVE non toxic treatments
like beneficial neamatodes or diatomacious earth.

> > and resume use of Frontline.

michael DON'T CARE if your dog gets cancer,
seizures, liver / kidney failure and he
particularly DON'T MIND if the TOXIN kills
your KAT.

> > A dose of CapStar will give you a clean slate
> > to begin with. Do your homework online, and
> > consult your vet.

Yeah. Do your homework.

> I will look into treating the yard. Sandy do love
> the outdoors and it would be cruel to ever have to
> deny her such.
>
> > Unsolicited opinion: dogs belong inside with their family.
>
> Well ... My family don't stay inside either. We do quite a lot outside.
> So does Sandy, in our/my company... and she do love it... She even
> tried to help me pick hot peppers the other day. Yow! She learned a
> valuable lesson. Leave the peppers to PaPa.
>
> Thanks again
>
> = Paul =

HOWEDY BorisL,

"BorisL" <borysd5@verizon.net> wrote in message news:6NIdi.
1365$bn6.1035@trnddc03...
> Is Bio spot safe for my new 6 year old shelty

NO.

> or should I use a flea collar.

NEITHER. They're both systemic neuro toxins
that have life long heeth and temperament
detrimental effects:

"The public must recognize that any decision to use a
pesticide, or to otherwise be exposed to pesticides, is
a decision made in ignorance," says Eliot Spitzer,
Attorney General of the New York Environmental
Protection Bureau. "We do not know the identity of
the chemicals to which we are "Spot-on" flea-killers
are effective, but the long-term effects of their constant
use is unknown. In effect, our dogs are test subjects
that will determine their safety."

HERE'S THE TRUTH and CASE HISTORY DATA
YOUR VETERINARY MALPRACTICIONER WILL DENY:

Acute symptoms of headache, nausea, and abdominal
and lumbar pain are associ- Don't just "consult your
veterinarian." We would suggest NEVER using on
"debilitated, aged, medicated, pregnant or nursing"
dogs. US EPA "Signal Word" Learning to Read the
Label Note that cats are at a special risk of being
poisoned by this product, even if they simply have
"close physical contact" with treated dogs.

List of "active" (known) and "inert" (who knows what?)
ingredients. This is the product maker. If your dog
displays any problems following application, report this
to the maker. Pesticide manufacturers are required by
federal law to forward reports of product injuries to
the EPA. When researching a chemical, use the EPA Registered Number.

22 | FEBRUARY 2002 Copyright� 2002, Belvoir Publications, Inc.
TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL (800) 829-9165

Kathleen Dudley is a writer and photgrapher, and
lives in New Mexico. ated with carbitol, one of the
"inert" ingredients in Frontline. According to the
MSDS, carbitol induced these symptoms in laboratory settings.

Curiously, these potential side effects are not published
in the literature accompanying the products, nor do many veterinarians
know the dangers. But there are numerous
anecdotal reports from veterinarians in the U.S. and the
U.K. of dogs who were treated with spot-on products
who have displayed signs of neurological damage, such
as depression, lethargy, convulsions, underactivity,
tremors, overactivity, stiffened limbs, and lameness.

Adverse skin effects Topical skin irritation is listed
on all the MSDSs of the products reviewed in this
article; however, product literature inserts fail to
emphasize the extreme nature of the problems.

They all instruct the users that their products are for
"external use only," and to "avoid contact with the
skin," but only Merial's product insert appears to
suggest there is some possibility of adverse skin
contact reactions.

Dr. Dee Blanco, a holistic veterinarian practicing in
New Mexico, treated 20 dogs for adverse reactions to
Farnam's flea product. In a letter to the Farnam regarding
a client who had used one of Farnam's permethrin-based
insecticides, Dr. Blanco stated, "All the dogs (20 out of
her 24 dogs treated with BioSpot ) had pruritus (severe
itching of the skin) with bleeding and cracking of the
skin, various degrees of erythema (intense redness of
the skin), many fluid vesicles (blisters), severe hair loss,
and elephantiasis (thickening of the skin) with chronic
itching. Many also showed severe mental depression,
lethargy, and symptoms concomitant with aggravated
liver toxicity.

All symptoms appeared within two weeks after
applications of your (BioSpot) product, also a
consistent timeframe for liver toxicity after
absorption through the skin. . . To date, most
of the dogs have dramatically improved but a
few still remain symptomatic."

Dr. Blanco also stated that one dog died of liver
cancer within three months of this BioSpot application,
which she says "could have been exacerbated by the
application of BioSpot." Permethrin is indicated as
a possible carcinogen by the EPA, causing liver
enlargement and cancers in laboratory mammals.

When Dr. Dobozy reviewed the reports from fipronil
product studies, she found that Frontline "does not
adequately describe the severe reactions" reported by
veterinarians - sloughing, "chemical burn" conditions,
and extensively affected areas well beyond the
application site.

When these incidents were reported, Merial recommended
bathing the dogs. That's strange, because their literature
indicates the product remains effective after bathing. The
MSDS for Bayer's Advantage tell us that "prolonged
contact with the skin can cause defatting of the skin due
to solvent component in the products," to "avoid skin
contact," "to wear appropriate gloves when handling
he product," and to "wash off any contamination."

Here's The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin Insanely
Simply Amazing Grand Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy
And Horsey Wizard's informative Post regardin toxic
flea and tick treatments which KILLS dogs AS PRESCRIBED by veterinary
malpracticioners <{}: ~ ( >

Subject: Advantix and Mood Change

Date: Mon, Nov 28 2005 10:42 am

HOWEDY brian.lange,

b*.@gmail.com wrote:
> We have a 7 month old golden retreiver pup and
> when we give him his monthly Advantix for flea
> and tick, for a good 24 hours, his mood completely
> changes ... wants to be by himself, hides under tables,
> chairs, etc.

WELCOME to the world of veterinary approved poisons.

> Basically, he becomes a completely different "person."

Naaah? The EXXXPERTS tell us that's GOOD for dogs.

> Has anyone else had similar experiences?

Yeah. Most of the DOG LOVERS here got DEATHLY
ILL and DEAD DOGS on accHOWENT of their mishandling and inapupriate
veterinary malpractices.

Have you had your dog surgically sexually mutilated yet?

Better hurry. Oh, bye the bye, ONLY LIARS DOG
ABUSERS COWARDS and ACTIVE ACUTE
CHRONIC LONG TERM INCURABLE MENTAL CASES post here abHOWETS.

> Thanks.

You're welcome!

--------------------

> They then recommended Frontline Plus. Tried it.
> The one-month dosage lasted two-weeks before
> the fleas were back as bad as ever.

Naaaaah?

"While these new products are suggested as safer than
their predecessors, they indicate high levels of acute and
chronic poisoning from short term use. Method of action
Whether or not it is purposeful, manufacturers of these
spot-on flea products have managed to convince many
veterinarians and animal guardians that these products
are not absorbed into our dogs' systems.

The companies' literature describes in vague and
contradictory detail how the chemicals don't go
beyond the hair follicles and at layers of the dogs' skin.

Take, for example, information published on Merial's
Web site for Frontline ("How Frontline Works"). In
one place, it clearly states that fipronil (Frontline's
"active" ingredient) is absorbed into the skin ("Sebaceous
glands provide a natural reservoir for Frontline. . ."),
but other statements suggest that fipronil stays there and
then leaves through the same entry point without moving
into any other parts of the dog's body - an illogical conclusion.

When the EPA's Dr. Dobozy reviewed the results of a
fipronil metabolism study, she reported that "significant
amounts of radio- abeled fipronil were found [not only]
in various organs and fat . . . [but they were also] excreted
in the urine and feces, and were present in other parts of
the body . . . which demonstrated that the chemical is
absorbed systemically."

Veterinarians and pet owners who pay close attention
can witness evidence that these products are indeed
systemically absorbed. Dr. Stephen Blake, a San Diego
veterinarian, relates a client's experience: "We put
Advantage on the backs of our dogs and could smell it
on their breath in a matter of minutes following the
application." Blake stated that this indication of immediate
absorption did not tally with what he had been led to
believe by reading Bayer's literature.

He continues to question its safety for his clients' animals.

Neurological health effects

Logic tells us that a topical chemical that is not absorbed
into the skin has no chance of causing neurotoxic effects.
Then why do the Material Data Safety Sheets (MSDSs)
for all the permethrin-containing pesticides recommend
preventing their products from having prolonged contact
with the skin?

And why do they all state that skin sensations, such as
"numbness and tingling," can occur? Schering-Plough's
MSDS makes an additional statement about its Defend
EXspot Treatment: "can be harmful if absorbed through
the skin and harmful following inhalation," causing
headaches, dizziness, and nausea.

Bayer does not reveal more than 90 percent of the
ingredients in Advantage, but its MSDS does warn
us to "use a respirator for organic vapors" in order to
avoid "respiratory tract irritation and other symptoms
such as headache or dizziness" (symptoms of nervous
system exposure).

Bayer's promotional literature for Advantage, however,
states that "studies prove that using 20-24 times the
dosage on dogs and cats does not cause any internal or
external side effects," and that ". . . switching to Advantage
from another flea control product poses virtually no risk to
your pet."
--------------

> In years past I had used Advantage. Tried it again
> and with 6-hours things were better. Within 24-hours
> the fleas were apparently gone. It is amazing.

INDEED:

"An unidentified "inert" ingredient in the flea product
Advantage was implicated in the death of kittens who
received doses within laboratory tolerances. Why don't
pesticide manufacturers have to disclose all the ingredients
in their products?"

"Dr. Graham Hines, a veterinarian from the United
Kingdom, treated a four-year-old female German
Shepherd who had two Advantage Top Spot treatments.
He reported that "both times she became unusually clingy,
and would not leave her guardian's side, yet paced up and
down all day, very restlessly.

These symptoms persisted for 48 hours before a gradual
return to her normal state." The neurotoxic effects were
clear to Dr. Hines. Dr. Blake also finds different results
than the Bayer literature. "We are told that the product
affects only insects' nervous systems, not mammals'.

Several of my clients told me that they accidentally got
some Advantage on their hands and when they touched
their mouths, their lips became immediately numb for
several hours. So much for not having an effect on
the nervous system of mammals."

----------------

> At the same time, I am treating the yard and house
> for fleas as well. I tried flea control with pyrthrins
> (sp?), but the had little effect, so I went to the old
> stand-by, Malthion. Once-a-week for three weeks.
> Indoors I am using a flea-specific product sold at
> Home Depot with an insect growth regulator (IGR).

"The fourth type contains insect growth regulators
(IGR), which don't kill, but interrupt the flea's life
cycle. Imidacloprid is the first of its class of insecticides,
and is relatively new on the block; it was introduced in
1994. Laboratory testing on mice, dogs, and rats, indicates
that this insecticide can be neurotoxic to laboratory animals,
causing incoordination, labored breathing, thyroid lesions,
reduced birth weights, and increased frequency of birth
defects"

You COULD use entirely NON TOXIC pet, yard and
HOWES treatments such as beneficial nematodes and
indoor flea killers like boric acid and diatomacious earth,
IF you had the INTELLECT to figger it HOWET from the
DOCUMENTED CASE HISTORY DATA you dog abusin
punk thug coward's DECRY, in The Sincerely Incredibly
Freakin Insanely Simply Amazing Grand Puppy, Child,
Pussy, Birdy And Horsey Wizard's 100% CONSISTENTLY
NEARLY INSTANTLY SUCCESSFUL FREE WWW Wits' End Dog, Child, Kat And
Horse Training Method
Manual Forums And Human And Animal Behavior
Forensic Sciences Research Laboratory ARCHIVES
<{); ~ ) >

> If you use either the indoor flea spray or Malthion
> the only major rule is that the dogs don't go near the
> treated areas until it is completely dry.

That so?

SEZ YOU?

You're a pathetic anonymHOWES dog
abusin punk thug coward, REMEMBER?

> Good luck with your dog's fleas.

"The spot-on flea products fall into four general categories
of insecticides. All have neurotoxic effects. The first three -
imidacloprid (a chloro-nicotinyl insecticide), fipronil (a
phenylprazole insecticide), and permethrin (a synthetic broad spectrum
pyrethroid insecticide) - all work by
disrupting the nervous system of insects, killing by
contact or ingestion.

Fipronil was introduced in the United States in 1996.
It is a neurotoxin and suspected human carcinogen.
Fipronil can cause liver toxicity, thyroid lesions (cancer),
damage to the kidneys, increased cholesterol levels,
alterations in thyroid hormones, incoordination, labored
breathing, increased miscarriages, and smaller offspring."

Subject: Re: How to Get Rid of Fleas?

HOWEDY al,

Al wrote:
> Hi Mike,
> I have four dogs, at one time I had Chows, talk about
> hair and fleas..

"Cleanlieness is next to G-Dlieness."
Ever heard of THAT, al?

> anyway,

You mean anyHOWE, al, just
HOWETA RESPECT <{): ~ ( >

> I prefer TopSpot,

That's POISON, al. Would you put
POISON on your beast friend?

> I believe thats what it's called.

It's called NEUROTOXIN, al. It's a systemic POISON
which effects all the organs of the body, al. It's DEATHLY
POISONHOWES. Your veterinary malpracticioner is LYIN
to you if he tells you it's SAFE.

> I'm downstairs studying now,

Are you studyin to be a veterinary malpracticioner, al?

> but, I think thats what it is. Petmeds Express has it.

Are you a shill for a pharmacutical company, al?

> It's applied externally,

Oh, so it AIN'T a systemic neurotoxin which can
KILL dogs an kats or your boyfriend, eh al? Is that
what you're STUDYIN, al?

You'll find ALL the INFORMATION you need
to know RIGHT HERE to understand you're a
IMBECILE, al.

> just squirt a little between the dogs shoulder blades
> and for larger breeds a spot at the base of the tail as
> well.

Dogs DIE from that shit, al <{}: ~ ( >

> Directions will spell it all out for you.

You think so, al? You think the pharmacutical or
veterinary malpractice industries are interested in
tellin you the TRUTH, al?

> Al

Chronic disease

Based upon toxicological studies, a dog suffering from
liver, kidney, thyroid, adrenal, spleen, lung, brain or
gonadal conditions could experience heightened states
of chronic diseases, with the potential for development
of cancer, when spot-on flea preparations are used.

Permethrin is linked to malignant liver and lung tumors
and autoimmune system disease, and at very low levels suppresses the
immune system. Thyroid lesions have
developed in laboratory studies in dogs during imidacloprid
tests.

Further studies are necessary to understand the
possibilities of malignancy. Thyroid cancer has
been linked to fipronil, according to the EPA.
The data from the metabolism and chronic toxicity
studies for fipronil indicate that " . . . this is a
persistent chemical and has the potential for
nervous system and thyroid toxicity after
long-term exposure at low levels," according
to Dr. Dobozy.

In the Journal of Pesticide Reform, author Caroline Cox
cites studies that show thyroid sensitivity to imidacloprid
can result in thyroid lesions, as well as increased incidences
of miscarriages, mutagenic (DNA damage) abnormalities,
and abnormal skeletons in animal studies. In addition, one
metabolite (breakdown of the chemical into new chemical
compounds during the metabolism process in the body) of
imidacloprid appears to be far more toxic to mammals than
the imidacloprid itself.

General risk factors

Of course, not all dogs exhibit immediately noticeable
symptoms when dosed with a commercial spot-on flea
product. Adult animals and those in the peak of health
are less likely to show immediate signs compared to
animals that are young, old, or suffering from chronic
disease. Animals with a heightened sensitivity to
chemicals or with exposures from multiple sources
such as a flea collar; other dips, sprays, dust, or flea
bombs; yard pesticides; and house termite extermination,
are most likely to react.

The cumulative and synergistic impacts of pesticides
can take a heavy toll on animals. Dr. Jerry Blondell,
of the US EPA Office of Pesticides, has indicated
clearly "not to use pesticides on the old, the sick, or
the young." While some of the literature for the spot-
on products does discourage this usage, many dog
guardians and veterinarians overlook or disregard
these written precautions.

Although the number of dogs reported to react to these
products may seem small, this does not suggest the
overall impact is small. First, spot-on products are
relatively new, and many problems are cumulative.

Second, reactivity to chemicals in a population is
similar to other population statistics and is represented
by a bell-shaped curve. In other words, at one end of
the spectrum are sensitive individuals, and at the opposite
end are resistant individuals; these groups are relatively
small compared to the vast middle group, who show
varying degrees of susceptibility - but who are all
susceptible.

Thus the sensitive group - dogs who have displayed
signs of toxicity - happen to be the sentinels for the
younger, healthier ones who will eventually be affected;
it's just a matter of time.

Safe alternatives

Integrated pest management (IPM) is a nontoxic
approach used to eradicate any insect infestation.
Simply, it is a way of thinking about how to preserve
the quality of life on this planet and within the earth's
stratosphere - of understanding not only the damages of
the pesticide to all species and the environment, but also
understanding the consequences of insect resistance to
the constant parade of new, more sophisticated, and
perhaps more toxic pesticide formulas.

The IPM process was initially designed to safeguard all
species, including the environment, from the ravages of
pesticides.

18 | FEBRUARY 2002 Copyright� 2002, Belvoir Publications, Inc. TO
SUBSCRIBE, CALL (800) 829-9165
BY KATHLEEN DUDLEY
Are "Spot-On" Flea Killers Safe?

Absolutely not, says our author, despite what the commercials say.

Tempting as it may be to simplistically consider
fleas as horrible insects, the bane of dogs everywhere,
poisoning your dog in a vain attempt to wipe fleas out
of existence doesn't really make sense.

Even though more than half a billion dollars annually
are spent on products that kill fleas in that vain pursuit.
Of course fleas can make dogs (and everyone else in the
household) perfectly miserable.

But it's not as if using toxic flea killing chemicals is
the only way to control fleas. When we attempt to get
rid of our dogs' fleas by utilizing chemicals that are
toxic to the brain and nervous system, that may disrupt
hormone (endocrine) systems, and that cause cancer,
it's sort of like burning the house down to get rid of
ants - effective, sure, but what are you left with?

In the next issue of WDJ, we will describe effective,
nontoxic methods of flea control. No dogs (or any
other members of the household) will get sick from
these methods, and no dogs (or any other members
of the household) will die from them. In contrast,
dogs do get sick and die from the toxic chemicals
we will describe in this article.

New products not safer

All pesticides pose some degree of health risk to
humans and animals. Despite advertising claims
to the contrary, both over the counter and veterinarian-
prescribed flea killing topical treatments are pesticides
that enter our dogs' internal organs (livers, kidneys),
move into their intestinal tracts, and are eventually
eliminated in their feces and urine. Not only that,
but the humans and other household animals who
closely interact with dogs who have been treated with
these chemicals can be affected by the toxins.

What happens to the health of all exposed individuals
during this systemic absorption and filtration process
varies from animal to animal, but the laboratory and
field trial results clearly indicate toxicity on the chronic
and acute levels.

Until recently, foggers, flea collars, exposed. We
cannot make informed individual decisions on the
acceptability of those exposures, a basic element
in the maintenance and protection of our own health."

Spitzer adds, "The requirements for marketing a new
product fall considerably short of providing safety for
our animal and human families."

Active and inert ingredients

To fully understand the risks associated with any of
these products, it is important to understand the various
components in a flea product, or any chemical product
that you may buy, for that matter.

Like other chemical products, all flea products are
made up of "active" and "inert" ingredients; strangely,
the actual definitions of those phrases are very different
from what they seem to connote.

In the case of fleakilling chemicals, the "active"
ingredient does, in fact, target and kill fleas - but
some of the "inert" ingredients are poisons, too.

While the word "inert" suggests benign activity
and even connotes safety in the minds of many
consumers, legally, it simply means added
substances that are not the registered "active" ingredient.

This is important because most people assume that
only the "active" ingredient in a chemical CONSUMER
ALERT powders, sprays, shampoos, and dips containing
organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, malathion, diazinon),
pyrethrins, synthetic pyrethroids, and carbamates, were
the cutting-edge solutions to our flea problems.

They were effective, but unfortunately, they also caused
disease and sometimes death. Given enough time, most
pesticides eventually cause enough human and animal
injuries that they are identified as hazards and are removed
from the market.

While the newest flea products - socalled "spot-on"
liquids that are applied monthly to a dog's skin - are
being marketed aggressively by the manufacturers
and veterinarians and represented as safe alternatives
to their predecessors, the fact is, they are simply newer.

All the "active" ingredients in these spot-on preparations -
- imidacloprid, fipronil, permethrin, methoprene, and
pyriproxyfen - have been linked to serious health effects
in laboratory animals (see chart, page 20).

"The public must recognize that any decision to use a
pesticide, or to otherwise be exposed to pesticides, is
a decision made in ignorance," says Eliot Spitzer,
Attorney General of the New York Environmental
Protection Bureau. "We do not know the identity of
the chemicals to which we are "Spot-on" flea-killers
are effective, but the long-term effects of their constant
use is unknown. In effect, our dogs are test subjects
that will determine their safety.

CONSUMER ALERT TO SUBSCRIBE: www.whole-dog-journal.com Copyright�
2002,
Belvoir Publications, Inc. THE WHOLE DOG JOURNAL
| 19

product is of concern. Many people feel comforted by
the idea that a product contains only a minuscule amount
of an "active" ingredient and up to 99.9 percent "inert"
ingredients - a typical formula in many pesticide products.

Actually, this makeup should frighten consumers.

Why? Because the Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA, the government agency that oversees the pesticide
industry) requires a higher (if not high enough) standard
of scrutiny for "active" ingredients; these must undergo a
battery of tests to determine their toxicological profiles,
be registered with the EPA, and be listed on the product
inserts and packaging. In contrast, "inert" ingredients
need not be listed on the product inserts and packaging
and are subject to much less testing than the "active" ingredients;

"inerts" are generally tested in short-term studies for
acute toxicity only. The word "inert" implies chemicals
that are somehow inactive.

In actuality, many "inert" ingredients used in pesticides
are as toxic, or more toxic, than the registered "active"
ingredients. For example, naphthalene, one of the "inerts"
in an imidacloprid product, showed clear evidence of
cancer activity through inhalation (nasal cancers), as
well as anemia, liver damage, cataracts, and skin
allergies.

An unidentified "inert" ingredient in the flea product Advantage was
implicated in the death of kittens who
received doses within laboratory tolerances. Why don't
pesticide manufacturers have to disclose all the ingredients
in their products?

This kettle began brewing in 1949, when the U.S.
Congress passed the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide,
and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), fllowing manufacturers
confidentiality on issues they claimed would otherwise
make them vulnerable to market competition.

"Inert" ingredients, in other words, became protected
by industry as "trade secrets." While protecting industry,
this act supersedes the public's right to know to what we
are being exposed and the health hazards resulting from
these exposures. And without full disclosure, we are
unable to make educated decisions as to which
chemicals we want to avoid.

Laboratory studies Obviously, products undergo testing
in order to qualify for EPA registration, and presumably,
most of the overt dangers a product can exert are
ameliorated before the product can be marketed.

Scientists use healthy, adult, genetically identical
mammals to test pesticides, and then extrapolate
health information regarding the safety of the product
to domestic animals and human beings.

In the case of flea products, the laboratory tests are performed on
live mice, rats, cats, and dogs. These
toxicological (poison) studies are performed to establish
the LD 50 - the oral dose at which the product would kill
50 percent of a test population - and to determine the acute
and chronic effects. Throughout and following the test,
subjects are killed in order to study the specific system
damage (lungs, kidney, etc.).

Acute disease tests, such as nervous system and skin
reactions, can be performed over a relatively short time
period. Most studies are conducted for 3-, 13-, or 52-
week intervals, and use exaggerated dosages to
compensate for the short testing periods.

"Because of the short period under which the studies
are conducted, the health effects resulting from the
higher doses of the chemicals are relevant," says Dr.
Virginia Dobozy of the EPA's Pesticide Division.

These effects can include head-nodding; facial twitching;
exaggerated blinking; gag responses; weight increase of
the spleen, thymus, and adrenal glands; and/or atrophy
of the thymus. Long-term studies, needed to understand
the chronic effects of the pesticides, are few by comparison.

Chronic disease such as cancer, immune suppression, developmental or
reproductive damage, and DNA
damage can take months or years to manifest.

However, the cumulative effect - potential damage
from continued use of one specific pesticide product
or multiple products over a dog's lifetime - is unknown.
Also unknown is the potential for synergistic effects -
combined impacts of chemical exposures from their
home and outdoor environments. Neither the cumulative
nor the synergistic effects of chemicals in products are
required to be tested by the EPA before a product is
made commercially available

So, our dogs may be more vulnerable to unknown
chemical-related dangers than the happy commercials
would have you believe. Critics of the pesticide industry
claim that the EPA registers pesticides not on safety,
but on a cost-benefit basis, balancing health and
environmental concerns against the economic gain to
the manufacturer and the end user of the product.

But even if the pesticide manufacturers and the EPA
are not overly concerned about our safety, we as consumers
and guardians should be very concerned.

Too good to be true

Today, spot-on flea preparations are considered by
many as the Rolls Royce of flea products, and sell
swiftly in veterinary clinics and pet stores. Each of
the makers of these products claim that they are safe -
safer than ever - and that only the targeted insects
will be affected by the products' neu-Advantage
Bayer Corporation, Shawness Mission, KS (800)
255-6826 or nofleas.com

Active ingred: 9.1% imidacloprid Inert ingred: 90.9% (not
disclosed) (MSDS indicate inerts include some solvents)
Adams Spot-on Flea & Tick Control Farnam Pet Products,
Phoenix, AZ (602) 285-1660 or farnam.com Active ingred:
45.0% permethrin Inert ingred: 55.0% (not disclosed)
BioSpot Flea & Tick Control Farnam Pet Products, Phoenix,
AZ (602) 285-1660 or farnam.com

Active ingred: 45.0% permethrin 5.0% pyriproxyfen Inert
ingred: 50.0% (not disclosed) Defend EXspot Treatment
Schering-Plough Animal Health, Union, NJ (800) 842-3532
or www.sgp.com/main.html Active ingred: 65.0% permethrin
Inert ingred: 35.0% (not disclosed)

Spot-On Pesticides and Their Ingredients Frontline Top Spot
Merial Limited, Iselin, NJ (800) 660-1842 or frontline.com
Active ingred: 9.7% fipronil Inert ingred: 90.3% (not disclosed)
(MSDS indicates inerts include ethanol 7.7%, polyvinlpyrrolidone
6.9%, butylhydroxytoluene 0.3%, butlyhydroxanisole 0.3%, and
carbitol [diethylene glycol monoethyl ether]) (Note: Frontline
Plus is essentially the same as Frontline Top Spot, but with the
addition of 8.8% methoprene, an IGR.) Zodiac FleaTrol Spot On
Wellmark International, Schaumburg, IL (800) 950-4783 or
zodiacpet.com Active ingred: 45.0% permethrin 3.0% methoprene
(IGR) Inert ingred: 52.0% (not disclosed) 20 | FEBRUARY 2002
Copyright� 2002, Belvoir Publications, Inc. TO SUBSCRIBE,
CALL (800) 829-9165 rotoxic impacts.

The products are frequently advertised as safe for small children
and adults as well as puppies (over eight weeks) and geriatric dogs.
Do they sound too good to be true? Well, perhaps they are.

The spot-on flea products fall into four general categories of
insecticides. All have neurotoxic effects. The first three -
imidacloprid (a chloro-nicotinyl insecticide), fipronil (a
phenylprazole insecticide), and permethrin (a synthetic broad
spectrum pyrethroid insecticide) - all work by disrupting the
nervous system of insects, killing by contact or ingestion.

The fourth type contains insect growth regulators (IGR), which
don't kill, but interrupt the flea's life cycle. Imidacloprid
is the first of its class of insecticides, and is relatively
new on the block; it was introduced in 1994. Laboratory testing
on mice, dogs, and rats, indicates that this insecticide can be
neurotoxic to laboratory animals, causing incoordination, labored
breathing, thyroid lesions, reduced birth weights, and increased
frequency of birth defects.

Fipronil was introduced in the United States in 1996. It is a
neurotoxin and suspected human carcinogen. Fipronil can cause
liver toxicity, thyroid lesions (cancer), damage to the kidneys,
increased cholesterol levels, alterations in thyroid hormones,
incoordination, labored breathing, increased miscarriages, and
smaller offspring.

Fipronil Imidacloprid Methoprene Permethrin
Pyriproxyfen Ethanol Butylhydroxanisole Butyldydroxytoluene
Carbitol Polyvinlpyrrolidone
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Inert
Inert
Inert
Inert
Inert
Carcinogen
Organ damage
Neurotoxin
(nervous system
damage)
Teratogen
(reproductive damage)
Skin problems
Carcinogen
Organ damage
Neurotoxin
Teratogen
Organ damage
Neurotoxin
Carcinogen
Organ damage
Neurotoxin
Teratogen
Autoimmune
Teratogen
Teratogen
Carcinogen
Carcinogen
Neurotoxin
Organ damage
Carcinogen
Thyroid cancer (possible human carcinogen)

Increased organ weights, altered thyroid hormones Loss of appetite,
underactivity, convulsions, whining, barking, crying (vocalization),
body twitches/tremors, overactivity, salivation, stiffened limbs,
unsteady gait, incoordination, labored breathing Reduced fertility,
decreased litter size and body weights in litters, fetus mortality
Severe moist inflammation, ulcerations, skin sloughing, chemical
burn, itching, hair loss at and beyond the application site Yet to
be determined; evidence of thyroid lesions in dogs Liver, kidney,
thyroid, heart, lungs, spleen, adrenal, brain, gonads; liver toxicity,
increased organ weights, thyroid lesions, increased cholesterol
levels in dogs Incoordination and labored breathing, muscle weakness
including muscles necessary for breathing Increased miscarriages and
smaller offspring Liver enlargement Headaches, eye and throat
irritation, difficulty breathing, confusion, dizziness and nausea in
humans Liver and lung tumors (possible human carcinogen) Kidney
enlargement, changes in lung Tremors, incoordination, elevated body
temperature, increased aggressive behavior, learning disruption
Fertility is affected Bone marrow changes in laboratory animals
Reduced weight gain, toxicity to pups Adverse effects on fetus

Animal carcinogen (possible human carcinogen)

Headache, depression, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal and
lumbar pain Pathological lesions in brain, lungs, liver menni;
possibility of pulmonary edema, intravascular hemolysis and bone
marrow depression Not evaluated by EPA for carcinogenic

INGREDIENT TYPE AFFECTED SYSTEM LABORATORY
ANIMAL HEALTH EFFECTS Adverse Effects of Ingredients
Found in Spot-On Products Sources of the above information
include reports from the Environmental Protection Agency;
Occupational Safety & Health Administration, US Dept. of
Labor; Extoxnet: Extension Toxicology Network; Journal
of Pesticide Reform, Material Safety Data Sheets, Pesticide
Action Network North America, and more.

TO SUBSCRIBE: www.whole-dog-journal.com Copyright� 2002, Belvoir
Publications, Inc. THE WHOLE DOG JOURNAL | 21

In the next issue, we will present a complete indoor and outdoor
IPM treatment program for effective, non-poisonous flea control.

From The Annals Of Human And Animal Behavior Forensic Sciences
ResearchLaboratory

Subject: Advantix and Mood Change

Date: Mon, Nov 28 2005 10:42 am

HOWEDY brian.lange,

b*.@gmail.com wrote:
> We have a 7 month old golden retreiver pup and when we
> give him his monthly Advantix for flea and tick, for a good
> 24 hours, his mood completely changes ... wants to be by
> himself, hides under tables, chairs, etc.

WELCOME to the world of veterinary approved poisons.

> Basically, he becomes a completely different "person."

Naaah? The EXXXPERTS tell us that's GOOD for dogs.

> Has anyone else had similar experiences?

Yeah. Most of the DOG LOVERS here got DEATHLY ILL
and DEAD DOGS on accHOWENT of their mishandling
and inapupriate veterinary malpractices.

Have you had your dog surgically sexually mutilated yet?

Better hurry. Oh, bye the bye, ONLY LIARS DOG ABUSERS
COWARDS and ACTIVE ACUTE CHRONIC LONG TERM
INCURABLE MENTAL CASES post here abHOWETS.

> Thanks.

You're welcome!

Subject: Re: Canadavets.com

HOWEDY tom,

Tom wrote:
> Is anyone familiar with this site? I just ordered Frontline plus from
> there. Prices are good, and I do realize the product is manufactured for
> Australia, but I presume that it's the same medicine (different label) as I
> would pay twice as much for here.

Do you BELIEVE frontline or ANY systemic POISON is SAFE?

WOULD YOU BET YOUR OWN LIFE ON IT?

>From The_Insanely_Freakin_Simply_Amazing_Grand_ Puppy_
Child_Pussy_Birdy_And_Horsey_Wizard

Subject: Bichon Skin Problems

HOWEDY michael,

Michael Bulatovich wrote:
> Thanks for the reply. The thing on his ribs *feels* fatty.

Yeah. Perhaps you MISSED The Insanely Freakin Simply
Amazing Grand Puppy Wizard's REPLY. OR perhaps you
didn't think HE was responding to YOUR post when HE
replied to the other simpleton?

> I've been looking into the allergy explanation,

That so? CuriHOWES AIN'T IT HOWE COME you
OVERLOOKED The Insanely Freakin Simply Amazing
Grand Puppy Wizard's REPLY seein as it COVERED
ALL THEM ISSUES, michael?

> but have yet to approach the vet about it.

You mean your veterinary MALPRACTICIONER, michael.

> Last time we brought up a symptom, it cost a thousand in fees,

Naaaah? THOWESANDS??? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???

> they shrugged their shoulders in the end,

Naaaaah? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???

> and suggested more tests.

Naaaaah? DO TELL???

> The condition cleared up on its own and our
> current thinking is that it was a vaccine reaction.

Oh? YOU MEAN LIKE HOWE The Insanely Simply Freakin
Simply Amazing Grand Puppy Wizard TOLD YOU???

BEWEEEAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHAAA!!!

> We haven't vaccinated him as often, and it hasn't come back.

Naaah? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???

> (They were playing with the idea it was Lupus!)

Naaaaah??? DO TELL???

Hey michael? Does your vet GOT TESTS FOR THAT???

BWEEEEAAAAHAHAHAHHAHAAAAA!!!

> We are giving him "Advantage multi 20" by
> Bayer for fleas/heartworm/nematodes.

Oh? And can you BUY THAT from YOUR VETERINARY MALPRACTICIONER?

> It's his second year on that.

Naaah? DO TELL???

> Did your dog outgrow the allergies?

Advantage Flea product: how safe or how toxic is it?

* Here is a testimonial from a distraught cat owner
"Used Advantage on my cat and shes sick"

* Mary Ann lost her beloved bearded collie 'Kaimen' as a
result of using Advantage Flea Drops. "Advantage flea drops were
recomended by my veteranarian to control Kaimens flea problems.

The drops were placed on the back of his head in the nape of the
neck. After using Advantage for 13 months a growth the size of a
golf ball emerged in that very same spot where the Advantage flea
drop were placed.

The growth was made of a grey colored flesh with a putrid odor.

A purulent putrid liquid oozed out of it. Kaimen was taking to the
vet, where I learned more about the growth and just how deadly
Advantage is to our pets. The pesticide that is used in Advantage
is called lmidacloprid and should NOT be absorbed through the skin.

I learned that dogs and rats who were used to test this pesticide
developped thyroid cancer and it affected their appetite. My dog
Kaimen died at the age of two as a resuslt of using Advantage
which caused a tumerous cancer to develop in his neck and which
metastasized in his brain. I sent Bayer, the maker of Advantage, a
letter with a return receipt but they never bothered to reply to my
letter."

Subject: Advantix and Mood Change

From: Animal Behavior Forensic Sciences Research Laboratory

HOWEDY sharon aka sharon too, veterinary malpractice
office manager, mrs. veterinary malpracticioner, liar,
dog abuser, coward, animal murderin FRAUD mental case,

Sharon wrote:
> > I tried this with Maui, my 14 pound poodle and
> > he had a bad reaction to it so I have 3 of the 4
> > vials left.

BWEEEEEAHAHAHAHAHAHAAA!!!

> > I can't return them to the vet

Didn't she BUY the POISON from her veterinary malpracticioner?

> > so I was hoping someone might want to buy them from me.

It made her dog SICK. Doesn't THAT tell you sumpthin?

> > If anyone uses this brand and size and is
> > interested in getting a good deal on some,

It POISONS dogs.

> > please email me or post here.

You'd have to be INSANE to do THAT to your own dog.

> > They are brand new, not expired and purchased
> > within the month. They are still in the original
> > but opened box. Thanks.

> First things first.

You think she should hire a lawyer?

> Call Bayer.

Did you MISSPELL LAWYER?

> The phone number should be on the package.

Look up state board of veterinary medical EXXXAMINERS and
ASK THEM HOWE COME their licensed vet POISONED her dog.

> If you bought the product through the vet, Bayer may
> reimburse you. The reaction may be from the product
> being dosed in one spot versus several.

THAT'S INSANE. And it's a LIE.

> But in any event, call the manufacturer.

Wouldn't your office GUARANTEE the products THEY SELL???

> -Sharon

From: Sharon
Date: Sun, Apr 30 2006 11:03 pm
Email: "Sharon" <askformya...@nospamhotmail.com>

I think it's best to think of garlic as it relates to fleas
like sprinkling sage around the edges of a kitchen to keep
ants out. The ants are still there - alive - procreating,
just like the fleas will be. Further, fleas can cause issues
with the humans in the house. It's better to ask your vet
about a product that will kill all stages of the fleas' life
cycle.

-Sharon

From: showdogbark -
Date: Sun, Apr 30 2006

Garlic is not to be used in large does in the mixture I mentioned,
the other things that are offensive to fleas is the Engevta Yeast
and the Flake yeast, some people find just using the two yeasts
enough of a flea deterrent. Powdered garlic is much easier to use
in about one teaspoon to two cups of the yeast mixture. It does
not take much and that is not logical that there is a temptation
to use more as it is not addicting, and as I mentioned it is not
the garlic alone that works it is the mixture of the yeasts along
with it.

The smell of the yeasts is not appealing to fleas. Another
method that works for many people is to take a teaspoon of
the mixture for a severe case and rub it into the dog's fur,
for as I said the fleas do not like the smell, and then after
that feed it to the dog sprinkled on it's food twice a day.

What would a vet know except something that would be
self serving to sell, yeast and garlic do not line
their pockets.

Show Dog

From: Amy Dahl
Date: Fri, Jul 2 1999 12:00 am
Email: Amy Dahl <a...@oakhillkennel.com>

I don't have directly relevant experience, but would like
to suggest the usual--get a second opinion! Especially
before electing surgery.

I once had an experience involving cataracts and a kitten
which woke me up to how block-headed a veterinary specialist
can be (of course, you have to take my word for something the
vet. ophthalmologist did not).

I had adopted two "rescued" kittens that were found at the
age of about 1 day and raised on a foster mother. They had
various health problems, did not thrive, etc. Everything
kind of went together--they were poor, so even with up-to-date
flea treatments couldn't fight off the fleas, so they were
anemic, stayed poor, etc. When it became clear that loving
care, good food, and flea treatments weren't enough I took
them to my vet (who is very good). They were four months
old and about as big as the average 5-6 week kitten.

My vet treated them with several things, of which I remember
Ivomec for ear mites and feline Program (which had just come
out), tested and vaccinated for feline AIDS, which I had
never heard of.

The next morning, the male kitten was blind! The pupils of
his eyes were milky blue--completely clouded by cataracts.
I just happened to have an appointment to CERF a bitch, so
I took the kitten along. The vet. ophthalmologist told me,
"he's got congenital cataracts." Well, I know what congenital
means. I had already explained to her that his eyes had been
fine before taking him to the vet the previous day. She
didn't say, you're wrong, you didn't notice. She didn't
acknowledge the discrepancy between my observation and her
statement. She just repeated "they're congenital cataracts.
He's been this way since birth." She informed me about the
surgery and the cost--$1600 per eye at that time.

Twilight Zone theme here. I don't know about the rest of you,
but when face with this level of adamant assertion, I question
what I know. I was sure he'd been able to jump and climb, that
the bumping into things and crying was new that morning. When
I got home I called my vet to verify that the cat had been able
to see the previous day.

Because my vet had a couple of emergencies that day (Friday)
I didn't have the kitten put down. Lo and behold, by Monday
his pupils seemed to respond to light and he wasn't bumping
into things any more! The cloudiness gradually faded away
to nothing (to my unpracticed eye).

Then the next month I treated him with Program again and the
cataracts came back--not as severe, but this time they left
him with permanent cloudiness in one eye. My vet called her
ophthalmology professor from vet school and he mentioned the
possibility of "toxic cataracts," certainly not recorded as
a consequence of Program, but some medical treatments
(antibiotics, I think) cause cataracts in animals which are
in poor health--and sometimes these cataracts resolve.

I take the moral of this story to be that, just because
you are talking to a veterinary specialist, doesn't mean
they necessarily know what they're talking about.

--
Amy Frost Dahl Retriever Trainin phone: (910) 295-6710
Oak Hill Kennel & Handling email: a...@oakhillkennel.com
Pinehurst, NC 28370 (http://www.oakhillkennel.com)

Subject: Warning Revolution Heartworm Med

From: LUVAPOOCH
Date: Sat, Apr 8 2000 3:00 am
Email: luvapo...@aol.com (LUVAPOOCH)

Kelly Cruzan On 3/15/00 wrote:

I asked my Vet for a Heartworm preventive for my 2 year
old Australian Shepherd, Sage. They recommended Revolution.
It was applied on 3/15/00. On 3/20/00 Sage developed a cough,
but she was otherwise fine.

She had had a bath at the Vet on 3/15/00 also, so I decided
to watch her for further symptoms. On 3/23/00 she was fine
until late afternoon when she became quiet and didn't want
to play.

By 7pm that night, she had trouble opening her left eye and
whimpered when she jumped down from the couch or bed. In
the past, Sage always had a tendency to bruise easily.

She had sensitive skin and worry an area until it bruised.
She had no trouble with her blood clotting and had been
previously spayed.

She now had bruising on her body. When I took her to the
Vet, he asked if she had been in rat poison. I informed
him that she was an inside dog and only went out to play
with the kids and to use the bathroom. My neighbors have
pets and do not put out poisons. They also asked if she
had had a blow to the head because there was blood in the
whites of her eyes that was not there yesterday.

I stated that she was not hit in the head. I asked if it
could be the Revolution and was informed that it could not
be. I told my vet that was the only thing that Sage had
been exposed to.

He did a CBC and her platelets were 87 and WBC count was
27,000. her Hct was 37. He treated her for infection and
rat poisoning and sent us home.

Within 3 hours she was falling over. I rushed her back
to the Vet and he kept her until 5pm that afternoon. I
brought her home after they said she was doing better.

At 6pm she was again falling over and I called my Vet back
and was informed to bring her back the next day. By 11pm,
she was bleeding from her nose and had vomited with streaks
of bright red blood. My husband and I drove her to an ER
clinic in Savannah, GA and was told that it was either a tick
born disease or rat poisoning or a blow to the head.

I again asked if could be the Revolution and was informed no.

They kept her and treated her as my vet. When I called at
6am, I was informed that she was having seizures but she was
otherwise stable. I was worried about a subdural hematoma
and talked with my Vet.

He suggested I take Sage to Charleston, SC to see a Specialist.
She arrived there at 4:30pm. When I gave her history, I again
asked if it could be the Revolution and was informed no. Later
that night Sage continued to have seizures and she bled into the
orbits of her eyes, but they said their was still hope.

At 6:45am they called and said Sage had arrested and
was on a ventilator. We asked that they let her go.
This has been devastating to my family.

We loved that dog. She was a family member. At 10am, the
clinic called and asked for an autopsy. They informed me
that another dog had died last month there, with symptoms
the same as Sage. The dog was an inside dog and the only
thing different was that the owner had started Revolution.

The dog died of low platelets and intracrannial
hemorrhage just like Sage.

The vet in Charleston called the Revolution people and
they are paying for Sages autopsy. They also paid for
the other dogs autopsy. That autopsy showed low platelets
and intracrannial hemorrhage from a toxin. (? Revolution
was the only toxin the owners had given).

I will not know the results of the autopsy for a month,
but I believe it was the Revolution. If 2 dogs have died
in the Savannah-Charleston area in the last month, how
many nation wide.

Please spread the word for owners to be careful about
using this drug on their dogs. No dog should suffer
like my Sage suffered.

Thanks for Listening,
Terri Eddy
Rincon, GA

HOWEDY jst,

jst wrote:
> Sharon wrote:
> > What are you doing for flea prevention?

Allergies are a result of compromised auto-immune
system. Auto-immune systems are COMPROMISED by STRESS,
insufficient diet, and TOXINS. ALL commercial dog food
is GARBAGE.

sharon is a veterinary malpractice office manager and
mrs. veterinary malpracticioner and proven lyin dog
abusing punk thug coward active acute chronic long
term incurable mental case.

She SELLS toxins and prescription garbage diets for her
livin when she ain't SELLIN MUTILATIONS and MURDERIN dogs
and comfortin their owners while acceptin their payments.
Shell fleece you as fast as her own veterinary malpractice
customers..

> Frontline,

HOWEDY Nell71,

> Nell71 wrote:
> Re: Broken Heart Needs Answers/Help
> My dog has died

From: Nell71
Date: Sat, Mar 4 2006 10:03 pm
Email: Nell71 <Nell71.246...@dogbanter.com>

My dog has died and I was hoping if I give you the details that you
could shed some light on what could have happened to her. The vet
didn't know and we couldn't face an autopsy. We have talk to a few
professionals who deny Frontline could have been the prbolem.

At 5pm on Monday night, Frontline Plus was applied as per
instructions.
By about 6.30-7pm she was showing signs of disorientation, looking
vague (I would call her and she stared blankly at me), fatigue,
panting
heavily, a little drool, excessive thirst. No vomiting but a 'hack' a
couple
of times. No diarrheoa. No bleeding that we could see.

We phoned 24 hour local vet who said it couldn't be the Frontline so
she would be ok.

We watched her over night, but by morning still very thirsty,
fatigued,
vague. Called our vet who said if she was still the same later that
day
to bring her in.

My partner was finally able to get off work to check on her at 4pm
that
day on the Tuesday.

Temperatures outside were 38c and he found her sitting by the pool
gate
(we always left the doors open so she could have stayed inside in the
cool), panting heavily, glassy eyed, drooling, a little foamy in
corners of mouth, tongue blueish under and white on top, gums
whiteish.
He got her into the car, by the time he reached the vet 5 minutes away
she was limp. The vet gave her 2 adrenalin shots and got her heart
going again but she died.

If it is any help with diagnosing, she has always been a little
'simple'. We lovingly said she was our down syndrome dog as she hung
her head to the left from birth with her tongue hanging out the left
side of her mouth. She was always a little left sided when walking
etc.

She would run and get the ball and drop it straight away then run to
you with nothing. She would growl when you hugged her and we have
never
hurt her for her to be aggressive. We have been told maybe she had a
neurological disorder, does it sound like it to you?

We have Rhubarb in our pool area but don't think she ate any although
this is toxic.

We get poisoned dead rats in the pool area (from other people, we
don't
use snail pellets or rat poison ourselves) and found one there the day
after but it wasn't undisturbed, could a 'lick' have killed her?)
Frankly we blame ourselves as it seems too coincidental for it to be
anything but the Frontline Plus.

What do you think the symptoms show?

Any past experiences, thoughts are appreciated,
Thanks in advance

--
Nell71

That's too bad Nell71. The Freakin Simply Amazing
Puppy Wizard will PREY for him <{): ~ ( >

> and I was hoping if I give you the details that you could
> shed some light on what could have happened to her.

Could be. The DOG LOVERS you're askin here abHOWETS got
very long posted case histories of hurtin intimidatin an
murderin innocent defenseless dumb critters through
TRADITIONAL abuse mishandling and veterinary care and
malpractice <{): ~ ( >

DECENT PEOPLE DO NOT POST HERE abHOWETS <{) : ~ ( >

---------

> we live in the city but have a LOT of rabbits and
> squirrels in the area and they carry fleas like crazy.

"Crazy"? You want CRAZY? The only people who've replied
to you thus far are INSANE LYIN DOG ABUSING COWARDS with
very long verifiable posted case histories of THE SAME
PROBEM your dog got with NO CURE or solutions.

HOWEDY sharon aka sharon too veterinary malpractice office
manager and mrs. veterinary malpracticioner,

Sharon wrote:
> > Advantix is good, but it is HIGHLY toxic to cats! Even
> > if you dog lays down and leaves a small amount (if its
> > still wet) and the cat licks it,it can kill the cat. If
> > the cat grooms the dog even after if dry it will kill
> > the cat.
> That's not completely true.

Sez you sharon too? You've got a very long posted
case history of hurtin intimdiatin mutilatin and
murderin innocent defenseless dumb critters an lyin
abHOWET it <{): ~ ( >

> Should it be applied to the cat? No.

Perhaps is shouldn't be applied to dogs either?

> It takes no more than 12 hours to absorb into the skin.
> Separate the pets if it concerns you. But I can tell you
> that we've had no issues at our practice and the folks at
> both Merial (Frontline) and Bayer (Advantix) repeatedly
> mention that if it were the case, these preventives would
> never be on the market.

You think the SALES REP is gonna tell you the truth?
Perhaps you just fell HOWETA a cabbage truck an landed
on your head?

> As with any product or medication, directions must be
> followed and application to 4 spots is a must. It absorbs
> quickly this way.

You'll find PLENTY of alternatives to TOXINS in Dr. Pitcairn's
books on Natural Pet Care. HOWEver, HOWER DOG LOVERS PREFER to
buy toxins from their TRUSTED veterinary malpracticioners
like we got RIGHT HERE whom The Freakin Simply Amazing Puppy
Wizard has IDENTIFIED EXXXPOSED and DISCREDITED as bein LIARS
DOG ABUSERS FRAUDS and MALPRACTICIONERS <{): ~ ( >

Subject: Warning Revolution Heartworm Med

From: LUVAPOOCH
Date: Sat, Apr 8 2000 3:00 am
Email: luvapo...@aol.com (LUVAPOOCH)

Kelly Cruzan On 3/15/00 wrote:

I asked my Vet for a Heartworm preventive for my 2 year
old Australian Shepherd, Sage. They recommended Revolution.
It was applied on 3/15/00. On 3/20/00 Sage developed a cough,
but she was otherwise fine.

She had had a bath at the Vet on 3/15/00 also, so I decided
to watch her for further symptoms. On 3/23/00 she was fine
until late afternoon when she became quiet and didn't want
to play.

By 7pm that night, she had trouble opening her left eye and
whimpered when she jumped down from the couch or bed. In
the past, Sage always had a tendency to bruise easily.

She had sensitive skin and worry an area until it bruised.
She had no trouble with her blood clotting and had been
previously spayed.

She now had bruising on her body. When I took her to the
Vet, he asked if she had been in rat poison. I informed
him that she was an inside dog and only went out to play
with the kids and to use the bathroom. My neighbors have
pets and do not put out poisons. They also asked if she
had had a blow to the head because there was blood in the
whites of her eyes that was not there yesterday.

I stated that she was not hit in the head. I asked if it
could be the Revolution and was informed that it could not
be. I told my vet that was the only thing that Sage had
been exposed to.

He did a CBC and her platelets were 87 and WBC count was
27,000. her Hct was 37. He treated her for infection and
rat poisoning and sent us home.

Within 3 hours she was falling over. I rushed her back
to the Vet and he kept her until 5pm that afternoon. I
brought her home after they said she was doing better.

At 6pm she was again falling over and I called my Vet back
and was informed to bring her back the next day. By 11pm,
she was bleeding from her nose and had vomited with streaks
of bright red blood. My husband and I drove her to an ER
clinic in Savannah, GA and was told that it was either a tick
born disease or rat poisoning or a blow to the head.

I again asked if could be the Revolution and was informed no.

They kept her and treated her as my vet. When I called at
6am, I was informed that she was having seizures but she was
otherwise stable. I was worried about a subdural hematoma
and talked with my Vet.

He suggested I take Sage to Charleston, SC to see a Specialist.
She arrived there at 4:30pm. When I gave her history, I again
asked if it could be the Revolution and was informed no. Later
that night Sage continued to have seizures and she bled into the
orbits of her eyes, but they said their was still hope.

At 6:45am they called and said Sage had arrested and
was on a ventilator. We asked that they let her go.
This has been devastating to my family.

We loved that dog. She was a family member. At 10am, the
clinic called and asked for an autopsy. They informed me
that another dog had died last month there, with symptoms
the same as Sage. The dog was an inside dog and the only
thing different was that the owner had started Revolution.

The dog died of low platelets and intracrannial
hemorrhage just like Sage.

The vet in Charleston called the Revolution people and
they are paying for Sages autopsy. They also paid for
the other dogs autopsy. That autopsy showed low platelets
and intracrannial hemorrhage from a toxin. (? Revolution
was the only toxin the owners had given).

I will not know the results of the autopsy for a month,
but I believe it was the Revolution. If 2 dogs have died
in the Savannah-Charleston area in the last month, how
many nation wide.

Please spread the word for owners to be careful about
using this drug on their dogs. No dog should suffer
like my Sage suffered.

Thanks for Listening,
Terri Eddy
Rincon, GA

* A friend used Advantage on his dog who got sick from it.
He stopped using it and the dog recovered.

Reply Posted: on 2005-10-19

I have been going thru the same kind of problem with my Yorkie.
He is also on the Advantage flea protection. I am beginning to
wonder if this is a reaction to that medication.

If anyone else has this type of problem I would like to know.
I have been feeding him a hypo-allergenic type of dog food
with venison and potato as the main ingredients and just got
a capsul from my vet to put on the food for dry skin.

Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

Reply Posted: on 2005-10-19

that is interesting that you are wondering if it has anything
to do with the advantage. the last time i bought advantage, i
purchased the one for dogs 20-50 pounds. i know it is the same
formula but i always wondered if it was too much for their little
bodies since they only weigh about 20-25 pounds. it was after that
when i noticed the dogs itching excessively.

Flea Control - Cats

Just a little warning for all you cat owners out there. I work
at a veterinary clinic and have done so for the past 15 years.

We had a cat come in last week that had a severe reaction to
Advantage-Multi being applied wrong by the owner. It is very
important to apply the medication at the base of the skull.

Not between the shoulder blades like other flea control products
like Revolution. Because the owners applied the Advantage at a
lower point the cat was able to turn around and lick the area and
Advantage Multi is not meant to be orally consumed.

The cat presented to the clinic with the following clinical signs:
fever, tachycardia, unable to walk and vomiting. We placed the cat
on IV fluids, started some medications and general nursing care and
the cat made a full recovery but if the owners had not noticed what
was happening with their pet they may have lost her.

Program - side effects?

Q: I have a 12 year old (18 lbs. Schnauzer) and a 3 year old (75 lbs.
collie) - The collie is presently on heartworm medication and
hypothyroid medication (2 pills daily - .05mm each)- the collie is
prone to seizures approximately every 8-9 weeks, we believe from the
hypothyroidism.

Will putting the collie on The Program flea control pill monthly
cause any reaction or side effects with the other medications the
dog is on? Would it be safe?

And the 12 year old is on no medications but on a special diet due
to fatty stones just surgically removed.

I want my animals safe and I don't like giving them medications
unless absolutely necessary. Frontline flea control was expensive
and did not work for my animals last flea season. Topical treatments
are just not enough and I am suspicious that some of the flea bombs
and dips that I have used in the past may have been toxic enough to
have caused these seizures in my collie.

The seizures have only been noticable since January of this year.

Thank you for your time.

Please respond. RJ in Pennsylvania

A: RJ - There is no evidence that I am aware of that Program (Rx)
will induce or facilitate seizures. It should be safe to use in
this situation and does not interact with the medications listed.

It is always hard to figure out what is causing seizures and many
times it is impossible to do so.

That leaves a lot of room for guessing at causes. It is probably
unlikely that previous insecticide use is the cause of the seizures
but it is probably possible. Hypothyroidism has been implicated
as a cause of seizures but it is probably not a common cause, either.

Supplementation of thyroid hormone should reduce the incidence
of seizures if hypothyroidism is the underlying cause.

Advantage - skin reaction possible

Q: We have a 7 month old golden who has dermatitis on the back of
the neck. The area affected is about 6" diameter. We are treating
with Cephalexin antibiotic and Gentocin topical spray.

My question regards the source of the infection. This location
matches the position where we apply Advantage flea control
(Imadacloprid).

I have been unable to find information regarding side affects of
this flea control. Can it act as a skin irritant that would lead
to infection? Would you discontinue this flea control?

A: Tom- I have seen some anecdotal reports of reactions to Advantage
(Rx) at the site it is put on. While this is a relatively minor
problem
as reactions to medications go there is still no reason to use it if
it
causes problems.

It is possible to use Frontline (Rx) or Program (Rx) as alternatives
for flea control. I would not give up on flea control entirely over
a reaction to one medication.

Mike Richards, DVM

The topical version (vs. the spray version) of Frontline (Rx) has
been more successful on long haired breeds such as collies, for us.
If Program does not control the fleas you might consider trying this -
or using both Program and Frontline or Advantage (Rx).

I hope that the seizures do diminish as time goes on.

Mike Richards, DVM

Gave her a dose of Revolution, hoping to prevent mange, and she went
into a shaking fit and wouldn't get up for hours. (Anyone want to buy
some Revolution cheap? I have 5 vials left.).

2 months ago, I ran out of the Revolution, and had a few extra
Advantage vials left over that I hadn't used yet, the date was
still good, and since a full month had passed, I saw no reason
why I couldn't apply the Advantage to the sheepies.

Annabelle had no reaction, but Jack lost a patch of hair the size
of a 3 inch circle in diameter, and the area turned red and raw.
I assume it was a reaction to the Advantage, it healed quickly
and the hair has grown back. I won't try that again though.

Rolling Eyes

=============

Here sharon aka sharon too *(veterinary office manager,
mrs. veterinary malpracticioner, animal murderin FRAUD
COWARD and MENTAL CASE) SNIPPED the part where Robin
REPORTED CURING her 12 year old dog's SEPARATION
anXXXIHOWESNESS and told her not to talk abHOWET her
100% CONSISTENTLY NEARLY INSTANT SUCCESS here on The
Freakin Simply Amazing Puppy Wizard's 100% CONSISTENTLY
NEARLY INSTANTLY SUCCESSFUL FREE WWW Wits' End Dog
Training Method Manual Forums.

LIKE THIS:

From: lolajo...@webtv.net (lolajo...@webtv.net)
Subject: Re: My greyhound becoming bully of dogpark,help?
Date: 2004-01-07 01:15:04 PST

> From: requestaddyfi...@nospam.com (Sharon too)
> "If that don't work, check out some training books or look up
> the "Puppy Wizard" for suggestions on controlling this."
> Uh... since this was a response to my response I feel the need
> to clarify my position. In no way would I recommend anyone pay
> attention to Puppy Wizard.
> -Sharon

What is wrong with "The Puppy Wizard"?

I know his posts are a little wacky but his sound distraction
technique has worked very well for me. After using traditional
training with mixed results, I was able to stop my dog from
jumping up, eating poop, begging from the table and
excessive barking using his methods.

Lolajoker.

---------------------

AND LIKE THIS:

From: Sharon too
Date: Tues, Jun 14 2005 3:52 pm
Email: "Sharon too" <requestmyaddyfi...@nospam.com>

> Sharon, if you feel you were trying to be helpful in the
> post you sent me, you are delusional. You are not nice
> (revealed by your own post), certainly not helpful, and
> when the time comes where I want your advice, you'll be
> the first to know.

The Puppy Wizard feeds on paranoia. When he starts calling
you a dog abuser for asking a simple question, maybe you'll
understand where we're ALL coming from.

But for know, you've earned yourself that coveted
spot in my killfile with PW.

Have at it.

sharon too, mrs. veterinary malpracticioner, veterinary
malpractice office manager, liar, dog abuser, coward,
active acute chronic long term incurable mental case

---------------

AND THEN sharon DONE IT AGAIN.

LIKE THIS:

From: Sharon too
Date: Mon, Jun 13 2005 6:23 pm
Email: "Sharon too" <requestmyaddyfi...@nospam.com>

>> This is obviously a request for a two person conversation.

<snipped>

>> Your private discussion with him here will benefit no one.
> Who are you to judge the group benefit of the content of
> my posts, or to dictate if I may post it, to Jerry or
> anyone else?

Read the group. Google archives. By all means, if you are
seeking a professional opinion from this person you had
better check resources and references. Since he has tried
hundreds of times, if not more, over the years to insert
himself and his claims here at rec.pets.dogs.health, that
should be reference enough. Still want to follow his
convoluted advice?

Your risk.

As for judging the group, I was merely trying to give
you advice which was to take your questions to private
e-mail snce your request would get you nothing but
headaches from people who are constantly killfiling
Jerry, his new IDs and sockpuppets.

-Sharon

-----------

Robin REPORTED she CURED her 12 year old
dog's FEAR OF THUNDER and SEPARATION
anXXXIHOWESNESS NEARLY INSANTLY.

DOGS DIE FROM THAT, sharon aka sharon too,
veterinary malpractice office manager, mrs.
veterinary malpracticioner, liar, animal
murderin coward, active acute chronic long
term incurable mental case <{} ; ~ ) >

LIKE THIS DOG NEARLY DONE, sharon too:

"Sharon" <askformya...@nospamhotmail.com>
wrote in message news:129umcv96eaev77@corp.supernews.com...

> At my wit's end, I found Jerry Howe's information on the
> Internet, contacted him and read his manual. At this point she is not
> cured, but by making a fuss over an inanimate object when I leave, I
> can see progress in the area of separation anxiety. I am using his
> manual to work on other aspects of her behavior. I just want to say
> thanks so much to Jerry for his manual, .....

Let me be the first:

<PLONK>

Fall in line, folks.

sharon
--------------------

O.K., permit The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin Insanely Simply
Amazing Grand Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy And Horsey Wizard
start by IDENTIFYING EXXXPOSING and DISCREDITING you
and the rest of these pathetic miserable stinkin lyin animal
murderin MENTAL CASES and PROFESSIONAL dog trainin
an veterinary MALPRACTICIONER FRAUDS an SCAM ARTISTS.

Subject: My dog has flees

From: ThePuppyProphet
Date: Mon, Oct 3 2005 5:02 am

HOWEDY Prophet,

Prophet wrote:
> What should i do?

1st, You should go to The Amazing Puppy Wizard's Archives
on Google and other fine pubicly archived news group
search engines and type in the correct SPELLIN and
see what The Amazing Puppy Wizard SEZ HE DOES to live
in a flea and other parasite free environment.

2nd, DO NOT believe the professional lying dog abusing
punk thug coward mental cases who SELL training lessons
and promote unethickal veterinary practices like toxic
substances and surgical sexual mutilation which may harm
your dogs and family.

3rd, if you DON'T FIND a definive authentic Amazing
Puppy Wizard's Post then ASK HIM HOWE to accomplish
whatever your needs are.

4th, DECENT PEOPLE DO NOT POST HERE so if you see
someWON giving you contradictory information, KNOW that
they're a miserable lying dog abusing punk thug coward and
DISREGARD them.

Better yet, tell them to get the heel HOWETA The Amazing Puppy
Wizard's 100% CONSISTENTLY NEARLY INSTANTLY SUCCESSFUL
FREE WWW Wits' End Dog Training Method Manual Forums.

Here's your own FREE COPY of The Amazing Puppy Wizard's' 100%
CONSISTENTLY NEARLY INSTANTLY SUCCESSFUL FREE WWW
Wits' End Dog Training Method Manual:

Here's your own FREE COPY of The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin
Insanely Simply Amazing Grand Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy And
Horsey Wizard's

The *666* Edition Of Your Own
FREE COPY
Of
The Sincerely Incredibly Freakin Insanely Simply Amazing
GRAND
Puppy, Child, Pussy, Birdy And Horsey Wizard's
100% CONSISTENTLY NEARLY INSTANTLY SUCCESSFUL
FREE WWW
Wits' End Dog, Child, Kat And Horsey Training Method Manual <{)
;~ ) >

<{#}: ~ } >8< { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > http://makeashorterlink.com/?K3AD21A3D < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } >8< { ~ :{@}>

Please study my manual using a text to speech reader.
There's a free one at http://www.ultrahal.com

If you need any additional free help call me
ANY TIME at 407-425-5092.

Here's The Amazing Puppy Wizard's most recent post
on non toxic flea CON-TROLL methods and treatments:

Subject: Re: Excerpt: Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to Natural Health
for Dogs & Cats

HOWEDY Jane,

Thank you for the valuable information. Dr.Pitcairn's
works are EXXXCELLENT, to say the least. In addition
to her fleating (Ouch!) tips, I recommend insect growth
regulators (IGR's) and beneficial nematodes.

For daily grooming / inspection I always have a "Q-Tip"
soaked in alcohol to quickly swab them up off the dog
and dunk it back into a small bottle of alocohol to
dispatch them.

Of curse, cleanlieness is next to G-dlieness!

Thank you again,

Yours,
The Amazing Puppy Wizard <{); ~ ) >

Jane Smith wrote:
> The following is an excerpt from the book Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to
> Natural Health for Dogs & Cats by Richard H. Pitcairn, DVM, PhD, and Susan
> Hubble Pitcairn Published by Rodale; September 2005;$18.95US/$25.95CAN;
> 1-57954-973-X Copyright � 2005 Richard H. Pitcairn, DVM, PhD, and Susan
> Hubble Pitcairn

> Safe, Effective Flea Control

> The best approach to controlling fleas is to start with the least toxic and
> most natural choices, resorting to stronger measures only if reasonable
> control is not achieved. As a prerequisite to any flea-control program, I
> recommend building up your animal's health and resistance as much as
> possible through a healthy diet and lifestyle. Along with that, it's
> important to practice thorough sanitation and cleaning.

> Understanding the life cycle of the flea makes it clear why cleaning is so
> important. Adult fleas live about three to four months. During that time
> they are steadily laying tiny white eggs on your pet that look like dandruff
> or salt crystals. Flea eggs hatch out into larvae that live in the cracks
> and crevices of rugs, upholstery, blankets, floors, sand, earth, and the
> like.

> Because these tiny larvae cannot jump or travel very far (less than an
> inch), they feed on the black specks of dried blood ("flea dirt") that fall
> off along with the eggs during grooming and scratching. After one to two
> weeks, the larvae go through a cocoon stage (pupa). A week or two later,
> they hatch out as small fleas that hop onto the nearest warm body passing by
> (usually your pet -- sometimes you!), bite it for a meal of blood, and then
> start the whole process all over again. This cycle takes anywhere from 2 to
> 20 weeks, depending on the temperature of the house or environment. During
> summer -- flea season -- the entire cycle is usually just 2 weeks long.
> That's why fleas increase so rapidly at that time.

> The bad news is that, no matter how many adult fleas you manage to kill,
> numerous future fleas are developing in the environment simultaneously. The
> good news is that these eggs, larvae, pupa, and the flea dirt they feed upon
> can be sucked up by a vacuum cleaner or washed away in the laundry. And
> because the developing fleas are so immobile, they are most concentrated
> wherever your pet sleeps, so you know where to focus your efforts.

> Your important ally in the battle against fleas is cleanliness, both for
> your pet and your home, particularly in your pet's sleeping areas. Regular
> cleaning interrupts the life cycles of the fleas and greatly cuts down on
> the number of adult fleas that end up on your pet, especially if you act
> before flea season begins. So start your program with these nontoxic steps.
> Steam clean your carpets at the onset of flea season (or whenever you begin
> your flea-control program). Though it is somewhat expensive, steam cleaning
> is effective in killing flea eggs.

> Thoroughly vacuum and clean floors and furniture at least once a week to
> pick up flea eggs, larvae, and pupae. Concentrate on areas where your pet
> sleeps and use an attachment to reach into crevices and corners and under
> heavy furniture. If there is a heavy infestation, you may want to put a flea
> collar (or part of a flea collar) in the vacuum bag to kill any adult fleas
> that get sucked up and might crawl away. Or else immediately dispose of the
> bag or its contents because it can provide a warm, moist, food-filled
> environment for developing eggs and larvae. Mop vinyl floors.
> Launder your pet's bedding in hot, soapy water at least once a week. Dry on
> maximum heat. Heat will kill all stages of flea life, including the eggs.
> Remember that flea eggs are very slippery and easily fall off bedding or
> blankets. So carefully roll bedclothes up to keep all the flea eggs
> contained on the way to the washing machine.

> Bathe the animal with a natural flea-control shampoo. Use a nontoxic shampoo
> as recommended above, such as one containing d-limonene (dogs only).
> Use a flea comb to trap and kill fleas that are on your pet. Most pet stores
> carry special fine-toothed combs that trap fleas for easy disposal. Make a
> regular habit of flea-combing your pet while you watch TV or talk on the
> phone. Depending on the degree of infestation and the time of year, this
> might be daily (at the onset of the flea season), weekly, or monthly.

> Gently but thoroughly comb as many areas as your pet will allow, especially
> around the head, neck, back, and hindquarters. As you trap the little
> buggers, pull them off the comb and plunge them into a container of hot,
> soapy water (or dip the comb and pull the flea off underwater). Cover your
> lap with an old towel to catch extra clumps of hair and flea dirt and to
> wipe the comb off as you work.

> When you're finished, flush the soapy water and fleas down the toilet.
> If your pet goes outdoors, follow these steps as well.

> Mow and water your lawn regularly. Short grass allows sunlight to penetrate
> and warm the soil, which kills larvae. Watering drowns the developing fleas.
> Encourage ants. Perhaps I should say "do not discourage ants." They love to
> eat flea eggs and larvae. This is another reason not to use pesticides that
> kill all the insects in your yard.

> "Sterilize" bare-earth sleeping spots. If your pet likes to sleep or hang
> out in a certain bare or sandy area, occasionally cover the spot with a
> heavy black plastic sheet on a hot, sunny day. Rake up any dead leaves and
> other debris first. The heat that builds up under the plastic does an
> excellent job of killing fleas and larvae. Of course, this is not
> appropriate to use where you want to preserve live grass or plants.

> Apply agricultural lime on grassy or moist areas. This helps to dry out the
> fleas. Rake up any dead leaves and grassy debris first.

> Along with the above steps, you might try these methods to repel fleas that
> may try to jump back on your pet, especially those harder-to-kill ones
> hanging out in the backyard.

> Use an herbal flea powder. You'll find them in pet stores and natural food
> stores, or you can make your own. Combine one part each of as many of these
> powdered herbs as you can find: eucalyptus, rosemary, fennel, yellow dock,
> wormwood, and rue. Put this mixture in a shaker-top jar, such as a jar for
> parsley flakes.

> Apply the flea powder sparingly to your pet's coat by brushing backward with
> your hand or the comb and sprinkling it into the base of the hairs,
> especially on the neck, back, and belly. To combat severe infestations, use
> several times a week. Afterward, put your animal friend outside for awhile
> so the disgruntled tenants vacate in the yard and not in your house. Some
> herbal flea powders also contain natural pyrethrins, which are not strong
> flea-killers but do seem to greatly discourage them.

> Use an herbal flea collar. These are impregnated with insect-repellent
> herbal oils. Some are made to be "recharged" with the oils and used again.
> Buy them at natural food stores.

> Try a natural skin tonic. The animal herbalist Juliette de Bairacli-Levy
> recommends this lemon skin tonic, which many of my clients successfully use
> on their pets for a general skin toner, parasite repellent, and treatment
> for mange.

> Thinly slice a whole lemon, including the peel. Add it to 1 pint of
> near-boiling water and let it steep overnight. The next day, sponge the
> solution onto the animal's skin and let it dry. You can use this daily for
> severe skin problems involving fleas. It is a source of natural flea-killing
> substances such as d-limonene and other healing ingredients found in the
> whole lemon.

> Add ample nutritional or brewer's yeast and garlic to the diet. Some studies
> show yeast supplementation significantly reduces flea numbers, though others
> indicate no effect. My experience with using yeast is that it has some
> favorable effect, particularly if the animal's health is good. You can also
> rub it directly into the animal's hair. Many people also praise the value of
> garlic as a flea repellent, though so far studies do not support this.
> If these methods do not control the fleas sufficiently, take the following
> steps.

> Get your carpets treated with a special anti-flea mineral salt. There have
> been some developments in safe flea control. My clients report success with
> a service that applies or sells relatively nontoxic mineral salts for
> treating carpets. (Fleabusters is the company recommended.) Effective for up
> to a year, the products safely kill fleas and their developing forms over a
> few week's time.

> Once or twice a year, sprinkle natural, unrefined diatomaceous earth along
> walls, under furniture, and in cracks and crevices that you cannot access
> with a vacuum. This product, which resembles chalky rock, is really the
> fossilized remains of one-celled algae. Though direct skin contact is
> harmless to pets and people, it is bad news for many insects and their
> larvae, including fleas. The fine particles in the earth kill insects by
> attacking the waxy coating that covers their external skeletons. The insects
> then dry out and die.

> I do not recommend using diatomaceous earth frequently or directly on your
> animal -- mostly because of the irritating dust that can be breathed in by
> both of you. It is also messy. Be careful about breathing it in. Wear a dust
> mask when applying. It is not toxic, but inhaling even the natural,
> unrefined form of this dust can irritate the nasal passages.

> Important: Do not use the type of diatomaceous earth that is sold for
> swimming pool filters. It has been very finely ground, and the tiny
> particles can be breathed into the lungs and cause chronic inflammation.
> Use a spray or powder containing pyrethrins or natural pyrethrum. These are
> the least toxic of all the insecticides used on pets, and they are found in
> both conventional and natural flea-control products. For a more lasting
> effect, use a microencapsulated product, which is perhaps labeled "slow
> release." Repeat the applications as you simultaneously use the carpet
> treatment system or diatomaceous earth. This will help kill both adult fleas
> and developing fleas at the same time.

> Reprinted from: Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs &
> Cats by Richard H. Pitcairn, DVM, PhD, and Susan Hubble Pitcairn � 2005
> Richard H. Pitcairn, DVM, PhD, and Susan Hubble Pitcairn Permission granted
> by Rodale, Inc., Emmaus, PA 18098. Available wherever books are sold or
> directly from the publisher by calling (800) 848-4735 or visit their website
> at www.rodalestore.com

> Authors
> Richard H. Pitcairn, DVM, PhD, opened the Animal Natural Health Center, a
> clinic offering only holistic animal care, in 1985. Recently retired from
> practice, he teaches post-graduate courses in homeopathic medicine to
> veterinarians.

> Susan Hubble Pitcairn was a major contributor to the first two editions of
> this book. As the third edition goes to press, she is splitting her time
> between artistic pursuits and the support of positive social change.
> For more information, please visit www.drpitcairn.com

7 From: WalterNY
Date: Thurs, May 4 2000 12:00 am
Email: "WalterNY" <Walte...@email.msn.com>

If you feed your dog a proper diet it will never get fleas. If you can
not do
that here are some natural preventatives. Some things to try are first
when
bathing. After you are done add a few drops of Eucalyptus, Lavender
and
cedar essential oils to 1 to 2 gallons of warm water. Stir it and pour
it over
your dog. Do not rinse. Let the dog dry this way. Fleas hate this
smell, but
it will be nice to you and your dog.

I think someone has already suggested the great flea powder of
diatomaceous
earth. I can one better that, mix a cup of the earth with 1 to 2
tablespoons of the
essential oil of citronella along with 2 to four tablespoons of
eucalyptus oil and
orange (citrus sinenis) or bergamot. You can mix this in a small
sealable container
and use it over a few months as a powder. You will not see fleas near
it.

You can also put a bandana on your dog which you put some eucalyptus
and
cedar on soaking the whole rag. Or you can soak the dogs collar if it
is the
right material. Each week a dip in the solution is necessary. One
thing
to
remember is that none of these things should be done to a pregnant
dog.


As for a general repellent against ticks, fleas, flies, misquitos, if
you
wish you can get a spray bottle. Put some water and some aloe gel in
the
bottle. Add 25 drops of Geranium or palmarosa oil. Add five drops
citronella, 5 drops rosemary or lavender oil, 3 drops of clove oil, 1
table
spoon of bay rum or tincture, and 1 teaspoon of black walnut hull.
Keep the
spray handy and you can spray your dog once or twice a day in the
areas
that
he is susceptible.

Another great combo for a collar is to mix in a bowl 1/4 cup of almond
oil.
That is the base for the essential oils to rest in. Add a few drops of
cedar, lemon, clove, lavender, pennyroyal, geranium, cinnamon, and
basil
essential oils. Soak a rag in this and when your in the woods you'll
find
like I do that you want to be around your dog. In fact I spray this on
myself. It smells good and keeps the little buggers away safely.

REMEMBER DO NOT EVER PUT PENNYROYAL, CEDAR, BASIL,
OR CITRONELLA OIL ON A PREGNANT DOG!!!!!

These oils are available at any healthfood store or chain like wild
oats,
fresh fields, bread and circus etc. I use these formulas with great
success.
Remember watching the misquitos flying around me ready to go near my
arm,
suddenly turn away and disappear.

-----------


Spooner
2007-09-14 09:41:53 EST
my vet rx'd for my pet dog a product called Revolution. it comes in a
tiny tube. you just apply it to the back of the neck between the
shoulder blades. it is only a few drops. and that is it. your dog is
protected for an entire month. I have used it over the summer and my
puppy showed no negative side effects, and he has never had flea or
ticks. I am not in the USA, and I've only heard Floridians mention
Revolution product, so I don't know if it is carried in all parts of the
States. I hope this helps you get your flea problem under control.

Paul J. Dudley wrote:
> Hello,
>
> We have an 11 month old female Pom (Sandy). The poor dog has
> fleas galore. I bathe her every 4 days with Pet Select flea and
> tick shampoo which kills the fleas. Of course they are back
> within days. I use Heartz 2 in 1 powder in between.
>
> A little about Sandys habits. Where we live is rural. Sandy is allowed
> to roam our yard in our company and she loves it. We also have a
> cat that pretty much lives outside and trying to control her fleas
> is just about impossible ( therefore she stays out ). She will
> play with Sandy at times. As for the cleanliness of our living
> quarters, we keep it clean and vacuum constantly to hopefully
> suck up fleas that might be in the carpet. So as you see, eliminating
> all sources of flea contact is impossible. And I do not want to
> have to bomb the house. I hate the idea of fumigation.
>
> My question is this. Would I fare better with a flea collar ?
> We've tried Frontline drops ( the stuff you apply from the top
> of the head across the back to the tail ). It seemed to work
> but the dog grew greasy as heck over the ensuing days.
>
> What are the Pro's and Cons of flea collar verses Frontline drops ?
>
> advTHANKSance
>
> Paul
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