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Puppy Wizzard
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~shady Angel~
2006-05-23 03:18:26 EST
Hey I have put some of your methods into action as I was at my witts end
when cujo changed to "manhood" that all our training went out the window,
and is now very aggressive toward other dogs and cant be socialised. I'm not
looking for a flame war as I do not have the energy. My boyfriend is in
hospital getting his jaw reconstructed after surgery to remove a cancer lump
in it and have had little time to spend with my mate after work. So I am
asking for help and are there any good PB movies out there I'm working at a
video shop and can get any movie I desire.
Much thanks in advance,
--
~shady angel~



H*@HotMail.Com
2006-05-23 22:25:56 EST
HOWEDY ~shady angel~

~shady angel~ wrote:
> Hey I have put some of your methods into action as I was at my witts end
> when cujo changed to "manhood" that all our training went out the window,
> and is now very aggressive toward other dogs and cant be socialised. I'm not
> looking for a flame war as I do not have the energy. My boyfriend is in
> hospital getting his jaw reconstructed after surgery to remove a cancer lump
> in it and have had little time to spend with my mate after work. So I am
> asking for help and are there any good PB movies out there I'm working at a
> video shop and can get any movie I desire.
> Much thanks in advance,
> --
> ~shady angel~

http://www.tinyurl.com/7bl5u

Study the manual and follow it PRECISELY.

From: der...@alpha1.csd.uwm.edu (Marshall Dermer)
Date: 1999/12/21
Subject: Re: Doc Dermer's offer

In article <tfR74.1$W64....@typhoon3.tampabay.rr.com> "Jerry Howe"

<*.@cfl.rr.com> writes:
> Lemme aks you sumthin, doc? When you punish your dog,
> do you find that he masturbates more frequently after
> such instances? (referring to your post about your dog
> using a pillow to get himself off)

First, I punish behavior, not dogs.

Second, I rarely issue corrections.

Third, as time goes on my dog uses the pillow less frequently.

I would say he uses it about once a month. Finally, I'm not
really concerned about my dog's masturbating; I don't find
such dog behavior offensive. Eating dog poop, for me, is
another story. And the rate of that behavior has also
diminished with time. :-)

--Marshall

> They are also full right now which means
> they can't except anymore dogs

That's probably good, because EXXXCEPT for
STRAY and HARDSHIP cases THEY GOT NO DAMED
BUSINESS disadvantaging dogs of their homes
when all it takes is a FEW MINUTES to LEARN
HOWE to pupperly handle raise and train ANY
critter, including children:

<{#}: ~ } > http://www.tinyurl.com/7bl5u < { ~ :{@}>


From: der...@alpha1.csd.uwm.edu (Marshall Dermer)
Date: 1999/07/14
Subject: Re: Puppy adolescence

In article <378CB7A8.757C6...@earthlink.net>

j*.@earthlink.net
writes:

> Myth or fact?

> Our beagle pup has always had her share of attitude
> (c'mon, it called "spunky," mom), but I seem to be
> getting more than my fair share of blank stares these
> days. For example, she's across the room, I tell her
> to come, she stis there, tilts her head and stares at
> me. I can almost hear her little doggie brain thinking
> "wonder what'll happen if I ignore that???"

> Do all dogs have random periods of disobedience or is
> this the doggie-adolescence I've heard about (she's
> 10.5 months)? How long might it last? What's the best
> way to handle it -- do I clamp down a little or just
> wait it out?
>thanks,
>-jill

My dog almost always comes when called. I would assume
that this is because coming is often consequated with
some form of reinforcement like food, petting, the
opportunity to play a game, etc.

But there are some times when he does not come.

These are infrequent. What do I do? I say, "bad dog"
and the moment he starts coming I say "good dog."

Why is "bad dog" effective?

When my dog was a puppy and he did not obey a command,
that was in his repertoire, I would say "bad dog" and
pick him up by the back of his neck and deliver a brief,
"harsh," lecture.

I would assume that in the process, I established "bad
dog" as a powerful conditioned punisher. I also did the
"bad dog" harsh lecture routine, when he would eat his
poop which he seemed to do quite often.

My dog, a Havanese, is quite a "softy" so I quickly
discovered that not much of a "lecture" was needed
to establish "bad dog" as a conditioned punisher.

I should also note that I said "bad dog" in various
ways, including near whispers. The net result is that
"bad dog" functions as a conditioned punisher even
when whispered.

So, if my dog just "sits there" when I say "Max come"
and then I whisper "bad dog," the vocalization in
principle punishes the ongoing behavior and so the dog
is disposed to do something else and that something else
is almost always following the previously issued command.

(You really don't want to issue the same command multiple
times without some consequences for failing to comply, for
then your dog will initially ignore your commands!)

I am NOT a dog trainer. I am a behavioral psychologist
(Associate Professor) who has loved dogs all my life.

I write this because it is likely that Jerry Howe, who
apparently opposes all forms of punishment, will post
a follow-up to this post.

His follow-up will likely not directly answer your
question but instead refer you to his poorly written
training manual or his magic black box that putatively
cures nearly every canine problem.

His follow up, unfortunately is also likely to personally
attack me. You are free, of course, to form your own
opinions and follow Jerry's advice.

I want you to know that although I have used punishment,
infrequentely and in limited ways, my dog is strongly
bonded to me. He follows me everywhere, he sleeps with
me, he cuddles at night with me, and he loves to perch
himself on my legs, much like a cat, when I'm reading a
book or talking to folks with my feet outstretched.

I don't see where the limited use of punishment has
harmed him in any general way. Perhaps, the limited
punishment I have used together with all the postive
reinforcement I have provided for "coming" and "going
down" in the context of drills, in all sorts of settings,
and under all sorts of circumstances, will someday save
his precious life.

I hope this post is helpful (also see below). Diane
Blackman, Avrama Gingold, Paulette Nolan, Ludwig Smith,
Lynne K. and others regularly post great advice here.

Individually we sometimes make mistakes, but collectively
I think we offer a variety of viable approaches limited
mainly by our inability to be with you and your pooch at
your home.

Best wishes,

Marshall

From: <>
To: "Jerry Howe" <jho...@bellsouth.net>
Sent: Saturday, December 28, 2002 5:21 PM
Subject: Re: Damned Family Leadership Exercise -

Re: Am I expecting to much

Hi Jerry,

When I talked to you on the phone to order to machine
for daughter's new pup, I told you that I had an older
Chessie. I rescued him at 9 years old and have had
him for 3 years.

It's funny, but I thought I'd try some of your book
training with him. Where I used to say "come" and
then say "good boy" when he obeyed, I have reversed
it with a "good boy" first.

It really does work.

He was very confused at first, wondering what he
had done to get the praise.

But it really gets the attention and distracts him from
whatever he may have going through his brain when
he hears it.

Dogs are funny, but people are too. Can't wait to get
the Doggy do Right, etc.

Thanks,

N

=========


From: "Ray" <mikeflemi...@hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Sep 2001 19:41:46 GMT
Subject: re: Jerry Howe

Jerry, I will say this. You catch alot of flak in
this newsgroup and I've been peeping in here for 4
months since I got my Mastiff. I don't know you or
pretend to know you but the things that I've tried
that you've suggested HAS worked.

I've had dogs in the past that I bribed with food
and even spanked with a newspaper and honestly,
that didn't work.

The pack exercise worked, and getting my dog to
come to me is no problem after I used your exercise.

All of this WITHOUT food treats.

Even the "non-physical" praise was foreign to me, but
I see why it's a good idea. I can honestly tell that
this dog is more in tune with me and what I want him
to do and how our relationship should work.

Just wanted to say Thanks, and I may need your help
on a few more issues as they arise, like the border
training.

AND LIKE THIS:

b*.@gmail.com wrote:
> Well I am happy to reply that so far after 10
> minutes of work and the cans from mr Howes guide,

You mean The Amazing Puppy Wizard's FREE WWW Wits'
End Dog Training Method Manual <{); ~ ) >

> I have instilled the "come" command to Riley.

Good. You mean INSTALLED the come command as
a conditional reflex. Be SHORE to perform the
EXXXORCISES four times in each of four locations.

> He is an extremley smart dog, I have never had
> to go to the third or fourth try.

AND LIKE THIS:


Hi, Jerry.

I'm not sure that I'm a 100% convert, or that I agree
with (or even understand) 100% of what you say in this
manual ... BUT ... we had "come" down pat in a few
reps and you could have knocked me down when I tried
the exercise with "drop" and, after a few reps in
different spots Darwin practically *threw* the rubber
ball at my feet on command. He's still not perfect
(just a pup, after all, and he's stubborn enough to
want to push and test me a little bit more).

For what it's worth, I can see (as no doubt you have)
how your usenet manner is likely to rankle a few
folks, but that woman who advocates ear pulling and
beating with sticks deserves everything she gets. Even
if that was the only method that would work, I'd live
with my dog not fetching rather than do any of that.
(Darwin fetches enthusiastically and instinctively,
tho').

Best, ben

-------------

From: Paul B (NOSPAMpaulbou...@clear.net.nz)
Subject: Re: Dog eats poo!
Date: 2000-12-05 00:40:48 PST

I used sound distraction to stop my 2 dogs eating cow poo
during walkies. I posted here a while ago explaining how I
managed to control them from eating it but there were a lot
of sceptics. If your interested I'll be glad to tell you
what worked for me, just let me know and I'll post a thread
on this NG.

Paul
--------

From: Paul B
Date: Sat, Oct 21 2000 2:18 am
Email: "Paul B" <NOSPAMpaulbou...@clear.net.nz>

The sound distraction and praise method he uses is VERY effective,
I use those techniques on my dogs and the results are great. From
teaching a dog to recall to preventing unwanted behaviours (shit
eating, eating the cats food, growling when taking a bone from a
dog, jumping up, even escaping from the property, any behaviour).

To say sound distraction and praise methods don't work is pure
ignorance.

I can understand you not liking Jerry and being pissed off with
the posts he submits but please keep things in context and don't
slam a technique just because you can't stand the person suggesting
using it.

Paul.

------------

Subject: to Jerry Howe
From: MArtog
Date: Wed, Jan 17 2001 12:51 pm
Email: MArtog <mar...@my-deja.com>

Just wanted to say thanks. The method you told me to stop
my dog from eating my other Labs sh-t in the backyard has
worked well.

She has also improved greatly when off leash out in the woods.
She still sniffs (of course), but I rarely need to stop her
from anything else.

I've always been diligent about watching her, and cleaning
up the yard, but ya just can't be there every second. And
she is quick! So, thanks again for the advice.

I feel more confident now when I turn my back.

And to all you folks going yea, sure, right.

THIS IS NOT A TROLL POST. HE gave me advice.

It worked. Plain and simple. Nothing more, nothing less.

So Jerry, allthough I don't lurk here, I'm sure
you're still putting up with DogButt and his ilk.

So good keep up the good work!

Off course DogButt will read this, even thoe it doesn't
have his name on it. Cause he thinks he owns the group.

So to you DogButt.........Well,,,,never mind.

You're already a loser. I don't need to tell you that.

Please feel free to correct my spelling/grammer, etc.
Yes, goodbye, good riddance, blah blah blah.

Later.....
MArtog Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2003 9:06 AM

--------
From: AIMEE (countrygirl0...@yahoo.com)
Subject: House training and such...
Date: 2003-10-08 16:18:56 PST

I've been having a problem with my dog, Axel,
relieving himself in the house while I'm away
from home.

I've used TPW method's, and yesterday I was out
for 12 hours, and Axel didn't have one single "accident".

Today, I had hoped that the results would be just as
good - and they were (I was out for 11 hours).

The problem began when, as a puppy, Axel would
relieve himself in the house and I would point
at the mess and tell him "NO" or "Bad Dog".

That made him afraid to relieve himself in the
house or infront of me.

After I got TPW's training manual, I corrected my
mishandling of these instances.

When I came home to an "accident", I would simply
drop a can near the area and ask Axel "What's that?"
Then I would clean it up - with out showing him I was
the least bit upset about the mess, and when he looked
at the spot I would tell him "Good boy, you're a good dog".

This has been an ongoing problem, and thanks to the
Puppy Wizard, we've finally got it taken care of...

Also, Axel LOVES the cat's litter box...He enjoys the
"snacks" he can find in there...I followed TPW's methods
by alternating sounds and praising him while or before
he sticks his nose in it, and today, he's been going into
the room with the cat box and barking. That's because
he's thinking about getting into the box, but he knows he
shouldn't.

Thank you, Jerry, for all you help.

You've been a blessing to all of us.

AIMEE

===================

From: Paul
Date: Wed, Dec 6 2000 12:00 am
Email: "Paul B" <NOSPAMpaulbou...@clear.net.nz>

I'm not exactly sure why Jerry is saying to ignore me, it's his
advice that I found was the most successful. During walks in a
particular park the dogs would come across fresh cow pats and
munch away happily.

To stop this I'd set them up, I'd find a nice fresh cow turd and
stand next to it, when the dogs came over and saw it they would
start to munch, at the onset of this I'd chuck a throw chain near
the dog to distract it and praise straight away, the reason for
the praise is the dog stops eating as soon as it hears the distraction
so I'm praising that behaviour, the not eating.

I'd set them up again and repeat, but make the sound come from
a different direction, maybe the first time chuck the chain to
the right of the dog, the next time to the left, then behind etc,
it's the randomness that is effective and always sincerely praise
immediately.

Now when I walk through the park they leave the turds alone,
they aren't interested in them anymore due to the distraction
training. Don't let the dog know that you made the sound, the
sound just "occurs" this is important as it removes "you" out
of the problem.

Paul

-=--=-=-=-=--

Hello.

I never posted here (or anywhere) before.
I never trained or owned a dog before this
year.

I downloaded the Wit's End, read it, corresponded
with Mr. Howe and trained my dog to come and to
stop barking in a weekend.

Our dog, Jake, had been treated with kindness the
whole time we had him, about 10 months, but his
earlier life is unknown.

I worked on the hot-cold exercise for about 30
minutes when he suddenly "got it". After that
he came to me every time with no hesitation.

I used the cans filled with pennies to teach him
not to bark. If he now starts to bark, I go to the
door or window, say "Good Boy, its' alright" and
he usually calms down right away.

A couple of times I had to get the cans
out again to reinforce the behavior.

We feel a strong bond with this animal
and he is very eager to accept our love.

So with all the vitriolic spewing going on,
I have to believe Mr. Howe is right.

His method worked for us.

I don't know if it would have been quite
as effective if we had tried another method first.

Florence

-=-==--=-==--=---=


Everything Jerry does is positive reinforcement. In fact, a
lot of it is completely counter-intuitive (eg, praise the dog
even when he's doing the WRONG thing)... but for some bizarre
reason, it works.... His methods *don't* quite match up with
what Cesar does... but... I figure, if you're willing to give
it a try, the *worst* that could happen would be the dog gets
a lot of extra praise and there's no effect whatsoever :-).

The way Jerry's training works, *any* problem is sorted out
after four iterations of extinguishing the behaviour. He says
*anybody* can do it, *every* time, because if a method doesn't
work 100% of the time, for everybody, it's not a good method.

Here's *my* quick summary of it all....

Basically, Jerry's method is based on a foundation of:

a) Focusing the dog's attention on you (the Hot and Cold exercise)

b) Establishing yourself as pack leader (the Family Pack Leadership
exercise) - Note that he does this by dominating *mentally*, never
by dominating *physically* (no alph rolls, no leash corrections)

c) Praising EVERYTHING the dog does - desired or undesired !!!

This is the weird part !! because you are praising the dog
for *thinking* and *deciding* (even if he decided something
you didn't want him to do). This part is so counter-intuitive,
that a lot of people just won't even try this method of training,
because they "know" it couldn't possibly work.

You *never* show the dog displeasure, raise your tone, emphasize
a word strongly, sigh in disgust, *nothing* negative (a hard
habit for a human being to break), EVER. Everything is completely
calm and matter of fact.

All the dog ever hears is what a good dog he is, and you're
*telling* him what a great dog he is, even when he's doing
the behaviour you DON'T want him to do (!). As I said, this
makes so little sense to human beings that a lot of people
won't even *try* this method of training a dog.

d) You *never* put *any* pressure on, or pull on, the dog's
collar. the lead is *always* kept loose. NO corrections are
done by pulling on the collar (a hard habit for a human being
to break).

e) Every behaviour can be created, or extinguished, with only
four repetitions of the training session (another wildly counter-
intuitive concept).

f) Interrupting and eliminating bad behaviours from the dog's
repertoire is done by using sound distractions to condition
the dog *not* to do certain things (or, rather TO do certain
OTHER things)....

Part (f), the sound distraction part, always consists of an
unvarying sequence of saying the exact same thing, four times
in a row (the only new thing being the insertion of the command
keyword <sit, down, come, whatever>) into the sequence, and with
no tonal emphasis on the words at all... and you say all four
sequences in a row, as if they were one long monotone word...
Two of the verbal iterations are accompanied by a sound <pennies
rattling in a can> and two aren't. It's the timing of the sound
to come at the same time as the keyword, that is critical...

Iteration 1: Doggy-<keyword>-good-boy. (and he may have NO clue
what "<keyword>" means)... immediately followed by: Iteration 2:
Doggy-<keyword> <shake can with pennies on the word "<keyword>"> -
good-boy.... immediately followed by: Iteration 3: Doggy-<keyword>-
good-boy.... immediately followed by:Iteration 4: <toss can with
pennies so that *just* as you say the <keyword>, the can hits the
ground, somewhere on the far side of the dog>: Doggy-<keyword> <can
lands as you say the word "<keyword>"> - good-boy.

So, it's really: Take a deep reath: Doggy-keyword-good-boy-
Doggy-[keyword/NEARBY-SOUND]-good-boy-Doggy-keyword-good-boy-
Doggyy-[keyword/FAR-SOUND]-good-boy,

The important part is that the sound has to come from two different
locations, and it has to occur precisely when the keyword is said.

I, personally, have the most trouble with timing the toss
so that the far-away can lands precisely on the keyword.

Jerry explains how to communicate to the dog what "<keyword>"
means, with your own actions. Initially, the behaviours are
based on the dog's motion (coming, going), and the foundation
that was established in the first two exercises, and then he
focuses on extinguishing undesirable behaviours (barking,
jumping, aggression, slamming against fences, bolting through
doors). Establishing desired behaviours like "sit" and "heel"
takes up a lot of the third file.

I'm warning you right up front that Jerry's method seems
COMPLETELY counter-intuitive. Not just counter-intuitive,
it seems completely stupid, impossible, unlikely, ridiculous,
and even *uncomfortable* (for you, the human being) to do.

You reward the dog when he hasn't seemed to do *anything* yet.
(boy, do you feel stupid! "This can't work!" ... but it does.)

You reward the dog when he's very pointedly doing something you
DON'T want.... (keep that smile on your face, in your tone, and
in your body language! very difficult! "Why am I rewarding him
when he's disobeying or being bad?" Jerry explains why !! )

It's the weirdest thing in the world, and yet it seems to work anyway.

I know you don't have tons of time, and it is, of course better
to read the original author's version than a summary! But, here's
a quick summary of the exercises I'm hoping you'll think are worth
trying...

The "Hot and Cold" exercise:
- Done in four different sessions on the first day.
- Takes about 2-3 minutes. You praise the dog every time he
comes towards you, or even looks at you, even out of the corner
of his eyes. Very shortly, he's hovering close to you and keeping
at least one eye on you. Now he's paying attention.

The "Pack Family Leadership" exericise:
- Done in four different sessions on the first day. The first
session takes about 15 minutes the first time, the second session
that day takes about 12 minutes, 8 minutes for the third session,
6 minutes for the fourth session. You do it in a 60' x 60' foot
square (you'll be using a 20' x 20' section, the rest is for the
dog's 20 foot leash to play out, if he wants to roam).

Ideally each of the four sessions is done in four different physical
locations. Do this weekly for the first month, then monthly as a
"tune up" thereafter. What you do is, preferably the entire family
(although it can be done by just one person) marches very slowly
(one step per second) around the square, stopping at the corners,
talking only to each other, never pulling the dog along with them,
never looking at the dog. If he comes, or looks at the group, he
gets praised. If he looks away, or walks away, he hears nothing.

That's it!

Pretty soon, he's hovering around his "pack", seeking attention.

Now you have the foundation to build on.

You build on the "Pack Family Leadership" exercise, to get a come/
recall, by adding in the four iterations plus sound distractions,
as per Jerry's instructions.

After that, any undesired behaviour is interrupted with brief
variably alternating sound distractions INSTANTLY followed by
prolonged NON PHYSICAL praise (if it takes as many as four),
and praise in advance as per his instructions, and any new
desired behaviour is taught using the four iterations plus
sound distractions, as per Jerry's instructions.

He specifically addresses dogs who bark too much/fling themselves
at windows/throw themselves at the door/etc. and bolting out the
front door, dogs who throw themselves against fences, people-
aggressive dogs, etc., and more.

Well, hope that didn't drown you with information....

Anyway, I hope you get a chance to read through it, and are
willing to give it a try. It takes less time than correcting
the dog over and over for the rest of his life, and it's more
fun all the way around for everybody.

Thanks,
-Lauren

Wits' End Dog Training Method Manual

<{#}: ~ } >8< { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > http://www.tinyurl.com/7bl5u < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } > < { ~ :{@}>
<{#}: ~ } >8< { ~ :{@}>

Punishment ALWAYS Deranges Behavior.
"NO!" Does NOT Have Any Behavioral Function
EXCEPT
To DERANGE Behaviors.

Here's professor "SCRUFF SHAKE and SCREAM NO! into ITS face for
five seconds and lock IT in a box for ten minutes contemplation"
dermer of the Department of ANAL-ytic Behavior at UofWI, pryor:

From: Marshall Dermer (der...@alpha1.csd.uwm.edu)
Subject: Re: Jerry's Dog Training Manual
Date: 2001-07-12 06:49:13 PST

And how do we know this aspect of his
advice is right?

Jerry is not God and his manual is not the Bible.
His advice could be subject to an empirical analysis.

(Also, it is best to killfile posts from the
few regulars here who are either ill-tempered,
ill-mannered, or just plain ill.­),

--Marshall

Marshall Lev Dermer/ Department of Psychology/ University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee/ Milwaukee, WI 53201/ der...@uwm.edu
http://www.uwm.edu/~dermer
"Life is just too serious to be taken entirely seriousyl!"

From: der...@alpha1.csd.uwm.edu (Marshall Dermer) -
Date: 1998/08/28
Subject: Re: Puppy growls and snaps

In article <6s6ea0$8c...@uwm.edu> der...@alpha1.csd.uwm.edu (Marshall

Dermer) writes: In article <35E60819.65178...@pilot.msu.edu>
> >tami sutherland <suthe...@pilot.msu.edu> writes:
>> However, there have been incidences where she has
>> growled and snapped at us...for instance, when we
>> were trying to dry her off after bathtime.
> When your three-month old pooch growls or snaps, IMMEDIATELY
> pick her up ONLY by the skin at the back of her neck, for 5
> sec, and loudly say, "NO!" Alternatively, say "NO!" and hold
> her mouth shut for say 15 sec.
> If she so snaps that you can't do the above then you
> will have to find another way to administer a prompt
> correction, for example, throwing a can filled with
> pennies, or a tug on the collar. --Marshall

"Oops! I would start by only holing her mouth
shut for say 5 sec.

At this point, "No" does not have any behavioral function.
But, if you say "No,"pick up the puppy by its neck and
shake it a bit, and the frequency of the biting decreases
then you will have achieved too things.

First, the frequency of unwanted chewing has decreased;
and two, you have established "No" as a conditioned punisher.

How much neck pulling and shaking? Just the
minimum necessary to decrease the unwanted
biting.

**********IS THAT A CONSISTENT 5 SECONDS?************

When our dog was a puppy, "No" came before mild
forms of punishment (I would hold my dog's mouth
closed for a few seconds.) whereas "Bad Dog" came
before stronger punishement (the kind discussed above).

"No" is usually sufficient but sometimes I use "Bad Dog"
to stop a behavior. "Bad Dog" ALWAYS works," marshall
dermer, research professor of ANAL-ytic behaviorISM at
UofWI. For MOORE animal abuse, please visit dr p.

BWAHAHAHHAHAAAA!!!!!

That's INSANE. Ain't it.

P.S. Contacting Dr. P:

Please note that due to the large number of
requests I receive, I can no longer give free,
personal advice on problems related to dog
training and behavior.

In order for me to give such advice we would
have to "talk" about the problem at length.

That is, I would need detailed information about
the dog, it's environment and routine, the problem,
and the situation in which the problem occurs.

Thus, this type of consultation takes time which
I cannot afford to give away for free.

If you wish such advice, please see the information
I have provided about my K9 Behavioral Consulting
practice. Another alternative to obtaining personal
advice is to participate in e-mail, chat room, &
newsgroup discussions.

P.P.S. BWEEEEEEEAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAA!!!

YOU'RE FRAUDS, drs p. and dermer!

Either DEFEND your LIES, ABUSE And
Degrees or get the heel HOWETA THIS
BUSINESS.

From: "George von Hilsheimer, Ph.D." <drv...@mindspring.com>
To: "Jerry Howe" <theamazingpuppywiz...@mail.com>
Subject: Alleged Professors of Animal Behavior
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2005 12:50:51 -0400

Dear Jerry, I paged through some of the "dog business"
and was astonished at the low quality of opinions arising
from professors of behavior analysis.

I had the very great privilege of meeting Sam Corson
(Pavlov's last Ph.D. student) and his dogs at Ohio
University. I even got to spend a night at Sam's house.

There is no question but that you are a spiritual brother
to Corson and to Pavlov, both of whom knew that the dog's
great capacity for love was the key to shaping doggie behavior.

Paradoxical reward and paradoxical fixing of attention are
both well documented Pavlovian techniques. Even so humorless
a chap as B.F. Skinner taught students like the Breland's whose
"The Misbehavior of Organisms" demonstrate the utility of your
methods and their deep roots in scientific (as opposed to
commercial) psychology.

George von Hilsheimer, Ph.D., F.R.S.H.
you may find my resume in Who's Who in
Science and Technology

Here's professor dermer AFTER gettin JERRYIZED:

"We Are Lucky To Have You, And More People Should
Come To Their Senses And Support Your Valuable Work.
God Bless The Puppy Wizard," Professor Marshall Dermer,
Dept Of ANAL-ytic Behavior, UofWI.

From: "Marshall Dermer" <der...@csd.uwm.edu>
To: "The Puppy Wizard"
<*.@earthlink.net>
Sent: Friday, July 23, 2004 2:53 PM

Subject: God Bless The Puppy Wizard
Dear Mr. Puppy Wizard,

I have, of late, come to recognize your genius
and now must applaud your attempts to save
animals from painful training procedures.

You are indeed a hero, a man of exceptional talent­,
who tirelessly devotes his days to crafting posts ­to
alert the world to animal abuse.

We are lucky to have you, and more people should
come to their senses and support your valuable
work.

Have you thought of establishing a nonprofit
charity to fund your important work?
Have you thought about holding a press conference
so others can learn of your highly worthwhile
and significant work?

In closing, my only suggestion is that you
try to keep your messages short for most
readers may refuse to read a long message
even if it is from the wise, heroic Puppy Wizard.
I wish you well in your endeavors.

--Marshall Dermer

The Simply Amazing Puppy Wizard <{) ; ~ ) >


~shady Angel~
2006-05-24 04:44:18 EST
Human_And_Animal_Behavior_Forensic_Sciences_Research_Laboratory@HotMail.Com
wrote:
> HOWEDY ~shady angel~
>
> ~shady angel~ wrote:
>> Hey I have put some of your methods into action as I was at my witts
>> end when cujo changed to "manhood" that all our training went out
>> the window, and is now very aggressive toward other dogs and cant be
>> socialised. I'm not looking for a flame war as I do not have the
>> energy. My boyfriend is in hospital getting his jaw reconstructed
>> after surgery to remove a cancer lump in it and have had little time
>> to spend with my mate after work. So I am asking for help and are
>> there any good PB movies out there I'm working at a video shop and
>> can get any movie I desire.
>> Much thanks in advance,
>> --
>> ~shady angel~
>
> http://www.tinyurl.com/7bl5u
>
> Study the manual and follow it PRECISELY.
>

Ok i will try again but i'm not bloody thick.
No need of all this wasted bandwidth.!
--
~shady angel~<{) ; ~ ) >



John Oliver
2006-05-24 12:08:10 EST
On Wed, 24 May 2006 20:44:18 +1200, ~shady angel~ wrote:
>> Study the manual and follow it PRECISELY.
>>
>
> Ok i will try again but i'm not bloody thick.
> No need of all this wasted bandwidth.!

Do yourself a favor and ignore the Amazing Drooling Know-Nothing Puppy
Moron.

--
* John Oliver http://www.john-oliver.net/ *
* Reform California gun laws - http://www.reformcagunlaws.com/ *
* http://www.gunownersca.com - http://www.crpa.org/ *
* San Diego shooters come to http://shooting.forsandiego.com/ *

~shady Angel~
2006-05-24 20:16:27 EST
John Oliver wrote:
> On Wed, 24 May 2006 20:44:18 +1200, ~shady angel~ wrote:
>>> Study the manual and follow it PRECISELY.
>>>
>>
>> Ok i will try again but i'm not bloody thick.
>> No need of all this wasted bandwidth.!
>
> Do yourself a favor and ignore the Amazing Drooling Know-Nothing Puppy
> Moron.

I need help and am willing to try anything we'll see if it a go.
--
~shady angel~



John Oliver
2006-05-25 12:07:17 EST
On Thu, 25 May 2006 12:16:27 +1200, ~shady angel~ wrote:
> John Oliver wrote:
>> On Wed, 24 May 2006 20:44:18 +1200, ~shady angel~ wrote:
>>>> Study the manual and follow it PRECISELY.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Ok i will try again but i'm not bloody thick.
>>> No need of all this wasted bandwidth.!
>>
>> Do yourself a favor and ignore the Amazing Drooling Know-Nothing Puppy
>> Moron.
>
> I need help and am willing to try anything we'll see if it a go.

Call a real trainer in your area. Try Craigslist or the Yellow Pages or
the local Humane Society / SPCA. But trying the insane nonsense that
idiot spouts is more likely to hurt than help.

--
* John Oliver http://www.john-oliver.net/ *
* Reform California gun laws - http://www.reformcagunlaws.com/ *
* http://www.gunownersca.com - http://www.crpa.org/ *
* San Diego shooters come to http://shooting.forsandiego.com/ *

~shady Angel~
2006-05-26 05:38:59 EST
John Oliver wrote:
> On Thu, 25 May 2006 12:16:27 +1200, ~shady angel~ wrote:
>> John Oliver wrote:
>>> On Wed, 24 May 2006 20:44:18 +1200, ~shady angel~ wrote:
>>>>> Study the manual and follow it PRECISELY.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Ok i will try again but i'm not bloody thick.
>>>> No need of all this wasted bandwidth.!
>>>
>>> Do yourself a favor and ignore the Amazing Drooling Know-Nothing
>>> Puppy Moron.
>>
>> I need help and am willing to try anything we'll see if it a go.
>
> Call a real trainer in your area. Try Craigslist or the Yellow Pages
> or the local Humane Society / SPCA. But trying the insane nonsense
> that idiot spouts is more likely to hurt than help.

Thanks for your opinion.
--
~shady angel~


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