Dog Discussion: Do Dogs Have A Colour Preference

Do Dogs Have A Colour Preference
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Mieowmieowkittie
2003-10-05 15:21:08 EST
I was just wondering if any knew if their dog has a colour preference with
their toys?

My dog Chip who is a black lab, has 3 Frisbees, one pink, one green and one
blue but he always wants to play with the pink one. My other dog Honey who
is a Shetland Sheepdog likes the green one most. So does anyone know if dogs
like different colours or is it they just like those toys? I just wondered
because im getting them some new bedding and if they like one colour better
then I would get them the one they like the most.


Take care

Paul






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Me And Bobby Mcgee
2003-10-05 18:51:52 EST
My son and I did a science project when he was in 5th grade, which involved
testing our mixed-breed dog to see if he was color blind. We took black and
white photos of different colored construction paper, picked the 2 colors
that looked identical in black & white, and used red and green pieces of
construction paper to cover 2 identical plastic cups. Then we put treats in
the cups where the dog couldn't see it, and held the cups out of the dog's
reach. He had to "pick" the green cup, and he would get the treat if he
picked correctly. We also had a treat in the red cup so he couldn't just go
by smell, alternating left and right hands with the green cup, and we took
turns with the dog. We repeated this over 200 times, and he couldn't tell
the difference in the color of the cups.



Melly
2003-10-05 22:08:11 EST
>...We repeated this over 200 times, and he couldn't tell
> the difference in the color of the cups.

The experiment that the two of you conducted was clever. By
putting treats in both cups and eliminating a learned behavior by
altering which hand the cup was in was a good idea. The results from
your experiment are correct. Dogs are color blind and wouldn't be
able to tell the difference between black and white and bright colors.
They see colors on a grey scale, and use their other senses such as
smell, taste, and hearing.

Culprit
2003-10-06 04:45:59 EST

"Melly" <mlambada13@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1e61c13c.0310051808.142f18b6@posting.google.com...
> >...We repeated this over 200 times, and he couldn't tell
> > the difference in the color of the cups.
>
> The experiment that the two of you conducted was clever. By
> putting treats in both cups and eliminating a learned behavior by
> altering which hand the cup was in was a good idea. The results from
> your experiment are correct. Dogs are color blind and wouldn't be
> able to tell the difference between black and white and bright colors.
> They see colors on a grey scale, and use their other senses such as
> smell, taste, and hearing.

this isn't true. there was a great article about dogs and color posted to
another ng, the link is http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/s953902.htm

so yes, dogs can see color, but i have no idea if they have a preference or
not. i wish i could ask them!

-kelly



Me And Bobby Mcgee
2003-10-06 16:23:51 EST

> so yes, dogs can see color, but i have no idea if they have a preference
or
> not. i wish i could ask them!

Here are some of the newer studies on dogs' vision... it would appear that
they can discern certain colors of the visible spectrum-approximately half
of the ones we can discern. These newer studies also explain why our dog
couldn't tell red and green apart- these colors would appear the same to the
dog.

Link to article: http://www.vetinfo.com/dencyclopedia/devision.html

Pasted article:
__________________
Vision - How dogs see

1) Dogs can see in much dimmer light than humans. This is because the
central portion of a dog's retina is composed primarily of rod cells that
"see" in shades of gray while human central retinas have primarily cone
cells that perceive color. The rods need much less light to function than
cones do.

2) Dogs can detect motion better than humans can.

3) Dogs can see flickering light better than humans. The only significance
to this appears to be that dogs may see television as a series of moving
frames rather than as a continuous scene.

4) Dogs do not have the ability to focus as well on the shape of objects
(their visual acuity is lower). An object a human can see clearly may appear
to be blurred to a dog looking at it from the same distance. A rough
estimate is that dogs have about 20/75 vision. This means that they can see
at 20 feet what a normal human could see clearly at 75 feet.

5) Dogs are said to have dichromatic vision -- they can see only part of the
range of colors in the visual spectrum of light wavelengths. Humans have
trichomatic vision, meaning that they can see the whole sprectrum. Dogs
probably lack the ability to see the range of colors from green to red. This
means that they see in shades of yellow and blue primarily, if the theory is
correct. Since it is impossible to ask them, it is not possible to say that
they see these colors in the same hues that a human would. Whether or not
the ability to see some color is important to dogs or not is hard to say.

A dog with its eyes about 12 inches off the ground certainly sees the world
a different way than a human with eyes about 48 inches off the ground like
many 5th graders.

As humans we tend to think of dog's visual capabilities as inferior to ours.
It is different but it may suit their needs better than possessing accurate
color vision would.


_________________
ANOTHER LINK: http://www.k9web.com/dog-faqs/misc.01.html#l_23416

PASTED ARTICLE:
_________________

Dog Vision
Excerpted from: Vaughan, Dana (Ph.D.), "Canine:Color Vision," Gazette, May
1991:
The article explained the following about "color vision" in dogs/people:

Normal Human Color range includes VIBGYOR (each letter is a color
Violet->Red). The normal ability to see this wide range of color is due to
the presence of three cone cell types: blue, green and red cones.

The range of colors seen by deuteranopic (green-blind) humans and dogs are
probably the same. Color Vision in the VIB portion of the spectrum is
normal. However, both deuteranopes and dogs lack the green cones and thus
have a color vision deficit in GYO portion of the spectrum. This means that
blue-green appears white. Colors more toward the Red (R) portion of the
spectrum appears more and more yellowish. Red itself thus appears yellow.
Hunters take advantage of this by using bright orange bumpers while
training: it's difficult for the dog to actually see the bumper while the
trainer has no trouble spotting them.

Note that it is difficult for a dog to distinguish between objects which are
green, yellow and orange. Note also that the colors red and orange are hard
for a dog to tell apart, but that "red" is easily distinguished from blue.
Thus dogs are colorblind, but not to the extent of seeing only black and
white.




Hilary Wienand
2003-10-08 08:48:43 EST
I always thought dogs were colour-blind, but my border collie can
differentiate a postman's van (red) from any others even when it's
stationary and switched off and the postman is nowhere in sight. He has
now started jumping at a red estate car (station wagon) parked near our
gate, while ignoring all other parked cars. So he must be able to
perceive red as different from other colours in some way.

Hilary

In article <blpqv3$9im$1@sparta.btinternet.com>, Mieowmieowkittie
<*w@REMOVETHIShotmail.com> writes
>I was just wondering if any knew if their dog has a colour preference with
>their toys?
>
>My dog Chip who is a black lab, has 3 Frisbees, one pink, one green and one
>blue but he always wants to play with the pink one. My other dog Honey who
>is a Shetland Sheepdog likes the green one most. So does anyone know if dogs
>like different colours or is it they just like those toys? I just wondered
>because im getting them some new bedding and if they like one colour better
>then I would get them the one they like the most.
>
>
>Take care
>
>Paul
>
>
>
>
>
>
>---
>Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
>Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
>Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 24/09/2003
>
>

--
Hilary Wienand

KrisHur
2003-10-08 11:05:43 EST
My lab always goes for her yellow toys. Her yellow tug is her favorite as is
the yellow Tonka tug frisbee.

--
Kristen and
Kali CD, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com




"Mieowmieowkittie" <mieowmieow@REMOVETHIShotmail.com> wrote in message
news:blpqv3$9im$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
> I was just wondering if any knew if their dog has a colour preference with
> their toys?
>
> My dog Chip who is a black lab, has 3 Frisbees, one pink, one green and
one
> blue but he always wants to play with the pink one. My other dog Honey who
> is a Shetland Sheepdog likes the green one most. So does anyone know if
dogs
> like different colours or is it they just like those toys? I just wondered
> because im getting them some new bedding and if they like one colour
better
> then I would get them the one they like the most.
>
>
> Take care
>
> Paul
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
> Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
> Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 24/09/2003
>
>


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