Dog Discussion: Grosses Me Out.

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Don
2004-11-06 13:12:20 EST
Are Beagles the only dogs that like to eat cat poop?

--
Don



Diddy
2004-11-06 13:16:30 EST
in thread news:TZudnVPVVOWfiRDcRVn-pQ@giganews.com: "Don"
<dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> whittled the following words:

> Are Beagles the only dogs that like to eat cat poop?
>

NOPE!That love is shared by the whole canid family

The Puppy Wizard
2004-11-06 15:36:42 EST
HOWEDY Don,

"Don" <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> wrote in message
news:TZudnVPVVOWfiRDcRVn-pQ@giganews.com...
>
> Are Beagles the only dogs that like to eat cat poop?

A dog is a dog, Don.

> Don

You can break your dog of eatin kat poo NEARLY
INSTANTLY if you follow the INSTRUCTIONS in
your FREE copy of The Amazing Puppy Wizard's
FREE WWW Wits' End Dog Training Method
Manual available for FREE at http://www.doggydoright.com

Subject: Re: Dog is eating feces - CURE
Date: 2002-06-14 08:20:55 PST


"Paul B" <panders@zfree.co.nz> wrote in message
news:3d09f3eb$1@clear.net.nz...
>
>
> <TOTE@dog-play.com> wrote in message
> news:SULN8.9805$T_.228543@iad-read.news.verio.net...
> >>
> > The most effective solution long term is to
> > prevent him from getting to any more feces
> > until he has matured enough he won't bother.
> > In that sense it will "fix itself".


THAT'S INSANE.

> > Diane Blackman

> Diane in all honesty the sound distraction and
> praise technique really does stop poo eating.
> While my dogs never ate thier own or other dog
> poo they did eat cat poop and cow pats and I
> managed to stop them using the techniques our
> beloved Jerry describes.
>
> Paul

Thanks Paul. Our friends and dog lovers ALL know this.
They intentionally MISLEAD people cause if ANY THING
Jerry sez is right, EVERY THING Jerry sez is right, and
they're HOWETA BUSINESS.

That's HOWE COME their killfile campaigns.

From: AIMEE (countrygirl0334@yahoo.com)
Subject: House training and such...
Date: 2003-10-08 16:18:56 PST

I've been having a problem with my dog, Axel,
relieving himself in the house while I'm away
from home.

I've used TPW method's, and yesterday I was out
for 12 hours, and Axel didn't have one single "accident".

Today, I had hoped that the results would be just as
good - and they were (I was out for 11 hours).

The problem began when, as a puppy, Axel would
relieve himself in the house and I would point at the
mess and tell him "NO" or "Bad Dog".

That made him afraid to relieve himself in the house
or infront of me.

After I got TPW's training manual, I corrected my
mishandling of these instances.

When I came home to an "accident", I would simply
drop a can near the area and ask Axel "What's that?"
Then I would clean it up - with out showing him I was
the least bit upset about the mess, and when he looked
at the spot I would tell him "Good boy, you're a good dog".

This has been an ongoing problem, and thanks to the
Puppy Wizard, we've finally got it taken care of...

Also, Axel LOVES the cat's litter box...He enjoys the
"snacks" he can find in there...I followed TPW's methods
by alternating sounds and praising him while or before
he sticks his nose in it, and today, he's been going into
the room with the cat box and barking. That's because
he's thinking about getting into the box, but he knows he
shouldn't.

Thank you, Jerry, for all you help. You've been a
blessing to all of us.

AIMEE

===================

> From: Paul B (NOSPAMpaulbousie@clear.net.nz)
> Subject: Re: Dog vs cat food (stealing cat food)
> Date: 2001-03-03 22:18:03 PST
>
> It's possible to teach a dog not to eat out of a cat bowl
> without too much difficulty.
:>
> My dogs don't touch the food in the cat bowls although
> Roz licks up any bits that have been dropped around
> the bowls :-)
>
> I used a can with stones in it to create a distraction
> anytime the dogstried to eat the cats food, followed
> with immediate praise. It worked a treat.
>
> The cats bowls are down all the time, usually there
> is food left over but the dogs don't eat it, even if we
> go out and leave the dogs with access inside through
> a dog door.
>
> Paul
>
> Obedience and affection are not related, if they
> were everyone would have obedient dogs.
>
> See the dogs, cats, us and pics of NZ etc at my homepage.....
> http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/paulbousie/index.html
> Updated regularly (last time 23 Jan 01) so keep coming back!!!

====================

Disciple Paulie Writes:

I've never forced my dogs to do anything, I tell them
they are good dogs and they seem to follow me, once
I told them they were bad dogs and they ran away from
me, now I only ever tell them they are good dogs and
they always are, always.

Trust your dog, ask it to do your request and
say "good dog" sincerely at the end of the
request and I bet you'll find your dog thinking
then responding everytime.

A bit of respect works wonders, the same rule
applies to every aspect of the relationship with
your dog.

Obedience and affection are not related, if they
were everyone would have obedient dogs.

Paul.

========================


--- Original Message -----
From: Paul Bousie
To: The Puppy Wizard
Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2003 8:00 AM
Subject: Geday.


Hey J,

I see nothings changed on the NG. Still the same
old crappy advice and misunderstanding of the
only advice worth reading.

The problem with your method J is that I can't
answer the questions on the NG no more, people
are after a quick fix, they don't want to understand
that dog training requires a disiplined method, I'm
now really understanding that they are all result
orientated, they want the dog to sit, to down, to
stay, to come, to stop it's "bad" behaviours, they
want to stamp out each anxiety one at a time not
realising they create a new one as they deal with
the last.

I feel sorry for them, they don't understand, they
don't even realise the errors of thier ways and
they arn't self thinkers, they follow the majority,
after all if everyone says thats the way then it
must be. I've finally realised people don't want
to learn to train dogs they want a trained dog,
they want a little puppet that sits and stays and
downs and does all the nice doggy stuff or so
they think, then when the dog acts like a dog
they come squealing to the NG asking how to
stop the dog being a dog.

I have a nice little visulisation of a dogs mind
that I think demonstrates the way we approach
dog training. Imagine lots of little circles all in a
cluster, each one representing a dog anxiety or
behaviour ( desied or not), each circle represents
something about the dog, all of them create what
a dog is.

The traditional way to train a dog is to stamp out
the "bad" circles, try to eliminate as many as you
can, problem is each one you stamp out another
takes it's place (anxiety circles can't be destroyed
they just change), obviously it's a futile exercise,
but thats the traditional way.

Now imagine a big circle that completely surrounds
all the small circles, this big circle is the whole dog,
that's what we get hold of with all the little circles
inside, we don't see the little circles we see the BIG
circle the macro as you put it and use that to train.

I laugh now when I see posts critisising you, they
are critising something they don't even understand
or even have the capacity to understand.

See ya,

Paul

=====================

From: Paul B (NOSPAMpanders@zfree.co.nz)
Subject: Re: Jerry's Dog Training Manual
Date: 2001-07-12 00:13:28 PST

Hello Marshall,

The way I view it from my observation of how
my dogs react is that the distraction interrupts
the dogs thought, not for good or bad, just
interrupts, the dog is therefore distracted for
a second and then will either continue the
behaviour or do something else.

The praise reassures the dog that the sound
distraction is not a threat or punishment,
however if everytime the dog resumes a
particular behaviour it's distracted immediately
(and praised immediately for reassurance) then
it quickly decides this behaviour is not fulfilling
and it ceases.

A dog will offer another behaviour in it's place
and if that is acceptable to us then we let it be
otherwise the distraction continues until a suitable alternate
behaviour is offered.

One example, Sam used to jump up on me
when I arrived home, I would shake can to
distract him right at the moment he was
about to jump up, after about 4 repetitions
he tried sitting and offering me his paw, of
course this was fine so I let it be.

While the concept of shake cans is not new,
I haven't read any other advice that says to
praise immediately regardless of what the
dog does next (the common advice is to
praise once the dog is doing a desired
behaviour or at least stopped the unwanted
behaviour), this is unique to Jerry (and Marilyn)
and from my own experiences is an important
part of the process.

"Paul B" <panders@zfree.co.nz> wrote in message

The manual has no dangerous suggestions at all,
people who find the manual useful are those that
don't need to control a dog to satisfy their own ego
but simply want a well behaved dog that is easy to
live with.

I would suggest the people who follow the advice in
his manual are people who have already tried other inefficient
methods and are fed up with the poor results.

The more I think about the methods he suggests
the more sense it makes, the biggest problem is
people believe they have to be in control of the dog,
tell it whats right and wrong, dogs don't understand
our values and I don't believe they are capable of understanding
them either, so to train them we use
methods they understand.

That means abstract training, doing sometimes
what appears to almost be the opposite of what
makes sense to us.

If you are purely result orientated then you will
not find Jerry's manual much use, if you love
your dogs and love to work WITH them then
his manual is your dream come true.

Distraction and praise works with any dog,
when you sit back and really think about it,
it's very obvious why.

When a dog is properly distracted (and praised)
of a particular behaviour then that behaviour very
quickly becomes unfulfilling so the dog will no
longer have any interest in pursuing it, whether
we are about or not.

Thats the key to stopping garbage can raids
and food stealing etc etc, no force, no bad
dog, just distracting it in an appropriate manner
that it no longer wishes to pursue that behaviour.

Better than hiding the garbage can eh?

Paul

==============



Diana
2004-11-07 07:50:03 EST

"diddy" <diddy@nospam.diddy.net> wrote in message
news:Xns9599870564317danny@216.196.97.142...
> in thread news:TZudnVPVVOWfiRDcRVn-pQ@giganews.com: "Don"
> <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> whittled the following words:
>
> > Are Beagles the only dogs that like to eat cat poop?
> >
>
> NOPE!That love is shared by the whole canid family

I just managed to prevent Cindy rolling in one this morning - I think I'd
rather she ate it than me have to wash it off her!
Diana

--
Cindy's web site
http://cindy-incidentally.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk



Don
2004-11-07 20:54:36 EST
I sort of solved the problem today by getting one of those mechanical cat
litter boxes. It cleans itself out everytime a cat uses it so there is
nothing for the dog to get into. It's a pretty impressive gadget, I
recommend it.

--
Don
"Diana" <diana@dogstuffagain.fslife.co.uk> wrote in message
news:cml5lo$aan$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
> "diddy" <diddy@nospam.diddy.net> wrote in message
> news:Xns9599870564317danny@216.196.97.142...
> > in thread news:TZudnVPVVOWfiRDcRVn-pQ@giganews.com: "Don"
> > <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> whittled the following words:
> >
> > > Are Beagles the only dogs that like to eat cat poop?
> > >
> >
> > NOPE!That love is shared by the whole canid family
>
> I just managed to prevent Cindy rolling in one this morning - I think I'd
> rather she ate it than me have to wash it off her!
> Diana
>
> --
> Cindy's web site
> http://cindy-incidentally.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk
>
>



Diana
2004-11-08 04:02:53 EST

"Don" <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> wrote in message
news:MomdnUOGq75KTBPcRVn-vQ@giganews.com...
> I sort of solved the problem today by getting one of those mechanical cat
> litter boxes. It cleans itself out everytime a cat uses it so there is
> nothing for the dog to get into. It's a pretty impressive gadget, I
> recommend it.
>
> --

I don't have a cat <vbg>,

Diana

--
Cindy's web site
http://cindy-incidentally.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk



The Puppy Wizard
2004-11-08 17:11:08 EST
HOWEDY Don,

"Don" <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> wrote in message
news:MomdnUOGq75KTBPcRVn-vQ@giganews.com...
>
> I sort of solved the problem today by getting
> one of those mechanical cat litter boxes.

That's probably a good idea.

> It cleans itself out everytime a cat uses it
> so there is nothing for the dog to get into.

You think hidin the weenie is gonna fool your dog?

> It's a pretty impressive gadget, I recommend it.

Yeah. The ONLY PROBLEM is, your dog is fascinated
with eatin kat poo. Soon as the novelty of the box wears
off, your dog is gonna FIND the poo inside the box, even
if he has to break it to get it.

> Don

You'll probably ruin a couple of them before
you learn to hide the kat box on accHOWENT
of you can't train a dog not to eat kat poo or
roll in it like your pal lush aka diana:

> "Diana" <diana@dogstuffagain.fslife.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:cml5lo$aan$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
> >
> > "diddy" <diddy@nospam.diddy.net> wrote in message
> > news:Xns9599870564317danny@216.196.97.142...
> > > in thread news:TZudnVPVVOWfiRDcRVn-pQ@giganews.com: "Don"
> > > <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> whittled the following words:
> > >
> > > > Are Beagles the only dogs that like to eat cat poop?
>
> > > NOPE!That love is shared by the whole canid family

Only if you don't know HOWE to TRAIN the dog not to eat it.

> > I just managed to prevent Cindy rolling in one
> > this morning - I think I'd rather she ate it than
> > me have to wash it off her!

Perhaps diana aka lush will learn to pick it up first.

> > Diana

Probably not... on accHOWENT of you
can't HIDE ALL THE POO in the universe.

> > Cindy's web site


You can break your dog of eatin kat poo NEARLY
INSTANTLY if you follow the INSTRUCTIONS in
your FREE copy of The Amazing Puppy Wizard's
FREE WWW Wits' End Dog Training Method
Manual available for FREE at http://www.doggydoright.com

Subject: Re: Dog is eating feces - CURE
Date: 2002-06-14 08:20:55 PST


"Paul B" <panders@zfree.co.nz> wrote in message
news:3d09f3eb$1@clear.net.nz...
>
>
> <TOTE@dog-play.com> wrote in message
> news:SULN8.9805$T_.228543@iad-read.news.verio.net...
> >>
> > The most effective solution long term is to
> > prevent him from getting to any more feces
> > until he has matured enough he won't bother.
> > In that sense it will "fix itself".

THAT'S INSANE.

> > Diane Blackman

> Diane in all honesty the sound distraction and
> praise technique really does stop poo eating.
> While my dogs never ate thier own or other dog
> poo they did eat cat poop and cow pats and I
> managed to stop them using the techniques our
> beloved Jerry describes.
>
> Paul

Thanks Paul. Our friends and dog lovers ALL know this.
They intentionally MISLEAD people cause if ANY THING
Jerry sez is right, EVERY THING Jerry sez is right, and
they're HOWETA BUSINESS.

That's HOWE COME their killfile campaigns.


"Paul B" <panders@zfree.co.nz> wrote in message

The manual has no dangerous suggestions at all,
people who find the manual useful are those that
don't need to control a dog to satisfy their own ego
but simply want a well behaved dog that is easy to
live with.

I would suggest the people who follow the advice in
his manual are people who have already tried other inefficient
methods and are fed up with the poor results.

The more I think about the methods he suggests
the more sense it makes, the biggest problem is
people believe they have to be in control of the dog,
tell it whats right and wrong, dogs don't understand
our values and I don't believe they are capable of understanding
them either, so to train them we use
methods they understand.

That means abstract training, doing sometimes
what appears to almost be the opposite of what
makes sense to us.

If you are purely result orientated then you will
not find Jerry's manual much use, if you love
your dogs and love to work WITH them then
his manual is your dream come true.

Distraction and praise works with any dog,
when you sit back and really think about it,
it's very obvious why.

When a dog is properly distracted (and praised)
of a particular behaviour then that behaviour very
quickly becomes unfulfilling so the dog will no
longer have any interest in pursuing it, whether
we are about or not.

Thats the key to stopping garbage can raids
and food stealing etc etc, no force, no bad
dog, just distracting it in an appropriate manner
that it no longer wishes to pursue that behaviour.

Better than hiding the garbage can eh?

Paul

==============

From: AIMEE (countrygirl0334@yahoo.com)
Subject: House training and such...
Date: 2003-10-08 16:18:56 PST

I've been having a problem with my dog, Axel,
relieving himself in the house while I'm away
from home.

I've used TPW method's, and yesterday I was out
for 12 hours, and Axel didn't have one single "accident".

Today, I had hoped that the results would be just as
good - and they were (I was out for 11 hours).

The problem began when, as a puppy, Axel would
relieve himself in the house and I would point at the
mess and tell him "NO" or "Bad Dog".

That made him afraid to relieve himself in the house
or infront of me.

After I got TPW's training manual, I corrected my
mishandling of these instances.

When I came home to an "accident", I would simply
drop a can near the area and ask Axel "What's that?"
Then I would clean it up - with out showing him I was
the least bit upset about the mess, and when he looked
at the spot I would tell him "Good boy, you're a good dog".

This has been an ongoing problem, and thanks to the
Puppy Wizard, we've finally got it taken care of...

Also, Axel LOVES the cat's litter box...He enjoys the
"snacks" he can find in there...I followed TPW's methods
by alternating sounds and praising him while or before
he sticks his nose in it, and today, he's been going into
the room with the cat box and barking. That's because
he's thinking about getting into the box, but he knows he
shouldn't.

Thank you, Jerry, for all you help. You've been a
blessing to all of us.

AIMEE

===================

> From: Paul B (NOSPAMpaulbousie@clear.net.nz)
> Subject: Re: Dog vs cat food (stealing cat food)
> Date: 2001-03-03 22:18:03 PST
>
> It's possible to teach a dog not to eat out of a cat bowl
> without too much difficulty.
:>
> My dogs don't touch the food in the cat bowls although
> Roz licks up any bits that have been dropped around
> the bowls :-)
>
> I used a can with stones in it to create a distraction
> anytime the dogstried to eat the cats food, followed
> with immediate praise. It worked a treat.
>
> The cats bowls are down all the time, usually there
> is food left over but the dogs don't eat it, even if we
> go out and leave the dogs with access inside through
> a dog door.
>
> Paul
>
> Obedience and affection are not related, if they
> were everyone would have obedient dogs.
>
> See the dogs, cats, us and pics of NZ etc at my homepage.....
> http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/paulbousie/index.html
> Updated regularly (last time 23 Jan 01) so keep coming back!!!

====================

Disciple Paulie Writes:

I've never forced my dogs to do anything, I tell them
they are good dogs and they seem to follow me, once
I told them they were bad dogs and they ran away from
me, now I only ever tell them they are good dogs and
they always are, always.

Trust your dog, ask it to do your request and
say "good dog" sincerely at the end of the
request and I bet you'll find your dog thinking
then responding everytime.

A bit of respect works wonders, the same rule
applies to every aspect of the relationship with
your dog.

Obedience and affection are not related, if they
were everyone would have obedient dogs.

Paul.

========================


--- Original Message -----
From: Paul Bousie
To: The Puppy Wizard
Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2003 8:00 AM
Subject: Geday.


Hey J,

I see nothings changed on the NG. Still the same
old crappy advice and misunderstanding of the
only advice worth reading.

The problem with your method J is that I can't
answer the questions on the NG no more, people
are after a quick fix, they don't want to understand
that dog training requires a disiplined method, I'm
now really understanding that they are all result
orientated, they want the dog to sit, to down, to
stay, to come, to stop it's "bad" behaviours, they
want to stamp out each anxiety one at a time not
realising they create a new one as they deal with
the last.

I feel sorry for them, they don't understand, they
don't even realise the errors of thier ways and
they arn't self thinkers, they follow the majority,
after all if everyone says thats the way then it
must be. I've finally realised people don't want
to learn to train dogs they want a trained dog,
they want a little puppet that sits and stays and
downs and does all the nice doggy stuff or so
they think, then when the dog acts like a dog
they come squealing to the NG asking how to
stop the dog being a dog.

I have a nice little visulisation of a dogs mind
that I think demonstrates the way we approach
dog training. Imagine lots of little circles all in a
cluster, each one representing a dog anxiety or
behaviour ( desied or not), each circle represents
something about the dog, all of them create what
a dog is.

The traditional way to train a dog is to stamp out
the "bad" circles, try to eliminate as many as you
can, problem is each one you stamp out another
takes it's place (anxiety circles can't be destroyed
they just change), obviously it's a futile exercise,
but thats the traditional way.

Now imagine a big circle that completely surrounds
all the small circles, this big circle is the whole dog,
that's what we get hold of with all the little circles
inside, we don't see the little circles we see the BIG
circle the macro as you put it and use that to train.

I laugh now when I see posts critisising you, they
are critising something they don't even understand
or even have the capacity to understand.

See ya,

Paul

=====================

From: Paul B (NOSPAMpanders@zfree.co.nz)
Subject: Re: Jerry's Dog Training Manual
Date: 2001-07-12 00:13:28 PST

Hello Marshall,

The way I view it from my observation of how
my dogs react is that the distraction interrupts
the dogs thought, not for good or bad, just
interrupts, the dog is therefore distracted for
a second and then will either continue the
behaviour or do something else.

The praise reassures the dog that the sound
distraction is not a threat or punishment,
however if everytime the dog resumes a
particular behaviour it's distracted immediately
(and praised immediately for reassurance) then
it quickly decides this behaviour is not fulfilling
and it ceases.

A dog will offer another behaviour in it's place
and if that is acceptable to us then we let it be
otherwise the distraction continues until a suitable alternate
behaviour is offered.

One example, Sam used to jump up on me
when I arrived home, I would shake can to
distract him right at the moment he was
about to jump up, after about 4 repetitions
he tried sitting and offering me his paw, of
course this was fine so I let it be.

While the concept of shake cans is not new,
I haven't read any other advice that says to
praise immediately regardless of what the
dog does next (the common advice is to
praise once the dog is doing a desired
behaviour or at least stopped the unwanted
behaviour), this is unique to Jerry (and Marilyn)
and from my own experiences is an important
part of the process.


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