Dog Discussion: Treats For Pancreatitus-prone Dog

Treats For Pancreatitus-prone Dog
Posts: 7

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1   (First | Last)

Betsy
2003-08-25 11:53:21 EST
Hi. Beau the collie has epilepsy & pancreatitis, a bad combination because
his KBr must be given with food. He is also still young (5) and needs to
chew things occasionally. He gets the night crazies, when it's too late to
walk him. Only a chewie will do.

But he seems to react badly to chewies. Last night I gave him a booda bone
(the ones made from cornstarch). I buy the smaller kind, for smaller dogs.
But this morning he was vomiting bile, so the internist recommended
withholding food for 24 hours.

This puts him at risk for seizure, as the KBr is very tough on the stomach
unless given with food. I'll skip the morning dose but will attempt the
evening one.

Does anyone have any advice on safe treats that are going to keep him
chewing for some time, and won't just be inhaled? I will not give rawhide,
or other animal parts such as hooves or pigs ears. Perhaps a beef bone from
the butcher would be safe?

Thanks.



Lucille
2003-08-25 17:31:12 EST
I'm not sure this will work for a bigger dog than my Maltese (8+ lbs.) but
you might give it a try. I take his canned I/D diet food, cut pieces and
dry them in the oven. They may not get hard enough for what you're asking
but they do satisfy his request for a treat and don't hurt his stomach.
Lucille


"Betsy" <n0spam@spam.c-0> wrote in message
news:Ohq2b.9$M%4.90929@news.abs.net...
> Hi. Beau the collie has epilepsy & pancreatitis, a bad combination
because
> his KBr must be given with food. He is also still young (5) and needs to
> chew things occasionally. He gets the night crazies, when it's too late
to
> walk him. Only a chewie will do.
>
> But he seems to react badly to chewies. Last night I gave him a booda
bone
> (the ones made from cornstarch). I buy the smaller kind, for smaller
dogs.
> But this morning he was vomiting bile, so the internist recommended
> withholding food for 24 hours.
>
> This puts him at risk for seizure, as the KBr is very tough on the stomach
> unless given with food. I'll skip the morning dose but will attempt the
> evening one.
>
> Does anyone have any advice on safe treats that are going to keep him
> chewing for some time, and won't just be inhaled? I will not give
rawhide,
> or other animal parts such as hooves or pigs ears. Perhaps a beef bone
from
> the butcher would be safe?
>
> Thanks.
>
>



The Puppy Wizard
2003-08-26 14:20:37 EST
What's gonna stop the CAUSE of these STRESS RELATED health
disorders?

"Lucille" <lucillez1@nospamyahoo.net> wrote in message
news:Aev2b.18321$2Y6.5529763@news2.news.adelphia.net...
> I'm not sure this will work for a bigger dog than my Maltese (8
lbs.) but
> you might give it a try. I take his canned I/D diet food, cut
pieces and
> dry them in the oven. They may not get hard enough for what
you're asking
> but they do satisfy his request for a treat and don't hurt his
stomach.
> Lucille
>
>
> "Betsy" <n0spam@spam.c-0> wrote in message
> news:Ohq2b.9$M%4.90929@news.abs.net...
> > Hi. Beau the collie has epilepsy & pancreatitis, a bad
combination
> because
> > his KBr must be given with food. He is also still young (5)
and needs to
> > chew things occasionally. He gets the night crazies, when
it's too late
> to
> > walk him. Only a chewie will do.
> >
> > But he seems to react badly to chewies. Last night I gave him
a booda
> bone
> > (the ones made from cornstarch). I buy the smaller kind, for
smaller
> dogs.
> > But this morning he was vomiting bile, so the internist
recommended
> > withholding food for 24 hours.
> >
> > This puts him at risk for seizure, as the KBr is very tough on
the stomach
> > unless given with food. I'll skip the morning dose but will
attempt the
> > evening one.
> >
> > Does anyone have any advice on safe treats that are going to
keep him
> > chewing for some time, and won't just be inhaled? I will not
give
> rawhide,
> > or other animal parts such as hooves or pigs ears. Perhaps a
beef bone
> from
> > the butcher would be safe?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> >
>
>



Snixie
2003-08-27 08:08:41 EST
>Perhaps a beef bone from the butcher would be safe?

I would not suggest giving bones to dogs with pancreatic problems.. they are
very high in fat.

You could try something unusual.. some dogs will chomp on a carrot or other
vege.. alternatively a low fat bikkie of some sort?





The Puppy Wizard
2003-08-27 19:21:49 EST
The Puppy Wizard recommends NEVER giving bones to dogs.

"Snixie" <snixie@bigpond.com> wrote in message
news:db13b.66554$bo1.25056@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> >Perhaps a beef bone from the butcher would be safe?
>
> I would not suggest giving bones to dogs with pancreatic
problems.. they are
> very high in fat.
>
> You could try something unusual.. some dogs will chomp on a
carrot or other
> vege.. alternatively a low fat bikkie of some sort?
>
>
>
>



Tulip Tracy
2003-08-29 10:13:49 EST
interesting. What about one of those red rubber toys I see the dogs
having? I forget the name but they are bright red and cone shaped....
Anyway, i don't know if he would chew those like you'd want. You
mentioned wanting smaller bites, my friend has a little Yorkie and
they treat her with pupperoni nawsome minis. Basically they're like
the bigger size ones only bite sized for the little guy.

Good luck! Hope your dog feels better soon!

"The Puppy Wizard" <ThePuppyWizard@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:<h2b3b.18003$8i2.10674@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>...
> The Puppy Wizard recommends NEVER giving bones to dogs.
>
> "Snixie" <snixie@bigpond.com> wrote in message
> news:db13b.66554$bo1.25056@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> > >Perhaps a beef bone from the butcher would be safe?
> >
> > I would not suggest giving bones to dogs with pancreatic
> problems.. they are
> > very high in fat.
> >
> > You could try something unusual.. some dogs will chomp on a
> carrot or other
> > vege.. alternatively a low fat bikkie of some sort?
> >
> >
> >
> >

DT
2003-09-03 13:47:49 EST
We sliced potatoes (on the vets suggestion) and baked them slow in the oven.
The result was a hardish nibble which the dog enjoyed chomping on.

Coleen

"Tulip Tracy" <tulipgirl85@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:57683e5e.0308290613.6ebf6d72@posting.google.com...
> interesting. What about one of those red rubber toys I see the dogs
> having? I forget the name but they are bright red and cone shaped....
> Anyway, i don't know if he would chew those like you'd want. You
> mentioned wanting smaller bites, my friend has a little Yorkie and
> they treat her with pupperoni nawsome minis. Basically they're like
> the bigger size ones only bite sized for the little guy.
>
> Good luck! Hope your dog feels better soon!
>
> "The Puppy Wizard" <ThePuppyWizard@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:<h2b3b.18003$8i2.10674@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>...
> > The Puppy Wizard recommends NEVER giving bones to dogs.
> >
> > "Snixie" <snixie@bigpond.com> wrote in message
> > news:db13b.66554$bo1.25056@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> > > >Perhaps a beef bone from the butcher would be safe?
> > >
> > > I would not suggest giving bones to dogs with pancreatic
> > problems.. they are
> > > very high in fat.
> > >
> > > You could try something unusual.. some dogs will chomp on a
> > carrot or other
> > > vege.. alternatively a low fat bikkie of some sort?
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >


Page: 1   (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron