Dog Discussion: My Geriatric Chow Has Died ... His Eulogy

My Geriatric Chow Has Died ... His Eulogy
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Mr. Bluster
2004-07-23 12:03:51 EST



Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.

I first saw the signs Tuesday when he seemed a little bit lethargic. Even
though he exhibited tail wagging enthusiasm about his morning walk, he was
unable to pass the front gate. I brought him back into the house and Matty
Roo and I made a fast round of the neighborhood. When we returned, I gave
him his usual dose of Glucosamine and Chondroitin wrapped in cheese, but he
gulped it down with little of his usual zeal. He lay down and barely
moved -- there was an unspoken communication that his time was near. I
considered rushing him to the emergency pet hospital, but knew in the
cockles of my heart, that would be his last trip. I didn't want him to die
in such a sterile environment. It was a judgment call -- he was at least 15
years old -- in human terms well over 100 years of age. If he'd been
younger, Matty Roo's age, I'd have made the heroic effort. I decided that I
would make him comfortable and if he exhibited pain or suffering, I'd take
him to the vet for a humane end to a long and (I hope) rich life.

The remaining hours after Tuesday morning only demonstrated the rapid and
inexorable march of entropy. Thursday morning at about 5:00 a.m. I rushed
out to see how he was. I was shocked. His face was half in his water bowl
and his breaths were shallow and quick. I put him in a more comfortable
position. I grabbed the phone book to call the emergency pet clinic. Then I
looked over and he wasn't breathing. In a panic I rushed to his side and
noticed that he had suddenly expelled copious drool, urine, and runny fecal
matter. He was dead. There are no words to describe my feelings. My loyal
friend who would have protected me to the death, with no thoughts for
himself, was gone.

At this time I still don't know whether I made the right decision. I just
know that at his extreme age he would never improve and didn't have long to
live. Do you pursue euthanasia or do you provide a loving hospice situation?
It's a hard call -- it was for me.

It was about five summers ago when I still worked at a large software
company, that I was out for an evening stroll during my lunch hour. I
noticed a chow, just fur and bones without a collar, clambering, with some
difficulty, out of a wash. His ears perked when he saw me and limped in my
direction. I offered him whatever food I could find -- cheese on crackers
and water. He seemed quite pleased with that and he rested near the break
area just outside the exit. I had to go back in to complete my shift. He was
still there when I came out for a break. I left work that evening and he got
up as soon as he saw me and followed me to the car. He was weak and I had to
hoist him onto the backseat.

When I brought him into the house, Matty Roo suddenly bolted up with extreme
alarm over her throne (i.e., the couch). Her tail and ears became stiff --
she seemed to say, "How dare you bring another dog into this house!" I tried
to calm her but she'd have none of that. I fed Bearaboo dry dog food and
gave him a large bowl of water. Matty Roo gave him a disdainful look as if
to say, "We (i.e., the imperial 'we') don't eat dry dog food, you peasant."
But Bearaboo and I withstood Matty Roo's ire, and the situation improved to
one of acceptance after a few months.

He had some bad habits, and that may have explained his homeless state. I'm
certain that he was dumped. When I took him to PetsMart for his
vaccinations, he insisted (much to my embarrassment) in trying to mark his
territory on every box, can, and bag of food in the store. He even took a
shot at my leg. Such a bad boy. But as time wore on his behavior improved. I
could take him to some public places. At least he didn't pee on my leg
anymore.

Now we're into the monsoon season and although there isn't much rain, the
lightning and thunder were frightening to Bearaboo. Bearaboo would stay
close to me when the thunder would rumble. He looked to me for protection
and did seem calmer when close by. When someone would come near the front
door, both dogs would vigorously bark to let me know that a stranger was
approaching. It'll be a bit sad to only hear Matty Roo's bark. And although
I found it annoying in the evenings when Bearaboo and Matty Roo would pester
me by prodding with their wet noses to let me know it was time for their
walk, I'm really going to miss that too. I'm going to miss his smiles (yes,
he had a big doggy grin), his heartfelt wags, and zest for life. Bearaboo
never whined.

So, what does one do with a deceased loyal and loved dog? I considered
taking him to the Humane Society for cremation but opted, for personal
reasons, to bury him at home. I've probably violated some code or other, but
Bearaboo always loved lounging on the patio in the evenings gazing at the
birds, trees, and sky. I was able to dig a fairly deep grave off the patio
which is quite a trick in Arizona soil. The digging was exhausting but
somewhat cathartic. It was probably made more difficult by having not eaten
since Tuesday morning -- I did feel a bit weak. Food wasn't too important
those two days. I wrapped him in a shroud and noticed that he had already
stiffened. That will soon change as he returns to the earth. He's buried now
and soon I'll plant something he'd like over his grave.

I hope this hasn't been too tedious or depressing but, in a way, this is my
eulogy to Bearaboo. This hasn't been an easy time.



JD Cooper
2004-07-23 12:43:24 EST
Mr. Bluster wrote:

> Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
>
> I first saw the signs Tuesday when he seemed a little bit lethargic. Even
> though he exhibited tail wagging enthusiasm about his morning walk, he was
> unable to pass the front gate. I brought him back into the house and Matty
> Roo and I made a fast round of the neighborhood. When we returned, I gave
> him his usual dose of Glucosamine and Chondroitin wrapped in cheese, but he
> gulped it down with little of his usual zeal. He lay down and barely
> moved -- there was an unspoken communication that his time was near. I
> considered rushing him to the emergency pet hospital, but knew in the
> cockles of my heart, that would be his last trip. I didn't want him to die
> in such a sterile environment. It was a judgment call -- he was at least 15
> years old -- in human terms well over 100 years of age. If he'd been
> younger, Matty Roo's age, I'd have made the heroic effort. I decided that I
> would make him comfortable and if he exhibited pain or suffering, I'd take
> him to the vet for a humane end to a long and (I hope) rich life.
>
> The remaining hours after Tuesday morning only demonstrated the rapid and
> inexorable march of entropy. Thursday morning at about 5:00 a.m. I rushed
> out to see how he was. I was shocked. His face was half in his water bowl
> and his breaths were shallow and quick. I put him in a more comfortable
> position. I grabbed the phone book to call the emergency pet clinic. Then I
> looked over and he wasn't breathing. In a panic I rushed to his side and
> noticed that he had suddenly expelled copious drool, urine, and runny fecal
> matter. He was dead. There are no words to describe my feelings. My loyal
> friend who would have protected me to the death, with no thoughts for
> himself, was gone.
>
> At this time I still don't know whether I made the right decision. I just
> know that at his extreme age he would never improve and didn't have long to
> live. Do you pursue euthanasia or do you provide a loving hospice situation?
> It's a hard call -- it was for me.
>
> It was about five summers ago when I still worked at a large software
> company, that I was out for an evening stroll during my lunch hour. I
> noticed a chow, just fur and bones without a collar, clambering, with some
> difficulty, out of a wash. His ears perked when he saw me and limped in my
> direction. I offered him whatever food I could find -- cheese on crackers
> and water. He seemed quite pleased with that and he rested near the break
> area just outside the exit. I had to go back in to complete my shift. He was
> still there when I came out for a break. I left work that evening and he got
> up as soon as he saw me and followed me to the car. He was weak and I had to
> hoist him onto the backseat.
>
> When I brought him into the house, Matty Roo suddenly bolted up with extreme
> alarm over her throne (i.e., the couch). Her tail and ears became stiff --
> she seemed to say, "How dare you bring another dog into this house!" I tried
> to calm her but she'd have none of that. I fed Bearaboo dry dog food and
> gave him a large bowl of water. Matty Roo gave him a disdainful look as if
> to say, "We (i.e., the imperial 'we') don't eat dry dog food, you peasant."
> But Bearaboo and I withstood Matty Roo's ire, and the situation improved to
> one of acceptance after a few months.
>
> He had some bad habits, and that may have explained his homeless state. I'm
> certain that he was dumped. When I took him to PetsMart for his
> vaccinations, he insisted (much to my embarrassment) in trying to mark his
> territory on every box, can, and bag of food in the store. He even took a
> shot at my leg. Such a bad boy. But as time wore on his behavior improved. I
> could take him to some public places. At least he didn't pee on my leg
> anymore.
>
> Now we're into the monsoon season and although there isn't much rain, the
> lightning and thunder were frightening to Bearaboo. Bearaboo would stay
> close to me when the thunder would rumble. He looked to me for protection
> and did seem calmer when close by. When someone would come near the front
> door, both dogs would vigorously bark to let me know that a stranger was
> approaching. It'll be a bit sad to only hear Matty Roo's bark. And although
> I found it annoying in the evenings when Bearaboo and Matty Roo would pester
> me by prodding with their wet noses to let me know it was time for their
> walk, I'm really going to miss that too. I'm going to miss his smiles (yes,
> he had a big doggy grin), his heartfelt wags, and zest for life. Bearaboo
> never whined.
>
> So, what does one do with a deceased loyal and loved dog? I considered
> taking him to the Humane Society for cremation but opted, for personal
> reasons, to bury him at home. I've probably violated some code or other, but
> Bearaboo always loved lounging on the patio in the evenings gazing at the
> birds, trees, and sky. I was able to dig a fairly deep grave off the patio
> which is quite a trick in Arizona soil. The digging was exhausting but
> somewhat cathartic. It was probably made more difficult by having not eaten
> since Tuesday morning -- I did feel a bit weak. Food wasn't too important
> those two days. I wrapped him in a shroud and noticed that he had already
> stiffened. That will soon change as he returns to the earth. He's buried now
> and soon I'll plant something he'd like over his grave.
>
> I hope this hasn't been too tedious or depressing but, in a way, this is my
> eulogy to Bearaboo. This hasn't been an easy time.

Well done, sir, and my sympathy to you.

I face the very same issue with my very old Dane and am not relishing
the coming days. I will bury him out in the pasture where he spent many
happy days chasing jack rabbits.

Peace.

JD


Michael A. Ball
2004-07-23 22:49:41 EST
On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 09:03:51 -0700, "Mr. Bluster" <mb@neoscum.con>
wrote:

>Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
>...
>I hope this hasn't been too tedious or depressing but, in a way, this is my
>eulogy to Bearaboo. This hasn't been an easy time.

Without question, Chow Chows and I are made for one another. So,
whenever I see another Chow Chow guardian that's heart broken, my heart
breaks, too.

Thanks for sharing Bearaboo's eulogy. I thought I could keep my eyes
dry, but I couldn't. I am deeply sorry for your loss.

A dog's life is too short: their only fault really.

Peace be with you.
Michael

Maximas Luke Tooray and Nightbear Maximus welcome Bearaboo
When I die, I want to go where dogs go!

Mr. Bluster
2004-07-24 09:30:04 EST

"JD Cooper" <never-a-problem@holyflyingcow.org> wrote in message
news:8IudnWKANfWQopzcRVn-hA@texas.net...
> Mr. Bluster wrote:
>
> > Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
> >
> Well done, sir, and my sympathy to you.
>
> I face the very same issue with my very old Dane and am not relishing
> the coming days. I will bury him out in the pasture where he spent many
> happy days chasing jack rabbits.
>
> Peace.
>
> JD
>
Thank you for your kind thoughts. The house now has an undeniable
emptiness. Even, Matty Roo (an Australian Shepherd) who only seemed to only
tolerate Bearaboo's presence displays an aura of somber resignation.

I wish you the best with your Dane. I feel that each moment of
companionship with our confederates whether animal, vegetable, or human is
valuable -- in the end, that's all we really have..

~Gene



Mr. Bluster
2004-07-24 09:30:38 EST

"Michael A. Ball" <Guardian@wireco.net> wrote in message
news:n7i3g0d53btot4m71ggb88i4jskgfmumfp@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 09:03:51 -0700, "Mr. Bluster" <mb@neoscum.con>
> wrote:
>
> >Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
> >...
> >I hope this hasn't been too tedious or depressing but, in a way, this is
my
> >eulogy to Bearaboo. This hasn't been an easy time.
>
> Without question, Chow Chows and I are made for one another. So,
> whenever I see another Chow Chow guardian that's heart broken, my heart
> breaks, too.
>
> Thanks for sharing Bearaboo's eulogy. I thought I could keep my eyes
> dry, but I couldn't. I am deeply sorry for your loss.
>
> A dog's life is too short: their only fault really.
>
> Peace be with you.
> Michael
>
> Maximas Luke Tooray and Nightbear Maximus welcome Bearaboo
> When I die, I want to go where dogs go!

There are some relationships too ephemeral and all too short to be captured
in the cold pages of a eulogy. Bearaboo has left an empty place. Matty Roo
(an Australian Shepherd) and I have just completed our morning walk. When
Bearaboo was with us, our walks were much longer as he would want to
investigate every bush and tree along the path -- he truly valued everything
in his surroundings.

I don't know where Bearaboo is now, but I hope he's gaily frolicking with
your deceased chow chows.



Nik Egerton
2004-07-25 05:45:01 EST
Well done for what you have written .... and I too, understand only too well
what you are going through at this time ... I have lost three very special
friends in the past few years.

The times we share with our special friends seem to go too quickly ...
whether it is from the time you bring a tiny puppy into your home and heart
or you choose to share with an older companion, they bring so much fun, and
laughter into your life ... whether it is redecorating your house with
toilet paper or redesigning the television remote control..... it is
heartbreaking when the day comes that we must lose them.

It sounds like Bearaboo had a wonderful time since he found you those five
summers ago. Take heart in this time of sadness that you gave him a
wonderful life.

There is a wonderful poem on the Petloss website called "From Friend to
Friend "- and I think the last two verses say it really well.

"And don't despair my passing,
For I won't be far away,
Forever here, within your heart
And memory I will stay.

I'll be watching over you,
Your ever faithful friend,
And in your memories I will run,
... a young dog once again.

Regards

Nik Egerton
New Zealand


"Mr. Bluster" <mb@neoscum.con> wrote in message
news:2mf6j5Fl17acU1@uni-berlin.de...
>
> "JD Cooper" <never-a-problem@holyflyingcow.org> wrote in message
> news:8IudnWKANfWQopzcRVn-hA@texas.net...
> > Mr. Bluster wrote:
> >
> > > Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
> > >
> > Well done, sir, and my sympathy to you.
> >
> > I face the very same issue with my very old Dane and am not relishing
> > the coming days. I will bury him out in the pasture where he spent many
> > happy days chasing jack rabbits.
> >
> > Peace.
> >
> > JD
> >
> Thank you for your kind thoughts. The house now has an undeniable
> emptiness. Even, Matty Roo (an Australian Shepherd) who only seemed to
only
> tolerate Bearaboo's presence displays an aura of somber resignation.
>
> I wish you the best with your Dane. I feel that each moment of
> companionship with our confederates whether animal, vegetable, or human
is
> valuable -- in the end, that's all we really have..
>
> ~Gene
>
>



Mr. Bluster
2004-07-25 18:24:51 EST

"Nik Egerton" <nik.e@paradise.net.nz> wrote in message
news:IiLMc.225$zS6.40010@news02.tsnz.net...
> Well done for what you have written .... and I too, understand only too
well
> what you are going through at this time ... I have lost three very special
> friends in the past few years.
>
> The times we share with our special friends seem to go too quickly ...
> whether it is from the time you bring a tiny puppy into your home and
heart
> or you choose to share with an older companion, they bring so much fun,
and
> laughter into your life ... whether it is redecorating your house with
> toilet paper or redesigning the television remote control..... it is
> heartbreaking when the day comes that we must lose them.
>
> It sounds like Bearaboo had a wonderful time since he found you those five
> summers ago. Take heart in this time of sadness that you gave him a
> wonderful life.
>
> There is a wonderful poem on the Petloss website called "From Friend to
> Friend "- and I think the last two verses say it really well.
>
> "And don't despair my passing,
> For I won't be far away,
> Forever here, within your heart
> And memory I will stay.
>
> I'll be watching over you,
> Your ever faithful friend,
> And in your memories I will run,
> ... a young dog once again.
>
> Regards
>
> Nik Egerton
> New Zealand
>
Thanks for the kind thoughts. I wasn't aware of the petloss web site. I'll
check it out. And thanks for the verse -- it is appreciated.

~Gene



Mr. Bluster
2004-07-25 18:30:58 EST

"Alky" <newsantispam@iprimus.com.au> wrote in message
news:41032296_1@news.iprimus.com.au...
>
> "Mr. Bluster" <mb@neoscum.con> wrote in message
> news:2mcr85Flb323U1@uni-berlin.de...
> >
> >
> >
> > Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
>
> This is the fourth attempt to reply to this. Every time I go to reply,
tears
> blur my vision and I can't type.
>
> My sympathy to you. I lost Casey my German Short-Haired Pointer in Feb
last
> year and I confess I cried more for her than when my Dad died. Not a day
> goes by that I don't think of her. In August last year, Jemma the
Dalmatian,
> came into my life. Whilst she has filled the void in my home, she has not
> filled the void in my heart. However, she has already inveigled her way
into
> my heart and I love her dearly.
>
> They say that time heals everything but all it does is force the good
> memories into the front of our mind and the bad memories slowly fade away.
>
> I hope my girls are waiting at the bridge for me.
>
> Al.
>
Thank you for the sympathetic words. The loss of a close friend, I feel, is
always devastating. I'm sorry to read about Casey's passing. I hope that
as time goes on Jemma will insinuate herself into your life as profoundly as
Casey once did. At least that's been my experience as dogs have come and
gone in my life.

I'm so glad that I still have Matty Roo (an Australian Shepherd.)

~Gene



MiddleEarth
2004-07-25 18:50:26 EST
God Bless, My thoughts are with you.




"Mr. Bluster" <mb@neoscum.con> wrote in message
news:2miql7Fmrpe7U1@uni-berlin.de...
>
> "Alky" <newsantispam@iprimus.com.au> wrote in message
> news:41032296_1@news.iprimus.com.au...
> >
> > "Mr. Bluster" <mb@neoscum.con> wrote in message
> > news:2mcr85Flb323U1@uni-berlin.de...
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
> >
> > This is the fourth attempt to reply to this. Every time I go to reply,
> tears
> > blur my vision and I can't type.
> >
> > My sympathy to you. I lost Casey my German Short-Haired Pointer in Feb
> last
> > year and I confess I cried more for her than when my Dad died. Not a day
> > goes by that I don't think of her. In August last year, Jemma the
> Dalmatian,
> > came into my life. Whilst she has filled the void in my home, she has
not
> > filled the void in my heart. However, she has already inveigled her way
> into
> > my heart and I love her dearly.
> >
> > They say that time heals everything but all it does is force the good
> > memories into the front of our mind and the bad memories slowly fade
away.
> >
> > I hope my girls are waiting at the bridge for me.
> >
> > Al.
> >
> Thank you for the sympathetic words. The loss of a close friend, I feel,
is
> always devastating. I'm sorry to read about Casey's passing. I hope that
> as time goes on Jemma will insinuate herself into your life as profoundly
as
> Casey once did. At least that's been my experience as dogs have come and
> gone in my life.
>
> I'm so glad that I still have Matty Roo (an Australian Shepherd.)
>
> ~Gene
>
>



Mr. Bluster
2004-07-26 21:40:15 EST

"Mr. Bluster" <mb@neoscum.con> wrote in message
news:2mcr85Flb323U1@uni-berlin.de...
>
>
>
> Bearaboo died the morning of Thursday, July 22nd at about 5:10.
>
For anyone who may be interested, I've created an illustration of Bearaboo:

http://img62.photobucket.com/albums/v189/monoceroo/?action=view&current=Bearaboo_Renderosity.jpg

OR

http://tinyurl.com/6pfp9


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