Dog Discussion: Stop A Beagle Barking?

Stop A Beagle Barking?
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Dalesgate
2004-07-10 07:36:24 EST
Is there any way to stop a young Beagle from barking when left alone? He
will often stop after 10-20 mins, but this is still unacceptable.

My labrador learned to quiet when left alone within a few weeks...

Regards



Nik Egerton
2004-07-10 23:22:33 EST
I reckon the trick would be to catch him in the act of barking .....

Have you tried leaving for work as normal in the car etc, then parking the
car a little way down the road and walking back in quietly and telling him
off. You have to actually catch him barking though.

Good luck
Nik

"Dalesgate" <notlikely@abuse.net> wrote in message
news:40efd4b6$0$562$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader03.plus.net...
> Is there any way to stop a young Beagle from barking when left alone? He
> will often stop after 10-20 mins, but this is still unacceptable.
>
> My labrador learned to quiet when left alone within a few weeks...
>
> Regards
>
>



The Puppy Wizard
2004-07-11 17:06:35 EST
HOWEDY Dalesgate,

"Dalesgate" <notlikely@abuse.net> wrote in message
news:40efd4b6$0$562$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader03.plus.net...
>
> Is there any way to stop a young Beagle
> from barking when left alone?

Barking is a SYMPTOM of sumpthin WRONG,
not loneliness.

> He will often stop after 10-20 mins, but this
> is still unacceptable.

INDEED. You cannot allHOWE your dog to
bark from anxiHOWESNESS for even WON
minute. A mom dog wouldn't allHOWE that.

> My labrador learned to quiet when left alone
> within a few weeks...

The Amazing Puppy Wizard's FREE WWW
Wits' End Dog Training Method Manual Students
learn not to bark NEARLY INSTANTLY.

> Regards

"Just Want To Second Jerry's Method For
Dealing With This (Destructive Separation
Anxiety). I've Suggested It To Quite A Few
Clients Now And It's Worked 'EVERY TIME
The Very First Time' - marilyn, Trainer, 33
Years Experience.

"His Amazing Progress Almost Makes Me Cry.
Your Method Takes Positive Training To The
Next Level And Should Really Be Used By All
Trainers Who Call Themselves Trainers. Thank
You For Helping Me Save His Life," Kay Pierce,
Professional Trainer, 30 Years Experience.

From: The Puppy Wizard (ThePuppyWizard@earthlink.net)
Subject: Barking
Date: 2004-05-15 21:29:55 PST

lyinglynn writes to a new foster care giver:
For barking in the crate - leave the leash on and
pass it through the crate door. Attach a line to it.
When he barks, use the line for a correction.

- if necessary, go to a citronella bark collar.

Lynn K.

From: Jenn (dont@try.it)
Subject: Re: Jerry's Dog Training Manual
Date: 2001-07-10 12:42:34 PST

Hi Lynn,

I used to have a barking problem with my
German Shepherd Dog a couple of years
ago.

I tried several things recommended to me
by different trainers, and nothing was working.

When I read that section of Jerry's Manual,
I thought the same way you did.

"What???? PRAISE her for barking?"

It sounded counterproductive, but I had
tried everything else I'd heard so I thought
I'd try it too.

Next time she went nuts at a person walking
by outside, I told her, "Good job! Good girl!
You are such a good protector!" And instead
of continuing the barking, she came to me for
a belly rub!

She will still bark (she's a guard dog, that's
her job), but after one bark, she knows she's
done her job to warn me by my praise, and
she stops.

Your mom's dog *does* think that those dogs
are going to come through the tv and get her
mummie.

If your mum tells her in a happy voice,"good
girl! I see them! Good job!" I really think she'll
just think her job is done now and she won't
have to keep barking.

Jenn

From: The Puppy Wizard (ThePuppyWizard@earthlink.net)
Subject: CURE Fear Of Thunder Crate AnxiHOWESNESS Digging Barking
WithHOWET MURDERING Your Dog?

Date: 2004-06-30 10:01:28 PST

HOWEDY People,

HOWE To CURE Fear Of Thunder Crate
AnxiHOWESNESS Digging Barking
WithHOWET MURDERING Your Dog?

Date: 2003-11-17 06:41:47 PST

"memememe" <[rem]casolorz[rem]@hot[rem]mail.com>
wrote in
messagenews:XUWtb.4306$NV7.1906035754@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com..
>
> We just got (3 or 4 weeks ago) a puppy that's
> mostly Labrador. He has been living inside most
> of the time but whenever noone is home hegoes
> on the backyard. We noticed that recently he has
> started digging pretty badly. He found that next to
> some bricks laid on the ground its easy to dig and
> he is making some pretty big holes and messing
> the layout of the bricks.
>
> What can we do to stop him from digging?
> Thanks,

Date: 2003-09-01 09:48:42 PST
HOWEDY memememe,

"memememe" <[rem]casolorz[rem]@hot[rem]mail.com>
wrote in message
news:cxCYa.259974$o86.32847@news1.central.cox.net...
>
> My gfs dog has got some small personality issues.

No. Your dog has some small mishandling issues.

> He is a very sweet dog, very lovin, etc, towards
> us, however when he sees new people he barks
> like a mad dog,

That's probably because he's afraid and being restrained.

> takes him 10 minutes to come down then he is sweet
> to those people as well. He barks usually at every noise
> he hears, from sudden noises on tv to people walking outside.

Right. He's generally afraid or being restrained.

> He is also extremely attached to my gf and me.
> If we leave the apartment he scratches the door,
> unless we leave him crated.

That's caused by the same same mishandling that
makes him afraid and bark at sHOWENDS.

> We usually dont like to put him in his crate

The crate reinforces his fears like hiding under the
blanket from the boogeyman.

> while we are out cause we would love for him to be free
> running around the apartment. He never used to scratch
> the door until my gf moved apartments and thats he started
> scratching the door. He usually doesnt cry inside the crate
> or at least doesnt cry more than a minute or so.

That's unaccpetable.

> He gets extremely anxious when he sees one of
> us moving away from him, he cries, tries to run, etc.

Separation anxiety is caused by the controller not
being there to control the environment.

> The dog is a 2 year old (his bday was about 2
> weeks ago) american cocker spaniel, his best
> friend is actually a 2 yr old siamese cat, and he
> loves to swim.
>
> We absolutely love this dog but we are unable to
> take him everywhere we want to because of his
> behavior (he was banned from playtime at petsmart).

Probably should stay far away from the "experts"
at pest mart, they're incomptent doubletalking dog
abusing thugs, for the most part.

> Please tell us how we can start working on fixing
> at least one of his issues, we are sure he can act
> like a littel perfect dog, we just dont know how to
> get him to do it.

That's EZ, FAST, and FREE if you follow all the
instructions in your FREE copy of The Puppy
Wizard's FREE WWW Wits' End Dog Training
Method Manual.

Subject: Re: Attention-Seeking Barking
Date: 2003-03-26 10:10:37 PST

HOWEDY tara o,

"Tara O." <nospam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:b5sik0$2diefm$1@ID-92443.news.dfncis.de...

> Here's a question for you guys.

You got a lot of nerve posting to HOWER dog lovers forum...
You hurt and kill dogs, tara o.

> My newest foster boy is a sweetheart.

Yeah... think you'll KILL IT???

> Dumped by owners because "he is uncontrollable."

So you'll treat IT like you did Summer, and KILL IT, to be fair,
cause she TRUSTED you, despite that she didn't have no
problems that YOU didn't cause, and The Puppy Wizzzard
offered her a FREE SAFE HOWES, forever.

> I've yet to see anything but a 15mo boy who is laid back,
> well-mannered and super-sweet.

That won't last long, you'll drive IT crazy like you did Summer
and the other dogs you've been kindly enough to KILL for
"Boxer Rescue."

> The horns may yet come out

All dog behavior problems are caused by mishandling.

> since I've only had him for 4 days but I don't see anything
> uncontrollable overall..not a reason to dump him anyway.

Yeah...

> One thing he does is bark, non-stop for attention.

IMAGINE?

> He barks outside but that's normally in response to other
> barking dogs or strange noises. I'm not looking to curb that.

Because you don't know HOWE.

> I just call him inside when he starts barking

Dogs bark because something's WRONG.

Dogs bark when they're SCARED.

Calling IT inside does not relieve his ANXIETY,
does not make the situation right, it just AVOIDS
and REINFORCES the FEAR ANXIETY PROBLEM.

> (with the weather so nice I've been leaving my back door open
> so the dogs can come and go into the fenced backyard). When
> he's excited he also barks but here again I'm not really looking
> to rid him of this behavior.

Right. His fear and anxiety mean NUTHIN to you... so long
as he's HOWETside and your neighbors don't complain.

> I'm working on teaching him "hush".

Try givin IT some CHEDDAR like you did Summer
when you KILLED her.

> Alot of dogs get vocal when excited

Yeah. That's HOWE COME they GO NUTS, like Summer did.

> so this isn't uncommon.

RIGHT. That's HOWE COME you hurt and kill them.

> The problem I'm having is that he barks inside when he
> wants something, normally attention.

Better not give in, he'll think he's alphalphal..

> He'll get right up in front of you and start barking,
> loudly and non-stop.

Like marie's dog Macula and a few others here.
You got a crate to lock IT in?

> Here's what I've tried so far:

BWWWAWHAHAHAHAAAA!!!

Thanks for sharing what didn't work.

> 1. Since he understands "NO"

You're a idiot, tara o. Dogs do not understand
being rejected and intimidated.

> I tried using the cue in a stern voice

Then you'll wonder HOWE COME the dog GOT NUTS???

> then withdrawing attention,

Yeah... GOOD LUCK.

> ready to pet him when he quieted down.

Oh, that'll be a real treat.

> He didnt' quiet down.

Of curse not. You'll intimidate punish hurt and crate this dog
till you make it NUTS and MURDER IT like you did Summer.

> 2. I've used no verbal commands and just withdrew eye
> contact and moved away.

To REJECT the dogs friendly overtures...

> This didn't work as he'll just follow-me and keep
> going around me if my back is turned..continuing
> the barking.


Yeah. Don't tell IT he's a GOOD BOY. That'd
make you seem inferior to IT and teach the
dog that you're not in control.

> 3. I've tried doing #2 but walking to a room
> and closing the door, shutting him out.

You mean, to cure his BONDING activity...

> This didn't work either.

Right. That'll just make him FRANTICK.

> The barking will literally go on until he either gets distracted
> by something/someone else or I give in and pet him.

Yeah. Better be careful about that, the dog
might become alphalphal.

> Its my suspicion

IMAGINE?

> that his former owners either neglected him

Like you've been INTENTIONALLY doin.

> to the extent that he learned that barking gets him attention

IMAGINE? You've tried scolding and locking him in a other
room and ignoring IT... and nuthin's worked. Try CHEDDAR.

> and he's perfectly willing to accept negative attention.

Yeah. You mean you HURT and INTIMIDATE him.

Could be he's trying to become alphalpha
by wearin you HOWET chokin him.

> Or that it was a cute puppy behavior

Dogs bark because there's SUMPTHIN WRONG.

> that was reinforced and turned into an adolescent
> nuisance behavior.

Yeah... blame the other handler, blame the dog...

> Either way he is definitely of the assumption that
> barking will bring attention, no matter the kind of
> attention.

Yeah. That's HOWE COME dogs bark. Ain't it.

> On two occasions withdrawing attention did work

Did it really?

> because he was distracted.

You're a half wit tara o, like your pals diddler and professor
SCRUFF SHAKE, tara.green2, melanie, melinda, shelly,
lugNUT, and Master Of Deception blankman, to name a
few of like minded lying dog abusing Punk Thug Cowards.

> I then went to him and gave him praise and petted him.

BWAAAAHAHAHAHAAA!!!

> He's not looking so much for verbal recognition as he is for
> being touched. Petting him lightly while he's barking will make
> him stop because he's being petted.

No. That'll reinforce his ANXIETY and make IT
MOORE dependent on you... to quiet his FEARS.

> I don't want to teach a new behavior of bark-bark-bark-silence

You already have.

> in order to get attention but am not sure how
> to proceed with stopping this behavior.

You've got to praise him in advance, and do some TRAINING.
Takes The Puppy Wizzzard's FREE WWW Wits' End Dog
Training Method Manual Students only a few minutes, maybe
LESS, to break this behavior...

> Normally the withdrawal of eye contact and
> moving away does the trick

You mean, rejecting the dog's BONDING attempts,
like it did for Summer.

> but not with him.

Right. Keep it up, he'll be DEAD in a few weeks. Like Summer.

> Tara


"Estel J. Hines" <ejhines@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:w86dna9lBfNZgbTdRVn-hA@comcast.com...
>
>>> Until i read the Jerry method of Bark reduction,
>>> it went something like this with our 11 month old
>>> puppy "Yoshi"
>
>>> Yoshi: Bark, bark,
>
>>> us: HUSH Youshi
>
>>> Yoshi Bark, bark......................
>
>>> us: Hush Youshi
>
>>> Yoshi BARK, BARK, BARK, .................................
>
>>> it stopped when Yoshi got tired barking
>
>>> We decided to try the Jerry method
>
>>> :Yoshi: BARK, BARK
>
>>> US: GOOD Yoshi, Good Boy, who is it?
>
>>> Yoshi Bark, Bark
>
>>> US: It's ok, good boy Yoshi, We know them.
>
>>> Yosh without fail, now stops after we say that.
>
>>> I must say, it is so much more fun, when we
>>> can praise him, to deal with things like this.
>
>>> Thanks Jerry
>>> ps: We are just starting to go thru the Jerry
>>> Papers, and learn how to live with our son
>>> "Yoshi", whom we love very much. --
>
>>> Best Regards,
>>> Estel J. Hines

==============

Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2003 9:06 AM

Hello.

I never posted here (or anywhere) before.
I never trained or owned a dog before this
year.

I downloaded the Wit's End, read it, corresponded
with Mr. Howe and trained my dog to come and to
stop barking in a weekend.

Our dog, Jake, had been treated with kindness the
whole time we had him, about 10 months, but his
earlier life is unknown.

I worked on the hot-cold exercise for about 30
minutes when he suddenly "got it". After that
he came to me every time with no hesitation.

I used the cans filled with pennies to teach him
not to bark. If he now starts to bark, I go to the
door or window, say "Good Boy, its' alright" and
he usually calms down right away.

A couple of times I had to get the cans
out again to reinforce the behavior.

We feel a strong bond with this animal
and he is very eager to accept our love.

So with all the vitriolic spewing going on,
I have to believe Mr. Howe is right.

His method worked for us.

I don't know if it would have been quite
as effective if we had tried another method first.

Florence
------------------------------------

"Ned" <komodo71@rogers.com> wrote in message
news:fQIg9.25850$561.25365@news02.bloor.is.net.cable.rogers.com...

> Hi !
> Our black lab girl is 3 months old (she will be 4 months
> on the 30th).
>
> When we first brought her home she had a bad habit
> of trying to nip our faces (including my 3 year old twins)
> during playtime. It drove everyone in the house nuts
> and it brought my little girls to tears as you can imagine.
>
> We tried saying no, and that would just get her even
> more excited, so we would yell no and that would just
> get her "scared" but still excited. In short it just wasn't
> working.
>
> So we finally did what Jerry has suggested to you.
> We used a sound do distract her and we would
> immediately praise her.
>
> I have to say that it worked great. BUT she then
> moved on to nipping at the feet LOL silly little thing.
>
> So again, we tried no, and then louder no, but again
> it didn't work so we went for the distraction and praise.
> I must say that she is doing great!
>
> I hope that helps.
> Edyta aka Ned

===================


----- Original Message -----
From: "LEE " <>
To: <ThePuppyWizard@EarthLink.Net>
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2004 6:11 AM
Subject: Wits end training in England

HOWEDY Lee,

> Hi,
> I have stumbled across your training method on the internet

EXCELLENT!

Nuthin happens by accident or coincidence.

> and I am pleased to say, one part of it has worked
> already after only 3 days of training.

Wonderful! Please follow the method entirely and
PRECISELY. It NEVER FAILS, but it's very unforgiving
of mistakes and doesn't play well with other methods.

> I own two boxers, one of which is a rescue dog who
> sufferred from 'seperation anxiety'

SA usually takes no more than WON day or two, to break.

> and would constantly chew his bedding in his crate
> when in the house alone. After only 2 sessions of
> praising his favourite nylon bone and leaving it in
> front of the crate before leaving, the behaviour is gone!
> Lee.

HOWETSTANDING!

===================

Dave Cohen <cohen1@total.net writes:
Re: Barking Deterrants Needed...

Hi.

Please understand that I do not know Jerry and have
spoken with him briefly once by email.

I have no stake or interest in the success of his business.
I simply want to thank him publicly for one of his tips, with
regards to separation anxiety.

I thought it seemed far fetched to praise a stuffed animal
and then say good bye to my own dog, but I am usually a
very open minded person, so I tried it. Well, lo and behold-
the damn trick worked!

I think Jerry has some intriguing techniques, and
personally I think everyone who constantly criticizes
him is not understanding his logic.

Thank you Jerry!

********************************************************


"melisande" <melisande55@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:rLo08.751$0H.535937@paloalto-snr1.gtei.net...

> I haven't quite finished reading the free chapter on
> your website,

It's moore than a chapter, it's a comprehensive,
total, complete, gestalt method to train all animals
to any level you desire.

> but it already worked miracles with our three dogs.

Excellent.

> The barking at the door has diminished so much
> that, well, frankly, we're stunned.

My methods work faster than any others, anywhere at
any price, including the thirty five level of medical grade
static like stimulation devices and pronged spiked pinch
choke collars our "experts" here love so much.

> We were sort of on the same page with you to begin
> with (no crates, no choke chains).

Good. Crates aren't inherently bad, only the way they're
misused.

> A lot of what you say reminds of my dad's techniques
> (he's an 84 year old dog lover,one of those about whom
> people say, "dogs really like him." He's
> never had a badly behaved dog.

Good. I've got a lot in common with folks who are gentle
and treat animals kindly.

> We'd never heard of the noise emphasis,

You mean the sound distraction and praise techniques.

> but the overall plan makes great sense.

Yes, one of my students Paul B wrote an excellent post
recently I'll include it at the bottom. It'll explain HOWE the
distraction and praise process works from his POV as an
experience handler using my methods.

> I did have a question. The hardest part for us to
> implement is the verbal praise only.

Why? That should be spontaneous and in association
with every glance towards you and every thought.

> It's so hard not to pet and stroke the dog (especially
> our seven month old).

Oh. Patting is O.K., only not in conjunction with a
thought or command, as it will interrupt the thought
process and may lock the dog's thoughts on an
inappropriate idea.

> Can you give me the rationale behind that?

It's called positive thigmotaxis, the opposition reflex.
Like if we're walking our dog and want to prevent him
from interacting with another dog, and we pull back
on the collar, that often triggers the dog to go out of
control.

As long as there's contact on the collar, the dog will
continue his original thoughts about interacting with
the passerby. Then because the dog is out of control,
the handler needs to further force restraint, making
communication with the dog's MIND, impossible.

> It will help me modify my own behavior.

Any time your dog is close enough to be patted is
fine to pat him, as long as we're not working with a
command or thought we want him to process.

> Anyway, your approach is amazing.

Yes, it's caused quite a stir here. If my methods are as
effective and fast and safe as I claim and my students
confirm, that pretty much means that all of my critics
are DEAD WRONG, and all's that's left for me to
do is shovel some dirt over them over and let 'em push
up daisies.

> Melisande

==========================================




The Puppy Wizard
2004-07-11 17:29:16 EST
HOWEDY nik,

"Nik Egerton" <nik.e@paradise.net.nz> wrote in message
news:8o2Ic.7223$NA1.690901@news02.tsnz.net...
>
> I reckon the trick would be to catch him in
> the act of barking .....

That so, nik? You think trainin dogs is a TRICK?

> Have you tried leaving for work as normal in
> the car etc, then parking the car a little way
> down the road and walking back in quietly
> and telling him off.

You mean scold and intimidate your dog
for being AFRAID, nik? That'd be MENTALLY
ILL. Wouldn't it, nik.

> You have to actually catch him barking though.

The dog ain't gonna bark if you don't molest IT, nik.

> Good luck

Dog trainin AIN'T LUCK, nik.

"Luck is for SUCKERS," The Puppy Wizard's DADDY.

> Nik

"Just Want To Second Jerry's Method For
Dealing With This (Destructive Separation
Anxiety). I've Suggested It To Quite A Few
Clients Now And It's Worked 'EVERY TIME
The Very First Time' - marilyn, Trainer, 33
Years Experience.

"His Amazing Progress Almost Makes Me Cry.
Your Method Takes Positive Training To The
Next Level And Should Really Be Used By All
Trainers Who Call Themselves Trainers. Thank
You For Helping Me Save His Life," Kay Pierce,
Professional Trainer, 30 Years Experience.

Here's the rest of your advice, nik:

"The Koehler Method of Dog Training"
Howell Book House, 1996":

BARKING, WHINING, HOWLING, YODELING,
SCREAMING, AND WAILING

The fact that you realize you have such a problem
makes it certain you have "reproved" the dog often
enough to let him know you were against his sound
effects, even though your reproving didn't quiet them,
so we'll bypass the loudly clapped hands, the cup of
water in his face, and the "shame-shames" and start
with something more emphatic.

We'll begin with the easiest kind of vocalist to correct:
the one that charges gates, fences, doors, and
windows, barking furiously at familiar or imaginary
people and objects. A few clusters of BBs from a
good slingshot, in conjunction with the light line and
plenty of temptations, will cause such a dog to use
his mind rather than his mouth.

But you won't make the permanent impression unless
you supply dozens of opportunities for him to exercise
the control he thus acquires. Make sure these
opportunities don't always come at the same time
of the day, else he may learn to observe the "quiet
hour" and pursue his old routines at other times.

With the help of the light line, it will be easy to follow
the BBs with a long down to make sure he gets the
most from his lesson. As was mentioned before,
eliminating the senseless barking will not lessen the
dog's value as a watchdog but rather, as he grows
more discriminating, increase it.

The dog who vocalizes in bratty protest or
lonesomeness because you're gone constitutes a
different problem. If it is impractical for someone
to stay with him constantly (there are owners who
cater to neurosis by employing dog sitters), you'll have
to heed the neighbors and the law and quiet the dog.

This calls for a little ingenuity as well as a heavy hand.

Attach a line to your dog's collar, so your corrective
effort doesn't turn into a footrace around the house
until you reach a stalemate under the bed. This use of
the line in the correction will also serve to establish it
as a reminder to be quiet as the dog drags it around
when you're not present.

Next, equip yourself with a man's leather belt or a
strap heavy enough to give your particular dog a good
tanning. Yup-we're going to strike him. Real hard.
Remember, you're dealing with a dog who knows he
should be quiet and neighbors who have legal rights to
see that he does.

When the noise comes, instead of trying to sneak up to
the door so you can barge in while he's still barking,
which is generally impossible, respond to his first
sound with an emphatic bellow of "out," and keep
on bellowing as you charge back to his area.

Thunder through the door or gate, snatch up the belt
that you've conveniently placed, and descend on him.
He'll have no chance to dodge if you grab the line and
reel him in until his front feet are raised off the floor or,
if he's a big dog, until you've snubbed him up with a
hitch on something.

While he's held in close, lay the strap vigorously
against his thighs.

Keep pouring it on him until he thinks it's the bitter
end. A real whaling now may cut down somewhat
on the number of repeat performances that will be
necessary.

When you're finished and the dog is convinced that he
is, put him on a long down to think things over while you
catch your breath. After fifteen or twenty minutes, release
him from the stay and leave the area again.

So that you won't feel remorseful, reflect on the truth
that a great percentage of the barkers who are given
away to "good homes" end up in the kindly black box
with the sweet smell. Personally, I've always felt that
it's even better to spank children, even if they "cry
out," than to "put them to sleep."

You might have a long wait on that comfortable porch
before your dog starts broadcasting again. When he
does, let your long range bellow tie the consequent
correction to his first sound and repeat the
spanking, if anything emphasizing it a bit more.

It might be necessary to spend a Saturday or another
day off so that you'll have time to follow through
sufficiently. When you have a full day, you will be able
to convince him each yelp will have a bad
consequence, and the consistency will make your job
easier. If he gets away with his concert part of the
time, he'll be apt to gamble on your inconsistency.

After a half dozen corrections, "the reason and the
correction" will be tied in close enough association so
that you can move in on him without the preliminary
bellowing of "out." From then on, it's just a case of
laying for the dog and supplying enough bad
consequences of his noise so he'll no longer feel like
gambling.

If there has been a long history of barking and whining,
it sometimes requires a lot of work to make a dog be
quiet when you're not around, so give the above
method an honest try before you presume your dog
requires a more severe correction." wm koehler.

Perhaps the OP just needs some puppy raisin tips?:

Here's lying frosty dahl BEATING A DOG to TRAIN IT:

Borrowed from: "Puppy Raising Tips" from
professional trainers, John and Amy Dahl.

"Around four months many puppies can withstand a
correction. Unfortunately this is the time they start
teething and if their mouth hurts, they may act
generally sensitive. If this is the case, be patient and
wait for all those baby teeth to fall out.

In training, retrievers often respond to physical correction
better than verbal correction. While "NO!" is extremely
useful if puppy is about to bite an electrical cord or steal
food off the table, when you are teaching them something
(like obedience) a sharp jerk on their lead or swat with a
stick gets the message across with less emotion and less
effect on their confidence.

If they drop the dummy and act like their mouth hurts
when they are teething, stop all retrieving and wait for
their mouth to feel better. A correction should be just
severe enough to get the dog to respond.

Repeated weak corrections are very stressful to the dog."

=====================

Amy Dahl writes:

"From where I sit, there is a difference. I haven't noticed
any of the contingent who like Koehler trying to force
their method on everyone, or calling others names because
they do not use the method.

I personally believe the Koehler method is a more
humane way of teaching than any alternative I have
studied.

And I am not averse to learning--I have studied a
number of methods.

Koehler, of course, stops far short of the specialized
work I do with retrievers, and some of the things in his
book, such as making the dog walk behind the handler
on the "finish," are inappropriate for retriever work.

Why do I think Koehler's method is more humane than others?

First, I don't believe "corrections vs. no corrections" is as
significant to dogs as it is to people. Applied correctly,
Koehler's method uses *no* intimidation, fear, or emotional
manipulation. It is clear and definite, and the handler's
actions are always predictable. The method is masterfully
designed to prevent confrontation or vying for control in
any way. It places high demands of responsibility on the
trainer, and takes a great deal of commitment to do correctly,
so it is not for the casual "dabbler." When done well,very
few corrections are needed.

In brief, I think the clarity, predictability, and absence
of emotional blackmail weigh more strongly in the method's
favor, than the occasional brief unpleasantness of correction
weighs against it." lying frosty dahl.

Here's lyingdogDUMMY aka tommy soronson
beatin a dog to HOWEsbreak IT to save ITS life:

But FIRST, a little good KOEHLER trainin:

Koehler On Correcting The Housebreaking
Backslider.

"If the punishment is not severe enough, some of
these "backsliders" will think they're winning and
will continue to mess in the house.

An indelible impression can sometimes be
made by giving the dog a hard spanking of long
duration, then leaving him tied by the mess he's
made so you can come back at twenty minute
intervals and punish him again for the same
thing. (Dogs are REALLY stupid. J.H.)

In most cases, the dog that deliberately does this
disagreeable thing cannot be made reliable by the
light spanking that some owners seem to think is
adequate punishment. It will be better for your dog,
as well as the house, if you really pour it on him."

"Housebreaking Problems:

"The Koehler Method of Dog Training"
Howell Book House, 1996"

Occasionally, there is a pup who seems determined to
relieve himself inside the house, regardless of how
often he has the opportunity to go outside. This dog
may require punishment.

Make certain he is equipped with a collar
and piece of line so he can't avoid correction.

When you discover a mess, move in fast, take him to
the place of his error, and hold his head close enough
so that he associates his error with the punishment.

Punish him by spanking him with a light strap or
switch. Either one is better than a folded newspaper.

It is important to your future relationship that you
do not rush at him and start swinging before you get
hold of him.

When he's been spanked, take him outside.
Chances are, if you are careful in your feeding
and close observation, you will not have to do
much punishing.

Be consistent in your handling.

To have a pup almost house-broken and then force
him to commit an error by not providing an opportunity
to go outside is very unfair. Careful planning will
make your job easier.

The same general techniques of housebreaking
apply to grown dogs that are inexperienced in the
house.

For the grown dog who was reliable in the house
and then backslides, the method of correction
differs somewhat.

In this group of "backsliders" we have the
"revenge piddler." This dog protests being alone by
messing on the floor and often in the middle of a bed.

The first step of correction is to confine the dog
closely in a part of the house when you go away, so
that he is constantly reminded of his obligation.

The fact that he once was reliable in the house is
proof that the dog knows right from wrong, and it
leaves you no other course than to punish him
sufficiently to convince him that the satisfaction of
his wrongdoing is not worth the consequences.

If the punishment is not severe enough, some of
these "backsliders" will think they're winning and
will continue to mess in the house.

An indelible impression can sometimes be made
by giving the dog a hard spanking of long duration,
then leaving him tied by the mess he's made so you
can come back at twenty minute intervals and
punish him again for the same thing.

In most cases, the dog that deliberately does this
disagreeable thing cannot be made reliable by the
light spanking that some owners seem to think is
adequate punishment.

It will be better for your dog, as well as the house,
if you really pour it on him.

"Handsome Jack Morrison"
<*n@thedetonatorearthlink.net> wrote in
<message
news:a236iv0ngp58gv9jmi818kbmk928rjcokq@4ax.com...
> On 26 Jul 2003 22:14:29 GMT, dogstar716@aol.com
> (DogStar716)
wrote:
>
> >>>Never mind dogman :)
> >>
> >>You too? Some folks just never learn.
> >
> >Uh huh :)
>
> One of the signs of mental illness is to say "Uh
> huh" a lot.
>
> >>PS: If the "trainer" you were talking about isn't
> >>on this list, he (or she) is NOT an approved
> >>Koehler trainer, no matter how loud you scream
> >>otherwise.
> >
> >May I laugh again? LOL! One doesn't need to be on
> >a list to use Koehlers methods or teach his
> >methods.
>
> Let me be among the first (apparently) to tell you
> that not every trainer who uses a leash is a
> *Koehler* trainer.
>
> Sheesh.
>
> This person may call herself a Koehler trainer, but
> if she's hanging 12 week old puppies, she's about as
> far from a Koehler trainer as a dog trainer can
> possibly be.
>
> Again, this is just your IGNORANCE showing.
>
> I can call myself a devout Christian, but if I'm not
> adhering to the doctrine, I'm something else.
>
> >>http://www.koehlerdogtraining.com/patoflearn.html
> >Sorry, the very first sentences make me aware that
> >whoever wrote it knows nothing about PR based
> >training:
> >
> >"Amidst the current (and politically correct) trend
> >in Positive Reinforcement Only training systems"
> >
> >You cannot use PR only.
>
> Au contraire. Many, many posters to r.p.d.b. (and
> many other places as well) *claim* that they use
> nothing but R. You know, the PPers.
>
> And they do it quite loudly, too.
>
> Surely you aren't blind (and deaf), as well as
> ignorant?
>
> Those are hard handicaps to overcome, Dogstar.
>
> >And if you knew anything about PR BASED training,
> >you would realize that. It's not all cookies and
> >babytalk.
>
> There is no stronger supporter of R than Handsome
> Jack Morrison, but I also use every behavioral tool
> in my bag, including R-, P, and P-, because I know
> that even R has its limits.
>
> You'd know that too, if you didn't have your head in
> the sand.
>
> > But that seems to be the battle cry of the
> > Koehler-ites.
>
> The Koehlerites have no battle cry.
>
> They have behaviorism on their side, and that's more
> than enough.
>
> >I don't need instruction on how to give my dogs a
> >proper leash correction as I do not rely on a leash
> >to control or teach my dog.
>
> That may or may not be suitable for your needs, but
> it's not suitable for the majority of dog owners,
> especially since the advent of leash laws.
>
> Besides, after just a few weeks of proper Koehler
> training, Koehler dogs likewise are no longer in
> need of a leash.
>
> That you apparently don't know that, once again
> shows me just how ignorant of anything to do with
> Koehler you are.
>
> >My last two dogs have been trained offleash right
> >from the start, using rewards for what I like, and
> >nothing for what I don't like.
>
> Good for you, and if that level of training is good
> enough for you, fine. But it's not good enough for
> many of the rest of us.
>
> >Again, I'm not saying Koehler doesn't work.
>
> I really have no idea what you're saying anymore,
> because you apparently know so damn little about
> Koehler and behavioral principles in general that
> it's hard to have an informed discussion with you.
>
> PS: It boggles my mind at how stupid you must be to
> keep denying that those certain harsh methods are
> only for LAST RESORT situations, intended only to
> SAVE A DOG'S LIFE, even after I've repeatedly given
> you direct *quotes* from Koehler's book saying just
> that. It's like you don't even care how stupid
> people think you are, or how devious you are, etc.
> That can't help your cause any. You'd think that
> you'd at least want to *appear* to be honest, even
> if you're not. -- Handsome Jack Morrison *gently
> remove the detonator to reply via e-mail


"Handsome Jack Morrison"
<*n@thedetonatorearthlink.net> wrote in
<message
news:spb3ivgh7prvq9omhka0bcif0tfknv6oop@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 17:52:18 -0400, "Krishur"
> <kris_brock@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >Good books huh?
>
> Absolutely. Some are, in fact, classics.
>
> >Which idea was your favorite, the one where they
> >tell you to alpha roll a "dominant" dog,
>
> There's nothing inherently wrong with rolling a dog
> (i.e., it *can* and *does* work in *some*
> situations). Unfortunately, most people either do it
> incorrectly, do it at the wrong time, etc.
>
> >or where they tell you that you didn't hit him hard
> >enough if he doesn't yelp or approaches you within
> >5 minutes of his punishment?
>
> If physical discipline is deemed necessary (after
> careful evaluation), it's much more cruel not to get
> it over with quickly than it is to do it
> incrementally and half-heartedly, which usually only
> invites the need for even more discipline.
>
> >Maybe you liked when they recommend these beatings
> >for housebreaking accidents, chewing/destructive
> >behavior, stealing, trying to get on your bed
> >at night and dog on dog aggression.
>
> At no time do the Monks *ever* advocate beating a
> dog. A swat on the rump or a check to the chin does
> *not* constitute a "beating."
>
> I'm sorry if you don't agree.
>
> And each of those behavior "problems" needs to be
> looked at in its proper context.
>
> A quote from the Monks:
>
> "We repeat, these situations may merit physical
> discipline. Since no book can pretend to analyze
> every individual dog and situation, we feel
> obligated to emphasize from the outset that
> discipline is never an arbitrary training
> technique to be applied to each and every dog for
> all offenses. We do, however, believe that physical
> and verbal discipline can be an effective technique.
> The best policy if you experience any of the above
> problems is to consult a qualified trainer or
> veterinarian for evaluation of your individual
> situation....
>
> "If discipline is decided upon as a training
> technique, it should be the proper technique. We
> feel we have developed several methods that depend
> less on violent physical force than timing, a flair
> for drama, and the element of surprise.
> We feel an obligation, as responsible trainers, to
> map out
> these methods, rather than simply skip the topic
> because it is unpleasant. Dog owners want to know
> what to do."
>
> In other words, physical discipline is reserved for
> those serious, special occasions when other methods
> have failed.
>
> For example, they do not recommend using physical
> discipline for *routine* housebreaking chores --
> only on those rare occasions when an already
> reliably housebroken dog is (after careful
> evaluation) deemed to be soiling the house on
> purpose, backsliding, etc.
>
> I'll give you an actual example. Years ago, an
> adult dog was brought to me as an *incurable*
> house-soiler. It was either get the dog reliably
> housetrained or the dog was going on a one way trip
> to the pound. Being the kind, compassionate trainer
> that I am, I was prepared to do whatever it took to
> get this dog house-trained and save his life.
>
> After several weeks of more or less traditional
> training, and to poor result, I brought out the big
> guns -- physical and verbal discipline. Whenever the
> dog soiled the house (no, you don't even have to
> catch him in the act), I immediately (but very
> calmly) tossed a leash on his collar, dragged him to
> the scene of the crime, and (using a large
> chair as a prop) tethered him to the leg of the
> chair, with his nose about two inches away from the
> poop. After a couple of swats on the rump, some
> loud vocalizing, and a wait of about 20 minutes, I'd
> release the dog and then ignore him for a while. I
> had to repeat this process *three* times, I think --
> and the house-soiling miraculously stopped. The dog
> went home to enjoy a long and contented life with
> his original owners, and I got to feel good about
> myself.
>
> So, yes, the Monk's books are good ones. Even for
> novices.
>
> Yup, that's my opinion, and I'm sticking to it.
>
> -- Handsome Jack Morrison *gently remove the
> detonator to reply via e-mail



G_Reaper
2004-07-13 16:54:41 EST
"Dalesgate" <notlikely@abuse.net> wrote in message news:<40efd4b6$0$562$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader03.plus.net>...
> Is there any way to stop a young Beagle from barking when left alone? He
> will often stop after 10-20 mins, but this is still unacceptable.
>
> My labrador learned to quiet when left alone within a few weeks...
>
> Regards


Hmmmmmmmm.....I'd say a baseball bat to the head a few times should work.

The Puppy Wizard
2004-07-13 22:14:29 EST
Looks like it's either that or shock or surgically mutilate IT.

"G_Reaper" <skeets@rmci.net> wrote in message
news:a4e192b9.0407131254.8ff667d@posting.google.com...
> "Dalesgate" <notlikely@abuse.net> wrote in message
news:<40efd4b6$0$562$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader03.plus.net>...
> > Is there any way to stop a young Beagle from barking when left
alone? He
> > will often stop after 10-20 mins, but this is still
unacceptable.
> >
> > My labrador learned to quiet when left alone within a few
weeks...
> >
> > Regards
>
>
> Hmmmmmmmm.....I'd say a baseball bat to the head a few times
should work.


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