Research Discussion: The_Redshift_that’s_an_observed_variable?

The_Redshift_that’s_an_observed_variable?
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Brad Guth
2012-10-03 17:22:54 EST
Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
infinite stream of photons, if instead there were but only one photon
of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given distant
star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like if our
observation of this one photon was moving us away from that distant
star at nearly the speed of light?

Remember that this request is based upon individual photons actually
moving or propagating their way through mostly empty space, and the
velocity in between us and that distant star is supposedly a continual
variable imposed by the Hubble constant, as continually stretching
that individual photon over any given distance and time, so along the
way there’s not any one speed/velocity variation or redshift to
contend with.

Part 2: Are not older galaxies redder than newer galaxies?

http://groups.google.com/groups/search
http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”

Brad Guth
2012-10-06 13:13:30 EST
Depending on which galaxy its measured from, the Hubble constant is
different, even locally negative if it were measured from within the
Great Attractor that could be considered as acting somewhat like a
wormhole or soon to become a ultra mega black hole once a few galaxies
merge.

Locally there are any number of galaxies (including our galaxy)
heading into the GA at the average trek velocity of roughly 700 km/
sec, and of those coming head on to us will likely be making their
final encounter of merging with us at 1500+ km/sec. Of course we’ll
first have to survive getting rear-ended by the Andromeda galaxy
that’s nearby and closing fast. Even a galactic glancing blow could
become highly problematic for billions of solar systems like ours if
only 0.1% of stars and their planet collective get perturbed or
otherwise contributed to.

According to the latest interpretations of our supposedly forever
expanding universe, the expansion rate from our perspective is roughly
74.3 km/sec/3e6 ly, or 2.477e-2 m/sec/ly. Unfortunately this
migration or cosmic molecular outsourcing to places ever farther away,
and of galaxies going every which way at the same time (including
those colliding and of mergers) makes everything a whole lot more
complicated and dependent on each galaxy doing its own local thing
while this expansion or big ongoing flow is taking place.

In other words, most anything past 12.1e9 ly from us is going to
become invisible to us, because we’re moving faster than ‘c’ away from
it, and the propagation or FIFO handoff of those distant photons will
never again reach us unless something has slowed down or having sort
of been dragging its feet. Otherwise, older galaxies are also
becoming redder due to the fusion process that all main-sequence stars
must endure as they age, not to mention the greater populations of
those forever lasting red and brown dwarfs that seem to exist in the
vast majority. A brown dwarf can also gain mass of helium, hydrogen
and other elements as those are made available, thus further
sustaining themselves.

However, with perhaps at least 5e55 kg and possibly 5e56 kg worth of
cosmic mass (including its dark/clear aether), there should be
sufficient gravity to have slowed and even as having reversed this
rate of expansion, unless there’s an ongoing aether dark/clear flow or
some kind of excess diamagnetic helium or the collective photon
displacement to contend with.

http://groups.google.com/groups/search
http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”


On Oct 3, 2:22 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> infinite stream of photons, if instead there were but only one photon
> of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given distant
> star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like if our
> observation of this one photon was moving us away from that distant
> star at nearly the speed of light?
>
> Remember that this request is based upon individual photons actually
> moving or propagating their way through mostly empty space, and the
> velocity in between us and that distant star is supposedly a continual
> variable imposed by the Hubble constant, as continually stretching
> that individual photon over any given distance and time, so along the
> way there’s not any one speed/velocity variation or redshift to
> contend with.
>
> Part 2:  Are not older galaxies redder than newer galaxies?
>
>  http://groups.google.com/groups/search
>  http://translate.google.com/#
>  Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”


Double-A
2012-10-07 17:04:37 EST
On Oct 3, 2:22 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> infinite stream of photons, if instead there were but only one photon
> of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given distant
> star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like if our
> observation of this one photon was moving us away from that distant
> star at nearly the speed of light?


What if something happened to it along the way? Safety in numbers!

Double-A

Brad Guth
2012-10-07 17:14:36 EST
On Oct 7, 2:04 pm, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
> On Oct 3, 2:22 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> > infinite stream of photons, if instead there were but only one photon
> > of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given distant
> > star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like if our
> > observation of this one photon was moving us away from that distant
> > star at nearly the speed of light?
>
> What if something happened to it along the way?  Safety in numbers!
>
> Double-A

According to the mainstream status-quo, there's nothing obstructive
between us and way the hell out there. Obviously that's another lie,
because our galaxy alone has 1e5 rogue/nomad planets per star, and
that's not even counting any of the planetoids and mother-lodes of
smaller stuff (including carbon buckyballs) for them photons to
encounter.

How about transmitting and attempting to detect a maximum of one
photon/sec? (that's a lot of photons/year, whereas at least one should
get through)


Double-A
2012-10-07 17:42:31 EST
On Oct 7, 2:14 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 7, 2:04 pm, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
>
> > On Oct 3, 2:22 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> > > infinite stream of photons, if instead there were but only one photon
> > > of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given distant
> > > star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like if our
> > > observation of this one photon was moving us away from that distant
> > > star at nearly the speed of light?
>
> > What if something happened to it along the way?  Safety in numbers!
>
> > Double-A
>
> According to the mainstream status-quo, there's nothing obstructive
> between us and way the hell out there.  Obviously that's another lie,


Yes, because "empty" space contains an average of about 1 hydrogen
atom per cubic centimeter. That's a lot of opportunities for a photon
to collide with something over billions of ligjht years!

Double-A


> because our galaxy alone has 1e5 rogue/nomad planets per star, and
> that's not even counting any of the planetoids and mother-lodes of
> smaller stuff (including carbon buckyballs) for them photons to
> encounter.
>
> How about transmitting and attempting to detect a maximum of one
> photon/sec? (that's a lot of photons/year, whereas at least one should
> get through)


Brad Guth
2012-10-10 07:10:55 EST
On Oct 7, 2:42 pm, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
> On Oct 7, 2:14 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Oct 7, 2:04 pm, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
>
> > > On Oct 3, 2:22 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > > Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> > > > infinite stream of photons, if instead there were but only one photon
> > > > of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given distant
> > > > star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like if our
> > > > observation of this one photon was moving us away from that distant
> > > > star at nearly the speed of light?
>
> > > What if something happened to it along the way?  Safety in numbers!
>
> > > Double-A
>
> > According to the mainstream status-quo, there's nothing obstructive
> > between us and way the hell out there.  Obviously that's another lie,
>
> Yes, because "empty" space contains an average of about 1 hydrogen
> atom per cubic centimeter.  That's a lot of opportunities for a photon
> to collide with something over billions of light years!
>
> Double-A

Plus all those larger items of carbon buckyballs and whatever the dark/
clear aether has to contribute could be highly problematic.

Supposedly a quasar as well as closely orbiting binary neutrons or WDs
could yield those individual photons, although thus far we haven't
objectively proven that any singular photon actually moves through
space or that of its unmolecular aether.

>
>
>
> > because our galaxy alone has 1e5 rogue/nomad planets per star, and
> > that's not even counting any of the planetoids and mother-lodes of
> > smaller stuff (including carbon buckyballs) for them photons to
> > encounter.
>
> > How about transmitting and attempting to detect a maximum of one
> > photon/sec? (that's a lot of photons/year, whereas at least one should
> > get through)


Brad Guth
2012-10-10 07:23:54 EST
Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
infinite chain or stream of photons, if instead there were but only
one photon of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given
distant star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like
if our observation of this one individual photon was moving us away
from that distant star at nearly the speed of light?

A 550 nm photon should become way more then red:
–50% ‘c’ = 1100 nm
–75% ‘c’ = 2200 nm
–87.5% ‘c’ = 4400 nm

Remember that this request is based upon individual photons actually
moving or propagating their way through mostly empty space
(unmolecular space could be packed solid with dark/clear aether), and
the velocity in between us and that distant star is supposedly a
continual variable imposed by the Hubble constant, as continually
stretching that individual photon over any given distance and time,
and thereby along the way there’s not going to be any one speed/
velocity variation or redshift to contend with.

Part 2: Are not those older galaxies inherently redder than newer
galaxies?

Our own galaxy when viewed from any distance by a WISE or JWST kind of
optical instrument would likely be a somewhat reddish kind, perhaps
because the vast majority of its stars are M-class red dwarfs that
according to recent observations outnumber all other stars by at least
a magnitude (some speculating more than a couple magnitudes), and the
majority of those RDs likely host viable planets (including super-
Earths like Gliese 667). Otherwise we also have any number of spent
stars as red giants and others of greater mass than our sun that’ll
soon enough become RGs. The indirect evidence as to the unusually
large number of wandering/rogue nomad or unbound planets from 2e22 kg
and larger (up to 2e28 kg) might further suggest as to how many main-
sequence stars have become depleted RGs as having given away their
planets.
http://cronodon.com/SpaceTech/StarPopulations.html
http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.2687
http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/How-Many-Unbound-Planets-Roam-the-Milky-Way-140917963.html?pageSize=0
http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=22313

So, don’t look at me as though I’m inventing stuff that isn’t out
there, or having suggested the impossible. Exoplanetology and
Observationology kind of go together as a scientific team effort in
the recent discovery of RDs and their planets, as well as eventually
JWST quantifying the number of nomad planets could be yet another nail
in the coffin of what makes our galaxy tick within the unknowns of our
forever expanding universe.

On the other hand, unlike the expanding universe of galaxies we can’t
possibly do anything with or about, we also have the extremely nearby
planet Venus that’s anything but dull or inert, especially at
GuthVenus. The IR surface of Venus isn't Goldilocks friendly, but
it's also not technically insurmountable to those of us with any
forward looking resolve, that by rights should matter a great deal.

http://groups.google.com/groups/search
http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”



G=EMC^2
2012-10-10 10:04:27 EST
On Oct 10, 7:23 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> infinite chain or stream of photons, if instead there were but only
> one photon of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given
> distant star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like
> if our observation of this one individual photon was moving us away
> from that distant star at nearly the speed of light?
>
> A 550 nm photon should become way more then red:
>  –50% ‘c’ =  1100 nm
>  –75% ‘c’ =  2200 nm
>  –87.5% ‘c’ = 4400 nm
>
> Remember that this request is based upon individual photons actually
> moving or propagating their way through mostly empty space
> (unmolecular space could be packed solid with dark/clear aether), and
> the velocity in between us and that distant star is supposedly a
> continual variable imposed by the Hubble constant, as continually
> stretching that individual photon over any given distance and time,
> and thereby along the way there’s not going to be any one speed/
> velocity variation or redshift to contend with.
>
> Part 2:  Are not those older galaxies inherently redder than newer
> galaxies?
>
> Our own galaxy when viewed from any distance by a WISE or JWST kind of
> optical instrument would likely be a somewhat reddish kind, perhaps
> because the vast majority of its stars are M-class red dwarfs that
> according to recent observations outnumber all other stars by at least
> a magnitude (some speculating more than a couple magnitudes), and the
> majority of those RDs likely host viable planets (including super-
> Earths like Gliese 667).  Otherwise we also have any number of spent
> stars as red giants and others of greater mass than our sun that’ll
> soon enough become RGs.  The indirect evidence as to the unusually
> large number of wandering/rogue nomad or unbound planets from 2e22 kg
> and larger (up to 2e28 kg) might further suggest as to how many main-
> sequence stars have become depleted RGs as having given away their
> planets.
>  http://cronodon.com/SpaceTech/StarPopulations.html
>  http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.2687
>  http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/How-Many-Unbound-Planets-Roam-the...
>  http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=22313
>
> So, don’t look at me as though I’m inventing stuff that isn’t out
> there, or having suggested the impossible.  Exoplanetology and
> Observationology kind of go together as a scientific team effort in
> the recent discovery of RDs and their planets, as well as eventually
> JWST quantifying the number of nomad planets could be yet another nail
> in the coffin of what makes our galaxy tick within the unknowns of our
> forever expanding universe.
>
> On the other hand, unlike the expanding universe of galaxies we can’t
> possibly do anything with or about, we also have the extremely nearby
> planet Venus that’s anything but dull or inert, especially at
> GuthVenus.  The IR surface of Venus isn't Goldilocks friendly, but
> it's also not technically insurmountable to those of us with any
> forward looking resolve, that by rights should matter a great deal.
>
>  http://groups.google.com/groups/search
>  http://translate.google.com/#
>  Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”

Red and blue can be useful in a fast moving space ship. TeBet

Brad Guth
2012-10-10 11:37:45 EST
On Oct 10, 7:04 am, "G=EMC^2" <herbertglazi...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 10, 7:23 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> > infinite chain or stream of photons, if instead there were but only
> > one photon of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given
> > distant star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like
> > if our observation of this one individual photon was moving us away
> > from that distant star at nearly the speed of light?
>
> > A 550 nm photon should become way more then red:
> >  –50% ‘c’ =  1100 nm
> >  –75% ‘c’ =  2200 nm
> >  –87.5% ‘c’ = 4400 nm
>
> > Remember that this request is based upon individual photons actually
> > moving or propagating their way through mostly empty space
> > (unmolecular space could be packed solid with dark/clear aether), and
> > the velocity in between us and that distant star is supposedly a
> > continual variable imposed by the Hubble constant, as continually
> > stretching that individual photon over any given distance and time,
> > and thereby along the way there’s not going to be any one speed/
> > velocity variation or redshift to contend with.
>
> > Part 2:  Are not those older galaxies inherently redder than newer
> > galaxies?
>
> > Our own galaxy when viewed from any distance by a WISE or JWST kind of
> > optical instrument would likely be a somewhat reddish kind, perhaps
> > because the vast majority of its stars are M-class red dwarfs that
> > according to recent observations outnumber all other stars by at least
> > a magnitude (some speculating more than a couple magnitudes), and the
> > majority of those RDs likely host viable planets (including super-
> > Earths like Gliese 667).  Otherwise we also have any number of spent
> > stars as red giants and others of greater mass than our sun that’ll
> > soon enough become RGs.  The indirect evidence as to the unusually
> > large number of wandering/rogue nomad or unbound planets from 2e22 kg
> > and larger (up to 2e28 kg) might further suggest as to how many main-
> > sequence stars have become depleted RGs as having given away their
> > planets.
> >  http://cronodon.com/SpaceTech/StarPopulations.html
> >  http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.2687
> >  http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/How-Many-Unbound-Planets-Roam-the...
> >  http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=22313
>
> > So, don’t look at me as though I’m inventing stuff that isn’t out
> > there, or having suggested the impossible.  Exoplanetology and
> > Observationology kind of go together as a scientific team effort in
> > the recent discovery of RDs and their planets, as well as eventually
> > JWST quantifying the number of nomad planets could be yet another nail
> > in the coffin of what makes our galaxy tick within the unknowns of our
> > forever expanding universe.
>
> > On the other hand, unlike the expanding universe of galaxies we can’t
> > possibly do anything with or about, we also have the extremely nearby
> > planet Venus that’s anything but dull or inert, especially at
> > GuthVenus.  The IR surface of Venus isn't Goldilocks friendly, but
> > it's also not technically insurmountable to those of us with any
> > forward looking resolve, that by rights should matter a great deal.
>
> >  http://groups.google.com/groups/search
> >  http://translate.google.com/#
> >  Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”
>
> Red and blue can be useful in a fast moving space ship.  TeBet

Yes, everything ahead is shifted bluish, normal to the side, top or
bottom and otherwise reddish behind, and perhaps only because
individual photons as we know them don't actually move.

American
2012-10-10 12:56:22 EST
On Oct 10, 11:37 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 10, 7:04 am, "G=EMC^2" <herbertglazi...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Oct 10, 7:23 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > Instead of making this astrophysics request easy by offering an
> > > infinite chain or stream of photons, if instead there were but only
> > > one photon of 550 nm emitted and precisely directed at us by a given
> > > distant star, then what would that singular photon look or detect like
> > > if our observation of this one individual photon was moving us away
> > > from that distant star at nearly the speed of light?
>
> > > A 550 nm photon should become way more then red:
> > >  –50% ‘c’ =  1100 nm
> > >  –75% ‘c’ =  2200 nm
> > >  –87.5% ‘c’ = 4400 nm
>
> > > Remember that this request is based upon individual photons actually
> > > moving or propagating their way through mostly empty space
> > > (unmolecular space could be packed solid with dark/clear aether), and
> > > the velocity in between us and that distant star is supposedly a
> > > continual variable imposed by the Hubble constant, as continually
> > > stretching that individual photon over any given distance and time,
> > > and thereby along the way there’s not going to be any one speed/
> > > velocity variation or redshift to contend with.
>
> > > Part 2:  Are not those older galaxies inherently redder than newer
> > > galaxies?
>
> > > Our own galaxy when viewed from any distance by a WISE or JWST kind of
> > > optical instrument would likely be a somewhat reddish kind, perhaps
> > > because the vast majority of its stars are M-class red dwarfs that
> > > according to recent observations outnumber all other stars by at least
> > > a magnitude (some speculating more than a couple magnitudes), and the
> > > majority of those RDs likely host viable planets (including super-
> > > Earths like Gliese 667).  Otherwise we also have any number of spent
> > > stars as red giants and others of greater mass than our sun that’ll
> > > soon enough become RGs.  The indirect evidence as to the unusually
> > > large number of wandering/rogue nomad or unbound planets from 2e22 kg
> > > and larger (up to 2e28 kg) might further suggest as to how many main-
> > > sequence stars have become depleted RGs as having given away their
> > > planets.
> > >  http://cronodon.com/SpaceTech/StarPopulations.html
> > >  http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.2687
> > >  http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/How-Many-Unbound-Planets-Roam-the...
> > >  http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=22313
>
> > > So, don’t look at me as though I’m inventing stuff that isn’t out
> > > there, or having suggested the impossible.  Exoplanetology and
> > > Observationology kind of go together as a scientific team effort in
> > > the recent discovery of RDs and their planets, as well as eventually
> > > JWST quantifying the number of nomad planets could be yet another nail
> > > in the coffin of what makes our galaxy tick within the unknowns of our
> > > forever expanding universe.
>
> > > On the other hand, unlike the expanding universe of galaxies we can’t
> > > possibly do anything with or about, we also have the extremely nearby
> > > planet Venus that’s anything but dull or inert, especially at
> > > GuthVenus.  The IR surface of Venus isn't Goldilocks friendly, but
> > > it's also not technically insurmountable to those of us with any
> > > forward looking resolve, that by rights should matter a great deal.
>
> > >  http://groups.google.com/groups/search
> > >  http://translate.google.com/#
> > >  Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”
>
> > Red and blue can be useful in a fast moving space ship.  TeBet
>
> Yes, everything ahead is shifted bluish, normal to the side, top or
> bottom and otherwise reddish behind, and perhaps only because
> individual photons as we know them don't actually move.

Interesting take on the origin of super-resident photons @ 10^94 to
around 10^127 watts-seconds per cubic centimeter of the ZPF (Wheeler).
IMO lightspeed dilation occurs in proportion to the intensity of
bosonic exchange of photons throughout the aether.

According to a mysterious internal fractal symmetry, the galactic
velocity of the Milky Way galaxy is exactly the same as the Fine
Structure Constant says it is (c/137), within the Atomic unit of
velocity. This suggests a dynamic, internal symmetry, between both the
quantum and macroscopic worlds.
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