Research Discussion: A Fitting Eulogy To Neil Armstrong.

A Fitting Eulogy To Neil Armstrong.
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Hägar
2012-08-28 10:18:49 EST
Even the most spastic Liberal Moon Hoaxers should agree with
this tribute to the life of a dedicated Engineer and Scientist.

By Margaret Dean
8/28/2012

I wasn't going to write anything about the death of Neil Armstrong until
this morning, when I heard a commentator on the radio say that the former
astronaut had the reputation of being "private, almost to a fault." Of
course, I know what he meant -- Neil Armstrong was never comfortable with
the attention that his historic achievements brought with them, and at a
certain point he stopped granting interviews or making public appearances
almost entirely. The words "painfully shy" have appeared in obituaries for
Neil Armstrong since his death on Saturday, but his fellow astronauts all
agree that he wasn't shy, that he was comfortable speaking his mind and
could deploy a sly sense of humor. But he never liked being the center of
attention and never enjoyed the fame that came with being the first human on
the moon.

Some people think Neil Armstrong's choice to stop giving interviews and
making appearances showed him to be standoffish, rude, or even ungrateful.
To me, it shows just the opposite -- he had the humility to see the first
moon landing as an accomplishment of many people, not just one man. His view
of the meaning of Apollo was perhaps best summed up in what he chose to say
at the moment he placed his first boot on the surface of the moon. His words
reflect the profundity of the achievement while also deliberately shifting
the focus from his own part in it to what the moment meant for all mankind.

After the crew of Apollo 11 returned from the moon, they embarked on a world
tour during which they visited 28 cities in just over a month. It was an
experience that Michael Collins found enjoyable, Buzz Aldrin found in turns
exhilarating and exhausting, and Neil Armstrong found excruciating. As the
years went on, Neil Armstrong tried to remove himself more and more from the
limelight, until he finally stopped doing interviews and appearances
altogether except on the rarest of occasions. People who knew Neil Armstrong
understood his decision and appreciated the time and energy he had already
given to the public, but not everyone was so gracious. I once spent a day
with Buzz Aldrin at a book festival around the 40th anniversary of Apollo
11, and more than one of the fans who came out to meet him took a moment to
complain about the fact that Neil Armstrong no longer did similar events.
One woman vented: "I helped pay for your trip to the moon! And he can't even
sign a piece of paper for me?"

Buzz Aldrin, unflappably polite, said he was sorry she was having trouble
completing her collection and thanked her for coming. But I wished I could
get her alone to challenge her logic. Yes, American taxpayers paid for the
trip to the moon that Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins enjoyed. But the three
astronauts also risked their lives in doing so, and this was after they had
already served their country by flying combat missions in Korea and later
flying experimental aircraft as test pilots. I wanted to ask her: Exactly
how many years of his life do you think Neil Armstrong owes us? Exactly how
many autographs should he have to give? A thousand? Ten thousand? How many
times should he have to answer the question, "What did it feel like to walk
on the moon?" In the day I spent with Buzz Aldrin, I saw him give hundreds
of autographs and answer that question hundreds of times, but Buzz Aldrin is
an extrovert, a person who clearly enjoys the company of new people and
thrives on sharing his stories with others. By all accounts, Neil Armstrong
was a textbook introvert, a person who found encounters with new people
draining rather than energizing. (Michael Collins seems to be somewhere in
the middle.) Neil Armstrong's tendency toward introversion might have been
one of the factors that made him the perfect choice to be the commander of
Apollo 11, and as part of that duty he made the sacrifice of setting aside
his introversion to share his experiences publicly for years after the
journey. How much more did he owe us?

I saw a Tweet yesterday from a journalist who tells the story of driving to
Neil Armstrong's home uninvited on the twentieth anniversary of the moon
landing to find the former astronaut resealing his driveway. He reports that
Armstrong "said no thanks to interview."

Many people responded on Twitter that this anecdote was awesome, but I have
to admit that it makes me sad. I like to think of Neil Armstrong, nearing
60, doing some outdoor home improvement on the twentieth anniversary of his
moonwalk -- that seems just right for him. And it makes me cringe to imagine
him being forced to interrupt his meditative work to have to answer, for the
millionth time, a request from a person wanting something from The First Man
on the Moon. At a certain point in his life, a man should be able to reseal
his driveway in peace, and if anyone had earned that right, it was Neil
Armstrong.

I always told myself that if I ever had the chance to meet Neil Armstrong I
wouldn't request an autograph or ask him any questions about his time in
space -- I would just thank him for his service to our country. Now I'll
never have the chance. Neil Armstrong was not only the first man on the
moon, he was also a man who showed us how to live out a dignified second act
in a life marked by a startlingly hard-to-beat first. For the record, I
think his crewmates have done so as well, and their choices reflect their
personalities as well as Armstrong's did his.

Neil Armstrong turned down many offers of more money and more fame to teach
aeronautical engineering. I like to think his students might have absorbed
not only his first-hand knowledge of his subject, but also his unspoken
lessons about how to live a life. Godspeed Neil Armstrong, and may we
remember your dignity, humility, and hard work as well as your daring and
beautiful First.




Brad Guth
2012-08-28 10:33:12 EST
On Aug 28, 7:18 am, "Hägar" <hs...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Even the most spastic Liberal Moon Hoaxers should agree with
> this tribute to the life of a dedicated Engineer and Scientist.
>
> By Margaret Dean
> 8/28/2012
>
> I wasn't going to write anything about the death of Neil Armstrong until
> this morning, when I heard a commentator on the radio say that the former
> astronaut had the reputation of being "private, almost to a fault." Of
> course, I know what he meant -- Neil Armstrong was never comfortable with
> the attention that his historic achievements brought with them, and at a
> certain point he stopped granting interviews or making public appearances
> almost entirely. The words "painfully shy" have appeared in obituaries for
> Neil Armstrong since his death on Saturday, but his fellow astronauts all
> agree that he wasn't shy, that he was comfortable speaking his mind and
> could deploy a sly sense of humor. But he never liked being the center of
> attention and never enjoyed the fame that came with being the first human on
> the moon.
>
> Some people think Neil Armstrong's choice to stop giving interviews and
> making appearances showed him to be standoffish, rude, or even ungrateful.
> To me, it shows just the opposite -- he had the humility to see the first
> moon landing as an accomplishment of many people, not just one man. His view
> of the meaning of Apollo was perhaps best summed up in what he chose to say
> at the moment he placed his first boot on the surface of the moon. His words
> reflect the profundity of the achievement while also deliberately shifting
> the focus from his own part in it to what the moment meant for all mankind.
>
> After the crew of Apollo 11 returned from the moon, they embarked on a world
> tour during which they visited 28 cities in just over a month. It was an
> experience that Michael Collins found enjoyable, Buzz Aldrin found in turns
> exhilarating and exhausting, and Neil Armstrong found excruciating. As the
> years went on, Neil Armstrong tried to remove himself more and more from the
> limelight, until he finally stopped doing interviews and appearances
> altogether except on the rarest of occasions. People who knew Neil Armstrong
> understood his decision and appreciated the time and energy he had already
> given to the public, but not everyone was so gracious. I once spent a day
> with Buzz Aldrin at a book festival around the 40th anniversary of Apollo
> 11, and more than one of the fans who came out to meet him took a moment to
> complain about the fact that Neil Armstrong no longer did similar events.
> One woman vented: "I helped pay for your trip to the moon! And he can't even
> sign a piece of paper for me?"
>
> Buzz Aldrin, unflappably polite, said he was sorry she was having trouble
> completing her collection and thanked her for coming. But I wished I could
> get her alone to challenge her logic. Yes, American taxpayers paid for the
> trip to the moon that Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins enjoyed. But the three
> astronauts also risked their lives in doing so, and this was after they had
> already served their country by flying combat missions in Korea and later
> flying experimental aircraft as test pilots. I wanted to ask her: Exactly
> how many years of his life do you think Neil Armstrong owes us? Exactly how
> many autographs should he have to give? A thousand? Ten thousand? How many
> times should he have to answer the question, "What did it feel like to walk
> on the moon?" In the day I spent with Buzz Aldrin, I saw him give hundreds
> of autographs and answer that question hundreds of times, but Buzz Aldrin is
> an extrovert, a person who clearly enjoys the company of new people and
> thrives on sharing his stories with others. By all accounts, Neil Armstrong
> was a textbook introvert, a person who found encounters with new people
> draining rather than energizing. (Michael Collins seems to be somewhere in
> the middle.) Neil Armstrong's tendency toward introversion might have been
> one of the factors that made him the perfect choice to be the commander of
> Apollo 11, and as part of that duty he made the sacrifice of setting aside
> his introversion to share his experiences publicly for years after the
> journey. How much more did he owe us?
>
> I saw a Tweet yesterday from a journalist who tells the story of driving to
> Neil Armstrong's home uninvited on the twentieth anniversary of the moon
> landing to find the former astronaut resealing his driveway. He reports that
> Armstrong "said no thanks to interview."
>
> Many people responded on Twitter that this anecdote was awesome, but I have
> to admit that it makes me sad. I like to think of Neil Armstrong, nearing
> 60, doing some outdoor home improvement on the twentieth anniversary of his
> moonwalk -- that seems just right for him. And it makes me cringe to imagine
> him being forced to interrupt his meditative work to have to answer, for the
> millionth time, a request from a person wanting something from The First Man
> on the Moon. At a certain point in his life, a man should be able to reseal
> his driveway in peace, and if anyone had earned that right, it was Neil
> Armstrong.
>
> I always told myself that if I ever had the chance to meet Neil Armstrong I
> wouldn't request an autograph or ask him any questions about his time in
> space -- I would just thank him for his service to our country. Now I'll
> never have the chance. Neil Armstrong was not only the first man on the
> moon, he was also a man who showed us how to live out a dignified second act
> in a life marked by a startlingly hard-to-beat first. For the record, I
> think his crewmates have done so as well, and their choices reflect their
> personalities as well as Armstrong's did his.
>
> Neil Armstrong turned down many offers of more money and more fame to teach
> aeronautical engineering. I like to think his students might have absorbed
> not only his first-hand knowledge of his subject, but also his unspoken
> lessons about how to live a life. Godspeed Neil Armstrong, and may we
> remember your dignity, humility, and hard work as well as your daring and
> beautiful First.

He taught us nothing about the R&D or piloting of fly-by-rocket
landers. Why is that?

Almost anyone nowadays can put stuff in orbit around our moon, but
without a highly reliable and fuel efficient fly-by-rocket lander that
gives lots of downrange capability with fuel and payload to spare, you
can't do much else.

http://groups.google.com/groups/search
http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”

Hägar
2012-08-28 11:14:16 EST

"Brad Guth" <bradguth@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:3348ac21-15a3-42e6-a0d6-d872fe2830b2@k17g2000yqp.googlegroups.com...
On Aug 28, 7:18 am, "H\ufffdgar" <hs...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Even the most spastic Liberal Moon Hoaxers should agree with
> this tribute to the life of a dedicated Engineer and Scientist.
>
> By Margaret Dean
> 8/28/2012

< snipped to conserve virtual paper >

He taught us nothing about the R&D or piloting of fly-by-rocket
landers. Why is that?

*** But he did ... he was a teacher, a professor, in fact. The fact that you
are too stupid to even pass the entrance examn is reflected in your idiotic
statement above. ***

Almost anyone nowadays can put stuff in orbit around our moon, but without a
highly reliable and fuel efficient fly-by-rocket lander that gives lots of
downrange capability with fuel and payload to spare, you can't do much else.

*** You droll repeating monkey, that's exactly what Neil and the other Moon
Landings taught us. Why do you have the need to continuously echo the
obvious ... Oh, I see ... it's because you
have nothing new to contribute (stale old Venus regurgitations
don't count) ... ever.



Brad Guth
2012-08-28 12:26:56 EST
On Aug 28, 8:14 am, "H gar" <hs...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:3348ac21-15a3-42e6-a0d6-d872fe2830b2@k17g2000yqp.googlegroups.com...
> On Aug 28, 7:18 am, "H gar" <hs...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Even the most spastic Liberal Moon Hoaxers should agree with
> > this tribute to the life of a dedicated Engineer and Scientist.
>
> > By Margaret Dean
> > 8/28/2012
>
> <  snipped to conserve virtual paper >
>
> He taught us nothing about the R&D or piloting of fly-by-rocket
> landers.  Why is that?
>
> *** But he did ... he was a teacher, a professor, in fact. The fact that you
> are too stupid to even pass the entrance examn is reflected in your idiotic
> statement above. ***
>
> Almost anyone nowadays can put stuff in orbit around our moon, but without a
> highly reliable and fuel efficient fly-by-rocket lander that gives lots of
> downrange capability with fuel and payload to spare, you can't do much else.
>
> *** You droll repeating monkey, that's exactly what Neil and the other Moon
> Landings taught us.  Why do you have the need to continuously echo the
> obvious ... Oh, I see ... it's because you
> have nothing new to contribute (stale old Venus regurgitations
> don't count)  ... ever.

Not another usable fly-by-rocket lander or viable prototype was ever
created, and without such means that going to/from any naked (non-
atmospheric) planet or moon is highly problematic if not impossible.
Only most recently has highly supercomputer flown stuff worked some of
the time, and they had momentum reaction wheels.

There's no public documentation of his class ever teaching any such
R&D specifics about fly-by-rocket landers, other than purely
subjective stuff and otherwise having to obfuscate or exclude all of
the previous and ongoing failures that he himself was a big part of.

http://groups.google.com/groups/search
http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth,Brad_Guth,Brad.Guth,BradGuth,BG,Guth Usenet/”Guth Venus”

Sir Gilligan Horry
2012-08-28 13:15:42 EST
On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 07:18:49 -0700, "Hägar" <hsahm@yahoo.com> wrote:

>By Margaret Dean
>8/28/2012
>
>I wasn't going to write anything about the death of Neil Armstrong until
>this morning, when I heard a commentator on the radio say that the former
>astronaut had the reputation of being "private, almost to a fault." Of
>course, I know what he meant -- Neil Armstrong was never comfortable with
>the attention that his historic achievements brought with them, and at a
>certain point he stopped granting interviews or making public appearances
>almost entirely. The words "painfully shy" have appeared in obituaries for
>Neil Armstrong since his death on Saturday, but his fellow astronauts all
>agree that he wasn't shy, that he was comfortable speaking his mind and
>could deploy a sly sense of humor. But he never liked being the center of
>attention and never enjoyed the fame that came with being the first human on
>the moon.
>
>Some people think Neil Armstrong's choice to stop giving interviews and
>making appearances showed him to be standoffish, rude, or even ungrateful.
>To me, it shows just the opposite -- he had the humility to see the first
>moon landing as an accomplishment of many people, not just one man. His view
>of the meaning of Apollo was perhaps best summed up in what he chose to say
>at the moment he placed his first boot on the surface of the moon. His words
>reflect the profundity of the achievement while also deliberately shifting
>the focus from his own part in it to what the moment meant for all mankind.
>
>After the crew of Apollo 11 returned from the moon, they embarked on a world
>tour during which they visited 28 cities in just over a month. It was an
>experience that Michael Collins found enjoyable, Buzz Aldrin found in turns
>exhilarating and exhausting, and Neil Armstrong found excruciating. As the
>years went on, Neil Armstrong tried to remove himself more and more from the
>limelight, until he finally stopped doing interviews and appearances
>altogether except on the rarest of occasions. People who knew Neil Armstrong
>understood his decision and appreciated the time and energy he had already
>given to the public, but not everyone was so gracious. I once spent a day
>with Buzz Aldrin at a book festival around the 40th anniversary of Apollo
>11, and more than one of the fans who came out to meet him took a moment to
>complain about the fact that Neil Armstrong no longer did similar events.
>One woman vented: "I helped pay for your trip to the moon! And he can't even
>sign a piece of paper for me?"
>
>Buzz Aldrin, unflappably polite, said he was sorry she was having trouble
>completing her collection and thanked her for coming. But I wished I could
>get her alone to challenge her logic. Yes, American taxpayers paid for the
>trip to the moon that Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins enjoyed. But the three
>astronauts also risked their lives in doing so, and this was after they had
>already served their country by flying combat missions in Korea and later
>flying experimental aircraft as test pilots. I wanted to ask her: Exactly
>how many years of his life do you think Neil Armstrong owes us? Exactly how
>many autographs should he have to give? A thousand? Ten thousand? How many
>times should he have to answer the question, "What did it feel like to walk
>on the moon?" In the day I spent with Buzz Aldrin, I saw him give hundreds
>of autographs and answer that question hundreds of times, but Buzz Aldrin is
>an extrovert, a person who clearly enjoys the company of new people and
>thrives on sharing his stories with others. By all accounts, Neil Armstrong
>was a textbook introvert, a person who found encounters with new people
>draining rather than energizing. (Michael Collins seems to be somewhere in
>the middle.) Neil Armstrong's tendency toward introversion might have been
>one of the factors that made him the perfect choice to be the commander of
>Apollo 11, and as part of that duty he made the sacrifice of setting aside
>his introversion to share his experiences publicly for years after the
>journey. How much more did he owe us?
>
>I saw a Tweet yesterday from a journalist who tells the story of driving to
>Neil Armstrong's home uninvited on the twentieth anniversary of the moon
>landing to find the former astronaut resealing his driveway. He reports that
>Armstrong "said no thanks to interview."
>
>Many people responded on Twitter that this anecdote was awesome, but I have
>to admit that it makes me sad. I like to think of Neil Armstrong, nearing
>60, doing some outdoor home improvement on the twentieth anniversary of his
>moonwalk -- that seems just right for him. And it makes me cringe to imagine
>him being forced to interrupt his meditative work to have to answer, for the
>millionth time, a request from a person wanting something from The First Man
>on the Moon. At a certain point in his life, a man should be able to reseal
>his driveway in peace, and if anyone had earned that right, it was Neil
>Armstrong.
>
>I always told myself that if I ever had the chance to meet Neil Armstrong I
>wouldn't request an autograph or ask him any questions about his time in
>space -- I would just thank him for his service to our country. Now I'll
>never have the chance. Neil Armstrong was not only the first man on the
>moon, he was also a man who showed us how to live out a dignified second act
>in a life marked by a startlingly hard-to-beat first. For the record, I
>think his crewmates have done so as well, and their choices reflect their
>personalities as well as Armstrong's did his.
>
>Neil Armstrong turned down many offers of more money and more fame to teach
>aeronautical engineering. I like to think his students might have absorbed
>not only his first-hand knowledge of his subject, but also his unspoken
>lessons about how to live a life. Godspeed Neil Armstrong, and may we
>remember your dignity, humility, and hard work as well as your daring and
>beautiful First.
>
>

Thank You.

I could post videos, MP3s, and info about some non-moon landings,
but I better focus on finding the best people to support my
$500 Million Dollar App idea :-)

So instead of some non-moon landings proof,
I will just post proof of tweety birds...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xx43vcV2aX0


Besides, $500 Million Dollars will help develop
"multi-dimensional weapons" to teach the mothman creatures not to
follow our blood banks.


________________________

John A. Keel "talks about UFOs appearing to an inordinate number of
menstruating females, as well as an attempted abduction of a full
blood bank vehicle (during the Point Pleasant Mothman flap"

http://rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=14572&start=60

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Keel

________________________




.
.
.
.
.
.
.
__________________




Alt Alien Research Intelligence Agency Official Admiral Wizzard.
(i156.photobucket.com/albums/t2/SirGilliganHorry/Alien_UFO_Research_Intelligence_Agency.jpg)
... here... http://goo.gl/A7l9U

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Bast
2012-08-28 14:27:07 EST


H\ufffdgar wrote:
> Even the most spastic Liberal Moon Hoaxers should agree with
> this tribute to the life of a dedicated Engineer and Scientist.
>
> By Margaret Dean
> 8/28/2012
>
> I wasn't going to write anything about the death of Neil Armstrong until
> this morning, when I heard a commentator on the radio say that the
> former astronaut had the reputation of being "private, almost to a
> fault." Of course, I know what he meant -- Neil Armstrong was never
> comfortable with the attention that his historic achievements brought
> with them, and at a certain point he stopped granting interviews or
> making public appearances almost entirely. The words "painfully shy"
> have appeared in obituaries for Neil Armstrong since his death on
> Saturday, but his fellow astronauts all agree that he wasn't shy, that
> he was comfortable speaking his mind and could deploy a sly sense of
> humor. But he never liked being the center of attention and never
> enjoyed the fame that came with being the first human on the moon.
>

<snipped>




He perhaps had a pang of conscience, and while he could never admit NASA
lied about the whole apollo project, or he knew he would be "vanished".
He couldn't support the lie,....so just said nothing.
However lies of omission are just as bad as outright deception.



HVAC
2012-08-28 14:36:47 EST
On 8/28/2012 2:27 PM, Bast wrote:
>
> He perhaps had a pang of conscience, and while he could never admit NASA
> lied about the whole apollo project, or he knew he would be "vanished".
> He couldn't support the lie,....so just said nothing.
> However lies of omission are just as bad as outright deception.



I had a pang of conscience once.....














--
"OK you cunts, let's see what you can do now" -Hit Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjO7kBqTFqo

David Staup
2012-08-28 15:20:05 EST

"HVAC" <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:k1j32f$vea$2@hvac.motzarella.org...
> On 8/28/2012 2:27 PM, Bast wrote:
>>
>> He perhaps had a pang of conscience, and while he could never admit NASA
>> lied about the whole apollo project, or he knew he would be "vanished".
>> He couldn't support the lie,....so just said nothing.
>> However lies of omission are just as bad as outright deception.
>
>
>
> I had a pang of conscience once.....

liberals have no conscience....bast-bitch has no understanding of a
conscience....or logic for that matter...therefor her
comments............................

chuckle





Bast
2012-08-28 18:41:15 EST


David Staup wrote:
> "HVAC" <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:k1j32f$vea$2@hvac.motzarella.org...
>> On 8/28/2012 2:27 PM, Bast wrote:
>>>
>>> He perhaps had a pang of conscience, and while he could never admit
>>> NASA lied about the whole apollo project, or he knew he would be
>>> "vanished". He couldn't support the lie,....so just said nothing.
>>> However lies of omission are just as bad as outright deception.
>>
>>
>>
>> I had a pang of conscience once.....
>
> liberals have no conscience....bast-bitch has no understanding of a
> conscience....or logic for that matter...therefor her
> comments............................
>
> chuckle



Unlike YOU.
I don't really need a conscience,....since I don't do anything I ever have
to be ashamed of later.
I may not be fabulously wealthy because I have morals, but I sleep good at
night.



HVAC
2012-08-29 06:47:14 EST
On 8/28/2012 6:41 PM, Bast wrote:
>
>>>
>>> I had a pang of conscience once.....
>>
>>
>
>
> Unlike YOU.
> I don't really need a conscience


Ya. That's what I said to myself before I got rid of mine.

Guilt is like carrying a load of bricks.
All you have to do is set it down.











--
"OK you cunts, let's see what you can do now" -Hit Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjO7kBqTFqo
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