Research Discussion: Hottest July Ever Recorded

Hottest July Ever Recorded
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HVAC
2012-08-09 07:15:03 EST

According to NOAA scientists, the average temperature for the contiguous
U.S. during July was 77.6°F, 3.3°F above the 20th century average,
marking the hottest July and the hottest month on record for the nation.
The previous warmest July for the nation was July 1936 when the average
U.S. temperature was 77.4°F. The warm July temperatures contributed to a
record-warm first seven months of the year and the warmest 12-month
period the nation has experienced since recordkeeping began in 1895.

During July, the contiguous U.S. averaged a precipitation total of 2.57
inches, which was 0.19 inch below average. Near-record dry conditions
were present for the middle of the nation, with the drought footprint
expanding to cover nearly 63 percent of the Lower 48, according the U.S.
Drought Monitor, while some areas such as the Gulf Coast and the
Southwest had wetter-than-average conditions.

This monthly analysis from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center is part
of the suite of climate services NOAA provides government, business and
community leaders so they can make informed decisions.

U.S. climate highlights -- July

Higher-than-average temperatures engulfed much of the contiguous
U.S. during July, with the largest temperature departures from the 20th
century average occurring across most of the Plains, the Midwest, and
along the Eastern Seaboard. Virginia had its warmest July on record,
with a statewide temperature 4.0°F above average. In total, 32 states
had July temperatures among its ten warmest, with seven states having
their second warmest July on record.
Drier-than-average conditions continued across the Central Plains
and Midwest during July. Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri had July
precipitation totals ranking among their ten driest. Maine had its fifth
driest July on record.
An active storm pattern in the Southwest contributed to California
having its fifth wettest July on record and Nevada having its eighth
wettest. Wetter-than-average conditions were also observed through the
rest of the Southwest, along the western Gulf Coast, and through the
Ohio Valley where West Virginia had its tenth wettest July.
The warm and dry conditions over a large portion of the country
were associated with ideal wildfire conditions. Over 2 million acres
were burned nationwide during July due to wildfires, nearly half a
million acres above average, and the fourth most on record since 2000.

Drought conditions update

The May-July months, an important period for agriculture, was the
second warmest and 12th driest such three-months for the Lower 48,
contributing to rapid expansion of drought. The central regions of the
country were hardest hit by the drought, where ten states had
three-month precipitation totals among their ten driest, including
Nebraska, Kansas, and Arkansas which were record dry.
According to the July 31, 2012, U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM), 62.9
percent of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing moderate to exceptional
drought at the end of July. This is an increase of about 6.9 percent
compared to the end of June. The maximum value of 63.9 percent reached
on July 24 is a record in the 13-year history of the USDM.
The area of the country in the worst drought categories (extreme to
exceptional drought) doubled from 10 percent last month to 22 percent
this month. The extreme dryness and excessive heat devastated crops and
livestock from the Great Plains to Midwest.
The Primary Corn and Soybean Agricultural Belt, hard hit by
drought, experienced its eighth driest July, third driest June-July, and
sixth driest April-July (growing season) in the 1895-2012 record.
According to the Palmer Drought Severity Index, whose record spans
the 20th century, about 57 percent of the contiguous U.S. was
experiencing moderate-to-extreme drought in July. The last drought this
extensive was in December 1956 when about 58 percent of the nation was
in moderate-to-extreme drought.

Year-to-date (January-July)

The January-July period was the warmest first seven months of any
year on record for the contiguous United States. The national
temperature of 56.4°F was 4.3°F above the long-term average. Most of the
contiguous U.S. was record and near-record warm for the seven-month
period, except the Pacific Northwest, which was near average.
The first seven months of 2012 were drier than average, ranking as
15th driest January-July on record. Below-average precipitation totals
were observed for a large portion of the country, with 12 states having
January-July precipitation totals among their ten driest. Above-average
precipitation was observed for the Upper Midwest and the Pacific Northwest.
The U.S. Climate Extremes Index (USCEI), an index that tracks the
highest and lowest 10 percent of extremes in temperature, precipitation,
drought and tropical cyclones across the contiguous U.S., was a
record-large 46 percent during the January-July period, over twice the
average value, and surpassing the previous record large CEI of 42
percent which occurred in 1934. Extremes in warm daytime temperatures
(83 percent) and warm nighttime temperatures (74 percent) both covered
record large areas of the nation, contributing to the record high
year-to-date USCEI value.

12-month period (August 2011-July 2012)

The August 2011-July 2012 period was the warmest 12-month period of
any 12-months on record for the contiguous U.S., narrowly surpassing the
record broken last month for the July 2011-June 2012 period by 0.07°F.
The nationally averaged temperature of 56.1°F was 3.3°F above the long
term average. Except Washington, which was near average, every state
across the contiguous U.S. had warmer than average temperatures for the
period.














--
"OK you cunts, let's see what you can do now" -Hit Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjO7kBqTFqo

Hägar
2012-08-09 10:48:41 EST

"HVAC" <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:k0063m$sf8$1@hvac.motzarella.org...
>
> According to NOAA scientists, the average temperature for the contiguous
> U.S. during July was 77.6\ufffdF, 3.3\ufffdF above the 20th century average, marking
> the hottest July and the hottest month on record for the nation. The
> previous warmest July for the nation was July 1936 when the average U.S.
> temperature was 77.4\ufffdF. The warm July temperatures contributed to a
> record-warm first seven months of the year and the warmest 12-month period
> the nation has experienced since recordkeeping began in 1895.
>
> During July, the contiguous U.S. averaged a precipitation total of 2.57
> inches, which was 0.19 inch below average. Near-record dry conditions were
> present for the middle of the nation, with the drought footprint expanding
> to cover nearly 63 percent of the Lower 48, according the U.S. Drought
> Monitor, while some areas such as the Gulf Coast and the Southwest had
> wetter-than-average conditions.
>
> This monthly analysis from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center is part of
> the suite of climate services NOAA provides government, business and
> community leaders so they can make informed decisions.
>
> U.S. climate highlights -- July
>
> Higher-than-average temperatures engulfed much of the contiguous U.S.
> during July, with the largest temperature departures from the 20th century
> average occurring across most of the Plains, the Midwest, and along the
> Eastern Seaboard. Virginia had its warmest July on record, with a
> statewide temperature 4.0\ufffdF above average. In total, 32 states had July
> temperatures among its ten warmest, with seven states having their second
> warmest July on record.
> Drier-than-average conditions continued across the Central Plains and
> Midwest during July. Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri had July
> precipitation totals ranking among their ten driest. Maine had its fifth
> driest July on record.
> An active storm pattern in the Southwest contributed to California
> having its fifth wettest July on record and Nevada having its eighth
> wettest. Wetter-than-average conditions were also observed through the
> rest of the Southwest, along the western Gulf Coast, and through the Ohio
> Valley where West Virginia had its tenth wettest July.
> The warm and dry conditions over a large portion of the country were
> associated with ideal wildfire conditions. Over 2 million acres were
> burned nationwide during July due to wildfires, nearly half a million
> acres above average, and the fourth most on record since 2000.
>
> Drought conditions update
>
> The May-July months, an important period for agriculture, was the
> second warmest and 12th driest such three-months for the Lower 48,
> contributing to rapid expansion of drought. The central regions of the
> country were hardest hit by the drought, where ten states had three-month
> precipitation totals among their ten driest, including Nebraska, Kansas,
> and Arkansas which were record dry.
> According to the July 31, 2012, U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM), 62.9
> percent of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing moderate to exceptional
> drought at the end of July. This is an increase of about 6.9 percent
> compared to the end of June. The maximum value of 63.9 percent reached on
> July 24 is a record in the 13-year history of the USDM.
> The area of the country in the worst drought categories (extreme to
> exceptional drought) doubled from 10 percent last month to 22 percent this
> month. The extreme dryness and excessive heat devastated crops and
> livestock from the Great Plains to Midwest.
> The Primary Corn and Soybean Agricultural Belt, hard hit by drought,
> experienced its eighth driest July, third driest June-July, and sixth
> driest April-July (growing season) in the 1895-2012 record.
> According to the Palmer Drought Severity Index, whose record spans the
> 20th century, about 57 percent of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing
> moderate-to-extreme drought in July. The last drought this extensive was
> in December 1956 when about 58 percent of the nation was in
> moderate-to-extreme drought.
>
> Year-to-date (January-July)
>
> The January-July period was the warmest first seven months of any year
> on record for the contiguous United States. The national temperature of
> 56.4\ufffdF was 4.3\ufffdF above the long-term average. Most of the contiguous U.S.
> was record and near-record warm for the seven-month period, except the
> Pacific Northwest, which was near average.
> The first seven months of 2012 were drier than average, ranking as
> 15th driest January-July on record. Below-average precipitation totals
> were observed for a large portion of the country, with 12 states having
> January-July precipitation totals among their ten driest. Above-average
> precipitation was observed for the Upper Midwest and the Pacific
> Northwest.
> The U.S. Climate Extremes Index (USCEI), an index that tracks the
> highest and lowest 10 percent of extremes in temperature, precipitation,
> drought and tropical cyclones across the contiguous U.S., was a
> record-large 46 percent during the January-July period, over twice the
> average value, and surpassing the previous record large CEI of 42 percent
> which occurred in 1934. Extremes in warm daytime temperatures (83 percent)
> and warm nighttime temperatures (74 percent) both covered record large
> areas of the nation, contributing to the record high year-to-date USCEI
> value.
>
> 12-month period (August 2011-July 2012)
>
> The August 2011-July 2012 period was the warmest 12-month period of
> any 12-months on record for the contiguous U.S., narrowly surpassing the
> record broken last month for the July 2011-June 2012 period by 0.07\ufffdF. The
> nationally averaged temperature of 56.1\ufffdF was 3.3\ufffdF above the long term
> average. Except Washington, which was near average, every state across the
> contiguous U.S. had warmer than average temperatures for the period.

I am sure your report will cause the IPCC panel members to experience severe
cases of "wood", if you know what I mean.

I expect Al "there's a fire raging twixt me loins" Gore will come a-crawling
out from under his rock in the very near future to continue his doomsday
litany, waving his finger in obnoxious Obamaesque fashion, screaming "I told
you so!!", flanked by that floppy-eared Limey Prince Chuckles and his
horse-faced courtesan Camilla, another pair of demented doomsday losers..

The world has been much hotter in the past ...and much, much colder as well.
There is evidence of at least three Global Snowball events, where the entire
Earth was covered in snow and ice. Unfortunately, extended hot periods do
not leave behind calling cards such as drop stones for scientific evaluation
and exploration.

All I know is that the early Viking grew crops and raised outdoor livestock
in, of all places, "Greenland", a feat that is still impossible today,
largely due to the present day cold climate there. The name of the place
should be a clue to the whining bed-wetters of Liberaldom ... but those
facts are difficult to discern when their heads are permanently parked up
their colons and their sight is obstructed by brown fecal matter.



HVAC
2012-08-09 11:15:12 EST
On 8/9/2012 10:48 AM, Hägar wrote:
>
>>
>> The August 2011-July 2012 period was the warmest 12-month period of
>> any 12-months on record for the contiguous U.S., narrowly surpassing the
>> record broken last month for the July 2011-June 2012 period by 0.07°F. The
>> nationally averaged temperature of 56.1°F was 3.3°F above the long term
>> average. Except Washington, which was near average, every state across the
>> contiguous U.S. had warmer than average temperatures for the period.
>
> I am sure your report will cause the IPCC panel members to experience severe
> cases of "wood", if you know what I mean.


It is what it is. The temperature has no agenda.


> The world has been much hotter in the past ...and much, much colder as well.
> There is evidence of at least three Global Snowball events, where the entire
> Earth was covered in snow and ice. Unfortunately, extended hot periods do
> not leave behind calling cards such as drop stones for scientific evaluation
> and exploration.


Higher temps cause reactions in certain fossilized animals and plants
which can and has been studied.


> All I know is that the early Viking grew crops and raised outdoor livestock
> in, of all places, "Greenland", a feat that is still impossible today,
> largely due to the present day cold climate there. The name of the place
> should be a clue to the whining bed-wetters of Liberaldom ... but those
> facts are difficult to discern when their heads are permanently parked up
> their colons and their sight is obstructed by brown fecal matter.


Again, records of temperature increases and decreases has no agenda.



It is what it is.


--
"OK you cunts, let's see what you can do now" -Hit Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjO7kBqTFqo

Harry K
2012-08-09 11:38:42 EST
On Aug 9, 8:15 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 8/9/2012 10:48 AM, Hägar wrote:
>
>
>
> >>      The August 2011-July 2012 period was the warmest 12-month period of
> >> any 12-months on record for the contiguous U.S., narrowly surpassing the
> >> record broken last month for the July 2011-June 2012 period by 0.07°F. The
> >> nationally averaged temperature of 56.1°F was 3.3°F above the long term
> >> average. Except Washington, which was near average, every state across the
> >> contiguous U.S. had warmer than average temperatures for the period.
>
> > I am sure your report will cause the IPCC panel members to experience severe
> > cases of "wood", if you know what I mean.
>
> It is what it is. The temperature has no agenda.
>
> > The world has been much hotter in the past ...and much, much colder as well.
> > There is evidence of at least three Global Snowball events, where the entire
> > Earth was covered in snow and ice.  Unfortunately, extended hot periods do
> > not leave behind calling cards such as drop stones for scientific evaluation
> > and exploration.
>
> Higher temps cause reactions in certain fossilized animals and plants
> which can and has been studied.
>
> > All I know is that the early Viking grew crops and raised outdoor livestock
> > in, of all places, "Greenland", a feat that is still impossible today,
> > largely due to the present day cold climate there.  The name of the place
> > should be a clue to the whining bed-wetters of Liberaldom ... but those
> > facts are difficult to discern when their heads are permanently parked up
> > their colons and their sight is obstructed by brown fecal matter.
>
> Again, records of temperature increases and decreases has no agenda.
>
> It is what it is.
>
> --
> "OK you cunts, let's see what you can do now" -Hit Girlhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjO7kBqTFqo

And as ususal the denialist ignores the RATE it is happening. In any
case his real argument shkould b tht those statistics are _weather_
and not _climate_ :)

Harry k

HVAC
2012-08-09 11:53:22 EST
On 8/9/2012 11:38 AM, harry k wrote:
>
>> Again, records of temperature increases and decreases has no agenda.
>>
>> It is what it is.
>>
>>
>
> And as ususal the denialist ignores the RATE it is happening. In any
> case his real argument shkould b tht those statistics are _weather_
> and not _climate_ :)


And your point is....?











--
"OK you cunts, let's see what you can do now" -Hit Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjO7kBqTFqo

Hägar
2012-08-09 12:30:29 EST

"HVAC" <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:k00k5u$ior$1@hvac.motzarella.org...
> On 8/9/2012 10:48 AM, H\ufffdgar wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> The August 2011-July 2012 period was the warmest 12-month period of
>>> any 12-months on record for the contiguous U.S., narrowly surpassing the
>>> record broken last month for the July 2011-June 2012 period by 0.07\ufffdF.
>>> The
>>> nationally averaged temperature of 56.1\ufffdF was 3.3\ufffdF above the long term
>>> average. Except Washington, which was near average, every state across
>>> the
>>> contiguous U.S. had warmer than average temperatures for the period.
>>
>> I am sure your report will cause the IPCC panel members to experience
>> severe
>> cases of "wood", if you know what I mean.
>
>
> It is what it is. The temperature has no agenda.
>
>
>> The world has been much hotter in the past ...and much, much colder as
>> well.
>> There is evidence of at least three Global Snowball events, where the
>> entire
>> Earth was covered in snow and ice. Unfortunately, extended hot periods
>> do
>> not leave behind calling cards such as drop stones for scientific
>> evaluation
>> and exploration.
>
>
> Higher temps cause reactions in certain fossilized animals and plants
> which can and has been studied.
>
>
>> All I know is that the early Viking grew crops and raised outdoor
>> livestock
>> in, of all places, "Greenland", a feat that is still impossible today,
>> largely due to the present day cold climate there. The name of the place
>> should be a clue to the whining bed-wetters of Liberaldom ... but those
>> facts are difficult to discern when their heads are permanently parked up
>> their colons and their sight is obstructed by brown fecal matter.
>
>
> Again, records of temperature increases and decreases has no agenda.
>

I have no idea what "has no agenda" means, but there are cycles of warm
weather, which eventually stops the Atlantic conveyor belt, which then
causes cycles of cold weather.
The oscillations are not identical in magnitude and duration
and have occurred long before the industrial revolution and
will continue long after we've done ourselves in by listening to the
dooms-dayer, carbon credit trading, green energy freaks.

But one thing is always true: when it gets really hot, invest in blankets,
for the cold, it's a coming.



HVAC
2012-08-09 12:35:09 EST
On 8/9/2012 12:30 PM, Hägar wrote:
>
>> Again, records of temperature increases and decreases has no agenda.
>>
>
> I have no idea what "has no agenda" means,


It means that shortly after I posted up these temperature measurements,
some people claimed it was all a liberal conspiracy by Al Gore, and
others claimed it was part of a pattern of 'denial'.

All I did was post the facts...The temps have no agenda.













--
"OK you cunts, let's see what you can do now" -Hit Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjO7kBqTFqo

Zacharias Mulletstein - PENTECOSTAL WARRIOR AND FIGHTER OF THE FOX CHRISTIANS
2012-08-09 12:45:35 EST
"H\ufffdgar" <hsahm@yahoo.com> wrote:
> The oscillations are not identical in magnitude and duration
> and have occurred long before the industrial revolution and
> will continue long after we've done ourselves in by listening to the
> dooms-dayer, carbon credit trading, green energy freaks.
>
> But one thing is always true: when it gets really hot, invest in blankets,
> for the cold, it's a coming.
>

You define 0.01% as a "high success rate" when it comes to answered
prayers. You consider that to be evidence that prayer works. And you
think that the remaining 99.99% FAILURE was simply the will of God.


Zacharias Mulletstein - PENTECOSTAL WARRIOR AND FIGHTER OF THE FOX CHRISTIANS
2012-08-09 12:47:52 EST
HVAC <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote:
> > I have no idea what "has no agenda" means,
>
> It means that shortly after I posted up these temperature measurements,
> some people claimed it was all a liberal conspiracy by Al Gore, and
> others claimed it was part of a pattern of 'denial'.
>
> All I did was post the facts...The temps have no agenda.
>

Perhaps the most basic reason for not believing in any gods is the
absence of good reasons for doing so. The above are decent reasons for
not believing and for questioning \ufffd\ufffd\ufffd and eventually leaving \ufffd\ufffd\ufffd whatever
theistic and religious beliefs a person might have had in the past. Once
a person gets beyond the bias in favor of belief, though, they may
realize something critical: the burden of support lies with those
claiming that belief is rational and/or necessary. Believers fail to
meet this burden, though, and thus fail to provide good reasons to
accept their claims.


Hägar
2012-08-09 15:29:23 EST

"Zacharias Mulletstein - PENTECOSTAL WARRIOR AND FIGHTER OF THE FOX
CHRISTIANS" <zachariasmulletstein@alwaysalwaysright.com> wrote in message
news:029725eaa6307cb@swing.com...
> "H\ufffdgar" <hsahm@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> The oscillations are not identical in magnitude and duration
>> and have occurred long before the industrial revolution and
>> will continue long after we've done ourselves in by listening to the
>> dooms-dayer, carbon credit trading, green energy freaks.
>>
>> But one thing is always true: when it gets really hot, invest in
>> blankets,
>> for the cold, it's a coming.
>>
>
> You define 0.01% as a "high success rate" when it comes to answered
> prayers. You consider that to be evidence that prayer works. And you
> think that the remaining 99.99% FAILURE was simply the will of God.
>

What on Earth are you babbling about ???
Where did I cite "0.01%"
Where did I mention "High success rate" ??
Where did I mention "prayer" ??
Where did I mention "FAILURE" ??
and lastly, where did I mention "God" ??

Lay off the hemp, dude.


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