Research Discussion: Ping GuthBall

Ping GuthBall
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Hagar
2010-12-21 12:08:36 EST
What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???

You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our Solar
System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs distant from
Earth.

Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined mass of
2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs from
Earth.

There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.

So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual GuthBallese,
why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.

Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.



Brad Guth
2010-12-21 12:46:39 EST
On Dec 21, 9:08 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
> What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???
>
> You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our Solar
> System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs distant from
> Earth.
>
> Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined mass of
> 2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs from
> Earth.
>
> There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.
>
> So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual GuthBallese,
> why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.
>
> Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.

Sirius started out worth as much as 3e37 kg when for a million some
odd years it was just building up from within its terrific molecular/
nebula cloud, and consider that cloud of such terrific mass wasn't all
that terribly far away at the time of 260 some odd million years ago.

btw; what happens to our sun or any star when it's overtaken and
essentially surrounded by that expanding molecular/nebula Sirius
cloud?

~ BG

Hagar
2010-12-21 16:09:28 EST

"Brad Guth" <bradguth@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:215f211a-c8c9-454f-887c-ebfd4540af5f@j19g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
On Dec 21, 9:08 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
> What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???
>
> You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our
> Solar
> System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs distant
> from
> Earth.
>
> Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined mass
> of
> 2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs from
> Earth.
>
> There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.
>
> So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual
> GuthBallese,
> why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.
>
> Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.

Sirius started out worth as much as 3e37 kg when for a million some
odd years it was just building up from within its terrific molecular/
nebula cloud, and consider that cloud of such terrific mass wasn't all
that terribly far away at the time of 260 some odd million years ago.

btw; what happens to our sun or any star when it's overtaken and
essentially surrounded by that expanding molecular/nebula Sirius
cloud?

~ BG
**********************************
There are no molecular clouds of any concentration, at least when in the
accretion mode, whose diameter exceeds 2 LYs. Sirius, as a triple star
system is therefore pretty much anchored, least in relation to our Sun.
So what is your concern ???



Brad Guth
2010-12-21 16:36:21 EST
On Dec 21, 1:09 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
> "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:215f211a-c8c9-454f-887c-ebfd4540af5f@j19g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
> On Dec 21, 9:08 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
>
>
> > What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???
>
> > You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our
> > Solar
> > System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs distant
> > from
> > Earth.
>
> > Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined mass
> > of
> > 2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs from
> > Earth.
>
> > There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.
>
> > So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual
> > GuthBallese,
> > why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.
>
> > Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.
>
> Sirius started out worth as much as 3e37 kg when for a million some
> odd years it was just building up from within its terrific molecular/
> nebula cloud, and consider that cloud of such terrific mass wasn't all
> that terribly far away at the time of 260 some odd million years ago.
>
> btw;  what happens to our sun or any star when it's overtaken and
> essentially surrounded by that expanding molecular/nebula Sirius
> cloud?
>
>  ~ BG
>         **********************************
> There are no molecular clouds of any concentration, at least when in the
> accretion mode, whose diameter exceeds 2 LYs. Sirius, as a triple star
> system is therefore pretty much anchored,  least in relation to our Sun.
> So what is your concern ???

That original 3e37 kg mass of molecular/nebula cloud didn't simply
vanish at first light, and otherwise during the million year creation
cycle of those terrific Sirius stars (which may have included Sirius
C) and the subsequent blowing away of all that surplus of its
molecular/nebula mass, by which a small portion had to pass through
our solar system for a good thousand years. So what did our sun do
when all of that expanding cloud was surrounding us for a thousand
years?

Can you tell us exactly where those Sirius stars were created as of
260 some odd million years ago? (everyone else is merely guessing, but
since you're so smart is why you should know)

~ BG




Hagar
2010-12-21 18:10:46 EST

"Brad Guth" <bradguth@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:167c9bbc-7609-4643-b5f2-fd6c55afc4d4@o11g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
On Dec 21, 1:09 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
> "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:215f211a-c8c9-454f-887c-ebfd4540af5f@j19g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
> On Dec 21, 9:08 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
>
>
> > What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???
>
> > You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our
> > Solar
> > System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs distant
> > from
> > Earth.
>
> > Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined mass
> > of
> > 2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs from
> > Earth.
>
> > There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.
>
> > So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual
> > GuthBallese,
> > why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.
>
> > Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.
>
> Sirius started out worth as much as 3e37 kg when for a million some
> odd years it was just building up from within its terrific molecular/
> nebula cloud, and consider that cloud of such terrific mass wasn't all
> that terribly far away at the time of 260 some odd million years ago.
>
> btw; what happens to our sun or any star when it's overtaken and
> essentially surrounded by that expanding molecular/nebula Sirius
> cloud?
>
> ~ BG
> **********************************
> There are no molecular clouds of any concentration, at least when in the
> accretion mode, whose diameter exceeds 2 LYs. Sirius, as a triple star
> system is therefore pretty much anchored, least in relation to our Sun.
> So what is your concern ???

That original 3e37 kg mass of molecular/nebula cloud

*** You're hip-shooting. There is no way that anyone can even get as close
to the actual mass as you would like us to believe that you can.
didn't simply

vanish at first light, and otherwise during the million year creation
cycle of those terrific Sirius stars (which may have included Sirius
C)
*** Obviously Sirius C ... or do you have yet another litho-braking capture
in flight theory ???

and the subsequent blowing away of all that surplus of its molecular/nebula
mass, by which a small portion had to pass through
our solar system for a good thousand years.

*** In all likelihood, whatever was left over after the three Sirius stars
formed did not willy-nilly take off towards our Solar System, but resides in
some form of Kuyper belt and an Oort cloud surrounding the trio.
I have no proof of this, but it makes a whole lot more sense than your shot
in the dark.

So what did our sun do when all of that expanding cloud was surrounding us
for a thousand years?

*** Nothing, it never got here. If you had any clue as of the distance
(8.6LY) any dust that reached us would be measureable in terms of Atoms per
Square Mile, in other words, totally not affecting us.

Can you tell us exactly where those Sirius stars were created as of
260 some odd million years ago? (everyone else is merely guessing, but
since you're so smart is why you should know)

*** Since no one can with certainty, let's try some common sense, something
you obviously have very little of. A huge Star went Supernova about 550
million years ago and once its planetary nebula settled down, the first
swirling of accretion began in what eventually became two blue stars, Sirius
B being the larger. You can read the rest in an appropriate text book.
Please, GuthBall, abstain fron using your obnoxious powers of 10 when
referring to the mass of stars ... because you don't have a fucking clue.



Brad Guth
2010-12-22 00:29:24 EST
On Dec 21, 3:10 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
> "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:167c9bbc-7609-4643-b5f2-fd6c55afc4d4@o11g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> On Dec 21, 1:09 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
>
>
> > "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> >news:215f211a-c8c9-454f-887c-ebfd4540af5f@j19g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
> > On Dec 21, 9:08 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
> > > What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???
>
> > > You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our
> > > Solar
> > > System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs distant
> > > from
> > > Earth.
>
> > > Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined mass
> > > of
> > > 2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs from
> > > Earth.
>
> > > There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.
>
> > > So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual
> > > GuthBallese,
> > > why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.
>
> > > Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.
>
> > Sirius started out worth as much as 3e37 kg when for a million some
> > odd years it was just building up from within its terrific molecular/
> > nebula cloud, and consider that cloud of such terrific mass wasn't all
> > that terribly far away at the time of 260 some odd million years ago.
>
> > btw; what happens to our sun or any star when it's overtaken and
> > essentially surrounded by that expanding molecular/nebula Sirius
> > cloud?
>
> > ~ BG
> > **********************************
> > There are no molecular clouds of any concentration, at least when in the
> > accretion mode, whose diameter exceeds 2 LYs. Sirius, as a triple star
> > system is therefore pretty much anchored, least in relation to our Sun.
> > So what is your concern ???
>
> That original 3e37 kg mass of molecular/nebula cloud
>
> *** You're hip-shooting. There is no way that anyone can even get as close
> to the actual mass as you would like us to believe that you can.
> didn't simply
Are you suggesting that molecular/nebula clouds do not represent mass?

>
> vanish at first light, and otherwise during the million year creation
> cycle of those terrific Sirius stars (which may have included Sirius
> C)
> *** Obviously Sirius C ... or do you have yet another litho-braking capture
> in flight theory ???
>
> and the subsequent blowing away of all that surplus of its molecular/nebula
> mass, by which a small portion had to pass through our solar system for a
> good thousand years.
>
> *** In all likelihood, whatever was left over after the three Sirius stars
> formed did not willy-nilly take off towards our Solar System, but resides in
> some form of  Kuyper belt and an Oort cloud surrounding the trio.
> I have no proof of this, but it makes a whole lot more sense than your shot
> in the dark.
I've always insisted on a Sirius Oort cloud. Where have you been?

However, 99.9999% of that cloud mass got blown away as those three
stars came to life.

>
>  So what did our sun do when all of that expanding cloud was surrounding us
> for a thousand years?
>
> *** Nothing, it never got here.  If you had any clue as of the distance
> (8.6LY) any dust that reached us would be measureable in terms of Atoms per
> Square Mile, in other words, totally not affecting us.
>
> Can you tell us exactly where those Sirius stars were created as of
> 260 some odd million years ago? (everyone else is merely guessing, but
> since you're so smart is why you should know)
>
> *** Since no one can with certainty, let's try some common sense, something
> you obviously have very little of.  A huge Star went Supernova about 550
> million years ago and once its planetary nebula settled down, the first
> swirling of accretion began in what eventually became two blue stars, Sirius
> B being the larger.  You can read the rest in an appropriate text book.
> Please, GuthBall, abstain fron using your obnoxious powers of 10 when
> referring to the mass of stars ... because you don't have a fucking clue.

Had no idea you were 550 million years old. No wonder you're always
so cranky.

Do all 550 million year old rednecks use conditional laws of physics
and otherwise obfuscate/exclude whatever makes them unhappy campers?

~ BG

Hagar
2010-12-22 09:43:56 EST

"Brad Guth" <bradguth@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cf5dad99-2669-4bd0-b8e1-f33167a97a33@l34g2000pro.googlegroups.com...
On Dec 21, 3:10 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
> "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:167c9bbc-7609-4643-b5f2-fd6c55afc4d4@o11g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> On Dec 21, 1:09 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
>
>
> > "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> >news:215f211a-c8c9-454f-887c-ebfd4540af5f@j19g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
> > On Dec 21, 9:08 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
> > > What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???
>
> > > You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our
> > > Solar
> > > System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs
> > > distant
> > > from
> > > Earth.
>
> > > Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined
> > > mass
> > > of
> > > 2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs
> > > from
> > > Earth.
>
> > > There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.
>
> > > So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual
> > > GuthBallese,
> > > why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.
>
> > > Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.
>
> > Sirius started out worth as much as 3e37 kg when for a million some
> > odd years it was just building up from within its terrific molecular/
> > nebula cloud, and consider that cloud of such terrific mass wasn't all
> > that terribly far away at the time of 260 some odd million years ago.
>
> > btw; what happens to our sun or any star when it's overtaken and
> > essentially surrounded by that expanding molecular/nebula Sirius
> > cloud?
>
> > ~ BG
> > **********************************
> > There are no molecular clouds of any concentration, at least when in the
> > accretion mode, whose diameter exceeds 2 LYs. Sirius, as a triple star
> > system is therefore pretty much anchored, least in relation to our Sun.
> > So what is your concern ???
>
> That original 3e37 kg mass of molecular/nebula cloud
>
> *** You're hip-shooting. There is no way that anyone can even get as close
> to the actual mass as you would like us to believe that you can.
> didn't simply
Are you suggesting that molecular/nebula clouds do not represent mass?

>
> vanish at first light, and otherwise during the million year creation
> cycle of those terrific Sirius stars (which may have included Sirius
> C)
> *** Obviously Sirius C ... or do you have yet another litho-braking
> capture
> in flight theory ???
>
> and the subsequent blowing away of all that surplus of its
> molecular/nebula
> mass, by which a small portion had to pass through our solar system for a
> good thousand years.
>
> *** In all likelihood, whatever was left over after the three Sirius stars
> formed did not willy-nilly take off towards our Solar System, but resides
> in
> some form of Kuyper belt and an Oort cloud surrounding the trio.
> I have no proof of this, but it makes a whole lot more sense than your
> shot
> in the dark.
I've always insisted on a Sirius Oort cloud. Where have you been?

However, 99.9999% of that cloud mass got blown away as those three
stars came to life.

>
> So what did our sun do when all of that expanding cloud was surrounding us
> for a thousand years?
>
> *** Nothing, it never got here. If you had any clue as of the distance
> (8.6LY) any dust that reached us would be measureable in terms of Atoms
> per
> Square Mile, in other words, totally not affecting us.
>
> Can you tell us exactly where those Sirius stars were created as of
> 260 some odd million years ago? (everyone else is merely guessing, but
> since you're so smart is why you should know)
>
> *** Since no one can with certainty, let's try some common sense,
> something
> you obviously have very little of. A huge Star went Supernova about 550
> million years ago and once its planetary nebula settled down, the first
> swirling of accretion began in what eventually became two blue stars,
> Sirius
> B being the larger. You can read the rest in an appropriate text book.
> Please, GuthBall, abstain fron using your obnoxious powers of 10 when
> referring to the mass of stars ... because you don't have a fucking clue.

Had no idea you were 550 million years old. No wonder you're always
so cranky.

Do all 550 million year old rednecks use conditional laws of physics
and otherwise obfuscate/exclude whatever makes them unhappy campers?

~ BG
***********************************
No, you dingle berry, us old Rednecks, as you so affectionately
refer to our genre of common sense creatures, are, despite
rumors to the contrary, quite educated, unlike the dreamers and
aspiring, albeit failing, pseudo scientists like you.

So here it is one more time, explained in a way that even a
retard like you should understand: Lets just say that a star
goes supernova 8.7 LYs from us. The resulting debris, atoms and some
molecules i.e.DUST), will spread radially from the origin
of the supernova. After travelling the distance of 8.7LYs, it will simply
be imperceptible, since the distance between particles will have increased
proportionally to the distance from the progenitor star ... still with me,
moron ???
In the Sirius example two stars formed and yes, they created "Solar Winds"
which tend to blow outwards those particles left over after planet formation
(and yes, GuthBall, ALL star creation also creates planets), but that
pretty much stops at the Heliopause and ends completely at the "Bow Shock".

The particles in question settle in a comfy Oort like cloud, which is more
or less a spherical cocoon, surrounding the newly born Solar System and
held there by the gravitational forces of the two or three stars at its
core.

Other than that I have no further comments on the subject, except that you
were wrong once again and science, which is easily accessible to anyone who
knows how to do a Google search, once again triumphed over ignorance and
superstition, namely you.





Brad Guth
2010-12-22 10:50:52 EST
On Dec 22, 6:43 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
> "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:cf5dad99-2669-4bd0-b8e1-f33167a97a33@l34g2000pro.googlegroups.com...
> On Dec 21, 3:10 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
> > "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> >news:167c9bbc-7609-4643-b5f2-fd6c55afc4d4@o11g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> > On Dec 21, 1:09 pm, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
> > > "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> > >news:215f211a-c8c9-454f-887c-ebfd4540af5f@j19g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
> > > On Dec 21, 9:08 am, "Hagar" <ha...@sahm.name> wrote:
>
> > > > What is the story with your "Sirius" hangup ???
>
> > > > You keep claiming that magical influence that the Star wields over our
> > > > Solar
> > > > System. The Star is twice the mass of our Sun, but also 8.6 LYs
> > > > distant
> > > > from
> > > > Earth.
>
> > > > Then there is Alpha Centauri, a Triple Star System, with a combined
> > > > mass
> > > > of
> > > > 2.2 time that of our Sun, but at a much closer distance of 4.37 LYs
> > > > from
> > > > Earth.
>
> > > > There are also about 5 smaller Stars in between the two.
>
> > > > So please explain to us again, in simple terms, not your usual
> > > > GuthBallese,
> > > > why Sirius is such a threat and the others are not.
>
> > > > Much obliged ... looking forward to your explanation.
>
> > > Sirius started out worth as much as 3e37 kg when for a million some
> > > odd years it was just building up from within its terrific molecular/
> > > nebula cloud, and consider that cloud of such terrific mass wasn't all
> > > that terribly far away at the time of 260 some odd million years ago.
>
> > > btw; what happens to our sun or any star when it's overtaken and
> > > essentially surrounded by that expanding molecular/nebula Sirius
> > > cloud?
>
> > > ~ BG
> > > **********************************
> > > There are no molecular clouds of any concentration, at least when in the
> > > accretion mode, whose diameter exceeds 2 LYs. Sirius, as a triple star
> > > system is therefore pretty much anchored, least in relation to our Sun.
> > > So what is your concern ???
>
> > That original 3e37 kg mass of molecular/nebula cloud
>
> > *** You're hip-shooting. There is no way that anyone can even get as close
> > to the actual mass as you would like us to believe that you can.
> > didn't simply
>
> Are you suggesting that molecular/nebula clouds do not represent mass?
>
>
>
>
>
> > vanish at first light, and otherwise during the million year creation
> > cycle of those terrific Sirius stars (which may have included Sirius
> > C)
> > *** Obviously Sirius C ... or do you have yet another litho-braking
> > capture
> > in flight theory ???
>
> > and the subsequent blowing away of all that surplus of its
> > molecular/nebula
> > mass, by which a small portion had to pass through our solar system for a
> > good thousand years.
>
> > *** In all likelihood, whatever was left over after the three Sirius stars
> > formed did not willy-nilly take off towards our Solar System, but resides
> > in
> > some form of Kuyper belt and an Oort cloud surrounding the trio.
> > I have no proof of this, but it makes a whole lot more sense than your
> > shot
> > in the dark.
>
> I've always insisted on a Sirius Oort cloud.  Where have you been?
>
> However, 99.9999% of that cloud mass got blown away as those three
> stars came to life.
>
>
>
>
>
> > So what did our sun do when all of that expanding cloud was surrounding us
> > for a thousand years?
>
> > *** Nothing, it never got here. If you had any clue as of the distance
> > (8.6LY) any dust that reached us would be measureable in terms of Atoms
> > per
> > Square Mile, in other words, totally not affecting us.
>
> > Can you tell us exactly where those Sirius stars were created as of
> > 260 some odd million years ago? (everyone else is merely guessing, but
> > since you're so smart is why you should know)
>
> > *** Since no one can with certainty, let's try some common sense,
> > something
> > you obviously have very little of. A huge Star went Supernova about 550
> > million years ago and once its planetary nebula settled down, the first
> > swirling of accretion began in what eventually became two blue stars,
> > Sirius
> > B being the larger. You can read the rest in an appropriate text book.
> > Please, GuthBall, abstain fron using your obnoxious powers of 10 when
> > referring to the mass of stars ... because you don't have a fucking clue.
>
> Had no idea you were 550 million years old.  No wonder you're always
> so cranky.
>
> Do all 550 million year old rednecks use conditional laws of physics
> and otherwise obfuscate/exclude whatever makes them unhappy campers?
>
>  ~ BG
>         ***********************************
> No, you dingle berry, us old Rednecks, as you so affectionately
> refer to our genre of common sense creatures, are, despite
> rumors to the contrary, quite educated, unlike the dreamers and
> aspiring, albeit failing, pseudo scientists like you.
>
> So here it is one more time, explained in a way that even a
> retard like you should understand:  Lets just say that a star
> goes supernova 8.7 LYs from us.  The resulting debris, atoms and some
> molecules i.e.DUST), will spread radially from the origin
> of the supernova.  After travelling the distance of 8.7LYs, it will simply
> be imperceptible, since the distance between particles will have increased
> proportionally to the distance from the progenitor star ... still with me,
> moron ???
> In the Sirius example two stars formed and yes, they created "Solar Winds"
> which tend to blow outwards those particles left over after planet formation
> (and yes, GuthBall, ALL star creation also creates  planets), but that
> pretty much stops at the Heliopause and ends completely at the "Bow Shock".
>
> The particles in question settle in a comfy Oort like cloud, which is more
> or less a spherical cocoon, surrounding the newly born Solar System and
> held there by the gravitational forces of the two or three stars at its
> core.
>
> Other than that I have no further comments on the subject, except that you
> were wrong once again and science, which is easily accessible to anyone who
> knows how to do a Google search, once again triumphed over ignorance and
> superstition, namely you.

Conventional star creation requires a great deal of molecular/nebula
mass, and some of that mass which created those Sirius stars went
through our solar system as it expanded during the stellar creation
blow-away phase. Stars like our sun do feed on such molecular mass if
and when its made available.

Our solar system Oort cloud may be part of the Sirius molecular/nebula
mass, but more importantly the Sirius Oort cloud which has to have
been considerably larger and more populated or mass saturated than our
Oort cloud are likely to interact with one another as we close the
interstellar gap.

This nearby and closing gap which involves the 3.5 Ms worth of those
Sirius stars and their surrounding Oort mass is likely going to affect
or perturb those icy comets, asteroids and planetoids of our Oort
cloud, because that's pretty much exactly what gravity does. It's
even conceivable that Sedna will get perturbed sufficiently to cause
us some concern.

~ BG

American
2010-12-22 12:15:12 EST
On Dec 22, 10:50 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:

: Our solar system Oort cloud may be part of Sirius molecular/nebula
: mass, but more importantly the Sirius Oort cloud which has to have
: been considerably larger and more populated or saturated than our
: Oort cloud are likely to interact with one another as we close the
: interstellar gap.

Would you be inclined to believe that the Oort Cloud contains
anywhere near 10^3 molecules/cm^3?

Given enough of an enveloping cloud of atomic H2 @ 10K degrees,
a newborn star might consolidate that to over 70K.

If that becomes possible, then we have a possible condition for
proto-star formation[1].

Would passage of our solar system through the plane of the ecliptic
enhance that
possibility?

American

"An ampler ether, a diviner air, And fields invested with pupureal
gleams"

- William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850), Laodamia (1815) I, 104

[1]

Interstellar Matters, G.L. Verschuur, Springer-Verlag, (c) 1989

>
> This nearby and closing gap which involves the 3.5 Ms worth of those
> Sirius stars and their surrounding Oort mass is likely going to affect
> or perturb those icy comets, asteroids and planetoids of our Oort
> cloud, because that's pretty much exactly what gravity does. It's
> even conceivable that Sedna will get perturbed sufficiently to cause
> us some concern.
>
> ~ BG

American
2010-12-22 12:25:03 EST
On Dec 22, 10:50 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:

: Our solar system Oort cloud may be part of Sirius molecular/nebula
: mass, but more importantly the Sirius Oort cloud which has to have
: been considerably larger and more populated or saturated than our
: Oort cloud are likely to interact with one another as we close the
: interstellar gap.

Would you be inclined to believe that the Oort Cloud contains
anywhere near 10^3 molecules/cm^3?

Given enough of an enveloping cloud of atomic H2 @ 10K degrees,
a newborn star might consolidate that to over 70K.

If that becomes possible, then we have a possible condition for
proto-star formation[1].

Would passage of our solar system through the plane of the ecliptic
enhance that
possibility?

American

"An ampler ether, a diviner air, And fields invested with pupureal
gleams"

- William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850), Laodamia (1815) I, 104

[1]

Interstellar Matters, G.L. Verschuur, Springer-Verlag, (c) 1989

>
> This nearby and closing gap which involves the 3.5 Ms worth of those
> Sirius stars and their surrounding Oort mass is likely going to affect
> or perturb those icy comets, asteroids and planetoids of our Oort
> cloud, because that's pretty much exactly what gravity does. It's
> even conceivable that Sedna will get perturbed sufficiently to cause
> us some concern.
>
> ~ BG
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