Research Discussion: 3 X Better Than Hubble

3 X Better Than Hubble
Posts: 21

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2 3   Next  (First | Last)

HVAC
2010-06-18 08:17:46 EST
The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.

It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
ground-based optics.

But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
(0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
atmospheric distortions.

The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
(compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.

Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.

Fasgnadh
2010-06-18 10:24:41 EST
HVAC (head-vacuum) can't show any link between science and atheism:
> The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
> we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
> sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
> pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
> three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
> and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.
>
> It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
> snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
> of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
> events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
> atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
> with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
> Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
> the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
> ground-based optics.
>
> But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
> clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
> the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
> (0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
> This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
> bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
> atmospheric distortions.
>
> The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
> scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
> unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
> twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
> (compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
> gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.
>
> Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
> optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
> at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
> like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.

I understand you posting this to alt.astronomy.. but why indulge your
fantasies by posting to alt.alien.research and alt.atheism?

Are you expecting photos of the Flying Spaghetti Monster? B^D


--

alt.atheism FAQ:

http://altatheismfaq.blogspot.com/


http://groups.google.com.au/group/alt.atheism/msg/7c0978c14fd4ed37?hl=en&dmode=source




"Atheism is the natural and inseparable part of Communism."
-Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin)

"We must combat religion"
-Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin)

"Our program necessarily includes the propaganda of atheism."
- Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin)

“Down with religion and long live atheism;
the dissemination of atheist views is our chief task!”
- Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin)

http://www.atheistnexus.org/photo/2182797:Photo:8290?context=latest

http://www.atheistnexus.org/photo/2182797:Photo:8295?context=latest

http://www.atheistnexus.org/photo/2182797:Photo:6348?context=latest

http://www.atheistnexus.org/photo/2182797:Photo:17478?context=latest


"How can you make a revolution without firing squads?"
- Lenin

http://www.atheistnexus.org/photo/2182797:Photo:17475?context=latest

http://www.c96trading.com/Nagant_NKVD_300h.jpg


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01001/Tsar-family_1001874c.jpg

HVAC
2010-06-18 11:58:24 EST

"fasgnadh" <fasgnadh@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message
news:JkLSn.3341$Ls1.716@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>
> I understand you posting this to alt.astronomy.. but why indulge your
> fantasies by posting to alt.alien.research and alt.atheism?
>
> Are you expecting photos of the Flying Spaghetti Monster? B^D


As much as I expect a photo of your fake-ass god.


Just think about it.... You believe in an invisible man.

You've never seen him.

You've never heard him.

The only way you know about him is because that's
what your parents taught you.

Look, I really DO understand why a child believes
in god. Children believe in lots of things and people
that don't really exist.

But why any rational, intelligent person would continue
to delude themselves about some sort of life after you
die is downright silly.

Seriously.



--
Faith is believing what you know ain't so" -Mark Twain





Brad Guth
2010-06-18 13:43:01 EST
On Jun 18, 5:17 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
> we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
> sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
> pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
> three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
> and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.
>
> It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
> snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
> of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
> events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
> atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
> with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
> Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
> the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
> ground-based optics.
>
> But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
> clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
> the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
> (0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
> This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
> bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
> atmospheric distortions.
>
> The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
> scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
> unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
> twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
> (compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
> gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.
>
> Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
> optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
> at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
> like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.

http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto/
http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto//AO/AOpressrelease.htm

Nice imaging improvements. Too bad it's not situated within our Earth-
moon L1(Selene L1) of zero delta-V and perhaps 3e-21bar vacuum.

~ BG

Sir Gilligan Horry
2010-06-18 15:27:48 EST
On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 10:43:01 -0700 (PDT), Brad Guth
<*h@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Jun 18, 5:17 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
>> we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
>> sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
>> pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
>> three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
>> and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.
>>
>> It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
>> snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
>> of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
>> events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
>> atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
>> with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
>> Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
>> the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
>> ground-based optics.
>>
>> But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
>> clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
>> the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
>> (0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
>> This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
>> bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
>> atmospheric distortions.
>>
>> The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
>> scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
>> unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
>> twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
>> (compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
>> gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.
>>
>> Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
>> optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
>> at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
>> like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.
>
> http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto/
> http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto//AO/AOpressrelease.htm
>
>Nice imaging improvements. Too bad it's not situated within our Earth-
>moon L1(Selene L1) of zero delta-V and perhaps 3e-21bar vacuum.
>
> ~ BG


Nice post, and nice links.


This is great too...

http://www.shatters.net/celestia/

(You can travel throughout the solar system, to any of over 100,000
stars, or even beyond the galaxy)



Sir Gilligan Horry
2010-06-18 15:32:23 EST
Mr HVAC wrote:

>> so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
>> at full capacity yet.

On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 14:24:41 GMT, fasgnadh <fasgnadh@yahoo.com.au>
wrote:

>I understand you posting this to alt.astronomy.. but why indulge your
>fantasies by posting to alt.alien.research and alt.atheism?


Because ...
alt.alien.research
... is my home !!!

And we always get a kick out of your alt.atheism
contributions to the Galaxy.




Haiku Jones
2010-06-18 15:47:39 EST
On Jun 18, 10:43 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Jun 18, 5:17 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
> > we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
> > sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
> > pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
> > three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
> > and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.
>
> > It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
> > snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
> > of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
> > events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
> > atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
> > with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
> > Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
> > the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
> > ground-based optics.
>
> > But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
> > clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
> > the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
> > (0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
> > This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
> > bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
> > atmospheric distortions.
>
> > The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
> > scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
> > unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
> > twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
> > (compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
> > gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.
>
> > Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
> > optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
> > at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
> > like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.
>
>  http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto/
>  http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto//AO/AOpressrelease.htm
>


> Nice imaging improvements.  Too bad it's not situated within our Earth-
> moon L1(Selene L1) of zero delta-V and perhaps 3e-21bar vacuum.

Well, except for the fact that the adaptive optics
would not be needed there (not to mention the fact
that there would be nothing to bounce the reference
laser off of)




>
>  ~ BG


Brad Guth
2010-06-18 16:32:29 EST
On Jun 18, 12:27 pm, Sir Gilligan Horry <G...@ga7rm5er.com> wrote:
> On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 10:43:01 -0700 (PDT), Brad Guth
>
>
>
> <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >On Jun 18, 5:17 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
> >> we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
> >> sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
> >> pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
> >> three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
> >> and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.
>
> >> It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
> >> snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
> >> of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
> >> events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
> >> atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
> >> with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
> >> Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
> >> the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
> >> ground-based optics.
>
> >> But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
> >> clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
> >> the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
> >> (0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
> >> This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
> >> bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
> >> atmospheric distortions.
>
> >> The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
> >> scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
> >> unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
> >> twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
> >> (compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
> >> gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.
>
> >> Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
> >> optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
> >> at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
> >> like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.
>
> >http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto/
> >http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto//AO/AOpressrelease.htm
>
> >Nice imaging improvements.  Too bad it's not situated within our Earth-
> >moon L1(Selene L1) of zero delta-V and perhaps 3e-21bar vacuum.
>
> > ~ BG
>
> Nice post, and nice links.
>
> This is great too...
>
> http://www.shatters.net/celestia/
>
> (You can travel throughout the solar system, to any of over 100,000
> stars, or even beyond the galaxy)

Yes in deed, and our DARPA/NASA has supercomputer simulators a million
fold more capable than the best PC or Apple for generating those fully
interactive 3D simulations under the most extreme multi-body
conditions. These public funded supercomputers along with their
public funded simulators can add/subtract any number of complex items,
adjust their masses and whatever given velocity and trajectory on the
fly (so to speak), including their depicting whatever results of
physical encounters, except that we the public never get access or
much less get to see whatever results other than what they decide to
show us.

~ BG

Brad Guth
2010-06-18 16:40:42 EST
On Jun 18, 12:47 pm, haiku jones <575jo...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Jun 18, 10:43 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Jun 18, 5:17 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
> > > we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
> > > sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
> > > pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
> > > three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
> > > and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.
>
> > > It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
> > > snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
> > > of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
> > > events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
> > > atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
> > > with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
> > > Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
> > > the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
> > > ground-based optics.
>
> > > But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
> > > clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
> > > the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
> > > (0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
> > > This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
> > > bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
> > > atmospheric distortions.
>
> > > The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
> > > scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
> > > unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
> > > twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
> > > (compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
> > > gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.
>
> > > Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
> > > optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
> > > at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
> > > like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.
>
> >  http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto/
> >  http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto//AO/AOpressrelease.htm
>
> > Nice imaging improvements.  Too bad it's not situated within our Earth-
> > moon L1(Selene L1) of zero delta-V and perhaps 3e-21bar vacuum.
>
> Well, except for the fact that the adaptive optics
> would not be needed there (not to mention the fact
> that there would be nothing to bounce the reference
> laser off of)

Reference stars could be utilized, or a laser dot of 100 meters
projected onto our physically dark moon, or just fired into its
extensive sodium atmosphere. A laser beacon/transponder could be
easily placed on the moon, or they could just use those as is Apollo
laser reflectors, and call it good.

~ BG

Sir Gilligan Horry
2010-06-18 17:22:36 EST
On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 13:32:29 -0700 (PDT), Brad Guth
<*h@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Jun 18, 12:27 pm, Sir Gilligan Horry <G...@ga7rm5er.com> wrote:
>> On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 10:43:01 -0700 (PDT), Brad Guth
>>
>>
>>
>> <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >On Jun 18, 5:17 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >> The Large Binocular Telescope just got a new pair of eyes, and while
>> >> we love our orbiting telescopes we have to admit the LBT looks pretty
>> >> sharp. The Arizona-based telescope just brought home the clearest
>> >> pictures of space ever taken from an Earth-based telescope -- images
>> >> three times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Oh,
>> >> and that's with only one of its two mirrors working.
>>
>> >> It's a lot easier to build and maintain large telescopes on Earth, but
>> >> snapping photos of the deep cosmos from the ground introduces a host
>> >> of problems, mostly of the atmospheric variety. Aside from weather
>> >> events that physically obscure a telescopes view of the sky, the
>> >> atmosphere itself bends light as it passes through. That's why we live
>> >> with and love even occasionally troublesome orbiting 'scopes like
>> >> Hubble; from high above the atmosphere they have such a nice view of
>> >> the universe even though they are often smaller and less powerful than
>> >> ground-based optics.
>>
>> >> But the LBT was just fitted with new adaptive optics that give it
>> >> clarity far superior even to Hubble. Adaptive optics compensate for
>> >> the atmosphere's light-bending nature by gently bending an ultra-thin
>> >> (0.06 inches thick) secondary mirror that corrects the incoming light.
>> >> This mirror is so thin that the 627 tiny magnets stuck to its back can
>> >> bend it into different shapes as dictated by sensors that detect
>> >> atmospheric distortions.
>>
>> >> The mirror compensates in real time with accuracy to the nanometer
>> >> scale, essentially unbending the bent light so the LBT can get an
>> >> unblemished picture. Once the atmosphere is out of the equation, its
>> >> twin 27.6-foot mirrors are free to take in the night sky unhindered
>> >> (compared to Hubble's 7.9-foot main mirror). So it's no surprise it
>> >> gets better clarity, even being bound to the ground.
>>
>> >> Only one of the LBT's mirrors is currently outfitted with adaptive
>> >> optics, so we haven't even seen the $120 million installation working
>> >> at full capacity yet. For future space-based telescopes that sounds
>> >> like a challenge. Let's see what you got, JWST.
>>
>> >http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto/
>> >http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto//AO/AOpressrelease.htm
>>
>> >Nice imaging improvements.  Too bad it's not situated within our Earth-
>> >moon L1(Selene L1) of zero delta-V and perhaps 3e-21bar vacuum.
>>
>> > ~ BG
>>
>> Nice post, and nice links.
>>
>> This is great too...
>>
>> http://www.shatters.net/celestia/
>>
>> (You can travel throughout the solar system, to any of over 100,000
>> stars, or even beyond the galaxy)
>
>Yes in deed, and our DARPA/NASA has supercomputer simulators a million
>fold more capable than the best PC or Apple for generating those fully
>interactive 3D simulations under the most extreme multi-body
>conditions. These public funded supercomputers along with their
>public funded simulators can add/subtract any number of complex items,
>adjust their masses and whatever given velocity and trajectory on the
>fly (so to speak), including their depicting whatever results of
>physical encounters, except that we the public never get access or
>much less get to see whatever results other than what they decide to
>show us.
>
> ~ BG

Oh, yeah, I don't have proof, but I'm fully aware of the very
futuristic technological developments within DARPA, NASA, and other
facilities.

Like I've said before, I'm more than very happy with my new laptop,
even though I know about Dr Pete Peterson talking about PC chips that
are 10,000 times more powerful.

The general public don't need the best stuff.

99.3% of the population are changeable and dangerous.

We all talk of spooky aliens... well...
humans at our level of development are spookier !

http://www.theswarmite.com/wp-content/uploads/Images/tube%20drunk.jpg

http://craphound.com/images/3407356299_da5a89ebf0_b.jpg

http://tumyeto.com/images/uploaded/soccer-riot.jpg

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/00797/bangkok-riots-5_797936i.jpg


So, it must be a nightmare for certain aerospace facilities that
desire professionalism and perfect personnel.


I could go on with more information.

But, anyway, Have a Great Day !


Page: 1 2 3   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron