Research Discussion: Another One Bites The Dust

Another One Bites The Dust
Posts: 75

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8   Next  (First | Last)

HVAC
2010-06-01 06:57:31 EST
WASHINGTON -- Al Qaeda announced Monday that its No. 3 official,
Mustafa al-Yazid, had been killed along with members of his family --
perhaps one of the most severe blows to the terror movement since the
U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda began. A senior U.S. official told Fox
News that al-Yazid was believed to have died in a U.S. missile strike.

A statement posted on an Al Qaeda Website said al-Yazid, which it
described as the organization's top commander in Afghanistan, was
killed along with his wife, three daughters, a grandchild and other
men, women and children but did not say how or where.

The statement did not give an exact date for al-Yazid's death, but it
was dated by the Islamic calendar month of "Jemadi al-Akhar," which
falls in May.

A U.S. official in Washington said word was "spreading in extremist
circles" of his death in Pakistan's tribal areas in the past two weeks
and the U.S. government had confirmed the reports.

His death is a major blow to Al Qaeda, which in December "lost both
its internal and external operations chiefs," the official said on
condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the information.

The Egyptian-born al-Yazid, also known as Sheik Saeed al-Masri, was a
founding member of Al Qaeda and the group's prime conduit to Usama bin
Laden and Ayman al-Zawahri. He was key to day-to-day control, with a
hand in everything from finances to operational planning, the U.S.
official said.

Al-Yazid has been reported killed before, in 2008, but this is the
first time his death has been acknowledged by the militant group on
the Internet.

Two Pakistani intelligence officials, speaking on condition of
anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media, said
al-Yazid died in a U.S. missile strike on May 21 in the North
Waziristan tribal area.

Soon after the attack, officials reported that two foreigners were
among the 10 people killed, but did know their identities. Five women
and two children were also wounded in the attack, which occurred in
the village of Boya near the main town in the area, Miran Shah.

The intelligence officials said they received word of al-Yazid's death
last week and confirmed it by speaking to local tribal elders and
Taliban members. They said their sources had not seen al-Yazid's body
and did not know where he was buried.

Al-Yazid has been one of many targets in a U.S. Predator drone
campaign aimed at militants in Pakistan since President Barack Obama
took office. Al-Yazid made no secret of his contempt for the United
States, once calling it "the evil empire leading crusades against the
Muslims."

"We have reached the point where we see no difference between the
state and the American people," al-Yazid told Pakistan's Geo TV in a
June 2008 interview. "The United States is a non-Muslim state bent on
the destruction of Muslims."

The shadowy, 55-year-old al-Yazid has been involved with Islamic
extremist movements for nearly 30 years since he joined radical
student groups led by fellow Egyptian al-Zawahri, now the No. 2 figure
in Al Qaeda after bin Laden.

In the early 1980s, al-Yazid served three years in an Egyptian prison
for purported links to the group responsible for the 1981
assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. After his release, al-
Yazid turned up in Afghanistan, where, according to Al Qaeda's
propaganda wing Al-Sabah, he became a founding member of the terrorist
group.

He later followed bin Laden to Sudan and back to Afghanistan, where he
served as Al Qaeda's chief financial officer, managing secret bank
accounts in the Persian Gulf that were used to help finance the Sept.
11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington. After the U.S. and its
allies invaded Afghanistan in 2001, al-Yazid went into hiding for
years. He surfaced in May 2007 during a 45-minute interview posted on
the Web by Al-Sabah, in which he was introduced as the "official in
charge" of the terrorist movement's operations in Afghanistan.

Some security analysts believe the choice of al-Yazid as the Afghan
chief may have signaled a new approach for Al Qaeda in the country
where it once reigned supreme.

Michael Scheuer, former head of the CIA unit that tracked bin Laden,
believes bin Laden and al-Zawahri wanted a trusted figure to handle
Afghanistan "while they turn to other aspects of the jihad outside"
the country.

Al-Yazid had little background in leading combat operations. But
terrorism experts say his advantage was that he was close to Taliban
leader Mullah Omar. As a fluent Pashto speaker known for impeccable
manners, al-Yazid enjoyed better relations with the Afghans than many
of the Al Qaeda Arabs, whom the Afghans found arrogant and abrasive.

That suggested a conscious decision by Al Qaeda to embed within the
Taliban organization, helping the Afghan allies with expertise and
training while at the same time putting an Afghan face on the war.

Al-Yazid himself alluded to such an approach in an interview this year
with Al-Jazeera television's Islamabad correspondent Ahmad Zaidan. Al-
Yazid said Al Qaeda fighters were involved at every level with the
Taliban.

"We participate with our brothers in the Islamic Emirate in all
fields," al-Yazid said. "This had a big positive effect on the
(Taliban) self-esteem in Afghanistan."

A September 2007 Al Qaeda video sought to promote the notion of close
Taliban-Al Qaeda ties at a time when the Afghan insurgents were
launching their comeback six years after their ouster from power in
Kabul.

The video showed al-Yazid sitting with a senior Taliban commander in a
field surrounded by trees as a jihad anthem played. The Taliban
commander vowed to "target the infidels in Afghanistan and outside
Afghanistan" and to "focus our attacks, Allah willing, on the
coalition forces in Afghanistan."

There is also evidence that al-Yazid has promoted ties with Islamic
extremist groups in Central Asia and Pakistan, where other top Al
Qaeda figures are believed to be hiding.

"He definitely seems to have significant influence among the Pakistani
Taliban and the Central Asian groups," terrorism expert Evan Kohlman
said. "They regularly post and share his videos on the Web, just as
they would with bin Laden or al-Zawahri."

In August 2008, Pakistani military officials claimed al-Yazid had been
killed in fighting in the Bajaur tribal area along the Afghan border.
However, he turned up in subsequent Al Qaeda videos, all of which had
clearly been made after the Bajaur fighting.


Bast
2010-06-01 07:35:37 EST


HVAC wrote:
> WASHINGTON -- Al Qaeda announced Monday that its No. 3 official,
> Mustafa al-Yazid, had been killed along with members of his family --
< CIA fairy tale snipped>

I like the one about goldilocks and the three bears better.



Yap
2010-06-01 08:03:56 EST
On 1 Jun, 17:57, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> WASHINGTON -- Al Qaeda announced Monday that its No. 3 official,
> Mustafa al-Yazid, had been killed along with members of his family --
> perhaps one of the most severe blows to the terror movement since the
> U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda began. A senior U.S. official told Fox
> News that al-Yazid was believed to have died in a U.S. missile strike.
>
> A statement posted on an Al Qaeda Website said al-Yazid, which it
> described as the organization's top commander in Afghanistan, was
> killed along with his wife, three daughters, a grandchild and other
> men, women and children but did not say how or where.
>
> The statement did not give an exact date for al-Yazid's death, but it
> was dated by the Islamic calendar month of "Jemadi al-Akhar," which
> falls in May.
>
> A U.S. official in Washington said word was "spreading in extremist
> circles" of his death in Pakistan's tribal areas in the past two weeks
> and the U.S. government had confirmed the reports.
>
> His death is a major blow to Al Qaeda, which in December "lost both
> its internal and external operations chiefs," the official said on
> condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the information.
>
> The Egyptian-born al-Yazid, also known as Sheik Saeed al-Masri, was a
> founding member of Al Qaeda and the group's prime conduit to Usama bin
> Laden and Ayman al-Zawahri. He was key to day-to-day control, with a
> hand in everything from finances to operational planning, the U.S.
> official said.
>
> Al-Yazid has been reported killed before, in 2008, but this is the
> first time his death has been acknowledged by the militant group on
> the Internet.
>
> Two Pakistani intelligence officials, speaking on condition of
> anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media, said
> al-Yazid died in a U.S. missile strike on May 21 in the North
> Waziristan tribal area.
>
> Soon after the attack, officials reported that two foreigners were
> among the 10 people killed, but did know their identities. Five women
> and two children were also wounded in the attack, which occurred in
> the village of Boya near the main town in the area, Miran Shah.
>
> The intelligence officials said they received word of al-Yazid's death
> last week and confirmed it by speaking to local tribal elders and
> Taliban members. They said their sources had not seen al-Yazid's body
> and did not know where he was buried.
>
> Al-Yazid has been one of many targets in a U.S. Predator drone
> campaign aimed at militants in Pakistan since President Barack Obama
> took office. Al-Yazid made no secret of his contempt for the United
> States, once calling it "the evil empire leading crusades against the
> Muslims."
>
> "We have reached the point where we see no difference between the
> state and the American people," al-Yazid told Pakistan's Geo TV in a
> June 2008 interview. "The United States is a non-Muslim state bent on
> the destruction of Muslims."
>
> The shadowy, 55-year-old al-Yazid has been involved with Islamic
> extremist movements for nearly 30 years since he joined radical
> student groups led by fellow Egyptian al-Zawahri, now the No. 2 figure
> in Al Qaeda after bin Laden.
>
> In the early 1980s, al-Yazid served three years in an Egyptian prison
> for purported links to the group responsible for the 1981
> assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. After his release, al-
> Yazid turned up in Afghanistan, where, according to Al Qaeda's
> propaganda wing Al-Sabah, he became a founding member of the terrorist
> group.
>
> He later followed bin Laden to Sudan and back to Afghanistan, where he
> served as Al Qaeda's chief financial officer, managing secret bank
> accounts in the Persian Gulf that were used to help finance the Sept.
> 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington. After the U.S. and its
> allies invaded Afghanistan in 2001, al-Yazid went into hiding for
> years. He surfaced in May 2007 during a 45-minute interview posted on
> the Web by Al-Sabah, in which he was introduced as the "official in
> charge" of the terrorist movement's operations in Afghanistan.
>
> Some security analysts believe the choice of al-Yazid as the Afghan
> chief may have signaled a new approach for Al Qaeda in the country
> where it once reigned supreme.
>
> Michael Scheuer, former head of the CIA unit that tracked bin Laden,
> believes bin Laden and al-Zawahri wanted a trusted figure to handle
> Afghanistan "while they turn to other aspects of the jihad outside"
> the country.
>
> Al-Yazid had little background in leading combat operations. But
> terrorism experts say his advantage was that he was close to Taliban
> leader Mullah Omar. As a fluent Pashto speaker known for impeccable
> manners, al-Yazid enjoyed better relations with the Afghans than many
> of the Al Qaeda Arabs, whom the Afghans found arrogant and abrasive.
>
> That suggested a conscious decision by Al Qaeda to embed within the
> Taliban organization, helping the Afghan allies with expertise and
> training while at the same time putting an Afghan face on the war.
>
> Al-Yazid himself alluded to such an approach in an interview this year
> with Al-Jazeera television's Islamabad correspondent Ahmad Zaidan. Al-
> Yazid said Al Qaeda fighters were involved at every level with the
> Taliban.
>
> "We participate with our brothers in the Islamic Emirate in all
> fields," al-Yazid said. "This had a big positive effect on the
> (Taliban) self-esteem in Afghanistan."
>
> A September 2007 Al Qaeda video sought to promote the notion of close
> Taliban-Al Qaeda ties at a time when the Afghan insurgents were
> launching their comeback six years after their ouster from power in
> Kabul.
>
> The video showed al-Yazid sitting with a senior Taliban commander in a
> field surrounded by trees as a jihad anthem played. The Taliban
> commander vowed to "target the infidels in Afghanistan and outside
> Afghanistan" and to "focus our attacks, Allah willing, on the
> coalition forces in Afghanistan."
>
> There is also evidence that al-Yazid has promoted ties with Islamic
> extremist groups in Central Asia and Pakistan, where other top Al
> Qaeda figures are believed to be hiding.
>
> "He definitely seems to have significant influence among the Pakistani
> Taliban and the Central Asian groups," terrorism expert Evan Kohlman
> said. "They regularly post and share his videos on the Web, just as
> they would with bin Laden or al-Zawahri."
>
> In August 2008, Pakistani military officials claimed al-Yazid had been
> killed in fighting in the Bajaur tribal area along the Afghan border.
> However, he turned up in subsequent Al Qaeda videos, all of which had
> clearly been made after the Bajaur fighting.

Going around the world killing people will bring hatred from the
victims' family.
Revenge can have burning desire and US cannot defend against it year
in year out later.

HVAC
2010-06-01 08:25:36 EST

"Yap" <hhyapster@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:2312a51d-45ea-4245-9ab0-a781b9b6f9be@t26g2000prt.googlegroups.com...
>
> Going around the world killing people will bring hatred from the
> victims' family.
> Revenge can have burning desire and US cannot defend against it year
> in year out later.


I say, kill em all!

Let's show them OUR hate.

They hate us? Fuck em.

Slowly and systematically, we are wiping out
al Quida. The world is a far better place with
these pieces of human filth blown to smithereens.


Oh.... And shut your fucking Yap.




--
HVAC is the reason why Waldo is hiding.



Brad Guth
2010-06-01 09:04:06 EST
On Jun 1, 3:57 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> WASHINGTON -- Al Qaeda announced Monday that its No. 3 official,
> Mustafa al-Yazid, had been killed along with members of his family --
> perhaps one of the most severe blows to the terror movement since the
> U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda began. A senior U.S. official told Fox
> News that al-Yazid was believed to have died in a U.S. missile strike.
>
> A statement posted on an Al Qaeda Website said al-Yazid, which it
> described as the organization's top commander in Afghanistan, was
> killed along with his wife, three daughters, a grandchild and other
> men, women and children but did not say how or where.
>
> The statement did not give an exact date for al-Yazid's death, but it
> was dated by the Islamic calendar month of "Jemadi al-Akhar," which
> falls in May.
>
> A U.S. official in Washington said word was "spreading in extremist
> circles" of his death in Pakistan's tribal areas in the past two weeks
> and the U.S. government had confirmed the reports.
>
> His death is a major blow to Al Qaeda, which in December "lost both
> its internal and external operations chiefs," the official said on
> condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the information.
>
> The Egyptian-born al-Yazid, also known as Sheik Saeed al-Masri, was a
> founding member of Al Qaeda and the group's prime conduit to Usama bin
> Laden and Ayman al-Zawahri. He was key to day-to-day control, with a
> hand in everything from finances to operational planning, the U.S.
> official said.
>
> Al-Yazid has been reported killed before, in 2008, but this is the
> first time his death has been acknowledged by the militant group on
> the Internet.
>
> Two Pakistani intelligence officials, speaking on condition of
> anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media, said
> al-Yazid died in a U.S. missile strike on May 21 in the North
> Waziristan tribal area.
>
> Soon after the attack, officials reported that two foreigners were
> among the 10 people killed, but did know their identities. Five women
> and two children were also wounded in the attack, which occurred in
> the village of Boya near the main town in the area, Miran Shah.
>
> The intelligence officials said they received word of al-Yazid's death
> last week and confirmed it by speaking to local tribal elders and
> Taliban members. They said their sources had not seen al-Yazid's body
> and did not know where he was buried.
>
> Al-Yazid has been one of many targets in a U.S. Predator drone
> campaign aimed at militants in Pakistan since President Barack Obama
> took office. Al-Yazid made no secret of his contempt for the United
> States, once calling it "the evil empire leading crusades against the
> Muslims."
>
> "We have reached the point where we see no difference between the
> state and the American people," al-Yazid told Pakistan's Geo TV in a
> June 2008 interview. "The United States is a non-Muslim state bent on
> the destruction of Muslims."
>
> The shadowy, 55-year-old al-Yazid has been involved with Islamic
> extremist movements for nearly 30 years since he joined radical
> student groups led by fellow Egyptian al-Zawahri, now the No. 2 figure
> in Al Qaeda after bin Laden.
>
> In the early 1980s, al-Yazid served three years in an Egyptian prison
> for purported links to the group responsible for the 1981
> assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. After his release, al-
> Yazid turned up in Afghanistan, where, according to Al Qaeda's
> propaganda wing Al-Sabah, he became a founding member of the terrorist
> group.
>
> He later followed bin Laden to Sudan and back to Afghanistan, where he
> served as Al Qaeda's chief financial officer, managing secret bank
> accounts in the Persian Gulf that were used to help finance the Sept.
> 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington. After the U.S. and its
> allies invaded Afghanistan in 2001, al-Yazid went into hiding for
> years. He surfaced in May 2007 during a 45-minute interview posted on
> the Web by Al-Sabah, in which he was introduced as the "official in
> charge" of the terrorist movement's operations in Afghanistan.
>
> Some security analysts believe the choice of al-Yazid as the Afghan
> chief may have signaled a new approach for Al Qaeda in the country
> where it once reigned supreme.
>
> Michael Scheuer, former head of the CIA unit that tracked bin Laden,
> believes bin Laden and al-Zawahri wanted a trusted figure to handle
> Afghanistan "while they turn to other aspects of the jihad outside"
> the country.
>
> Al-Yazid had little background in leading combat operations. But
> terrorism experts say his advantage was that he was close to Taliban
> leader Mullah Omar. As a fluent Pashto speaker known for impeccable
> manners, al-Yazid enjoyed better relations with the Afghans than many
> of the Al Qaeda Arabs, whom the Afghans found arrogant and abrasive.
>
> That suggested a conscious decision by Al Qaeda to embed within the
> Taliban organization, helping the Afghan allies with expertise and
> training while at the same time putting an Afghan face on the war.
>
> Al-Yazid himself alluded to such an approach in an interview this year
> with Al-Jazeera television's Islamabad correspondent Ahmad Zaidan. Al-
> Yazid said Al Qaeda fighters were involved at every level with the
> Taliban.
>
> "We participate with our brothers in the Islamic Emirate in all
> fields," al-Yazid said. "This had a big positive effect on the
> (Taliban) self-esteem in Afghanistan."
>
> A September 2007 Al Qaeda video sought to promote the notion of close
> Taliban-Al Qaeda ties at a time when the Afghan insurgents were
> launching their comeback six years after their ouster from power in
> Kabul.
>
> The video showed al-Yazid sitting with a senior Taliban commander in a
> field surrounded by trees as a jihad anthem played. The Taliban
> commander vowed to "target the infidels in Afghanistan and outside
> Afghanistan" and to "focus our attacks, Allah willing, on the
> coalition forces in Afghanistan."
>
> There is also evidence that al-Yazid has promoted ties with Islamic
> extremist groups in Central Asia and Pakistan, where other top Al
> Qaeda figures are believed to be hiding.
>
> "He definitely seems to have significant influence among the Pakistani
> Taliban and the Central Asian groups," terrorism expert Evan Kohlman
> said. "They regularly post and share his videos on the Web, just as
> they would with bin Laden or al-Zawahri."
>
> In August 2008, Pakistani military officials claimed al-Yazid had been
> killed in fighting in the Bajaur tribal area along the Afghan border.
> However, he turned up in subsequent Al Qaeda videos, all of which had
> clearly been made after the Bajaur fighting.

Why didn't we just send in a special redneck forces team to
exterminate all those Muslims (including their extended families) that
our faith-based republicans specifically hired, trained and outfitted
to kill Russians in the first place?

Now every remote relative and friend of theirs is out to get us,
simply because we reneged on our original deal. It seems for every
one we eliminate, there's two or three more that are smarter and
double pissed off to take their place. Now we have to kill a dozen
innocent Muslims just to get any one of theirs, and those few
surviving Muslims don't seem to share any sense of humor about it.

Amazing how hot and spendy we made our mutually perpetrated cold-war.
Not so oddly enough, there has never been any Russian support for our
actions. It's almost as though them Russians are pleased that it has
cost us so much for having killed a few of their troops that had been
trying their best to shut down our Taliban drug market.

~ BG

Brad Guth
2010-06-01 09:11:34 EST
On Jun 1, 5:03 am, Yap <hhyaps...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 1 Jun, 17:57, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > WASHINGTON -- Al Qaeda announced Monday that its No. 3 official,
> > Mustafa al-Yazid, had been killed along with members of his family --
> > perhaps one of the most severe blows to the terror movement since the
> > U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda began. A senior U.S. official told Fox
> > News that al-Yazid was believed to have died in a U.S. missile strike.
>
> > A statement posted on an Al Qaeda Website said al-Yazid, which it
> > described as the organization's top commander in Afghanistan, was
> > killed along with his wife, three daughters, a grandchild and other
> > men, women and children but did not say how or where.
>
> > The statement did not give an exact date for al-Yazid's death, but it
> > was dated by the Islamic calendar month of "Jemadi al-Akhar," which
> > falls in May.
>
> > A U.S. official in Washington said word was "spreading in extremist
> > circles" of his death in Pakistan's tribal areas in the past two weeks
> > and the U.S. government had confirmed the reports.
>
> > His death is a major blow to Al Qaeda, which in December "lost both
> > its internal and external operations chiefs," the official said on
> > condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the information.
>
> > The Egyptian-born al-Yazid, also known as Sheik Saeed al-Masri, was a
> > founding member of Al Qaeda and the group's prime conduit to Usama bin
> > Laden and Ayman al-Zawahri. He was key to day-to-day control, with a
> > hand in everything from finances to operational planning, the U.S.
> > official said.
>
> > Al-Yazid has been reported killed before, in 2008, but this is the
> > first time his death has been acknowledged by the militant group on
> > the Internet.
>
> > Two Pakistani intelligence officials, speaking on condition of
> > anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media, said
> > al-Yazid died in a U.S. missile strike on May 21 in the North
> > Waziristan tribal area.
>
> > Soon after the attack, officials reported that two foreigners were
> > among the 10 people killed, but did know their identities. Five women
> > and two children were also wounded in the attack, which occurred in
> > the village of Boya near the main town in the area, Miran Shah.
>
> > The intelligence officials said they received word of al-Yazid's death
> > last week and confirmed it by speaking to local tribal elders and
> > Taliban members. They said their sources had not seen al-Yazid's body
> > and did not know where he was buried.
>
> > Al-Yazid has been one of many targets in a U.S. Predator drone
> > campaign aimed at militants in Pakistan since President Barack Obama
> > took office. Al-Yazid made no secret of his contempt for the United
> > States, once calling it "the evil empire leading crusades against the
> > Muslims."
>
> > "We have reached the point where we see no difference between the
> > state and the American people," al-Yazid told Pakistan's Geo TV in a
> > June 2008 interview. "The United States is a non-Muslim state bent on
> > the destruction of Muslims."
>
> > The shadowy, 55-year-old al-Yazid has been involved with Islamic
> > extremist movements for nearly 30 years since he joined radical
> > student groups led by fellow Egyptian al-Zawahri, now the No. 2 figure
> > in Al Qaeda after bin Laden.
>
> > In the early 1980s, al-Yazid served three years in an Egyptian prison
> > for purported links to the group responsible for the 1981
> > assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. After his release, al-
> > Yazid turned up in Afghanistan, where, according to Al Qaeda's
> > propaganda wing Al-Sabah, he became a founding member of the terrorist
> > group.
>
> > He later followed bin Laden to Sudan and back to Afghanistan, where he
> > served as Al Qaeda's chief financial officer, managing secret bank
> > accounts in the Persian Gulf that were used to help finance the Sept.
> > 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington. After the U.S. and its
> > allies invaded Afghanistan in 2001, al-Yazid went into hiding for
> > years. He surfaced in May 2007 during a 45-minute interview posted on
> > the Web by Al-Sabah, in which he was introduced as the "official in
> > charge" of the terrorist movement's operations in Afghanistan.
>
> > Some security analysts believe the choice of al-Yazid as the Afghan
> > chief may have signaled a new approach for Al Qaeda in the country
> > where it once reigned supreme.
>
> > Michael Scheuer, former head of the CIA unit that tracked bin Laden,
> > believes bin Laden and al-Zawahri wanted a trusted figure to handle
> > Afghanistan "while they turn to other aspects of the jihad outside"
> > the country.
>
> > Al-Yazid had little background in leading combat operations. But
> > terrorism experts say his advantage was that he was close to Taliban
> > leader Mullah Omar. As a fluent Pashto speaker known for impeccable
> > manners, al-Yazid enjoyed better relations with the Afghans than many
> > of the Al Qaeda Arabs, whom the Afghans found arrogant and abrasive.
>
> > That suggested a conscious decision by Al Qaeda to embed within the
> > Taliban organization, helping the Afghan allies with expertise and
> > training while at the same time putting an Afghan face on the war.
>
> > Al-Yazid himself alluded to such an approach in an interview this year
> > with Al-Jazeera television's Islamabad correspondent Ahmad Zaidan. Al-
> > Yazid said Al Qaeda fighters were involved at every level with the
> > Taliban.
>
> > "We participate with our brothers in the Islamic Emirate in all
> > fields," al-Yazid said. "This had a big positive effect on the
> > (Taliban) self-esteem in Afghanistan."
>
> > A September 2007 Al Qaeda video sought to promote the notion of close
> > Taliban-Al Qaeda ties at a time when the Afghan insurgents were
> > launching their comeback six years after their ouster from power in
> > Kabul.
>
> > The video showed al-Yazid sitting with a senior Taliban commander in a
> > field surrounded by trees as a jihad anthem played. The Taliban
> > commander vowed to "target the infidels in Afghanistan and outside
> > Afghanistan" and to "focus our attacks, Allah willing, on the
> > coalition forces in Afghanistan."
>
> > There is also evidence that al-Yazid has promoted ties with Islamic
> > extremist groups in Central Asia and Pakistan, where other top Al
> > Qaeda figures are believed to be hiding.
>
> > "He definitely seems to have significant influence among the Pakistani
> > Taliban and the Central Asian groups," terrorism expert Evan Kohlman
> > said. "They regularly post and share his videos on the Web, just as
> > they would with bin Laden or al-Zawahri."
>
> > In August 2008, Pakistani military officials claimed al-Yazid had been
> > killed in fighting in the Bajaur tribal area along the Afghan border.
> > However, he turned up in subsequent Al Qaeda videos, all of which had
> > clearly been made after the Bajaur fighting.
>
> Going around the world killing people will bring hatred from the
> victims' family.
> Revenge can have burning desire and US cannot defend against it year
> in year out later.

Our Hagar, rabbi Saul, HVAC and all other ZNR approved rednecks will
gladly save us all by killing every Muslim and genetic linked soul on
Earth, but only as long as they don't have to set any foot outside of
their cozy faith-based box, nor having to pay a cent out of their
public funded loot.

~ BG

Dakota
2010-06-01 09:34:44 EST
On Tuesday 6/1/10 7:25 AM, HVAC wrote:
> "Yap"<hhyapster@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:2312a51d-45ea-4245-9ab0-a781b9b6f9be@t26g2000prt.googlegroups.com...
>>
>> Going around the world killing people will bring hatred from the
>> victims' family.
>> Revenge can have burning desire and US cannot defend against it year
>> in year out later.
>
>
> I say, kill em all!
>
> Let's show them OUR hate.
>
> They hate us? Fuck em.
>
> Slowly and systematically, we are wiping out
> al Quida. The world is a far better place with
> these pieces of human filth blown to smithereens.
>
>
> Oh.... And shut your fucking Yap.
>
>

Invading other countries and killing innocent civilians is a very poor
way to win hearts and minds but a great recruiting tool for our enemies.
We are playing a deadly game of Whac-A-Mole. We keep killing al-Queda's
leaders and new ones take their place.


Slika
2010-06-01 09:45:03 EST

"HVAC" <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:c04cbb78-54ee-4237-952d-cb0cce31d6cd@e6g2000vbm.googlegroups.com...
> WASHINGTON -- Al Qaeda announced Monday that its No. 3 official,
> Mustafa al-Yazid, had been killed along with members of his family --
> perhaps one of the most severe blows to the terror movement since the
> U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda began. A senior U.S. official told Fox
> News that al-Yazid was believed to have died in a U.S. missile strike.
>
> A statement posted on an Al Qaeda Website said al-Yazid, which it
> described as the organization's top commander in Afghanistan, was
> killed along with his wife, three daughters, a grandchild and other
> men, women and children but did not say how or where.
>
> The statement did not give an exact date for al-Yazid's death, but it
> was dated by the Islamic calendar month of "Jemadi al-Akhar," which
> falls in May.
>
> A U.S. official in Washington said word was "spreading in extremist
> circles" of his death in Pakistan's tribal areas in the past two weeks
> and the U.S. government had confirmed the reports.
>
> His death is a major blow to Al Qaeda, which in December "lost both
> its internal and external operations chiefs," the official said on
> condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the information.
>
> The Egyptian-born al-Yazid, also known as Sheik Saeed al-Masri, was a
> founding member of Al Qaeda and the group's prime conduit to Usama bin
> Laden and Ayman al-Zawahri. He was key to day-to-day control, with a
> hand in everything from finances to operational planning, the U.S.
> official said.
>
> Al-Yazid has been reported killed before, in 2008, but this is the
> first time his death has been acknowledged by the militant group on
> the Internet.
>
> Two Pakistani intelligence officials, speaking on condition of
> anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media, said
> al-Yazid died in a U.S. missile strike on May 21 in the North
> Waziristan tribal area.
>
> Soon after the attack, officials reported that two foreigners were
> among the 10 people killed, but did know their identities. Five women
> and two children were also wounded in the attack, which occurred in
> the village of Boya near the main town in the area, Miran Shah.
>
> The intelligence officials said they received word of al-Yazid's death
> last week and confirmed it by speaking to local tribal elders and
> Taliban members. They said their sources had not seen al-Yazid's body
> and did not know where he was buried.
>
> Al-Yazid has been one of many targets in a U.S. Predator drone
> campaign aimed at militants in Pakistan since President Barack Obama
> took office. Al-Yazid made no secret of his contempt for the United
> States, once calling it "the evil empire leading crusades against the
> Muslims."
>
> "We have reached the point where we see no difference between the
> state and the American people," al-Yazid told Pakistan's Geo TV in a
> June 2008 interview. "The United States is a non-Muslim state bent on
> the destruction of Muslims."
>
> The shadowy, 55-year-old al-Yazid has been involved with Islamic
> extremist movements for nearly 30 years since he joined radical
> student groups led by fellow Egyptian al-Zawahri, now the No. 2 figure
> in Al Qaeda after bin Laden.
>
> In the early 1980s, al-Yazid served three years in an Egyptian prison
> for purported links to the group responsible for the 1981
> assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. After his release, al-
> Yazid turned up in Afghanistan, where, according to Al Qaeda's
> propaganda wing Al-Sabah, he became a founding member of the terrorist
> group.
>
> He later followed bin Laden to Sudan and back to Afghanistan, where he
> served as Al Qaeda's chief financial officer, managing secret bank
> accounts in the Persian Gulf that were used to help finance the Sept.
> 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington. After the U.S. and its
> allies invaded Afghanistan in 2001, al-Yazid went into hiding for
> years. He surfaced in May 2007 during a 45-minute interview posted on
> the Web by Al-Sabah, in which he was introduced as the "official in
> charge" of the terrorist movement's operations in Afghanistan.
>
> Some security analysts believe the choice of al-Yazid as the Afghan
> chief may have signaled a new approach for Al Qaeda in the country
> where it once reigned supreme.
>
> Michael Scheuer, former head of the CIA unit that tracked bin Laden,
> believes bin Laden and al-Zawahri wanted a trusted figure to handle
> Afghanistan "while they turn to other aspects of the jihad outside"
> the country.
>
> Al-Yazid had little background in leading combat operations. But
> terrorism experts say his advantage was that he was close to Taliban
> leader Mullah Omar. As a fluent Pashto speaker known for impeccable
> manners, al-Yazid enjoyed better relations with the Afghans than many
> of the Al Qaeda Arabs, whom the Afghans found arrogant and abrasive.
>
> That suggested a conscious decision by Al Qaeda to embed within the
> Taliban organization, helping the Afghan allies with expertise and
> training while at the same time putting an Afghan face on the war.
>
> Al-Yazid himself alluded to such an approach in an interview this year
> with Al-Jazeera television's Islamabad correspondent Ahmad Zaidan. Al-
> Yazid said Al Qaeda fighters were involved at every level with the
> Taliban.
>
> "We participate with our brothers in the Islamic Emirate in all
> fields," al-Yazid said. "This had a big positive effect on the
> (Taliban) self-esteem in Afghanistan."
>
> A September 2007 Al Qaeda video sought to promote the notion of close
> Taliban-Al Qaeda ties at a time when the Afghan insurgents were
> launching their comeback six years after their ouster from power in
> Kabul.
>
> The video showed al-Yazid sitting with a senior Taliban commander in a
> field surrounded by trees as a jihad anthem played. The Taliban
> commander vowed to "target the infidels in Afghanistan and outside
> Afghanistan" and to "focus our attacks, Allah willing, on the
> coalition forces in Afghanistan."
>
> There is also evidence that al-Yazid has promoted ties with Islamic
> extremist groups in Central Asia and Pakistan, where other top Al
> Qaeda figures are believed to be hiding.
>
> "He definitely seems to have significant influence among the Pakistani
> Taliban and the Central Asian groups," terrorism expert Evan Kohlman
> said. "They regularly post and share his videos on the Web, just as
> they would with bin Laden or al-Zawahri."
>
> In August 2008, Pakistani military officials claimed al-Yazid had been
> killed in fighting in the Bajaur tribal area along the Afghan border.
> However, he turned up in subsequent Al Qaeda videos, all of which had
> clearly been made after the Bajaur fighting.

But Bin Laden, an old man on a dialysis is still at large.
Thank god for UK and US soldiers and their "competence".

Oh wait, they've been duped too, like the rest of us!

http://tinyurl.com/3yzwrhm



HVAC
2010-06-01 10:35:38 EST

"Dakota" <markp@NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:kIWdnXeXuY_7kZjRRVn_vwA@giganews.com...
>>
>> I say, kill em all!
>>
>> Let's show them OUR hate.
>>
>> They hate us? Fuck em.
>>
>> Slowly and systematically, we are wiping out
>> al Quida. The world is a far better place with
>> these pieces of human filth blown to smithereens.
>>
>>
>> Oh.... And shut your fucking Yap.
>>
>>
>
> Invading other countries and killing innocent civilians is a very poor way
> to win hearts and minds but a great recruiting tool for our enemies.
> We are playing a deadly game of Whac-A-Mole. We keep killing al-Queda's
> leaders and new ones take their place.


So what is YOUR plan to wipe out Al Quida?

Harsh language?

THEY target civilians. We don't. Sometimes shit happens.

It's just the way it is.

I think we are keeping Osama alive because he provides a
wealth of intel on Al Quida. We listen to every phone call he
makes. We read his e-mail. We are living in his network.

When his usefulness is up, we will kill him.




--
"Every living thing out there that walks, flies or squats in the
mud, wants to kill you and eat your eyeballs for Jew-Jew bees "




HVAC
2010-06-01 10:44:13 EST

"slika" <slika@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4c050cd1@news.x-privat.org...
>
> But Bin Laden, an old man on a dialysis is still at large.
> Thank god for UK and US soldiers and their "competence".

We are keeping Bin Laiden alive so we can collect every
bit of intel on Al Queida that we can. We listen to every phone
call, read every e-mail. When his use as a source is gone, his
time will be up.




~
HVAC- Providing common sense answers to kooks.
He expects no praise for this.... Only worship.


Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8   Next  (First | Last)


2020 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron