Research Discussion: Ball Lightning

Ball Lightning
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HVAC
2010-05-20 06:55:36 EST
Ball lightning is a rare circular light phenomenon occurring during
thunderstorms. Scientists have been puzzled by the nature of these
apparent fire balls for a long time. Now physicists at the University
of Innsbruck have calculated that the magnetic field of long lightning
strokes may produce the image of luminous shapes, also known as
phosphenes, in the brain. This finding may offer an explanation for
many ball lightning observations.

Physicists Josef Peer and Alexander Kendl from the University of
Innsbruck have studied electromagnetic fields of different types of
lightning strokes occurring during thunderstorms. Their calculations
suggest that the magnetic fields of a specific class of long lasting
repetitive lightning discharges show the same properties as
transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a technique commonly used in
clinical and psychiatric practice to stimulate neural activity in the
human brain. Time varying and sufficiently strong magnetic fields
induce electrical fields in the brain, specifically, in neurons of the
visual cortex, which may invoke phosphenes. "In the clinical
application of TMS, luminous and apparently real visual perceptions in
varying shapes and colors within the visual field of the patients and
test persons are reported and well examined," says Alexander Kendl.
The Innsbruck physicists have now calculated that a near lightning
stroke of long lasting thunderbolts may also generate these luminous
visions, which are likely to appear as ball lightning.

Is the mystery of ball lightning solved now?

Ball lightnings are rather rare events. The majority of researchers
agree that different phenomena are likely to be summarized under the
collective term "ball lightning." Over time, various theories and
propositions about the nature of these experiences have been
suggested. Other researchers have produced luminous fire balls in the
laboratory, which appeared not completely unlike ball lightning and
could explain some of the observations but were mostly too short
lived. Other plausible explanations for some of observations are St.
Elmo's fire, luminous dust balls or small molten balls of metal. In
which cases then, can a lightning bolt invoke a ball-shaped phosphene?
"

Lightning strokes with repetitive discharges producing stimulating
magnetic fields over a period of a few seconds are rather rare and
only occur in about one in one hundred events," reports physicist
Kendl. "An observer located within few hundred metres of a long
lightning stroke may experience a magnetic phosphene in the shape of a
luminous spot." Also other sensations, such as noises or smells, may
be induced. Since the term "ball lightning" is well known from media
reports, observers are likely to classify lightning phosphenes as
such. Alexander Kendl's hypothesis that in fact the majority of ball
lightning observations are phosphenes is strongly supported by its
simplicity: "Contrary to other theories describing floating fire
balls, no new and other suppositions are necessary."

Bert
2010-05-20 07:07:54 EST
On May 20, 6:55 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ball lightning is a rare circular light phenomenon occurring during
> thunderstorms. Scientists have been puzzled by the nature of these
> apparent fire balls for a long time. Now physicists at the University
> of Innsbruck have calculated that the magnetic field of long lightning
> strokes may produce the image of luminous shapes, also known as
> phosphenes, in the brain. This finding may offer an explanation for
> many ball lightning observations.
>
> Physicists Josef Peer and Alexander Kendl from the University of
> Innsbruck have studied electromagnetic fields of different types of
> lightning strokes occurring during thunderstorms. Their calculations
> suggest that the magnetic fields of a specific class of long lasting
> repetitive lightning discharges show the same properties as
> transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a technique commonly used in
> clinical and psychiatric practice to stimulate neural activity in the
> human brain. Time varying and sufficiently strong magnetic fields
> induce electrical fields in the brain, specifically, in neurons of the
> visual cortex, which may invoke phosphenes. "In the clinical
> application of TMS, luminous and apparently real visual perceptions in
> varying shapes and colors within the visual field of the patients and
> test persons are reported and well examined," says Alexander Kendl.
> The Innsbruck physicists have now calculated that a near lightning
> stroke of long lasting thunderbolts may also generate these luminous
> visions, which are likely to appear as ball lightning.
>
> Is the mystery of ball lightning solved now?
>
> Ball lightnings are rather rare events. The majority of researchers
> agree that different phenomena are likely to be summarized under the
> collective term "ball lightning." Over time, various theories and
> propositions about the nature of these experiences have been
> suggested. Other researchers have produced luminous fire balls in the
> laboratory, which appeared not completely unlike ball lightning and
> could explain some of the observations but were mostly too short
> lived. Other plausible explanations for some of observations are St.
> Elmo's fire, luminous dust balls or small molten balls of metal. In
> which cases then, can a lightning bolt invoke a ball-shaped phosphene?
> "
>
> Lightning strokes with repetitive discharges producing stimulating
> magnetic fields over a period of a few seconds are rather rare and
> only occur in about one in one hundred events," reports physicist
> Kendl. "An observer located within few hundred metres of a long
> lightning stroke may experience a magnetic phosphene in the shape of a
> luminous spot." Also other sensations, such as noises or smells, may
> be induced. Since the term "ball lightning" is well known from media
> reports, observers are likely to classify lightning phosphenes as
> such. Alexander Kendl's hypothesis that in fact the majority of ball
> lightning observations are phosphenes is strongly supported by its
> simplicity: "Contrary to other theories describing floating fire
> balls, no new and other suppositions are necessary."

Never saw a picture of ball lighning Hmmm Its said to be a plasma
gas ball. Hmmm Live in the most lighning area on Earth,and nothing
has been on ball lighning in many years. Maybe it relates to
aliens,and Presley. Ghost,Gods and devils TreBert

U*@t-online.de
2010-05-20 08:10:06 EST
On Thu, 20 May 2010 03:55:36 -0700 (PDT), HVAC <mr.hvac@gmail.com>
wrote:

>Is the mystery of ball lightning solved now?

Do your balls glow at night?
C.

Hybrid Archangel/Messenger
2010-05-20 09:12:21 EST
On May 20, 6:55 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ball lightning is a rare circular light phenomenon occurring during
> thunderstorms. Scientists have been puzzled by the nature of these
> apparent fire balls for a long time. Now physicists at the University
> of Innsbruck have calculated that the magnetic field of long lightning
> strokes may produce the image of luminous shapes, also known as
> phosphenes, in the brain. This finding may offer an explanation for
> many ball lightning observations.
>
> Physicists Josef Peer and Alexander Kendl from the University of
> Innsbruck have studied electromagnetic fields of different types of
> lightning strokes occurring during thunderstorms. Their calculations
> suggest that the magnetic fields of a specific class of long lasting
> repetitive lightning discharges show the same properties as
> transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a technique commonly used in
> clinical and psychiatric practice to stimulate neural activity in the
> human brain. Time varying and sufficiently strong magnetic fields
> induce electrical fields in the brain, specifically, in neurons of the
> visual cortex, which may invoke phosphenes. "In the clinical
> application of TMS, luminous and apparently real visual perceptions in
> varying shapes and colors within the visual field of the patients and
> test persons are reported and well examined," says Alexander Kendl.
> The Innsbruck physicists have now calculated that a near lightning
> stroke of long lasting thunderbolts may also generate these luminous
> visions, which are likely to appear as ball lightning.
>
> Is the mystery of ball lightning solved now?
>
> Ball lightnings are rather rare events. The majority of researchers
> agree that different phenomena are likely to be summarized under the
> collective term "ball lightning." Over time, various theories and
> propositions about the nature of these experiences have been
> suggested. Other researchers have produced luminous fire balls in the
> laboratory, which appeared not completely unlike ball lightning and
> could explain some of the observations but were mostly too short
> lived. Other plausible explanations for some of observations are St.
> Elmo's fire, luminous dust balls or small molten balls of metal. In
> which cases then, can a lightning bolt invoke a ball-shaped phosphene?
> "
>
> Lightning strokes with repetitive discharges producing stimulating
> magnetic fields over a period of a few seconds are rather rare and
> only occur in about one in one hundred events," reports physicist
> Kendl. "An observer located within few hundred metres of a long
> lightning stroke may experience a magnetic phosphene in the shape of a
> luminous spot." Also other sensations, such as noises or smells, may
> be induced. Since the term "ball lightning" is well known from media
> reports, observers are likely to classify lightning phosphenes as
> such. Alexander Kendl's hypothesis that in fact the majority of ball
> lightning observations are phosphenes is strongly supported by its
> simplicity: "Contrary to other theories describing floating fire
> balls, no new and other suppositions are necessary."

Balls of light have been seen in the fields of England.....
There's a video of it....

Probably can be found in a search for 'crop circles'.....

~>
Twonky....

(Out of the TV, and into your monitor....just trying to help).

Islam and Judaism exist.....don't they.....?
They have an origin too.......

Genesis 16, an angel of HaShem borne Islam....
Genesis 17, HaShem borne Judaism....
Isaiah 14:12, shows the angel in Genesis 16.....

There is a hierarchy being played out upon the Earth.
And crop-markings are a part of it......

I think Team Satan (circlemakers.org) should share the
differences between a 'yank on a plank, a push, and a
stomp, bend. They produce, "pushed over" stalks....

Compare those to a 90% bend....the angel's angle...




Hagar
2010-05-20 09:23:05 EST

<*y@t-online.de> wrote in message
news:ij9av51krsba0j0q8qrp7205g8860fl31o@pasoschweiz.de...
> On Thu, 20 May 2010 03:55:36 -0700 (PDT), HVAC <mr.hvac@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Is the mystery of ball lightning solved now?
>
> Do your balls glow at night?
> C.

About as much as the empty space between your ears, Chuckie ..



Jan Panteltje
2010-05-20 11:36:54 EST
On a sunny day (Thu, 20 May 2010 03:55:36 -0700 (PDT)) it happened HVAC
<*c@gmail.com> wrote in
<7f46616b-75a0-49a1-ad8f-df8134da2bd1@q13g2000vbm.googlegroups.com>:

>Ball lightning is a rare circular light phenomenon occurring during
>thunderstorms. Scientists have been puzzled by the nature of these
>apparent fire balls for a long time. Now physicists at the University
>of Innsbruck have calculated that the magnetic field of long lightning
>strokes may produce the image of luminous shapes, also known as
>phosphenes, in the brain. This finding may offer an explanation for
>many ball lightning observations.

It is complete BULLSHIT.
I have seen a ball-lightning, and it was hanging in from of my open
window for many seconds before exploding on the radio antenna between
two trees downstairs,
Just a ball, maybe 30 cm diameter, no heat radiation, no sound,
and enough power to evaporate that antenna a few seconds later with a bang,
VERY physical.
I personally think ball-lightning could be an electron black hole.
There are movies on youtube showing these balls floating in air,
somebody should look at those.
Camers have no BRAINS.
An other bunch of nutcase researchers who do have no clue, and other paper
for the round bin, time and money wasted, and other clueless PhD is born.

Dinosaurs, humanity will go dinosaur's way that way.

Bet nobody of them so called 'researchers' ever SAW one themselves.

Mitchell Jones
2010-05-20 12:03:52 EST
In article
<7f46616b-75a0-49a1-ad8f-df8134da2bd1@q13g2000vbm.googlegroups.com>,
HVAC <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote:

> Ball lightning is a rare circular light phenomenon occurring during
> thunderstorms. Scientists have been puzzled by the nature of these
> apparent fire balls for a long time. Now physicists at the University
> of Innsbruck have calculated that the magnetic field of long lightning
> strokes may produce the image of luminous shapes, also known as
> phosphenes, in the brain. This finding may offer an explanation for
> many ball lightning observations.
>
> Physicists Josef Peer and Alexander Kendl from the University of
> Innsbruck have studied electromagnetic fields of different types of
> lightning strokes occurring during thunderstorms. Their calculations
> suggest that the magnetic fields of a specific class of long lasting
> repetitive lightning discharges show the same properties as
> transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a technique commonly used in
> clinical and psychiatric practice to stimulate neural activity in the
> human brain. Time varying and sufficiently strong magnetic fields
> induce electrical fields in the brain, specifically, in neurons of the
> visual cortex, which may invoke phosphenes. "In the clinical
> application of TMS, luminous and apparently real visual perceptions in
> varying shapes and colors within the visual field of the patients and
> test persons are reported and well examined," says Alexander Kendl.
> The Innsbruck physicists have now calculated that a near lightning
> stroke of long lasting thunderbolts may also generate these luminous
> visions, which are likely to appear as ball lightning.
>
> Is the mystery of ball lightning solved now?
>
> Ball lightnings are rather rare events. The majority of researchers
> agree that different phenomena are likely to be summarized under the
> collective term "ball lightning." Over time, various theories and
> propositions about the nature of these experiences have been
> suggested. Other researchers have produced luminous fire balls in the
> laboratory, which appeared not completely unlike ball lightning and
> could explain some of the observations but were mostly too short
> lived. Other plausible explanations for some of observations are St.
> Elmo's fire, luminous dust balls or small molten balls of metal. In
> which cases then, can a lightning bolt invoke a ball-shaped phosphene?
> "
>
> Lightning strokes with repetitive discharges producing stimulating
> magnetic fields over a period of a few seconds are rather rare and
> only occur in about one in one hundred events," reports physicist
> Kendl. "An observer located within few hundred metres of a long
> lightning stroke may experience a magnetic phosphene in the shape of a
> luminous spot." Also other sensations, such as noises or smells, may
> be induced. Since the term "ball lightning" is well known from media
> reports, observers are likely to classify lightning phosphenes as
> such. Alexander Kendl's hypothesis that in fact the majority of ball
> lightning observations are phosphenes is strongly supported by its
> simplicity: "Contrary to other theories describing floating fire
> balls, no new and other suppositions are necessary."

***{So ball lightning is a magnetically-induced hallucination? The
lightning stroke produces a magnetic pulse which in turn triggers
neurons in the brain, which fire producing apparent spots before the
eyes?

Sorry, but that doesn't work. There would be no relationship, by this
theory, between the position of the ball lightning and the path
traversed by the lightning stroke. The "ball lighting," by this theory,
is in the mind, not in the world. However, many reports of ball
lightning do not fit that scenario. For example, one day many years ago
I was driving while a storm was approaching. I was on a road near the
edge of a cliff, which dropped off for about 30 feet, almost straight
down, near the edge of the road to my right, to a flat field with grass
and some widely scattered oak trees, one of which was very large. As it
happened, I was looking at that tree, which was about 100 feet away,
when it was struck by lightning. A bolt struck the tree and then, as it
dissipated, it broke into thousands of glowing balls, each roughly the
size of a basketball, which then disappeared.

If the balls were a magnetically induced hallucination and existed
solely in my brain, why did their positions perfectly line up with the
path of the lightning bolt, which unarguably existed in the real world?

Bottom line: lightning is real, and ball lightning is also real.

--Mitchell Jones}***

*****************************************************************
If I seem to be ignoring you, consider the possibility
that you are in my killfile. --MJ

HVAC
2010-05-20 12:16:32 EST

"Jan Panteltje" <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ht3kur$ko$1@news.albasani.net...
>
> It is complete BULLSHIT.
> I have seen a ball-lightning, and it was hanging in from of my open
> window for many seconds before exploding on the radio antenna between
> two trees downstairs,
> Just a ball, maybe 30 cm diameter, no heat radiation, no sound,
> and enough power to evaporate that antenna a few seconds later with a
> bang,
> VERY physical.

Interesting. I have seen lightning do some very strange shit as well.



> I personally think ball-lightning could be an electron black hole.


Excuse me?




> There are movies on youtube showing these balls floating in air,
> somebody should look at those.
> Camers have no BRAINS.
> An other bunch of nutcase researchers who do have no clue, and other paper
> for the round bin, time and money wasted, and other clueless PhD is born.


Ah-hah.... All is becoming clear to me now.




> Dinosaurs, humanity will go dinosaur's way that way.



You don't have to be a kook to write like one....

But it helps!




> Bet nobody of them so called 'researchers' ever SAW one themselves.



One of my areas of study includes particle physics.

Does the fact that I have never seen an atom
preclude me from studying them?




--
There's A Storm Coming......



Bast
2010-05-20 12:56:37 EST


Mitchell Jones wrote:
> In article
> <7f46616b-75a0-49a1-ad8f-df8134da2bd1@q13g2000vbm.googlegroups.com>,
> HVAC <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Ball lightning is a rare circular light phenomenon occurring during
>> thunderstorms. Scientists have been puzzled by the nature of these
>> apparent fire balls for a long time. Now physicists at the University
>> of Innsbruck have calculated that the magnetic field of long lightning
>> strokes may produce the image of luminous shapes, also known as
>> phosphenes, in the brain. This finding may offer an explanation for
>> many ball lightning observations.
>>
>> Physicists Josef Peer and Alexander Kendl from the University of
>> Innsbruck have studied electromagnetic fields of different types of
>> lightning strokes occurring during thunderstorms. Their calculations
>> suggest that the magnetic fields of a specific class of long lasting
>> repetitive lightning discharges show the same properties as
>> transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a technique commonly used in
>> clinical and psychiatric practice to stimulate neural activity in the
>> human brain. Time varying and sufficiently strong magnetic fields
>> induce electrical fields in the brain, specifically, in neurons of the
>> visual cortex, which may invoke phosphenes. "In the clinical
>> application of TMS, luminous and apparently real visual perceptions in
>> varying shapes and colors within the visual field of the patients and
>> test persons are reported and well examined," says Alexander Kendl.
>> The Innsbruck physicists have now calculated that a near lightning
>> stroke of long lasting thunderbolts may also generate these luminous
>> visions, which are likely to appear as ball lightning.
>>
>> Is the mystery of ball lightning solved now?
>>
>> Ball lightnings are rather rare events. The majority of researchers
>> agree that different phenomena are likely to be summarized under the
>> collective term "ball lightning." Over time, various theories and
>> propositions about the nature of these experiences have been
>> suggested. Other researchers have produced luminous fire balls in the
>> laboratory, which appeared not completely unlike ball lightning and
>> could explain some of the observations but were mostly too short
>> lived. Other plausible explanations for some of observations are St.
>> Elmo's fire, luminous dust balls or small molten balls of metal. In
>> which cases then, can a lightning bolt invoke a ball-shaped phosphene?
>> "
>>
>> Lightning strokes with repetitive discharges producing stimulating
>> magnetic fields over a period of a few seconds are rather rare and
>> only occur in about one in one hundred events," reports physicist
>> Kendl. "An observer located within few hundred metres of a long
>> lightning stroke may experience a magnetic phosphene in the shape of a
>> luminous spot." Also other sensations, such as noises or smells, may
>> be induced. Since the term "ball lightning" is well known from media
>> reports, observers are likely to classify lightning phosphenes as
>> such. Alexander Kendl's hypothesis that in fact the majority of ball
>> lightning observations are phosphenes is strongly supported by its
>> simplicity: "Contrary to other theories describing floating fire
>> balls, no new and other suppositions are necessary."
>
> ***{So ball lightning is a magnetically-induced hallucination? The
> lightning stroke produces a magnetic pulse which in turn triggers
> neurons in the brain, which fire producing apparent spots before the
> eyes?
>
> Sorry, but that doesn't work. There would be no relationship, by this
> theory, between the position of the ball lightning and the path
> traversed by the lightning stroke. The "ball lighting," by this theory,
> is in the mind, not in the world. However, many reports of ball
> lightning do not fit that scenario. For example, one day many years ago
> I was driving while a storm was approaching. I was on a road near the
> edge of a cliff, which dropped off for about 30 feet, almost straight
> down, near the edge of the road to my right, to a flat field with grass
> and some widely scattered oak trees, one of which was very large. As it
> happened, I was looking at that tree, which was about 100 feet away,
> when it was struck by lightning. A bolt struck the tree and then, as it
> dissipated, it broke into thousands of glowing balls, each roughly the
> size of a basketball, which then disappeared.
>
> If the balls were a magnetically induced hallucination and existed
> solely in my brain, why did their positions perfectly line up with the
> path of the lightning bolt, which unarguably existed in the real world?
>
> Bottom line: lightning is real, and ball lightning is also real.
>
> --Mitchell Jones}***
>


I have seen ball lightning myself (only one time), and there were 3 others
who saw it at the same time.
And we all saw exactly the same thing, and heard the same strange
crackling/hissing noise.

I can not explain it to this day, nor do I even try, but just accept that it
exists.



HVAC
2010-05-20 13:44:24 EST

"Mitchell Jones" <mjones@21cenlogic.com> wrote in message
news:mjones-27FDC0.11035220052010@newsfarm.iad.highwinds-media.com...
>
> ***{So ball lightning is a magnetically-induced hallucination? The
> lightning stroke produces a magnetic pulse which in turn triggers
> neurons in the brain, which fire producing apparent spots before the
> eyes?

That's what the author's say. I didn't write the article.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-05/uoi-mbl051810.php

Here's a link for you with the author's info.

> Sorry, but that doesn't work. There would be no relationship, by this
> theory, between the position of the ball lightning and the path
> traversed by the lightning stroke. The "ball lighting," by this theory,
> is in the mind, not in the world. However, many reports of ball
> lightning do not fit that scenario. For example, one day many years ago
> I was driving while a storm was approaching. I was on a road near the
> edge of a cliff, which dropped off for about 30 feet, almost straight
> down, near the edge of the road to my right, to a flat field with grass
> and some widely scattered oak trees, one of which was very large. As it
> happened, I was looking at that tree, which was about 100 feet away,
> when it was struck by lightning. A bolt struck the tree and then, as it
> dissipated, it broke into thousands of glowing balls, each roughly the
> size of a basketball, which then disappeared.


Yes. Lightning is still a poorly understood phenomenon.

It is possible that when the tree exploded, those 'thousands
of basketball-sized glowing balls' were fragments of the tree
which were on fire.

Trees sometimes explode when hit by lightning (I have seen trees
completely disintegrate) because the sap in the tree heats up and
boils/flashes in less then a second.


> If the balls were a magnetically induced hallucination and existed
> solely in my brain, why did their positions perfectly line up with the
> path of the lightning bolt, which unarguably existed in the real world?
>
> Bottom line: lightning is real, and ball lightning is also real.
>
> --Mitchell Jones}***


Mitch.... I have seen lightning, well I THINK it was lightning,
do things that if someone else told me I would think they
were nuts.

The fact that these events took place on military bases
gives me pause in my assessment




--
"I don't want to believe, I want to KNOW" - Carl Sagan




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