Research Discussion: Black Hole 'hurled Out Of Galaxy'

Black Hole 'hurled Out Of Galaxy'
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Greysky
2010-05-14 16:41:27 EST

"Brad Guth" <bradguth@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:b8708920-bb12-40c9-9b4b-fe5db93f9a5e@u3g2000prl.googlegroups.com...
On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm
>
> Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'
>
> A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
> being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.
>
> The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
> space X-ray observatory.
>
> However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.
>
> The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
> in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
>
> Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
> centre.
>
> Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
> Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.
>
> High-speed exit
>
> The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
> smaller black holes.
>
> But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
> could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
> (ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
> phenomena).
>
> Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
> larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.
>
> Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
> However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
> black holes are rotating before their collision.
>
> Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
> Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
> with the positions of millions of galaxies.
>
> The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
> final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
> sources.
>
> X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
> centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
> around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
> point.
>
> Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
> point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
> it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.
>
> Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
> of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
> measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
> their nature."

So how fast is it moving?

Why are you only telling us as little as possible?

What do our public-funded supercomputer simulations have to say?


~ BG

In the final analysis, we are all dead...

Why do you think our world leaders and those in control of our supereconomy
are acting as if there is no tomorrow? It's as if they're spending us into
our graves, and being so destructive to society because they already know
that there is not going to be very many tomorrows...so it's party hearty,
dude!





Chatnoir
2010-05-15 09:07:47 EST
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm

Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'

A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.

The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
space X-ray observatory.

However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.

The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
centre.

Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.

High-speed exit

The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
smaller black holes.

But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
(ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
phenomena).

Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.

Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
black holes are rotating before their collision.

Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
with the positions of millions of galaxies.

The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
sources.

X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
point.

Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.

Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
their nature."



Double-A
2010-05-15 15:25:47 EST
On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm
>
> Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'
>
> A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
> being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.
>
> The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
> space X-ray observatory.
>
> However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.
>
> The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
> in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
>
> Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
> centre.
>
> Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
> Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.
>
> High-speed exit
>
> The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
> smaller black holes.
>
> But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
> could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
> (ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
> phenomena).
>
> Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
> larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.
>
>  Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
> However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
> black holes are rotating before their collision.
>
> Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
> Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
> with the positions of millions of galaxies.
>
> The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
> final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
> sources.
>
> X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
> centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
> around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
> point.
>
> Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
> point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
> it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.
>
> Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
> of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
> measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
> their nature."


Is it heading toward us? Faster than c?!!

Since according to GR, time should be infinitely dilated (slowed) at
the event horizon of a black hole, it shouldn't be capable of
observable motion at all. So if it is capable of breaking this law of
physics and be moving extremely rapidly, why should it not be able to
break another law of physics and be moving faster than light?

Double-A



Brad Guth
2010-05-15 16:31:19 EST
On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm
>
> Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'
>
> A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
> being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.
>
> The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
> space X-ray observatory.
>
> However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.
>
> The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
> in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
>
> Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
> centre.
>
> Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
> Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.
>
> High-speed exit
>
> The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
> smaller black holes.
>
> But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
> could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
> (ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
> phenomena).
>
> Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
> larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.
>
>  Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
> However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
> black holes are rotating before their collision.
>
> Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
> Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
> with the positions of millions of galaxies.
>
> The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
> final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
> sources.
>
> X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
> centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
> around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
> point.
>
> Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
> point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
> it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.
>
> Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
> of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
> measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
> their nature."

So how fast is it moving?

Why are you only telling us as little as possible?

What do our public-funded supercomputer simulations have to say?


~ BG

Brad Guth
2010-05-15 16:32:32 EST
On May 15, 12:25 pm, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
> On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> >http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm
>
> > Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'
>
> > A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
> > being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.
>
> > The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
> > space X-ray observatory.
>
> > However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.
>
> > The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
> > in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
>
> > Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
> > centre.
>
> > Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
> > Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.
>
> > High-speed exit
>
> > The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
> > smaller black holes.
>
> > But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
> > could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
> > (ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
> > phenomena).
>
> > Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
> > larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.
>
> >  Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
> > However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
> > black holes are rotating before their collision.
>
> > Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
> > Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
> > with the positions of millions of galaxies.
>
> > The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
> > final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
> > sources.
>
> > X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
> > centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
> > around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
> > point.
>
> > Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
> > point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
> > it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.
>
> > Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
> > of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
> > measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
> > their nature."
>
> Is it heading toward us?  Faster than c?!!
>
> Since according to GR, time should be infinitely dilated (slowed) at
> the event horizon of a black hole, it shouldn't be capable of
> observable motion at all.  So if it is capable of breaking this law of
> physics and be moving extremely rapidly, why should it not be able to
> break another law of physics and be moving faster than light?
>
> Double-A

Using the mainstream peer approved conditional laws of physics, almost
anything is either possible or impossible.

~ BG

Hagar
2010-05-15 17:12:36 EST

"Brad Guth" <bradguth@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:fbbc743e-dd4c-4a96-8a30-34a4b9246d6e@a39g2000prb.googlegroups.com...
On May 15, 12:25 pm, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
> On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:

< snipperoony >

Using the mainstream peer approved conditional laws of physics, almost
anything is either possible or impossible.

~ BG
********************************************
You are such a fountain of intelligent commentary, you Loon ...



Double-A
2010-05-15 17:36:02 EST
On May 15, 1:32 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On May 15, 12:25 pm, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>
> > >http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm
>
> > > Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'
>
> > > A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
> > > being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.
>
> > > The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
> > > space X-ray observatory.
>
> > > However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.
>
> > > The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
> > > in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
>
> > > Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
> > > centre.
>
> > > Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
> > > Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.
>
> > > High-speed exit
>
> > > The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
> > > smaller black holes.
>
> > > But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
> > > could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
> > > (ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
> > > phenomena).
>
> > > Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
> > > larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.
>
> > >  Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
> > > However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
> > > black holes are rotating before their collision.
>
> > > Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
> > > Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
> > > with the positions of millions of galaxies.
>
> > > The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
> > > final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
> > > sources.
>
> > > X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
> > > centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
> > > around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
> > > point.
>
> > > Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
> > > point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
> > > it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.
>
> > > Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
> > > of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
> > > measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
> > > their nature."
>
> > Is it heading toward us?  Faster than c?!!
>
> > Since according to GR, time should be infinitely dilated (slowed) at
> > the event horizon of a black hole, it shouldn't be capable of
> > observable motion at all.  So if it is capable of breaking this law of
> > physics and be moving extremely rapidly, why should it not be able to
> > break another law of physics and be moving faster than light?
>
> > Double-A
>
> Using the mainstream peer approved conditional laws of physics, almost
> anything is either possible or impossible.
>
>  ~ BG


Almost anything? I wonder what those remaining things would be that
you would consider both possible and impossible at the same time!

Double-A


Double-A
2010-05-15 18:12:35 EST
On May 15, 1:31 pm, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> >http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm
>
> > Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'
>
> > A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
> > being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.
>
> > The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
> > space X-ray observatory.
>
> > However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.
>
> > The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
> > in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
>
> > Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
> > centre.
>
> > Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
> > Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.
>
> > High-speed exit
>
> > The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
> > smaller black holes.
>
> > But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
> > could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
> > (ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
> > phenomena).
>
> > Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
> > larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.
>
> >  Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
> > However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
> > black holes are rotating before their collision.
>
> > Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
> > Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
> > with the positions of millions of galaxies.
>
> > The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
> > final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
> > sources.
>
> > X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
> > centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
> > around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
> > point.
>
> > Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
> > point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
> > it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.
>
> > Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
> > of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
> > measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
> > their nature."
>
> So how fast is it moving?
>
> Why are you only telling us as little as possible?


What is your need to know?


> What do our public-funded supercomputer simulations have to say?


They say, "Vote Obama in 2012!"


>  ~ BG


Double-A


Double-A
2010-05-15 18:23:40 EST
On May 14, 1:41 pm, "greysky" <ftls...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> "Brad Guth" <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:b8708920-bb12-40c9-9b4b-fe5db93f9a5e@u3g2000prl.googlegroups.com...
> On May 15, 6:07 am, chatnoir <wolfbat3...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> >http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10108226.stm
>
> > Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'
>
> > A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of
> > being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.
>
> > The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra
> > space X-ray observatory.
>
> > However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.
>
> > The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published
> > in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
>
> > Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its
> > centre.
>
> > Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion
> > Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.
>
> > High-speed exit
>
> > The authors believe this could be the result of the merger of two
> > smaller black holes.
>
> > But there are alternative explanations for the bright X-ray source; it
> > could also be a Type IIn supernova, or an ultra-luminous X-ray source
> > (ULX) with an optical counterpart (which could represent several
> > phenomena).
>
> > Simulations using supercomputers suggest that when this happens, the
> > larger black hole that results is shot away at high speed.
>
> > Black holes may be expelled from their host galaxies after mergers
> > However, this depends on the direction and velocity at which the two
> > black holes are rotating before their collision.
>
> > Marianne Heida of the University of Utrecht used data in the Chandra
> > Source Catalogue to compare hundreds of thousands of sources of X-rays
> > with the positions of millions of galaxies.
>
> > The material that falls into black holes heats up dramatically on its
> > final journey, which often means that black holes are strong X-ray
> > sources.
>
> > X-rays are also able to penetrate the dust and gas that obscures the
> > centre of a galaxy, giving astronomers a clear view of the region
> > around the black hole, with the bright source appearing as a star-like
> > point.
>
> > Looking at one galaxy in the Catalogue, Ms Heida noticed that the
> > point of light was offset from the centre and yet was so bright that
> > it could be associated with a supermassive black hole.
>
> > Ms Heida said: "We have found many more objects in this strange class
> > of X-ray sources. With Chandra we should be able to make the accurate
> > measurements we need to pinpoint them more precisely and identify
> > their nature."
>
> So how fast is it moving?
>
> Why are you only telling us as little as possible?
>
> What do our public-funded supercomputer simulations have to say?
>
>  ~ BG
>
> In the final analysis, we are all dead...
>
> Why do you think our world leaders and those in control of our supereconomy
> are acting as if there is no tomorrow? It's as if they're spending us into
> our graves, and being so destructive to society because they already know
> that there is not going to be very many tomorrows...so it's  party hearty,
> dude!


Politicians don't have the same sense of responsibility,
accountability, ethics, and morality as the normal person. They have
no problem at all with cynically going into debt to let the good times
continue to roll so long as they calculate the price will not have to
be paid during their watch, that price being paid most probably by a
total collapse!

Double-A




Hagar
2010-05-15 18:46:00 EST

I can dream, can't I ....


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